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HP Slate 2: Brilliant or Bust?

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the do-you-want-it-this-time? dept.

Businesses 235

First time accepted submitter redletterdave writes "After being introduced in September, HP's new CEO Meg Whitman announced Oct. 27 that the company 'needs to be in the tablet business.' However, by creating a lackluster product in the Slate 2 that runs on a soon-to-be-outdated operating system, HP will surely find itself back where it started, when furious Best Buy executives demanded HP to take back their thousands of unsold tablets piling up in storage."

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HP? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938348)

HP is still around? I thought they went out of business years ago. Wow, you learn new things every day.

Re:HP? (3, Interesting)

N0Man74 (1620447) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938396)

I shouldn't bother to feed the trolls, but I wouldn't count HP out just yet. At least not until we find out how their memristors turn out.

Re:HP? (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938762)

Wouldn't it poetic irony if Agilent Technologies [agilent.com] bought hp [agilent.com] ?

Re:HP? (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938782)

I remember buying into Freescale when they announced MRAM. A month or so later, Blackrock (or Blackstone, it's hard to tell those hedgies apart; they all dress alike and have the same forked tails) offered a bundle to take the company private. Haven't heard a word about MRAM from Freescale since.

Re:HP? (1)

JBMcB (73720) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939434)

There's a computer chronicles on YouTube from ~1990 that features Toshiba announcing flash ram, a technology that would replace hard drives and floppies within a couple of years. Twenty years later and it's starting to happen.

Sometimes this stuff takes a while to get to market in a usable form.

Re:HP? (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939106)

I was surprised Whitman was still around. I thought she disapparated back to the unreverberate blackness of the abyss after losing the governor's election.

Re:HP? (1)

flimflammer (956759) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939396)

I wonder who actually found this funny?

Re:HP? (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939400)

"HP is still around? I thought they went out of business years ago. Wow, you learn new things every day."

HP could die tomorrow, but LaserJet 4s will be printing until the Sun burns out.

Their test equipment was also Good Stuff.

Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938374)

Really? Another Windows 7 tablet? These are garbage. We know this. Windows 8 can't get here soon enough.

Re:Bust (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938446)

Windows 8 can't get here soon enough.

What's Windows 8 going to offer that iPad and Android currently don't? Putting Windows on a tablet is pointless if Microsoft can't convince developers to produce apps for it... and developers probably won't be interested in producing apps if most people have iPads and Android tablets.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938542)

Couldn't Windows 8 tablets run windows applications? I'm not sure if the Metro interface prevents that or not, so my question is genuine.

Re:Bust (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938566)

Couldn't Windows 8 tablets run windows applications?

Some, but who in their right mind wants to run Word on a tablet?

Re:Bust (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938736)

Couldn't Windows 8 tablets run windows applications?

Some, but who in their right mind wants to run Word on a tablet?

A fair point.

What's the horse power of the minimum configuration for Windows 7 PC? What will it be for Win 8? Anyone paying attention to the considerably slower processors (compared to laptops and desktops) of tablets? If Win 8 is the bloated beast of its presecessors, good luck.

Re:Bust (2)

Motard (1553251) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938800)

Windows 8 has the same hardware requirements as Windows 7 and is said to be slightly smaller and faster.

Re:Bust (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938844)

Windows 8 has the same hardware requirements as Windows 7 and is said to be slightly smaller and faster.

So... without significantly paring things from it it will be a cow even on the fastest tablet.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939282)

Have you tried it? It runs great on slates. I've tried both on an ASUS and on the official Samsung that was handed out to participants at the Build conference. It runs amazingly well on them. Very smooth and fast. If you watch some of the demo videos you can see it run smooth on ARM as well (although you can't run your normal windows apps on ARM). The slate from Samsung runs classic Windows apps very well - although I do agree with the poster that asked why you would want to try to run Word on it - slates aren't the best for typing long documents and applications that aren't designed for touch aren't the best tools on slates either.

Re:Bust (1)

Motard (1553251) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938776)

Why would I want a device I can't edit a document on? Even Windows Phone 7 runs Office.

Re:Bust (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938846)

That's like asking "Why would I want a vehicle I can't tow a boat with?" Answer: lots of reasons; not everyone wants or needs to tow a boat.

