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Vim Turns 20

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the they-grow-up-so-fast dept.

News 271

quanticle writes "20 years ago today, Bram Moolenaar released vim to the public. From the article:'The Vim text editor was first released to the public on November 2, 1991—exactly 20 years ago today. Although it was originally designed as a vi clone for the Amiga, it was soon ported to other platforms and eventually grew to become the most popular vi-compatible text editor. It is still actively developed and widely used across several operating systems.' Share your vim stories and your tales of battles with emacs users."

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271 comments

And this is why emacs beats vim: (2, Funny)

gentryx (759438) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926278)

It is more mature. It was initially released in 1976, and is still being actively developed, too. :-P

emacs this emacs that (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926302)

emacs would make a great operating system, if only it had a text editor worth a shit

Re:And this is why emacs beats vim: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926348)

With a first post.

Seriously though they're both old as shit, you can't claim one is more 'mature' than the other because these days things that are a year old+ are called mature.

Re:And this is why emacs beats vim: (3, Informative)

makubesu (1910402) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926540)

Vi was also released in 1976.

Re:And this is why emacs beats vim: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926650)

TECO wins, hands down!

Re:And this is why emacs beats vim: (2)

cream wobbly (1102689) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926710)

If it's being actively developed, doesn't that mean it's not yet mature?

Re:And this is why emacs beats vim: (1)

svick (1158077) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927098)

I think that the only software that's not actively developed is one that was abandoned.

If I used your definition, Windows 1.0 would be a very mature system.

Re:And this is why emacs beats vim: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926860)

I use EDLIN, released in 1981 (but leaked to OEMs in 1980). Shift-E saves, Shift-Q quits (discards changes).

Edlin is still actively developed [sourceforge.net] as part of FreeDOS. Wikipedia isn't making friends in the EDLIN world by referring to it as primitive [wikipedia.org] .

NANO ftw! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926304)

that is all.

Re:NANO ftw! (4, Informative)

IceNinjaNine (2026774) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926656)

More like NANO, wtf?

Re:NANO ftw! (1)

c (8461) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927048)

Amen. My SOP when installing a new system is "apt get purge nano".

Why? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926330)

Why would they mention the argument with emacs? That was settled years ago.

emacs users? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926336)

Everyone knows only retards and homeless people use emacs.

Emacs vs Vi(m) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926338)

The battle that never was.

still using it for remote admin (1)

lorinc (2470890) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926350)

I'm still using vim for remote admin of servers which don't have X installed. Am I the only one? I guess not. I bet vim is editor number 1 for this task.

Re:still using it for remote admin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926470)

I use it locally in a terminal window of all my systems that do have X installed too. Never needed another dev environment

Re:still using it for remote admin (3, Informative)

Ogi_UnixNut (916982) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926614)

I use it all the time, for editing, for development, for general work, for writing my todo list today. Hell, I sometimes catch myself trying to use VI commands in my web browser, or other GUI programs.

It's actually come to replace all my other stuff, from IDE's to graphical text editors. I'm really happy with it!

Re:still using it for remote admin (3, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926890)

Ditto.
For a web browser look into vimperator.

Re:still using it for remote admin (1)

ls -la (937805) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927320)

Me too. Even the web browser et. al part (I've more than once ended up with random j's and k's in word[shudder] documents. I even use vim for my iPhone apps. PITA that I have to tab over to compile and run it... though I'm sure there's a way I should look for.

Re:still using it for remote admin (1)

swimnurd (322157) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926582)

Who installs X on a server?

Re:still using it for remote admin (2)

cream wobbly (1102689) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926746)

Windows admins.

Re:still using it for remote admin (1)

lorinc (2470890) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926750)

I have some computing servers at the lab (i.e. servers for computationally intensive simulations) on which X is sometimes handy (demoing some stuff for instance).

Re:still using it for remote admin (1)

nessus42 (230320) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926826)

Who installs X on a server?

Actually, every server I've ever logged into has had X11 on it. (And I've logged into hundreds of different servers over the years.)

Or they've had the X11 clients in any case. If you don't know why this would be a common thing to do, I guess you're not that familiar with X11.

|>ouglas

Re:still using it for remote admin (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926970)

Why would you have it on a webserver?
What possible use would you have for it?

