Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Asteroid Passes Closer To Earth Than the Moon on Nov 8

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the spitting-distance dept.

NASA 169

First time accepted submitter TheNextCorner writes "NASA scientists will be tracking asteroid 2005 YU55 with antennas of the agency's Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif., as the space rock safely flies past Earth slightly closer than the moon's orbit on Nov. 8. Scientists are treating the flyby of the 1,300-foot-wide (400-meter) asteroid as a science target of opportunity – allowing instruments on 'spacecraft Earth' to scan it during the close pass. "

cancel ×

169 comments

I have to say... (2)

Lyrata (1900038) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928078)

I'm amazed I haven't seen doomsday theories regarding this yet.

Re:I have to say... (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928268)

*checks time* ummmm i believe u needed to give it one more minute and an anon; who missed yelling first, would say "WERE DOOMED"

Re:I have to say... (1)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928526)

First Apocalyp.....

Re:I have to say... (1)

englishknnigits (1568303) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928482)

How much change do I need to have in my pockets again?

Re:I have to say... (2)

mcneely.mike (927221) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928808)

all you need is a towel!

Re:I have to say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928952)

And purple triangles and Nike's, so important those Nike's.......

Re:I have to say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928668)

Don't worry, it will collide with some space junk and change course towards earth just in the nick of time, they always do.

Re:I have to say... (1)

SilentStaid (1474575) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929106)

Yeah, we would have seen that if Bruce Willis didn't have it covered.

Re:I have to say... (1)

wooferhound (546132) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929520)

The summery is Wrong ! !
According to TFA . . .
>> The trajectory of asteroid 2005 YU55 is well understood. At the point of closest approach,
>> it will be no closer than 201,700 miles (324,600 kilometers)
>> or 0.85 the distance from the moon to Earth.

so the asteroid will be just inside the orbit of the moon . . .

Re:I have to say... (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930348)

How do you know it won't hit the moon? It ought to be able to break off chunks large enough to destroy civilization as they rain down on the Earth. That should be awesome to watch!

Re:I have to say... (1)

agentgonzo (1026204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931842)

It's not wrong, it's just ambiguous. The summary means "asteroid passes closer to Earth than the Moon is to the Earth", not "asteroid passes closer to the Earth than it will be to the moon".

Re:I have to say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929934)

You need to get out to more conspiracy sites, some have been on this for months (well at least since comet Elenin went and broke apart on them).

There have been many different theories....many of them bring in the national emergency alert system test the day after as being planned for communicating the start of martial law....

Afterall why else would FEMA, FCC and NOAA do a nationwide 'test' of the EAS, they never have before.

Re:I have to say... (2)

formfeed (703859) | more than 2 years ago | (#37932358)

Just make sure you have your towel ready.

WERE DOOMED (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928084)

WERE DOOMED

Re:WERE DOOMED (5, Funny)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928094)

WERE DOOMED

We were doomed? So we're safe now?

LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928262)

Top 10 Funniest of the year.

WEIRD DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928316)

Corrected now...

APK

Re:WEIRD DOOMED (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928380)

So, speaking of asteroids and moons, would you happen to have any info on hostsfiles or something like that?

Re:WEIRD DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928802)

No, you fool!! Don't get him started!!!

Re:WEIRD DOOMED (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929560)

HOST files SUCK.

Do not use them.

Re:WERE DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928632)

Speaking of doomed, wasn't someone predicting the end of the world on October 25th?

Re:WERE DOOMED (1)

Lyrata (1900038) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928178)

Well then. I guess I spoke too soon.

Re:WERE DOOMED (2)

Boigaz (789379) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928782)

NO! YOUR DOOMED

Re:WERE DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928828)

Yeah, and ITS DOOMED TWO!!!

Re:WERE DOOMED (1)

Tyrannosaur (2485772) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928920)

haha sadly many people wont get it

Re:WERE DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929274)

haha sadly many people wont get it

if there's one thing the internet has taught me it's that no one understands contractions.

Re:WERE DOOMED (3, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930644)

What's so hard to understand? Some may be strong, some barely noticeable, but each is preparing your body for the actual onset of labor.

Re:WERE DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929512)

Its an apostrophe joke, right?

Re:WERE DOOMED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929418)

No wear doomed!

fp (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928088)

fp

Re:fp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37931862)

Fat Poofta? Where?

That sounds close. (1)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928110)

What we should do is send Bruce Willis with a master plan to slow it down, and get ourselves a new satellite.