Re:Bust (0)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939260)

More like asking, "Why would I want a vehicle I can't use to bring groceries home?" There might be a some people who don't want to write documents, but it's really cutting off a large amount of your customer base.

Re:Bust (1)

RingDev (879105) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938804)

I'd consider it one of the necesities.

Along with Power Points, MS Project, and Excel.

If I can't get them and an HDMI port for hooking up to the projector, the tablet loses a huge incentive for me to use it.

I'm not going to be writting massive docs on a tablet, but I need to be able to plug into a projector at a meeting, present project plans and status reports, open spread sheets for SME's to see data models, etc...

The Tablet isn't a replacement for the Laptop/PC, it's just a tool used to increase mobile ability. One that I have so far lived with out, and probably wont bother with until a next gen ASUS Transformer comes out.

-Rick

Re:Bust (1)

uniquename72 (1169497) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938908)

Agreed. I use my gf's iPad occasionally, and constantly think to myself all the things I'd LIKE to use it for if it had a better port set, broader file support, and a little more horsepower.

Re:Bust (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938828)

People who use tablets for more than fart apps and Angry Birds? Why wouldn't want to run it on my tablet?

Re:Bust (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939194)

Couldn't Windows 8 tablets run windows applications?

Some, but who in their right mind wants to run Word on a tablet?

When paired with a bluetooth keyboard, Apple's pages works quite well on the iPad.

I'd still prefer doing such things on a laptop or desktop, though - mainly because I find myself moving the text cursor (e.g. which works much better using a mouse) more often than I find myself inserting/moving pictures.

Re:Bust: ARM vs Intel (1)

neurocutie (677249) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939164)

Don't forget that Windows 8 is supposedly moving to ARM CPUs for mobile/low power devices. So it won't run x86 binaries, though presumably MS Windows apps like Office could be ported...

Re:Bust (1)

JorDan Clock (664877) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938694)

What are you talking about? Windows 8 will run everything Windows 7 and before would run. Just because it doesn't have a Fischer-Price UI doesn't mean you can't use it with a touch screen. And developing for Windows 8 has the lowest cost of entry of any of the platforms, so it would be ludicrous to NOT develop apps that are desktop/tablet friendly for Win8 as well at iOS and Android.

Re:Bust (3, Informative)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938798)

Windows 8 will run everything Windows 7 and before would run.

No it won't. An ARM tablet won't run anything from Windows 7 other than the few .Net applications which don't call native code other than that provided by Microsoft.

And any of those applications which do run will leave you with a WIMP interface on a crappy touchscreen. Microsoft have been pushing that for at least a decade and it's been a dismal failure.

So again, what does a Windows 8 tablet offer that an iPad or an Android tablet don't?

Re:Bust (3, Interesting)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938968)

Windows 8 will run everything Windows 7 and before would run.

No it won't. An ARM tablet won't run anything from Windows 7 other than the few .Net applications which don't call native code other than that provided by Microsoft.

And any of those applications which do run will leave you with a WIMP interface on a crappy touchscreen. Microsoft have been pushing that for at least a decade and it's been a dismal failure.

So again, what does a Windows 8 tablet offer that an iPad or an Android tablet don't?

More powerful x86 slates that you can dock to use all existing PC apps but still use Metro apps on the go.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8-K1ELv6DE [youtube.com]
  Of course these will probably be bigger and heavier (and more expensive) than Win 8 ARM tablets or an iPad, but Microsoft and their OEMs think there is a market for them.

Re:Bust (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939004)

How does the cost entry get lower than free?
Android dev has no cost entry at all, assuming you already own some sort of computer.

Re:Bust (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938816)

Because existing android tablets are all underpowered, overpriced, or both, I think MSFT probably surmises that the #2 spot in this market is out there for the taking.

the Kindle Fire is a strong bid for #2 at the moment, but consumers aren't buying anything but iPads right now, and these other companies would be wise to bring a sub-$500 tablet to market that doesn't require a monthly service agreement.

Re:Bust (2)

mikecase (1991782) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939022)

Uh, there are several sub $500 android tablets already on the market. In fact, the Asus Transformer can be had for $350, and if you shop carefully you'll find standard spec tablets (e.g. the Acer Iconia) for ~$300. These are pretty competitive power wise with the iPads, but cost hundreds less. They only lack in mindshare.