Re:still using it for remote admin (3, Interesting)

menkhaura (103150) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926784)

I use vim for programming, tweaking, both locally and remotely. Don't quite like its GUI, I prefer to use it on konsole, xterm or whatever terminal emulator is at hand, even though I use KDE. Nothing beats vim for programming, with its syntax highlighting, fast navigation within a file and among files, reindenting, searching and replacing, window splitting and many, many other features, all available in a couple or two of keystrokes. I consider myself a long time vim user, but I know I've barely skimmed over the surface of its ocean of features. I'm very grateful to Bram Moolenaar and the hordes of brave but anonymous vim contributors.

Hope vim lives on at least another twenty years.

Re:still using it for remote admin (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927150)

I use vim for programming, tweaking, both locally and remotely. I use KDE.

Get Yakuake. Now I can use one of those extraneous function keys on my Apple keyboard to get a terminal to dropdown or go fullscreen at any time.

:1,$s/19/20/g (2)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926392)

Congratulations!

Re::1,$s/19/20/g (1)

Niac (2101) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926562)

Maybe %s/19/20/g?

Re::1,$s/19/20/g (1)

cream wobbly (1102689) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926762)

Alright, you first: you missed the colon.

Re::1,$s/19/20/g (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926596)

I tried that and got "The Vim text editor was first released to the public on November 2, 2091—exactly 20 years ago today."

Re::1,$s/19/20/g (1)

cream wobbly (1102689) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926800)

And now you: yes. It should've been :s/\([^[:digit:]]\)19\([^[:digit:]]\)/\120\2/. And why on earth did GP use a global flag?

Re::1,$s/19/20/g (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926914)

All 19s are now 20! I'm just giving them away!

Oblig.... (1)

trancemission (823050) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926404)

:wq

Re:Oblig.... (1)

DrogMan (708650) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926768)

ZZ

Re:Oblig.... (1)

Jerome H (990344) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926806)

:x

Re:Oblig.... (1)

reasterling (1942300) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926834)

:x

I like gvim, except... (5, Interesting)

serviscope_minor (664417) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926410)

I like and use gvim all the time.

My main beef with it (solved by recompiling) is with fonts. I like the old fashioned font called "fixed". It derives from the ancient, non-scalable standard bitmapped font which came with X. It also happens to be very readable and to my eyes looks much sharper than the anti-aliased fonts. There are also excellent UTF-8 versions available too.

For some reason, this is almost impossible to get if one has gvim compiled as most distros do it (using gtk or gnome). Not only that but the fonts seem to change on the slightest whim of an update from the package manager.

The solution seems to be to recompile it with Athena or Motif support.

I must say, however that if Athena is the solution, then you really have problems :(

Re:I like gvim, except... (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926484)

Awesome Vim story. Mods mod up please this one should be the lead.

And I agree with you on Athena. As an aside it looks like the latest macports no longer has the athena option though it still has motif.

Re:I like gvim, except... (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926606)

Awesome Vim story.

ummm that was a gvim story

I tried to be an ex-emacs user... (2)

drjones78 (961270) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926416)

... but it didn't work.

Emacs controls all its ex's.

Happily married (3, Funny)

suso (153703) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926424)

I use vim, my wife uses emacs. We sleep in the same bed, unless she is swapping.

Re:Happily married (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926620)

If you're using the same sized RAM she could easily be swapping and you, who wouldn't be, would be oblivious to it.

Re:Happily married (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926892)

RAM enlargement kit is easily available and perfectly safe.

Re:Happily married (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37927086)

Sounds like she has too much mammary.

One day (2)

M0j0_j0j0 (1250800) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926426)

In Linux camp i lost my ":" key

Re:One day (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926616)

Did you find it in your pussy?

Daily user thanks Bram (2)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926434)

Daily user thanks Bram. Vim is my hammer, my screwdriver and my wrench. I use it on almost every Unix-Like system I work on.

Although I'd be able to kick the gong around using a simple Vi, I find several Vim features making me much more productive. History and colours do it for me.

Re:Daily user thanks Bram (2)

serviscope_minor (664417) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926508)

History and colours do it for me

And:

visual (including block) highlight, working arrow keys, delete going off the end of the line and back onto the one before.

Re:Daily user thanks Bram (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926634)

Yup. Column editing is the killer app that vi never had.

Cscope integration is a close second through fifth.

Re:Daily user thanks Bram (3, Interesting)

serviscope_minor (664417) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927230)

Yup. Column editing is the killer app that vi never had.

Don't forget undo trees. It's a feature I use maybe once every few months, but those times I'm REALLY glad I had it.

If you don't already know, it fixes the problem where you undo some changes, make a new change, then can't redo the changes you undid. In vim, you can go back in time to retrieve the previous state. It's like having micro version control for every edit.

To avoid a flame war (1)

Idou (572394) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926460)

I would just like to state that all editors are created equal.