Great base for a space station (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928598)

That would be great, put it into orbit and use it as a space station/mining facility.. good times

Re:Great base for a space station (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928822)

Here, here! It's about time we started doing that. We could probably use the ore to make a larger ship.

Re:Great base for a space station (3, Interesting)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928844)

The thing is a little bigger than an aircraft carrier (the diameter is about the same as a carrier's length), so I don't know how useful it'd be for a space station, but it would be very interesting to know what its composition is; if it's useful minerals, then it could be extremely valuable. It's really rather pathetic that we haven't had enough foresight to invest in building up our space program so that we have the capability of trapping a small asteroid like this that's so convenient, so that we can mine it for resources. Unlike leveling mountains and digging giant pit mines, you'll never have any environmentalists complaining about off-planet asteroid mining, and the ores in asteroids have potentially much higher yield than those found in the earth's crust.

Re:Great base for a space station (1)

TheNextCorner (2152406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928868)

But wouldn't the cost of building the equipment to capture one of these puppies be much higher than what the materials bring up? I cannot even imagine how you would be able to capture one asteroid traveling a couple thousand M/hr in space.

Re:Great base for a space station (4, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928932)

First, you wouldn't try to capture it as it's whizzing by the Earth with a giant delta-V, you'd strap a rocket to it (or something) and slowly change its trajectory so that it eventually became "parked" in a location convenient to the earth, perhaps in a Lagrangian point, with zero delta-V. This would obviously take some time; one of those new ion engines, working over the course of a few years, might do the trick; it wouldn't be an overnight operation.

Secondly, no, building the equipment would be cheap if you already had manufacturing facilities in space (or someplace low-gravity, like the moon), and already had designs in place and had already built such equipment before. Getting to that point is obviously expensive, but obviously you wouldn't build a whole space program to capture one asteroid and mine it, and then quit. (Well, if you're America, you might....) You'd do this with lots of asteroids, and pretty soon you've easily repaid your investment. It's like building a factory: you don't spend $3 billion to make a semiconductor fab and then just build one chip, you build many millions of them, and eventually pay back your investment.

Re:Great base for a space station (1)

ganjadude (952775) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930404)

i think you woiuld be better offcatching it either before it gets to us, or as it does. Than you work on sending it past the sun, slowing it down and shifting its trajectory as it comes back towards earth

Ummm (1)

bdwoolman (561635) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930786)

Of course if we miscalculated the capture orbit and accidentally dropped the freaking thing on ourselves that would also solve the environmentalist problem. They would be annihilated along with the rest of us. Better still. There would be no environment left for anyone to fret over and fight about.

Re:Ummm (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930920)

Don't be ridiculous; in such a situation there'd be very little damage. Remember, the whole idea of capturing an asteroid relies on making adjustments to its trajectory far in advance of a fly-by with earth. By the time it's anywhere near the earth, after using ion rockets to change its course, or using some kind of slingshot effect like the other poster mentioned, the asteroid's delta-V with earth would be tiny. An asteroid's impact energy is a product of its mass and velocity (or rather its difference in velocity, or delta-V, since the earth itself is also moving). If the delta-V is small, then its impact energy is similarly small. Likewise, the likelihood of screwing up and having it hit the earth is tiny since, with such a small delta-V by the time it gets near the earth, it would be pretty easy to maneuver into position with rockets if the calculations were a little off.

Finally, this asteroid isn't much bigger than an aircraft carrier. In terms of asteroids, that's really not very large; there's been lots of asteroids that large that have hit the earth in the past few million years, not doing much damage relatively. The asteroid that caused the Chixulub crater and probably wiped out most of the dinosaurs with the K-T event was at least 10km in diameter, around 30 times the diameter of this little asteroid, which equates to around 27,000 times the volume.

confused (1)

shadowrat (1069614) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928126)

Is the distance from the asteroid to the earth going to be less than the distance from the earth to the moon? Is the distance from the asteroid to the moon going to be greater than the distance from the earth to the asteroid?

Re:confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928256)

Why are you confused? Assuming you read a bit further than the headline of the story you would see the line:

"as the space rock safely flies past Earth slightly closer than the moon's orbit"

Slightly closer than the earth's orbit.

Re:confused (2)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928276)

Re:confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928314)

In other news, the moon will pass slightly closer to the earth than the moon's orbit.

Re:confused (1)

riverat1 (1048260) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928354)

Wow, if I understand that animation correctly it appears the asteroids orbit is nearly perpendicular to the Earth's orbit around the Sun (at least in the plane shown).

Re:confused (2)

Intropy (2009018) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928850)

My, what an eccentric asteroid.