Re:Bust (2)

tchuladdiass (174342) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939364)

Not to mention items like the Nook Color (Barnes & Noble). You can install CyanogenMod 7 (a community-maintained Android distribution) on it; you can even run it 100% from an SD card so you won't have to mod the device itself (the Nook tries booting from the SD card first before booting from internal storage). If you do run CyanogenMod from an SD card, make sure to use a Sandisk (class 2 or class 4) card. It is the only card I've tested that has good performance on small read/writes (even beats out all the class 10 cards).

Only thing missing on the Nook Color after running a generic Android port is front/rear facing cameras, GPS, and 3G.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938990)

What's Windows 8 going to offer that iPad and Android currently don't?

The ability to run both proper tablet apps AND classic Windows apps, within a proper tablet UI (launcher, etc). This will ease the transition of the reluctant masses. Windows 7 tablets will just bitter people towards anything that isn't an iPad.

Re:Bust (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939044)

All I heard was "what is Windows 3.1 going to offer that System 6 [wikipedia.org] didn't.

iPad (2, Insightful)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938402)

Is it an iPad? Because people won't buy it unless it's an iPad.

Re:iPad (1)

Talderas (1212466) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938516)

It's a HumancentiPad.

Re:iPad (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938744)

Yea, all those Kindles people are buying is just to make book burning more efficient.

Inconceivable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938428)

So yea, I'm willing to admit I was wrong when I said the Whitman hire was a good move. I don't even know what to say to this. They are literally rereleasing the exact same product that failed a year ago, in a market that has grown in leaps and bounds over that year. It doesn't even require knowledge of technology or marketing to know that there is no chance this can succeed.

Need to be in the tablet business (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938430)

After being introduced in September, HP's new CEO Meg Whitman announced Oct. 27 that the company 'needs to be in the tablet business.'

Maybe they should buy WebOS - I heard that the company that owns it wants to get out of the tablet business.

Re:Need to be in the tablet business (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938836)

Maybe they should buy WebOS - I heard that the company that owns it wants to get out of the tablet business.

They've got a chance to make a great deal because I heard that that company have decided that they really want to be in the desktop PC business - and of course HP put their desktop PC business up for sale. Maybe they can swap.

Re:Need to be in the tablet business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939438)

Maybe they should buy WebOS - I heard that the company that owns it wants to get out of the tablet business.

Ha ha, using webos would make to much sense folks.
This is XXI st century HP we're talking about here.

Stockpile? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938448)

I thought these touchpads sold out within weeks after the cut....?
Is best buy refusing to sell them at the discounted price, or am I misreading this?

Re:Stockpile? (2)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938530)

Remember what prompted the price cut in the first place? It was Best Buy (and presumably other retailers) unhappy about their big stockpile of WebOS tablets that weren't selling.

That's what the story is referring to.

the problem with the HP Touchpad: (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939172)

People aren't going to drink RC when they can get Coca-Cola for the same price.
Note I didn't use the canonical hamburger/steak analogy since branding is a big part of this equation.
I see no reason why bogging down the hardware with Windows is going to improve their situation. Oh, wait, there's that branding again. Of course, many would see Windows as being a negative brand for something that's specifically intended to not be a desktop.

Re:Stockpile? (3, Interesting)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938580)

It appears HP still had committments with suppliers to purchase parts - so there was one final production run as it was likely more profitable to build the parts into firesale TouchPads than to just write them off.

Re:Stockpile? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938582)

The article is vacuous, and the submitter a troll.

