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Nokia Unveils OLED Phone You Control By Bending

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the both-hands-on-the-phone-no-the-wheel dept.

Cellphones 110

jldailey618 writes "Nokia just unveiled an OLED smartphone that is controlled by flexing the device with both hands. By bending corners and pushing the sides inward and outward, the user can scroll, zoom, and select. 'Researchers would not discuss exactly how the processor behind the twisty screen functioned, but they did say that it would be compatible with most current operating systems.'" Reader jones_supa adds a link to The Inquirer (with video), which points out that the twist-based (rather than poke-based) interface means "you can do many basic functions such as scrolling, zooming and answering calls even while wearing mittens."

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110 comments

Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

loosescrews (1916996) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876900)

I thought a resistive touch screen solved that problem.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876978)

So do conductive gloves. You can buy silver coated conductive thread to make your own, or you can buy some already made [agloves.com] .

Although they did say "while wearing mittens", not gloves. Mittens are warmer than gloves, but you lose a lot of dexterity with them. You could still do conductive mittens, but they might be cumbersome.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877022)

I don't see how you could use a touch screen with a mitten unless it was a 40" screen. I don't know about you but my right hand would cover the whole screen on a phone if I was touching something on the top left corner while wearing mittens. Remember that Nokia are from a cold country. This kind of problems haunts them.

captcha: thickest

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877600)

Go back to 4chan, child.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

LucidBeast (601749) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877130)

Please bring me my silver coated mittens James, and some Grey Popon for my caviar, I need to make a phone call!

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877500)

"Mittens are warmer than gloves, but you lose a lot of dexterity with them."

Agreed. By definition, you lose _all_of it.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (0)

mvdwege (243851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37878652)

So I should jump through hoops to get a device working for me, instead of the manufacturer fixing the obvious defect.

Let me guess, you're an Apple fanboi?

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 2 years ago | (#37879824)

Your glove manufacturer didn't make your gloves conductive? That does sound like a defect.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876988)

so did physical buttons when they were not the size of an atom with a 8 inch screen and your phone included a decent speaker, and service that did not echo

innovation is a bitch

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

aztracker1 (702135) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877144)

I think the number one reason I like Android is the convenience of entering my contacts into google, and they just automagically appear on my phone. That said, I really miss the reliability of my old late 90's nokia phone.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877204)

I think the number one reason I like Android is the convenience of entering my contacts into google, and they just automagically appear on my phone.

You know Google sync supports the Exchange protocol and is freely available for all phones (all devices actually) out there since Feb 9, 2009?

Android may have a slightly sleaker interface, but adding a contact to my gmail account automatically pushes it to my phone (which is not an android.)

Re:Exchange? (1)

miknix (1047580) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877390)

You know Google sync supports the Exchange protocol and is freely available for all phones

Yes but it sucks. I have my HTC Wizard syncing with Google's exchange servers and let me tell you, the Exchange protocol is utter crap. Or at least the Google's exchange implementation + WinMobile 6.5 exchange implementation combination is crap. Why? Because I can't simply create contacts in the phone or most probably the Active Sync software (the sync utility on WinMob) will prompt me with a
"there was an error with the exchange server, all your contacts in the phone need to be deleted and re-synced again from the server."
This is annoying! If wasn't for my phone having a qwerty keyboard and me only caring about, you know, sending messages and making phone calls, this phone would be in the garbage for a long long time..

Re:Exchange? (1)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877662)

I've been using it on my iPhone since day one and it works great.

Remains the Windows 6.5 sucks part, but there's nothing new about it.

Re:Exchange? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877708)

Works fine with my Nokia S60 with Google Sync [google.com] (which in fact uses the Exchange protocol). Never had to re-sync, even though my phone only connects once every two days or so, which means there are often multiple contacts on both ends to sync.

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37881516)

Is that really a new and exciting feature? My last three phones since about 2003 have supported syncing via bluetooth. Just put them near my computer and contacts and calendars are sync'd. The only advantage of doing it via the Internet is that it uses more battery power...

Re:Resistive Touch Screen? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877274)

I'd like to see those hybrid resistive/capacitive screens being used in phones. You would get the flexibility and accuracy of resistive with the responsiveness of capacitive.

innovation is dead? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37876904)

Gee, just when you thought Apple had a monopoly on smartphone innovation and it was necessary for Google to infringe on their patents, along comes Nokia. Well, get with it, Google! It's not innovative until you've not copied it!!