Re:confused (1)

GumphMaster (772693) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929010)

The JPL Small-Body Database Browser [nasa.gov] has an interactive approximation of the orbit (requires Java for the applet).

Re:confused (1)

agentgonzo (1026204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931850)

It was meaning the former "Earth-asteroid distance Earth-Moon distance".

ie, at the time of closest approach to the Earth, the asteroid is inside the Moon's orbit, is indeed closer to the Earth than it is to the moon, but not 0.5 x (mean Earth-Moon distance).

What a perfect opportunity... (1)

underlord_999 (812134) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928192)

...to land on a passing asteroid. That is, if we still had a space program able to carry a person to it. Heck, I'd even settle for a quick-launch of an instrument/rover/lander to take some video and transmit it to Earth in near real-time.

You might even be able to use it as a one-way intra-solar-system ferry if the asteroid was going close to the same direction you wanted the probe to go.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (2)

Dan East (318230) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928254)

The difference in velocity between the asteroid and earth could be enormous. Just because it's coming close doesn't mean it's practical to land on it or orbit it. However we could always smash something into it then analyze the ejecta from earth.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (2)

Columcille (88542) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928308)

"However we could always smash something into it then analyze the ejecta from earth."

That's crazy. We would never do something like that.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

valugi (1069088) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931176)

"However we could always smash something into it then analyze the ejecta from earth."

smash it into Earth and analyze that ejecta from first row. :)

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

riverat1 (1048260) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928378)

Let's see, 6 days from now to launch and get it out to nearly the Moon's orbit. Not going to happen. But it would be interesting if we could.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928510)

I think they knew about 2005 YU55 before today ;) Matching velocity probably makes it more difficult. From the little animation it made me wonder if we'll see one of these things hit the moon before the Earth and how much longer that might be.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

riverat1 (1048260) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929082)

Yes, maybe it was 2005 when they discovered it. But maybe they didn't know the orbital parameters all that well until recently. I can't imagine it taking less than 2 or 3 years to put something like that together. The Earth is a much bigger target than the Moon.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37931638)

Just because it's fast when close to the Earth doesn't mean that we have to intercept it close to the Earth. Just launch a craft into an orbit around the sun which intersects the orbit of the asteroid at its aphelion, where it moves slowest.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (5, Interesting)

Teancum (67324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928672)

The issue here is the relative speed of the asteroid. It is very likely that it is moving from much further out in the Solar System, thus it will be moving a bit faster than the Earth/Moon.

None the less, this distance to the Earth will be plenty to significantly change the orbital characteristics of this asteroid as it goes around the Sun (due to the gravity of the Earth).

In terms of landing on an asteroid like this, there have been several proposals made to do just that, and there are several other candidate asteroids that will be passing just as close if not even closer over the next decade or so. Some of those missions even have been suggested to be manned missions to the asteroid, which could get quite interesting. One of the mission profiles is to head out to meet the asteroid about a month before it comes close to the Earth, and then do a "sample return" (manned or unmanned) using the Earth's atmosphere as an aerobrake. Obviously you need a much beefier heat shield than for ordinary LEO reentry, but it isn't as bad as it would seem and certainly is the realm of current aeronautical technology to accomplish. The SpaceX Dragon could easily cope with that kind of entry profile, to give an example.

The issue with this particular one is simply timing and getting something sent up before it passes. This particular asteroid is unlikely to get that kind of treatment mainly because it is a much more recent discovery (discovered in 2005 based on its designation), and it hasn't even received an asteroid number yet. This one might actually get a name... something that is missing for most new asteroid discoveries.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (2)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928282)

To test attaching a rocket to it to send it on another course. It seems like a low cost way to test some of the anti-asteroid plans.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928604)

How is it low cost? We would have had to send something up about 2 years ago (probably more) to take a boost past Venus or something to end up coming back on the right trajectory to match speeds with this thing. Or, did you think delta-v is free and we have inertial dampeners like on Star Trek and can just "whoosh" off in a new direction at a new speed with no inertial effects at all? Although to be fair, it would be fairly cheap to launch something up to just sit in the asteroid's path. It wouldn't last long when the asteroid hit it at ludicrous speed though.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928776)

When I say cheap, I mean cheap compared to sending something 1AU as opposed to .00022 AU. It is small, not miles across.

We can use the transporter, since it would be in transporter range.

I doubt it would be moving at ludicrous speed, there is a chance it will be moving at ridiculous speed. As long as it does not go to plaid, it would be ok.