The comment about Best Buy was probably intended to be a reference to the companies earlier rant prior to the first fire-sale. The new tablets are designed to run MicroSoft's Windows:
http://www.reghardware.com/2011/10/28/hp_tablet_market_run/ [reghardware.com]
http://www.reghardware.com/2011/11/03/hp_introduces_slate_2_windows_tablet/ [reghardware.com]

Re:Stockpile? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938852)

The article is in no way vacuous, to an extent that I don't think you know what that word means. And while TFS may imply to an extent that Best Buy complained about a stockpile of Slate tablets, TFA does not make the same insinuation. Also, you seem to be unaware that HP already released a tablet that ran MicroSoft [sic] Windows. It was called the Slate, and it was pretty much exact same thing as this piece of shit they just announced, and it also failed just as epically, albeit with less fanfare, as the TouchPad.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP_Slate [wikipedia.org]

Bust (2)

yog (19073) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938462)

The WebOS-based TouchPad was innovative, but it was over-priced. HP proved that by lowering the price to fire-sale levels and it took off. Maybe they should have priced it at about $300 as a loss leader, to build up a market for apps. Amazon's losing money on their Fire tablet, for example. Seems like a smart strategy, and they're big enough to pull it off. Just fire a few of these over-paid execs like Whitman and presto! you have plenty of money for R&D.

Regarding this Slate: at $699 no one's going to buy this moldy old thing. They'll go with Apple or a Fire for $200 or some of the other up and coming budget Android offerings. Come on. Motorola proved that there's no market for a premium priced tablet that under performs compared to an iPad.

And Windows 7--excuse me? Do they really pay these executives millions of dollars to make these kinds of decisions? Heck, I'll take the CEO job for about $250K (with about a $100K golden parachute) and I'll set that house in order. Re-hire the WebOS team that they just fired, develop a world class, well engineered budget tablet to take the low ground away from Apple, and stay in the market for LONGER THAN SIX WEEKS. Offer an Android tablet, too. Come on, you're a $100 billion corporation and you can afford to develop two different platforms.

Oh, and I would keep making PC's and laptops, only make them better. More touch screens, maybe a best-in-class ultra light laptop, etc. Listen to the customers, HP. Corporate America is not dropping out of the desktop and laptop markets any time soon. Consumers don't want a Windows 7 tablet (as far as I know); they want an Apple or an Android.

Re:Bust (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938526)

Oh, and I would keep making PC's and laptops, only make them better. More touch screens, maybe a best-in-class ultra light laptop, etc.

How would more touchscreens make PCs and laptops better? Touchscreens are sucky interfaces for devices that don't have a keyboard and mouse.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938654)

Did it not occur to you that you can put a touchscreen and a keyboard on the same device? It's not like turning a screen into a touchscreen takes up any space or anything.

Re:Bust (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938676)

Did it not occur to you that you can put a touchscreen and a keyboard on the same device?

Uh, we were talking about laptops and desktops, which traditionally have keyboards.

Why would I want a touchscreen when I have a keyboard? How long do you think I'm going to sit at a desk prodding my monitor screen with a finger before I say 'who the hell thought this was a good idea' and go back to the keyboard and mouse?

Re:Bust (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938720)

It takes up very little space(not quite zero; but not a whole lot); but a touchscreen interface worth using bumps the BOM a fair bit. Resistive sucks, Wacom-style RF stylus isn't cheap, and consumer-friendly finger-paint capacitive also isn't cheap to do well.

At that point, you basically have a laptop that costs $100 more than your identical model, for the delight of being able to smudge at a few bundleware applications because nobody does touch applications for windows...

Re:Bust (2)

MBCook (132727) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938900)

I can tell you what I'd do to make HP's computers better. I'd kill 90% of their products.

I'd like to see a big computer maker try doing things Apple style. Stop trying to be all things to all people. It may be OK for corporate purchases (although at this point I'd think people would be looking for something to replace HP since they seem so... stable), but in the consumer market it's a major pain. Two or three laptops, two or three desktops.

Computer shopping is a major pain. Just a quick look at HP's site shows they sell 5 categories of laptop, with a total of 24 models between them. Once you pick one of those, there are still configuration options. There are 28 desktops in 5 categories. That's a LOT of choice. Once you cut down the number of models, you can afford to spend a lot of money and get custom parts designed for them. That way you can shrink the laptops thinner and get better economies of scale.

Is it copying Apple? Yes. But it's pretty easy to pick out a Mac, where as the major PC makers are just giant matrixes of choices. If HP gives you 7 basic (and clearly defined) choices and Dell gives you 45, which do you think consumers will prefer shopping? They'll go look at Dell's site, get frustrated, see HP's, and think "Now I'm getting somewhere."