Re:innovation is dead? (3, Funny)

NoobixCube (1133473) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876916)

I know, right? Only Apple could ever have thought of touching things on a screen!

Re:innovation is dead? (1)

justforgetme (1814588) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876960)

I'm sure this flexible thing will be just a fad and a failure. Unless Apple has already patented it in which case: "Nokia you mean mean copy machines!"

Re:innovation is dead? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877314)

I'd say the rounded corners on that phone make it PRETTY OBVIOUS that it is a stolen Apple prototype.

Re:innovation is dead? (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877562)

I'd say this shows the new Microsoft influence on Nokia. A pointless R&D tech demo that will never ship as a product.

Re:innovation is dead? (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877610)

Nokia has being doing that kind of innovation since long before Microsoft started eyeing the smartphone.

There is only one spokesman for this phone... (4, Funny)

phillymjs (234426) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876906)

...and if you disagree with me, you can bite my shiny metal ass!

~Philly

Re:There is only one spokesman for this phone... (1)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876968)

If I had mod points (or the copyrights), I would mod you up and/or make you richer.

Re:There is only one spokesman for this phone... (1)

jd (1658) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877238)

Actually, I can think of two living spokesmen who'd be better. It would have been four, but John and George are dead.

So, when can I buy one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37876914)

So many concept models never make it out of, well, concept model status. I can think of many ways in which this concept is a failure (lack of precision, looks pretty tiring on the arm, durability issue (especially on the lithium-ion batteries!), ), but there's really no way to be sure unless I can hold one in my hands and try it.

The real question is... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37876944)

will it blend?

Re:The real question is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877056)

Yes, it will bend.

nokia media campaign (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37876948)

Must be part of the effort to get nokia in the news more and raise their profile. However, a bendy phone is old news, and the Samsung news is better:

Samsung plans to release them sooner: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2395535,00.asp

Re:nokia media campaign (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876980)

none of the phones in that PR stunt were flexible, sure the screens were bent but in rigid cases .. that is because while yes you can make OLED screens that are on a flexible substrate, they shit on themselves in a blink of an eye outside of the ivory tower.

OLED (-1, Flamebait)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#37876970)

Is fragile, eats power, and burns images into its matrix, lets get some shit plasic to bend twist and break along with this darn near go nowhere technology that has been around for quite a damn while now and has never got past the fad phase

Re:OLED (1)

Thantik (1207112) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877200)

fad phase? Tell that to Samsung, the largest mobile phone producer in the world who uses AMOLED screens in all of their top of the line devices. Many people won't even buy a device without an AMOLED screen anymore...

Re:OLED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877510)

You're on crack. OLED displays are not only less fragile and less power hungry than LCD, but the contrast ratio is far, far superior. I have never had a problem with screen burn-in on an OLED display, I don't even think it's physically possible since each subpixel is self luminating and there is no grille or anything for the burn-in to occur on. LCD, on the other hand, has massive problems with dead and stuck pixels.

Re:OLED (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877558)

OLED is the first technology we have that is actually better then CRT quality-wise. When world moved from CRT tubes to LCD in monitors, the drop in image quality was very noticeable to those of us with keen eyes.

I just wish mass-produced 24" and above OLED monitors would get pushed down to reasonable price range soon, because I'm buying.

The Ultimate In Planned Obsolescence... (2, Funny)

beaverdownunder (1822050) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877062)

...you get your own customers to gradually break their phones so they inevitably have to buy new ones. Smart thinking.

More like the ultimate in irate customers (3, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877438)

Today if you bend and break your phone and try to get a warranty replacement they'll tell you to go fish, you're not supposed to do that. The moment you make it part of the interface, there's people who will go way overboard like intense games, kids being too rough with it, have anger management issues and whatever. Even if it's built like a tank that no average person would ever wear out, there's a pretty thick tail of users who'll treat it way more roughly than everybody else. To me it sounds more like support hell than planned obsolescence heaven. If you want that then you should do it on some part you control the life time of, like say the non-replaceable battery running out, the screen fading away, no more software updates, anything you can reasonably control doesn't happen in the warranty period. This would be anything but that.

Re:The Ultimate In Planned Obsolescence... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877476)

...you get your own customers to gradually break their phones so they inevitably have to buy new ones. Smart thinking.