Let everyone who bought their 1watt lasers aim at it and see if that is strong enough to move it.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928886)

Actually, Star Trek did fairly well in its portrayals of asteroids and inertia. While they obviously used the fictional inertial dampers inside the ship to prevent everyone from turning to mush when they changed velocity, there was an episode (old series) where a giant asteroid was headed for some planet with a bunch of Native Americans on it, and in the process of trying to save the day, Kirk got amnesia and the natives thought he was a god. Meanwhile, the Enterprise tried to alter the asteroid's path, even though it was (IIRC) months away from impact, but failed because it had too much inertia and the Enterprise didn't have enough power to make a significant change. Of course, at the end, Kirk regained his memory and they re-activated an alien asteroid deflector that was installed on the planet for just that purpose.

So, even way back in the late 1960s, the Star Trek writers knew of the dangers of asteroid impacts and why advanced cultures would want to create devices capable of deflecting them far ahead of their impact date. Too bad the rest of us haven't caught on yet.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929786)

Launching anything into space isn't cheap as mass costs time and energy. But it is nice to review cheaper and more effective methods. It's been known for some time that many asteroids are made up of smaller rocks and dust. They're held loosely together by gravity alone. Unless it's a chunk of iron ore from a super nova flying through space, it should be trivial to harpoon one of these (large) asteroids and push it with a booster. Just enough to alter its course.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

z0idberg (888892) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929054)

You might even be able to use it as a one-way intra-solar-system ferry if the asteroid was going close to the same direction you wanted the probe to go.

If you get your probe up to the same velocity as the asteroid (as you would do to land on it) then you don't really need to use it as a ferry do you?

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929518)

I thought the same thing, but what if you run a giant bungee cord or net across its path before it arrives? Let the asteroid accelerate you.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929370)

Dude, you're a fucking idiot. The last thing we'd want to do is maroon a human on that thing.
 
Luckily, we still have a robust non-passenger space program. If they'd thought ahead, and thought it worthwhile, they could have sent an instrument package to meet the visiting object.
 
Nice troll, though.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929718)

Not even if said person was a politician?

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

sharkman67 (548107) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929970)

Or a lawyer?

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929986)

Problem: one way missions are not ideal for humans.

Re:What a perfect opportunity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37931822)

Depends which human. I can think of quite a few humans where a one-way mission would be ideal (when viewed from my perspective)

No deflection? (1)

HaeMaker (221642) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928360)

Perhaps it is too small, but what I do not see in the animation is a new deflection in the orbit with this close fly-by to the earth and moon. What will the new orbit be after the flyby?

Re:No deflection? (1)

Bamfarooni (147312) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928614)

Too small to see.

Re:No deflection? (1)

muon-catalyzed (2483394) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928700)

@too small..

With the speed of about 12000 km/h and size of 400 meters it would be scary if it landed no matter where (earth/ocean), in comparison the dreaded Apophis asteroid is smaller, only ~300 meters in size.

Re:No deflection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928722)

HaeMaker is referring to the deflection being too small, not the asteroid itself.

Blow it up!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928512)

Before it's too late...

I think I'll rent Melancholia on the 8th (1)

darkjohnson (640563) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928542)

I mean, it will put me in the mood for the big NASA 'oops' event. :)

Melancholia [imdb.com] (new window)

If they call comets (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928692)

If they call comets that are 9 million miles away near earth objects what in god name do they call this?? lol i beat there heads are gong to explode from excitement :]

I'll be impressed when ... (1)

linear a (584575) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928716)

I'll be impressed when ... an asteroid passes closer than the space station to the earth.

Re:I'll be impressed when ... (1)

Grave (8234) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929304)

No you won't. You'll almost certainly be dead.

Margin of Error? (1)

rueger (210566) | more than 2 years ago | (#37928814)

(324,600 kilometers) or 0.85 the distance from the moon to Earth

Maybe I just re-read Lucifer's Hammer too many times, but I'm wondering what the margin of error is on this calculation?

If they're off by even 20% I can imagine some not good things happening.

Re:Margin of Error? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37928964)

The object is getting very close to us. As such, the margin for error in the calculations is minute at best.
We are close enough to use conventional satellite radar systems to determine location, direction and speed of movement rather than relying upon observing through a telescope to measure the path to model the trajectory.

Re:Margin of Error? (1)

Lexx Greatrex (1160847) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930236)

I'm wondering what the margin of error is on this calculation?

http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/neo_ca?type=NEO&hmax=all&sort=date&sdir=ASC&tlim=recent_future&dmax=5LD&max_rows=0&action=Display+Table&show=1 [nasa.gov]

The N-sigma for 2005 YU55 is 31,700, which means that the maximum error is 31,700 times smaller than the distance between the Earth and the object at its nearest point or an error so small as to be insignificant.