Re:Bust (2)

swb (14022) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939026)

It may make some sense, but it strikes me that there's something inherent in marketing or pricing theory that causes businesses to have a large number of apparently superfluous/redundant products and purchasing options.

They almost seem to need to have them to demonstrate that they have the "specific solution for you", as well as to create the complex pricing tiers that makes it difficult for purchases to choose which product suits their needs; inevitably you end up buying too much widget to get a specific feature you need or to ally some other concern.

Dell is a good example -- I seem to recall that it was almost impossible to get the display I wanted in a laptop (the consumer choices seemed better) and the CPU and OS support I needed (business choices). I'd like to believe they do it on purpose, but maybe they don't.

Re:Bust (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939252)

One thing that was pointed out in the recent memorialization of the the late Steve Jobs was that when he was brought back to Apple, he said "Our product line is to complicated. Let's simplify it - high-end/low-end X desktop/laptop". Seemed to work for them.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939388)

They almost seem to need to have them to demonstrate that they have the "specific solution for you", as well as to create the complex pricing tiers that makes it difficult for purchases to choose which product suits their needs; inevitably you end up buying too much widget to get a specific feature you need or to ally some other concern.

Dell is a good example -- I seem to recall that it was almost impossible to get the display I wanted in a laptop (the consumer choices seemed better) and the CPU and OS support I needed (business choices). I'd like to believe they do it on purpose, but maybe they don't.

Absolutely true. It has become almost impossible to get a decent screen on ANY laptop from a large manufacturer like Dell or HP. You can customize every other damn thing, but not the screen. There is usually exactly ONE model that has a screen resolution greater than 1366x768, and it is marketed for "HD Movies" or some such bullshit. If you want an actual "business" laptop then forget it, you are hosed.

As far as I am concerned, the display is the single most important component of any laptop. If it has less than 1000 vertical lines of resolution then just throw it in the garbage, it is of no use to me.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939378)

Absolutely. Even Acer has like 45 Acer Aspire Ones. What, we can't count to 2?

Re:Bust (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938554)

The only reason it took off at that price point was because it entered the "impulse buy" category for many people.

It also entered the "hack toy" category for many - Nearly everyone I know who scored a firesale TouchPad only had its stock OS as their "backup plan" - their main plan was to follow Android porting efforts for the device. That's why I tried to score a TouchPad, for example.

Had HP sold the TouchPad with Android, they would have at least managed to stay afloat in the market... It is possible to "stay alive" in the Android tablet market at the $500 price point. But $500 for a niche OS with declining marketshare - well, you're toast.

Similarly - every attempt to shoehorn a desktop OS into a tablet has been a failure, and it will continue to be that way. Win8 might be an exception because MS seems to be trying to make Win8 a "scaled up" version of WP7.

Re:Bust (1)

yog (19073) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938964)

And you know for a fact that the Touchpad would not have sold at $200 or $250 or $300 because...?

Everyone you know doesn't mean everyone in the market for a tablet. Several million people want to buy an Amazon Fire which is a lowly 7" tablet that doesn't even run regular Android, only a customized Amazon version, for $200.

WebOS was not declining until they screwed up the phones (that's another whole discussion). It was innovative in its day (a year or two ago). This is my main point. Lower the price of the Touchpad and people would have bought it. It didn't need to go down to $99. I'll bet they could have liquidated them at $200 just as easily, and maybe kept the business running at $300.

Agree about Win7 fail.

Re:Bust (1)

MBCook (132727) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938978)

It just proved the obvious: You can't sell a sub-iPad product at an iPad price. Why buy WebOS (not well known, no apps, slower hardware) when I can get an iPad (huge app and accessory ecosystem) for the same price? There is basically no point. If they had priced it better they'd have had a much better shot.

I really liked an idea I read somewhere, possibly on Darring Fireball. The person suggested that HP should have just given the things away with any purchase of a HP computer over some amount (say $1000) for a few months, just to push penetration. All of a sudden, the tablets would have a decent install base, and people might be more willing to buy a computer from you if there is a tablet thrown in.

Re:Bust (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938588)

To be up front about it, she didn't really do anything for eBay, except oversee the company becoming more monopolistic and distant from their user base

You may whine about your problem to a volunteer in our forum, but we don't really care about you or your problem, especially if we've already got our cut

OR

There are 4 people head of your in the help queue, average wait time, 2 hours.