:wq

Re:To avoid a flame war (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926796)

Some text editors are more equal than others.

Re:To avoid a flame war (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926836)

That's why I only run notepad. In Vista. In a VM.

Re:To avoid a flame war (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927110)

Is that why the stories all seem to be equally badly edited?

Most Popular (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926548)

...the most popular vi-compatible text editor.

Justin Timberlake is the most popular member of 'N Sync. Ha, I'm just C-y your chain.

Re:Most Popular (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926686)

You're pasting my chain?
Or you mean Y. Or maybe C-w or even M-w

Re:Most Popular (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926850)

Yanking. C-y "yank" (paste) the copied/killed region/line

Re:Most Popular (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37927156)

"yank" is a synonym for "paste"?

You Emacs users are weird...

vi 'til I die! (3, Funny)

theswade (2020510) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926570)

i[ENTER] Happy Birthday, vim!!! [ESC]:wq![ENTER]

I hate vim and emacs. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926572)

They are hard to use and counter intuitive. I'd rather have pico or nano any day. Ever gotten trapped in vim or vi?

Re:I hate vim and emacs. (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926604)

:qa!

Re:I hate vim and emacs. (1)

aix tom (902140) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926810)

No, but I get trapped in pico and nano every time I accidentally end up in them.

Re:I hate vim and emacs. (1)

cream wobbly (1102689) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926874)

In Bash, Ctrl-X Ctrl-E invokes emacs, and I have to google how to exit it every single time. Way too close to Ctrl-X Ctrl-R to re-read /etc/inputrc.

Re:I hate vim and emacs. (1)

3p1ph4ny (835701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927250)

In bash, C-x C-e is shorthand for "invoke $EDITOR on the current command line and run the result when $EDITOR exits". If you export EDITOR=vim you can get vim instead of emacs, and all is happy.

Re:I hate vim and emacs. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927030)

No, we are not idiots like you.
Pico and Nano are for children and idiots.

Emacs vs VIM: Who cares? (2)

CokeJunky (51666) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926580)

Honestly, both are excellent text editors. I, like most programmers, use the one that was favored at my university. Not because it was necessarily better, but because lots of other people used it and helped me get over the learning curve. I still use VIM today on every operating system I use or am forced to use.

At the end of the day, the text editor I use has to be something I use so well that I am not thinking about the text editor - I am thinking about the text I want to edit.

Can't we all just get along?

Re:Emacs vs VIM: Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926698)

Honestly, both are excellent text editors.

Both are outdated relics. Yes, I still use vim, but I never recommend either to new users.

Re:Emacs vs VIM: Who cares? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927060)

What would you replace it with?
As far as I can tell no one has yet invented a suitable replacement.

Re:Emacs vs VIM: Who cares? (1)

bunratty (545641) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927208)

I learned vi years ago when I realized that on some Unix systems I may not have any other visual editor installed. It's still true today... when I install Fedora I have to use vi to edit files until I get emacs installed. I would recommend learning vi to anyone who uses Unix or Linux extensively. I would recommend emacs or some other editor to anyone else.

Thanks Bram Mooler (1)

dark-templer (673947) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926588)

Such a nice editor, I use it everyday and everywhere for everything c,java,python,tex,bash,.... Simple, fast, lightweight, just amazing.
Thanks Bram for this editor and dedication of vim for charity
:q

Re:Thanks Bram Mooler (1)

drosboro (1046516) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926798)

I think his name's Moolenar, but I second your thanks to Bram - especially his commitment to the Kibaale Children's Centre. I work at the school in Vancouver, Canada that played an instrumental part in starting KCC, and many of my colleagues have worked there over the years. KCC is still doing fantastic work for the poorest of the poor in Uganda.

Re:Thanks Bram Mooler (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926978)

It's Moolenaar.
Old Dutch for the operator of a windmill.

So? (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926592)

I like Vim.

But why isn't it the default editor in this edit box?

Irony? (1)

tool462 (677306) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926594)

I like how the article is titled "Two decades of productivity" and the picture is of vim opened from a shell launched within vim. No shots of nicely formatted and highlighted code. Just a shot of the kind of crap you try to do when you're bored.

[Unintentional] Hilarity

20 years of wondering (2)

nimbius (983462) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926626)

if ugandan kids use VIM too?

Re:20 years of wondering (1)

drosboro (1046516) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926818)

I have it on second-hand authority that, while the kids at Kibaale Children Centre don't regularly use vim, they at least don't use emacs either... :)

I replaced notepad.exe with gvim.exe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926642)

It took some searching to get around Microsoft's safety things about replacing Win components, but, I replaced my Notepad with GVIM on my box. I do nearly all my coding, log reading, etc with vim.

