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59 comments

Sand Worms (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930272)

nuff said

Re:Sand Worms (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930308)

nuff said

I demand ONE MILLION DOLLARS - or I will destroy all the spice deposits on Mars! The spice will not flow. [places pinky finger to lips]

Re:Sand Worms (1)

Tetsujin (103070) | more than 2 years ago | (#37936602)

nuff said

It's too cold for sand worms. Besides, sand worms would have to contend with the Ice Warriors, and they'd probably find the waters of Mars to be rather inhospitable as well.

I feel a new meme coming on (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930286)

Hipster UFO conspiracy theorist says "I was abducted and probed by Martians when they were still underground"

Wait. What?

reports all coming in from all from all over the w (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930330)

reports all coming in from all from all over the world flying saucers are attacking from mars it's a attack from mars.

Re:reports all coming in from all from all over th (1)

Scarletdown (886459) | more than 2 years ago | (#37945008)

reports all coming in from all from all over the world flying saucers are attacking from mars it's a attack from mars.

Why don't we just direct them to Uranus?

Re:I feel a new meme coming on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37932362)

My first thought: oh great, martian hipsters.

Is there life below Mars surface? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930358)

Yes there is, and it's been well [blogspot.com] documented [googleusercontent.com].

tons of mineral data (3, Insightful)

fotoguzzi (230256) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930374)

This term seems to be here used as a figure of speech. Maybe a less-confusing, less provocative term could have been used?

Re:tons of mineral data (1)

FreakyGreenLeaky (1536953) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930544)

Yes, for a second there I kept reading that they had tons of marsian minerals and soil...

Re:tons of mineral data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37932304)

Nasa have been to Marsia? When did this happen?

Re:tons of mineral data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37933230)

How much, exactly, is a single ton of mineral data, for instance?

Re:tons of mineral data (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37934098)

How much, exactly, is a single ton of mineral data, for instance?

0.0000935678934634662346 Libraries of Congress

Re:tons of mineral data (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#37934798)

Of course, this isn't a figure of speecch. Have you ever tried to carry data? Someone has to push that stuff along the tubes. Think about the data carriers the next time you're playing WoW.

Niven had it (sort-of) right. (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930470)

So the dust isn't hundreds of meters deep, and there are no spear-toting maniacs, nor any diamond wells, but he at least guessed the underground bit...

Its in the mines (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930522)

If you dig into the mines on Mars, you can find the underground tunnels the aliens built. There is a control center with an activation button that starts a nuclear reactor that melts the ice and creates oxygen. The boss selling air on Mars tried to kill both Arnold and his girlfriend and keep them from starting it up, but he fired a gun through the glass and caused the dome to crack and depressurize. He was then sucked outside (where he died since there was no air outside yet). The violent depressurization sucked Arnold and his girlfriend outside too, but before he got sucked out, Arnold managed to put his hand on the alien start button, starting the reactor. It got very hot very fast and pressed into the gracier, creating oxygen. Arnold and his girlfriend choked for a while but did not die. The sudden change in air pressure caused all the remaining domes to crack. So for sure there was life on Mars, and there is alien technology down there too. Its all right here [imdb.com].

Re:Its in the mines (0)

Narcocide (102829) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930578)

I can't tell if you need more drugs or less of them.

Re:Its in the mines (0)

JWSmythe (446288) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931334)

Lets have a look.

    [tappity][tappity][tappity]

    Yup, his shrink is recommending anti-psychotics, heavy sedation, and chemical castration.

    You don't want to know the rest of what's in his file. Really. [shivers]

Apollo 18 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930528)

Haven't you seen Apollo 18! It's the rocks man they are in teh fuckin rocks!

Was underground? (1)

SpaceLifeForm (228190) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930566)

As in past tense. Seems someone is making an assumption.

Re:Was underground? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930648)

The truth table for the proposition if P then Q, denoted by P -> Q, is,

P Q P->Q
T T T
T F F
F T T
F F T

As you can see, because Q is true, we really don't know anything about P. It could be either T or F. So no, the proposition in the summary is valid and nobody is making any assumptions.

Re:Was underground? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37930660)

As in past tense. Seems someone is making an assumption.

Nothing to see here, move along.
- K'Breel, whisperer for the Council.

No Surprise (-1, Troll)

inexia (977449) | more than 2 years ago | (#37930762)

So how is NASA not a Ponzi scheme? Screwing people out of billions while providing nothing more than hypotheses? Oh, wait. They are powered by the government. They are free to squander money at will and give very shitty results.

Re:No Surprise (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37931316)

because they have never done any real research, right?

how is the army anything more then a ponzi scheme? screwing people out of billions while providing nothing but a false feeling of safety?
its not like they stopped that last terrorist attack, and they had quite a bigger budget then nasa.

That's a joke, right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37932908)

Do you have any idea how much money DoD squanders every year? Usually between 300 and 500 million dollars.

Up yours, troll.

oh, they were slashdotters! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37931222)

living in moms below ground basement rec room. couldnt evolve enough to survive above ground. asexual reproduction led to fewer useful variations in form. they had good internet forums, though.