What did HP really think they were getting?

Yeah, I don't think I could do worse as CEO at HP, either and I don't even require a company car.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938818)

now eBay becomes a rubbish company and lot of buyer went away to other shopping cart. I seldom buy from them, now deal with

hkcolordigital [hkcolordigital.com]

for the electronics products.

Re:Bust (1, Informative)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938602)

the HP Slate 500 was meant for a target market for uses such as myself who need to be able to use stuff like cisco vpn that is not supported on android and use windows apps that are not available on apple. Considering nobody I've ever heard of has an apple based server environment, and vpn is the only way into the network, that leaves a shocking realization... if you can't see the benefits of win 7 on a tablet, then its not for you! It's for the IT crowd who are too cool for laptops, or in my case corporate bought it, why would I say no?

Now why would I ever use my single core tablet over my m15x? Portability, but I don't own say the m11, where that would make it a tough choice for me on what to carry. Personally I wouldn't even consider it, professionally it makes a lot of sense. And even though win 7 is lame on a touchscreen, the whole concept / idea is pretty cool and you can always connect a bluetooth keyboard and mouse into it. It does everything ipad and android based tablets do, in some cases not as good, but it DOES stuff neither one of the aforementioned does, such as run mmc, if you don't know what mmc is, refer to first paragraph.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938708)

cisco vpn is coming to android with the enhanced vpn apis available in ice cream sandwich. http://phandroid.com/2011/10/25/ice-cream-sandwich-will-have-cisco-anyconnect-vpn-support/ [phandroid.com]

most samsung touchwiz enabled products already support it, too.
https://market.android.com/search?q=anyconnect&so=1&c=apps [android.com]

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939126)

That is, of course, assuming that your company will allow Android devices on its network. Many don't allow Android phones, even, because they cannot control them. They can at least lock down Windows and Apple devices.

Re:Bust (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938650)

you can afford to develop two different platforms.

Hell, if you engineer it right, you don't even have to build two different hardware specs. And if you're creative, you can have the guys over at CyanogenMod make a Tablet OS for you that is world class and always up to date, while you build WebOS for yourselves.

THEN you give people a choice, and they can change their mind later and put a different but fully armed and operational OS on it.

Re:Bust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939196)

$799 is reasonable, if they deliver the tablet by dropping it out of a helicopter!

outdated? (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938482)

However, by creating a lackluster product in the Slate 2 that runs on a soon-to-be-outdated operating system

http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-Wireless/HP-Slate-2-Tablet-PC-Offers-Windows-at-a-Touch-676841/ [eweek.com]

it'll run windows 8...

That's what submitter gets for reading an article about HP on IBM's website. P.S. they're competitors.

Re:outdated? (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938546)

it'll run windows 8...

Exactly. Not even released yet and it's already outdated.

Re:outdated? (4, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938670)

it'll run windows 8...

Exactly. Not even released yet and it's already outdated.

Very cautious about Windows on a tablet. When XP for tablets came out it was extremely clunky and far to large for the humble resources of a device loaded with low power chips and a slow (by desktop standards) HDD. Perhaps the greatest reason tablets didn't catch on until iPad.

As Win 8 is probably still going to be a Be-All, Do-All OS and crammed with everything, including the kitchen sink, it'll probably not compare to iPad or Android. But that's my speculation.

Re:outdated? (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938556)

It'll run Win8 when it'll be available. Right now it runs Win7. Which, for most users, would equal to "no thanks".

Right now, it may be a decent device for someone who's looking for hardware to test their Win8 Metro apps on in advance, especially for the price (compared to most other Windows tablets, it's cheap). But that's a very narrow niche.

Re:outdated? (1)

Shadyman (939863) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939020)

It's also not aimed at the consumer market, so it won't likely ever be seen at Best Buy.

Mod article -1 Troll, please.

Out of touch (2)

Jerry Rivers (881171) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938486)

Most voters in California could see that Whitman is out of touch with reality, but apparently the board of HP is equally out of touch. She is yesterday's player and proves it with this product.