I just got a new Mac yesterday. Installing macvim was one of the first things I did.

I for one welcome my vi overlords.

I am pleased to say... (4, Interesting)

Darren Hiebert (626456) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926658)

I am pleased to say that I was the one who first added Vim to the Sunsite Linux archive back in 1993. I had transferred to a company which did its development on Windows (yuk) and went looking for a vi-clone which I could use on it. I came across Vim and found it to be very solid, but with some bugs to fix. I regularly emailed Bram on these issues and he was very responsive to my reports and suggestions on how to improve its tag support (vis-a-vis ctags). Back then, the newly-available Linux archive only had the vi-clone Elvis, which wasn't nearly as good. So, thinking that I had discovered a gem, I uploaded Vim to the Sunsite Linux archive and eventually it got picked up for use as the resident vi editor by each of the Linux distributors.

In 1996, I developed Exuberant Ctags as a better ctags. Bram started including it in his Vim distributions and our programs were paired together in much the same was that Elvis was packaged with its own ctags clone, and Emacs was packaged with its own ctags. Eventually, Exuberant Ctags became large enough that it caused the Vim distribution to become too large to fit on a 5.25-inch floppy and Bram said it was time to let them grow separately. Exuberant Ctags, as well, got picked up by the Linux distributors as the resident ctags program.

I have always enjoyed working with Bram over the years and wish I could have met him. He is a very pleasant and easy person to work with, very accommodating, and very bright. I think very highly of him and I am glad to see his editor become one of the bulwarks of Linux distributions, as well as used on many other platforms.

Darren Hiebert

Re:I am pleased to say... (1)

ShakaUVM (157947) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926980)

I worked on a patch for VIM ~2001 for combining searches with code folding. You could search for a term, tap zf or whatever the shortcut was, and it would fold away all lines that didn't match that code, with an adjustable number of context lines around it.

I found it very very useful for code refactoring, but Bran didn't want to include it in the main release. So I just had it up for years as an optional patch for people to compile in.

Congrats... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37926732)

You only look 40.

Vim and its Clone (2)

meadwizard (1136767) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926734)

Vim is the only editor I'll use. Well when I'm working in MS products such as Visual Studio I have to use ViEmu. Which works great since I have VIM inside VS. Love the fact that people are now emulating Vim. Love the that I can edit a 6M log file with no significant impact on the system and still have full search capability. Thanks Bram, I owe you days of saved time over the years.

Which came first... (1)

ABadDog (28370) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926778)

I occasionally have to use vim to edit the Makefile for emacs.

vim gripe (1)

jasnw (1913892) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926816)

The first *nix editor I used was vi on Solaris boxes many moons past. Now that I'm on Linux boxes I'm saddled with vim. Pretty much I'm OK with vim, but PLEASE GOD why is there this non-disable-able mode called "recording" or some such??? I never ever use it, nor do I want to use it, but I always find myself IN that damnable mode by accident when my fumble-fingered keyboarding hits the wrong key (which happens several times each and every day). I then have to fuss and fume and get back to normal mode. I'd be OK with this if I could just disable this behavior, or change the keystrokes required to enter that mode to something like PleaseStartRecordingModeForMeNow, but for reasons best known to Conan the Destroyer you either cannot disable this mode or the method by which you can is not known to mere mortals. Yes, I know that if I just gave "recording mode" a chance it would change my life and help me hook up with beautiful [gender choice here], but I don't want to learn a new trick. I want to have this mode go away. In the words of my 3-year-old grandson "don't want to can't make me."

Re:vim gripe (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37927002)

Press q next time. I won't attempt to teach you why it is awesome, just how to get out of it.

Re:vim gripe (1)

__1200333 (1200333) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927114)

That's macro mode. It's super useful. I used to be like you, but now I have seen the light.

Quick version: press 'q' again to get out of macro mode.

Long version: press 'q' followed by a letter to start macro mode. Then press 'q' again to stop. You can press '@' followed by that same letter to replay your commands.

Re:vim gripe (1)

3p1ph4ny (835701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927212)

:noremap q <nop>

Re:vim gripe (1)

gewalker (57809) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927222)

Google gvim disable recording mode. Number 1 result: EASY BUTTON [stackoverflow.com]

I must be officially old (-1, Troll)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37926936)

Share your vim stories

Seriously? People have stories to tell about text editors? I'd rather have a life, thanks.