People get new phones every 2 years anyway. The 24 month contracts are actually a boon to manufacturers (but at least it allows the tech to advance fast as well.)

Re:The Ultimate In Planned Obsolescence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37879520)

Especially Nokia!

Worst warranty service ever! Google and you will read so many horror stories it will make you wonder how they are still in business.

Out of warranty support, ask them if you can buy replacement parts on a phone model that is 2yrs. old, and they will tell you to try amazon.com (really; I just went through this B.S. on a $500 two year old phone).

Never will purchase a Nokia device again.

Re:The Ultimate In Planned Obsolescence... (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 2 years ago | (#37880414)

For what it's worth, I just got OTA phone software update for the... Nokia 5800XM. The phone was release in spring 2008, that is three and half years ago.

Of course by... well, any standard, the UI is still crap, even if it's probably 10x better than it was at release, no need to comment about that. But the phone is pretty solid as a phone, considering all the manhandling it has received, such as being dropped so that the phone lock slider broke (fixed with a suitable lock app), does not drop calls etc. It (Symbian S60 5th edition, not Symbian^3, or Anna, or Belle) still seems to get some new apps, too, even though the OS is so old.

Just out of curiosity, how's the software situation or usability of an iPhone purchaced in 2008? Can you still get apps for it from Apple's app store, even if it's just the apps you originally downloaded for it?

What about Android devices from 2008, what's software situation with them, for real use?

These are honest questions, because I don't really know. Also,

Moving parts = wear and tear (1)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877070)

The great thing about my smartphone now is that there are no moving parts (except for the vibration motor). How many bends until the phone breaks in half?

Re:Moving parts = wear and tear (1)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877076)

Oh, I forgot about the power and volume buttons, those are also moving parts. I heard the Nexus One has a problem with power buttons breaking after a year.

Not the moving parts. (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877410)

And the voice coils in the speakers and microphone, the microswitches in the headphone socket, the accelerometer (you covered already), magnetometer, and for those phones with them, gyroscopes.

All this is beside the point anyway. Smartphones are flimsy devices. The slightest fall is met with a cracked screen rendering the phone completely unusable. In some designs even something as simple as putting a case on the phone will cause some weak points to appear across the screen or (dumbest idea ever) glass back.

My entire family has a reasonable history with phones. We've managed to break:

iPhone 3G with a broken screen (dropped from waist height).
Some Erricson world traveler model (resistive touchscreen stopped working one day)
Some short wide Nokia with a qwerty keyboard ("s" key stopped working).

But notably the ones that are still working to this day:
Nokia 8210 (dropped from the second floor of a building. The screen is cracked and won't display anything, but the moving parts still work fine and it still makes and receives calls).
Nokia 5110 (my favourite. There's nothing wrong with it. It has been passed through 3 family members before I got it. One of them was using it for business purposes and it was basically being used constantly from 9-5, and another psycho member used this phone to learn to touchtype while sending text messages. The mechanical moving parts have taken a hellovalot of abuse, the cases have been replaced several times due to cracks, but it still works as good as the day it was bought)

It's not the moving parts which necessarily break. It's the cheap parts that break. Users of IBM model M keyboards will know this very well.

Re:Not the moving parts. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877522)

I don't think you can really consider a modern mems accelerometer or gyro as having "plain old moving parts". They're vibrating an incredibly small amount, hermetically sealed, and have operating lives > 10 years. 10 years is the target for most chips, btw.

Re:Not the moving parts. (1)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877580)

I miss my old 3310... dropped onto floors, flung across rooms, trodden on, rained on... frequently used as a bottle opener. Nothing bothered it until I accidentally dropped it into a pint of stout. Not even a 3310 will stand for that. I know people still using theirs after ten years.

My replacement 1110 is OK, but it's too rounded to open bottles.

Re:Not the moving parts. (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877690)

Nothing bothered it until I accidentally dropped it into a pint of stout. Not even a 3310 will stand for that.

Well, my mother's Motorola from around the same time as the 3310 spent an entire night submerged in greasy water and survived just fine (after drying).

The UI was shitty, though, even at the time.

Re:Not the moving parts. (1)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877922)

Plain old water's less of a problem since it will just evaporate over time, and grease is non-conductive -- stout is both more conductive and harder to get out of nooks and crannies, alas. Maybe lots of rinsing and patient drying would have done the trick in my case...

It tasted a bit funny after I'd fished the phone out too.