Re:Out of touch (0)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938740)

Most voters in California could see that Whitman is out of touch with reality

That is not what happened. The voters of California chose between two people out of touch with reality. proving that most of California is out of touch with reality, because the (R) party gave us Whitman and the (D) party gave us Moonbeam.

California is after all, the land of fruits and nuts.

Re:Out of touch (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938826)

Most voters in California could see that Whitman is out of touch with reality

That is not what happened. The voters of California chose between two people out of touch with reality. proving that most of California is out of touch with reality, because the (R) party gave us Whitman and the (D) party gave us Moonbeam.

California is after all, the land of fruits and nuts.

How you talk.

Meg was fortunately outed as poor manager. Sitting at the helm of eBay was a cake walk, they hold a dominant position in online auctions, pretty much everyone else threw in the towel and left it to them. So they never really got better and she was collecting a lot of money for being there.

Put her in a company which is struggling to keep pace with the technology market, which was once a leader, and she's a fish out of water. Super poor choice. She'll be out in a year.

Riiiight (1)

unassimilatible (225662) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938796)

But career politician Jerry "Governor Moonbeam" Brown and his 5 or 6 government pensions, owned by the unions, and who created the CA public employee collective bargaining mess in the first place, he's "in touch?"

Re:Riiiight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939012)

You do realize that being close to unions, which are literally a union of regular Joe Schmoe workers, is pretty much exactly the definition of being 'in touch'?

Much, much, much more so than an executive like Whitman would be.

Re:Out of touch (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938982)

Yeah, as much as anything, the question is "What was HP's board thinking?" Why did they hire Whitman in the first place? I haven't heard anything to indicate that she's qualified.

I don't object to the idea that HP should get into tablets per se, but that doesn't mean that they should put out a tablet just for the sake of putting out a tablet. It's as though they've learned nothing from the past several years.

I think I'm giving up on HP altogether.

Re:Out of touch (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939036)

I'm reading more about it, and it looks like their Slate 1 is doing ok in business markets-- so maybe it's not a completely stupid move.

Brilliant business decision (3, Funny)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938490)

Meg Whitman is just continuing her drive to make eBay successful.

This (2)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938502)

This is the sort of brilliance the people of California were very nearly exposed to as a follow up to Governor Ahnold.

Sad to see she's being clueless for millions at HP, but better than clueless for billions in Sacramento.

I think HP should buddy-up with Google.

Re:This (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939010)

actually HP and the state of california have almost identical revenue, HP at 126 Billion, and California at 120, so she can fuck up a roughly equal amount of money.

Best Buy was returning TouchPads, not Slates (5, Informative)

WillAdams (45638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938504)

Apparently the Slate has been selling pretty steadily since its announcement --- mostly to business, but Amazon is listing just 4 in stock at the moment.

More positive and informative article here:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-33200_3-57317842-290/surprise-hps-slate-pc-is-a-success/ [cnet.com]

There aren't that many competitors in the Windows Tablet PC slate-format since Fujitsu quit. I really wish HP would revive the form-factor of the critically-acclaimed Compaq TC-1x00 though:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP_Compaq_TC1100 [wikipedia.org]

which truly offered the best of all possible worlds.

William

Has HP sold off Touchpad? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938624)

Has HP sold of Touchpad to Amazon or B&N or anyone else, or have they just canned the product? The touchpad would have been a lot more acceptable. Who would buy a Windows 7 tablet for $800 when one can buy a better laptop for less, or a better tablet - iPad, Xoom, TouchPad or even PlayBook for less?

crosses fingers (4, Interesting)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938632)

....for the next HP sell-off, after which someone jailbreaks the product and makes it actually useful.

Re:crosses fingers (1)

Shadyman (939863) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939032)

But... how do you jailbreak Windows 7?

Not a consumer device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938652)

Granted that the Slate 2's specs are anemic but the article submitter's editorializing is just brain-dead. Best Buy won't be demanding anything since the Slate 2, like its predecessor, is positioned as a business and enterprise product. The requirements and lifecycle are considerably different from consumer products that get updated every season and are built as cheaply as possible.