The 3rd set of data supporting subsurface H20 ice (5, Informative)

kurthr (30155) | more than 2 years ago | (#37931290)

There was new data this year indicating subsurface water ice from two synthetic radars (SHARAD and MARSIS at different frequencies on two different landers).
They have estimates for the volume and placement of the ice as well.
http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/news/feats/2010/mars_glaciers.html [utexas.edu]

An original finding from 2002 based on a single Gamma Ray Spectrometer instrument showed excess Hydrogen...
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2002/28may_marsice/ [nasa.gov]

And now even more extensive results from long term surface studies... I find the recent subsurface radar measurements most compelling.

Re:The 3rd set of data supporting subsurface H20 i (1)

Limburgher (523006) | more than 2 years ago | (#37935012)

indicating subsurface water ice from two synthetic radars

What other kind is there? :)

Re:The 3rd set of data supporting subsurface H20 i (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37935052)

Dry ice.

Re:The 3rd set of data supporting subsurface H20 i (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37936624)

My theory is that Mars was more like the Earth, and one day started violently spewing out its molten iron core and interacted with the water to oxidate the iron. Once a sufficient amount was ejected from the core, the magnetosphere was lost and the solar winds stripped away the atmosphere.

If true, that might explain an excess of hydrogen.

translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37931520)

NASA: "Life on Mars" expectations are getting lame. We're moving them underground so nobody can disprove us and we'll more likely get the budget for bigger mars missions.

Theosophical society called it first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37932180)

Whether you think they're quacks or not, or never even heard of them, they present some very interesting and entertaining beliefs about the history of Mars. They believed Mars flourished with life and go into great detail describing the civilisation and how they survived in the harsh condition. It'll be interesting to see how much our recent discovery support such ideas. Here's an excerpt, makes for good sci-fi like reading:

http://www.redicecreations.com/specialreports/2006/07jul/leadblavatskymarslife.html

I can think of that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37932252)

Seems very plausible that life survived longest underground. As the planet heats up (and gets freezing cold at night) it's impossible (as far as we think at the moment) for anything to live on the surface. So life migrates/focuses on subsurface environments.

A 12-year old could get to this conclusion!

Okay, I know that only know they have proven it. Science = proving theories.

global warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37932336)

I wonder if global warming drove them underground.

Other evidence (1)

kurt555gs (309278) | more than 2 years ago | (#37932406)

I have seen some photos from the Mars Explorer that clearly show Thoat, Calot, and Mad Zitidar tracks. Nasa refuses to acknowledge this. If you look at the pictures from the Valley Dor, just above the lost sea of Korus, it's obvious.

Re:Other evidence (1)

doston (2372830) | more than 2 years ago | (#37936090)

Wow, Google really is indexing now. NASA: If There Was Life On Mars, It Was Likely Underground ... science.slashdot.org/.../nasa-if-there-was-life-on-mars-it-was-likely-... 1 hour ago – I have seen some photos from the Mars Explorer that clearly show Thoat, Calot, and Mad Zitidar tracks. Nasa refuses to acknowledge this. ...

Obviously (1)

Coffee Warlord (266564) | more than 2 years ago | (#37934224)

Anyone who's ever played X-Com has known for years that the alien HQ on Mars was underground.

Time to hunt some Sectoids...

nearly every Earth well below 100C has life (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 2 years ago | (#37934690)

Scientists have found microbes in five mile deep wells that have been buried for tens of millions of years. They were either buried too, or percolated very slowly from ground water. Mars, which is more geologically stable than Earth, may likely have these too.

final schedule Mars probe launches in 3 weeks (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 2 years ago | (#37934934)

The nuclear-powered Curiosity "Martian SUV rover" launches the day after Thanksgiving. I'll try to make the launch. It was two years late and a billion dollars over budget. Its is the final funded probe in a 15 year successful run of orbiters and a 6 landers, due to US financial troubles. If it is as durable as the current rovers, it could keep scientists busy for the rest of the decade.

After a few more satellite observers in the pipeline for 2012, its looks very dismal for NASA's unmanned space programs.

Another hypothesis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37935482)

We live in an expanding universe. Perhaps that is only a theory, but in the same light it should be easy to see that Mars may have at one time been the same distance from the sun as the earth is now. That would have been the right distance to harbor life as Earth does now. An expanding Solar system is not so hard to imagine. Maybe there was a 'book of life' written for Mars a long, long, long time ago.

X-COM (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37936874)

I want to play again :(

Been there, done that and it's almost everywhere? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37945750)

Life Is Everywhere or just, as it happens, everywhere we go - there life is? Obviously.

They say once upon a time the moon was 'dead, barren and lifeless' with neither a virus nor a bug to be found. But, no more!

For - from 1969, as Ordered by JFK, said moon was invaded by all manner of bacteria and viruses carried there by a few humanoid explorers.

Imagine that.

Now check out these testimonials!
"Project Pegasus" vs "Jon Titor" in google and on coasttocoast net radio etc.
Compelling stuff!

Are we not being 'psychologically prepared' for the inevitable - is a better question - is it not?

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