Re:Not the moving parts. (1)

zoomshorts (137587) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877702)

"It's not the moving parts which necessarily break. It's the cheap parts that break. Users of IBM model M keyboards will know this very well."

Why would we know this well? My model M is 1984 vintage and still working as I type this. Douchebag!

Re:Moving parts = wear and tear (0)

roscocoltran (1014187) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877408)

What an horrible way to die for a phone: Being bent to death (with the cracks and such) by it's owner, raging at the device not reacting while it was in fact not turned on.

Re:Moving parts = wear and tear (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 2 years ago | (#37880496)

The great thing about my smartphone now is that there are no moving parts (except for the vibration motor). How many bends until the phone breaks in half?

Well, how many cycles of deformation does something like... car tyre take before it breaks down because of deformations?

Or how many rotations does a car engine take before even the bearings and seals need fixing?

Or, more electronic example, how many vibrations does a speaker take before it rips itself apart, or the connectors shake loose, or soldered joints break?

Now many bends is a bendable phone expected to take during a lifetime of... let's say, 3 years? Compared to the above exaples, why would it be impossible to build the phone to take that many bends before breaking? It's just a design decision, which then affects price etc.

From mechanical point of view, it's perfectly possible to build something, which allow certain amount of turning, but then not more. If you're unsure how, check out for example... car suspension. Makes travel smooth, yet takes a lot more than regular amount of force to break.

two-hands control (2)

DavMz (1652411) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877092)

FTA:

The smart phone prototype [..] has the gadget world buzzing with ideas about future products, and how exactly this product would enter the market. It is hard to imagine a phone that requires both your hands’ focus to control

Sure, because one can operate an iphone with just one hand. Since the smartphone, it seems to me that phones that can be operated single-handedly are things of the past.

Re:two-hands control (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877136)

For many years we have had technology to enable a car to be controlled by one hand (and no pedals) but it doesn't seem to have caught on.

Re:two-hands control (1)

ianezz (31449) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877176)

Uhm, perhaps it's just me, but other than when doing the pinch gesture to zoom in/out, I use my phone with one hand (a Samsung Galaxy S2). And there are other ways to zoom (albeit more awkward).

Re:two-hands control (1)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877222)

FTA:

The smart phone prototype [..] has the gadget world buzzing with ideas about future products, and how exactly this product would enter the market. It is hard to imagine a phone that requires both your hands’ focus to control

Sure, because one can operate an iphone with just one hand.

Hmm, yes, actually one can. And I do it on a pretty regular basis. This was even an argument invoked by Apple for not making a bigger screen iPhone, because the Galaxy S II for example *cannot* be operated with one hand as the screen is too large.

Granted, it's more comfortable with both hands but it does work and is useable with one hand. I'm sure all Android phones with a screen smaller or equal than an iPhone (Nexus one for example) can as well be operated with one hand.

Re:two-hands control (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877292)

I can operate an Evo with one hand. I also have very small hands (16.25cm from base of palm to tip of the middle finger.)

Re:two-hands control (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877720)

Like the other guy said, the Galaxy S2 can be operated with one hand. However, writing on a qwerty keyboard with one hand is far more painful than on a T9, and qwerty on a touch screen is even worse. Try doing it while walking. With actual keys you can rely on tactile feedback in addition to your eyes, with a capacitive touch screen you enter text on the mere touch of the screen. Typing on a modern touch screen demands far more attention and is far more error prone than a T9 (and no, your beloved autocorrect [damnyouautocorrect.com] doesn't improve things).

Sure, you can do it. But for some things, the touch screen is a giant leap backwards in usability.

The only way to improve... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877140)

The only way to improve on the idea of a phone that requires you to bend with BOTH hands to control it, would be if they could figure out a way to make a phone that required both hands AND a foot, or perhaps both hands and a tongue!

Re:The only way to improve... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877276)

It's just a concept. I would think this as additional feature, screen would still have a touch screen for one hand function.

behind (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877146)

gsmarena had this story on the 27th.. whats up with the delay slashdot

Good thing people never put phones in pockets (1)

John Bresnahan (638668) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877164)

Good thing people never put their phones in their pockets, where they will twist in an uncontrolled an accidental way.

I once started receiving calls from my brother every couple of minutes for a half-hour. When I answered, I could hear background noises, but he never replied to my shouts of "Hello?!?".