I've used vim everyday for the last 15 years (2)

jmcbain (1233044) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927000)

Next to gcc, vim is the greatest open-source project ever created. I've used vim every day of my life since discovering it back in 1996 as a replacement for basic 'vi' on a Sun Sparcstation. I'm currently using vim to write software on my MacBook Pro in a terminal window.

I started off learning vi on a DEC workstation back in the early 1990s while trying to keep my head above water as a freshman CS major. Since then, I've used vim inside of Visual Studio (with a plugin), inside of Eclipse (with a plugin), as the editor for the mutt mail client, and in a hundred other contexts.

Vim is excellent software.

From the archives, I bring you: Ed, man! !man ed (1)

LqdSlpStrm (464344) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927010)

http://www.gnu.org/fun/jokes/ed.msg.html

I use both Emacs and Vim. (2)

kermyt (99494) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927036)

I use Emacs as an IRC client, an RPN calculator, a mini text browser, for browsing usenet, and I even play a couple of games in it... but when I edit text I use vim.

Re:I use both Emacs and Vim. (1)

lannocc (568669) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927216)

lol... your post sums up the Vi vs. Emacs flamewar perfectly!

Love/Hate (g)Vim (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927042)

I love gVim (use it everyday at work) but god, some of it _still_ sucks.

- Can't map Ctrl-1, ... Ctrl-0 to custom mappings
- Can't distinguish between Ctrl-Char, Ctrl-Shift-Char, and Ctrl-Alt-Shift-Char
- Can't distinguish between TAB and CTRL-I
- Can't (re)map CAPS (I use CAPS in my games, remapping it to ESC is NOT an option)
- no way to "unbind" ALL keys

WHY is it so hard to find an editor that lets me use ALL the keys??

Vim would be perfect if it fixed the custom keybindings.

XML editor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37927082)

VIM came in really handy when I needed to delete extremely massive text lines from an XML file. Almost all the other editors croaked but VIM took it like a champ and 5 minutes later I was done.

Go cat, go... (1)

turgid (580780) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927104)

Elvis [vi-editor.org] knock vim into a cocked hat!

No garish colour schemes or any of that nonsense.

Which would you rather use: an editor named after a Rock Star or one named after a brand of toilet scourer? I rest my case.

Re:Go cat, go... (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927248)

No garish colour schemes or any of that nonsense.

huh? Wasn't elvis the first vi clone to do syntax colouring?

When VIM on DOS saved the day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37927148)

Back around 1996 or 1997, we were using old DOS based 286's as consoles for our embedded application. During debugging, when we had all debugging options turned on, we would capture the output to disk and this often resulted in a large file. The problem we were solving was buried somewhere in a large (for the time) several megabyte file. The DOS editors we had could not open the file because of the size. These DOS computers were not on the network, and the files were too big for a floppy, so there was no way to move the file off to a more powerful machine to take a look.

Enter VIM on DOS to the rescue. We copied over VIM to the PC and opened the big file, and searched for the error message or string we knew was buried in there somewhere. It took several (maybe as many as 10) minutes, but VIM found what we were looking for, and we could see the relevant debug information nearby. After that it was easy to fix the bug.

When you need a simple no windowing compact, but powerful editor, VIM is a good tool to have around.

No love for Bill Joy? (1)

hogger (566646) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927260)

Where's the love for Bill Joy? Vim is great and all, as are all the ports of vi, the plugins that give vi functionality to eclipse, firefox, etc... But really, isn't Bill the real hero here?

I use in in windows via cygwin, I use it on every linux server, desktop, and laptop I work on. I use it on my phone. I use it on my tablet. Vi's focus on dual modes, and no mouse, is just wonderful.

Thanks for vi Bill!

I like Vim because... (1)

Stephen Chadfield (7971) | more than 2 years ago | (#37927292)

I like Vim because it integrates well with Linux, Solaris and Windows environments and has great syntax highlighting (by default!) for languages associated with the Cadence IC design tools we use at work (i.e. Skill and DIVA).

On *nix systems I like to compile it myself using Motif. Gives a common appearance across all the systems I use that resembles the Windows GUI.

VI or VIM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37927312)

In the 21st century using VI or VIM or GVIM is strange!! It is a great tool for coding ONLY if you don't have a GUI (SSH, etc). I don't see any advantage of using it for serious software development when there are so many amazing and ultra powerful editors around.

We should be thinking of editors that can recognize speech not the ones that require your fingers AND sometimes your toes (emacs)!!

Happy anniversary but it's time to put it to rest.

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