Re:Margin of Error? (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | more than 2 years ago | (#37932286)

It seems you have a misconsception regarding errors.

Take a sheet of pape, make a random dot in the left side of it, now make a random dot in the right side of it.

Draw a small (fingernail big) circle around each dot.

Now connect the left circles upper edge with the right circles lower edge and vice versa with a straight line. The two lines will cross in between of the circles and will fan out behind the circles.

The bigger the circles are the bigger the fan out is. The fan out describes the uncertainess of the orbit you just tried to figure. The circle size is your error. If you have more than 2 points ... more than 2 "circles" you can narrow down the orbit pretty accurate.

something else (4, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929030)

According to TFA, the asteroid is mostly black and "aircraft carrier sized". The first thing that flashed into my mind was that it would be very interesting if radar images during the flyby revealed it was in fact a very, Very VERY old spacecraft.

How about a battleship? (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929244)

According to TFA, the asteroid is mostly black and "aircraft carrier sized". The first thing that flashed into my mind was that it would be very interesting if radar images during the flyby revealed it was in fact a very, Very VERY old spacecraft.

How about a balttleship instead?

http://www.starblazers.com/images/jun09/images/Starlogpages.PDF [starblazers.com]

DO NOT. REPEAT DO NOT watch this if you loved it as a child. The poor excuse for what passed as science and science fiction here made me think what a stupid ignorant child I was. Huge nostalgic letdown. By comparison Star Trek Original Series is realistic - that is how far fetched and bad the science is.

Re:How about a battleship? (1)

Jiro (131519) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929604)

The original version of Star Blazers was a national institution in Japan and is still remembered to this day. They just did an animated movie ( http://anbudom.net/2010/11/03/space-battleship-yamato-revival/ [anbudom.net] ), and even a live action movie.

True, it did have bad science (you can't see the Comet Empire from light years away, since the light would take years to get to you), but it was a breakthrough at the time.

Re:How about a battleship? (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930062)

Yes and an English version is planned. I only watched the English Starblazers as a kid and went back to watch it 20 years later as an adult. As I said in my earlier post, big big mistake. Childhood memories ruined.

Re:something else (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929596)

"The Final Countdown" [wikipedia.org] just popped into my head. Thanks. :)

Re:something else (1)

gregrah (1605707) | more than 2 years ago | (#37929862)

"The Final Countdown" [youtube.com] just popped into my head. Thanks. :)

Re:something else (1)

definate (876684) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930414)

We have never put anything that is "aircraft carrier sized" up there. So... you'd be saying that it's an alien spacecraft.

Just so we're clear.

Re:something else (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930446)

That is, of course, correct.

Re:something else (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930816)

1: Get shanghaied by little green men
2: Get rich entertaining them
3: Build spacecraft
4: ????
5: Fly past Earth

Re:something else (1)

Saintwolf (1224524) | more than 2 years ago | (#37932378)

4: Launch spacecraft?

Re:something else (1)

Splab (574204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931342)

Well duh, I'm pretty sure someone would have noticed if an aircraft sized piece of electronic space going gizmos vent missing.

Re:something else (2)

FreakyGreenLeaky (1536953) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930478)

Your post made me think of Rendezvous with Rama, which was quite unsatisfying.

Re:something else (1)

Dark Lord of Ohio (2459854) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931142)

According to TFA, the asteroid is mostly black and "aircraft carrier sized". The first thing that flashed into my mind was that it would be very interesting if radar images during the flyby revealed it was in fact a very, Very VERY old spacecraft.

from a galaxy far away... my guess it is a Tantive IV, size fits. A bit.

Who has an active space program? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929442)

hmmmmmmmm
Seems I just read me something about some country doin' some space stuff

Re:Who has an active space program? (2)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930598)

Probably China. Obama sold them NASA for a bag of magic beans that are supposed to allow him to increase the tax rates. However, when he planted them all that grew were massive debt weeds. So, now he's trying to buy another bag of seeds from them.

nds r4 , ndstt , nintendo ds r4i , nintendo ds r4 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37929776)

nds r4 [gamecardsale.com]
ndstt [gamecardsale.com]
nintendo ds r4 [gamecardsale.com]
nintendo ds r4i [gamecardsale.com]
nintendo r4i [gamecardsale.com]
nintendo r4 [gamecardsale.com]
ps3 controller [gamecardsale.com]
ps3 wireless controller [gamecardsale.com]

bearing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930958)

It's so good.thank you.http://www.1stbearing.com

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...