It turned out that he was umpiring his kid's little league game, and every time he squatted down, he was inadvertently pressing the "Call" button, which was redialing the last number he had called (mine).

Re:Good thing people never put phones in pockets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877300)

Booty called by your brother!

Re:Good thing people never put phones in pockets (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877370)

Good thing people don't learn to use the key/screen lock. Otherwise your brother wouldn't call you that often ;)

Re:Good thing people never put phones in pockets (1)

zmollusc (763634) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877628)

Maybe the key/screen lock was like on my old LG, where to unlock the key/screen, all you had to do was apply pressure to the screen. Yeah, really. Someone got paid to duhsign that.

Re:Good thing people never put phones in pockets (2)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877560)

Good thing people never put their phones in their pockets, where they will twist in an uncontrolled an accidental way.

So why couldn't a lock feature work for a bending UI, as it does for buttons and touchscreens?

Nokia - The First Phonebender (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877180)

Just wait for M. Night Shlallalmyallan to make a crappy movie about it.

wait for the Apple version (1)

recrudescence (1383489) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877210)

This looks awesome! I can't wait until Apple re-invents this, infuses magic in it, innovates, and gets it right. It will change everything. Again.

Re:wait for the Apple version (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877266)

and then patent it and sue nokia for infringement

HA! My first captcha was cellular

Re:wait for the Apple version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877798)

frankly, it looks retarded. that video shows how stupid it is to interact with a device by bending it. I hope no one else tries to copy it. It would be a waste of time and energy for something that "seems" cool but is stupid.

Its not a phone (3, Informative)

citizenr (871508) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877228)

Its a picture frame concept. Even the booth was named "bendable DEVICE prototype", not bendable smartphone.

Single Hand usage? (1)

cynop (2023642) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877272)

Though this seems very nice, and of course impressive at first, i have to wonder how good it will work with just one hand. Seems kinda difficult to imagine. I'm more impressed by the fact that we're seeing flexible screens closer to market

The filing cabinet (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877320)

In Bellevue, WA, US, there's a filing office where IP is stored. It contains the secrets of Orange, of Sendo, of others who've partnered with Microsoft on the long journey to a useful Microsoft phone. All these gave up their IP for free, under the terms that Microsoft would help them build a mobile future - but Microsoft got their IP out of receivership when the venture failed because they hand the foresight to insist on that in the contract.

They've already racked the filing cabinets where Nokia's IP will be stored.

Re:The filing cabinet (1)

Snard (61584) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877596)

Is it in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard'?

Wow (0)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877380)

Nokia is still in business. Why?

Stubborn finns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877426)

They are. I know, I used to be too but got better.

Don't see the point. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877402)

Control by flexing is a pretty useless feature. But makes a great phone if water tight for use in the building trade, the military and other places where toughness matters.... that is if it is tough? :)

Cool tech (2)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#37877436)

Cool tech but from the video you could do the same by using 4 buttons at the corners.

Re:Cool tech (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37877788)

"Cool tech but from the video you could do the same by using 4 buttons at the corners."

But then it wouldn't jump back if you drop it.

The thing they DIDN'T point out... (1)

bratwiz (635601) | more than 2 years ago | (#37878094)

The thing they DIDN'T point out, of course, is that you'll need TWO (or more) hands. You can't do all that bending and twisting with one hand.

Next version (1)

ChrisMaple (607946) | more than 2 years ago | (#37879522)

I'm looking for a phone I can control by running over it with a truck.

Re:Next version (1)

Snard (61584) | more than 2 years ago | (#37879848)

You can control your current phone this way. Unfortunately, the only command available through this interface is "disconnect call".

Re:Next version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37880998)

You can control your current phone this way. Unfortunately, the only command available through this interface is "disconnect all".

FTFY

Wrong, not a phone (1)

Evro (18923) | more than 2 years ago | (#37879554)

The thing that was demoed was not a "phone," but a bendable screen & chassis. They still need to develop bendable motherboards, processors, batteries, etc.

Re:Wrong, not a phone (1)

Derek Pomery (2028) | more than 2 years ago | (#37880108)

Flexible motherboards and batteries already exist.
The screen was one of the hard ones actually.

Processor doesn't necessarily have to bend, depending on size and position and amount of bendiness.

Windows Phone 7 Phone (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#37880306)

Other gestures include pounding it on any hard surface or throwing it across the room.

Future versions will include moisture sensors to detect the inevitable users' sobbing over the device.

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  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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