They can suck my nuts (1)

dcherryholmes (1322535) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938726)

After what they did to webOS, and after dangling that one last run for late October, then selling them exclusively to employees and then to Best Buy who decided we had to buy another PC to get one, well.... see the subject line. The can go to hell. /butthurt

No company "Needs" to be in tablets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938774)

Tablets are an emerging market to be sure. But not every hardware company needs to be making tablets - just as not every one of them needs to have it's own phone. It just isn't a great fit for HP - they do desktops and laptops well. They do Netbooks well enough. But they just don't seem to get tablets. Perhaps if they stopped being so much in a hurry to get a tablet on the market and focused on getting a good tablet out the door, they could change that. Instead they are just tossing out more and more shovel-ware.

Will not work (2, Insightful)

inhuman_4 (1294516) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938840)

Windows tablets suck, period. I don't know anyone who wants one, and I can think of a reason anyone should buy one. Windows is not a low power OS, it doesn't work on low power CPU's, and it's interface was not designed for touch.

Most people want an iPad, the poor and geeks go for Android. There is no room in the market for Windows based tablets.

Re:Will not work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939098)

People who want the iPad have one and are waiting for the 3. People who want tablets at a sensible price will be using Android versions.

Re:Will not work (2)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939180)

I want one... well, I have one, and I want a Windows 8 tablet bad.

Let me back up. I've owned Windows Tablets since the HP TC1100 [wikipedia.org] . It was a pretty good machine for its day, but it was a little large. Then I owned a couple of convertibles, including the Dell Latitude XT with multitouch screen. This was a great computer, due in no small part to windows 7. The larger task bar is a perfect size for fingers, jump lists can be accessed by flicking, adjusting DPI allows for larger buttons, and there are a number of touch and pen features that most people don't even know about (flick shortcuts, single touch gestures, multitouch gestures, and bounce feedback) built right into the OS.

Sure not a lot of apps were built specifically for touch, but I got through my day to day activities using pen/touch in windows 7 without a huge amount of compromise. What's more, I got actual work done. I do research in robotics, and having a full PC + pen was absolutely crucial for my work. I used that computer for everything from taking notes (in meetings and in the field), writing technical reports (both in tablet and laptop mode), giving presentations and annotating the screen, and even reading technical papers and marking them up.

Contrast this with the iPad (I own the iPad 1) and similar modern tablets. I use my iPad for exactly 3 things: internet, email, and reading. I find it great for these tasks (maybe not the best internet machine, but still pretty good) but otherwise I can't do anything useful with it. I can't take notes on it mostly because they all lack styluses, I can't type documents because of the lack of a full-featured word processor (Pages mobile doesn't cut it) and likewise Powerpoint is much better than the mobile keynote, especially in terms of presenter features and annotation (although I'll admit I haven't tried it since it first came out so maybe they improved this).

In all, I can't wait for Windows 8 tablets because they promise to be very touch friendly but still offer power users like me the ability to actually get my work done, rather than simply entertain myself. As for this current tablet HP Slate 2, I think it looks like a great machine and am certainly considering buying it.

Re:Will not work (2)

inhuman_4 (1294516) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939352)

You certainly provide some good reasons why you use it, sounds a lot like how I use my netbook. Have you considered Asus Transformer? It would provide stylus, keyboard, better touch, better battery, and probably lower price. I've never used the Transformer, and obviously I don't know how well it would fit your needs, but you sound like it's target audience.

But not at boutique prices (2)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938850)

HP, there is a market for a well built tablet that's not an iPAD. But not at the prices you were trying to charge.

Family Guy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37938868)

Shut up Meg....

Loss Leaders (-1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 2 years ago | (#37938998)

Until they figure out a way to get the price down where it can match the loss leaders from Apple and Amazon, this is going to be yet another almost-as-good device, for slightly more money. Good luck with that.

Too Soon (1)

Gyorg_Lavode (520114) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939158)

Personally, I'm semi-excited about the idea of a Windows 8 transformer tablet (similar to the other asus transformers) running on an ivy bridge CPU. It could be a solid daily driver when paired with a remotely accessable desktop for the heavy lifting.

That said, a windows 7 tablet running an atom CPU with no keyboard is rediculious. It's not a computer and it's not a tablet. It's a still-born bastard.

Ultimately though, I'm not convinced that an iPad plus a solid Windows 8 ivy bridge laptop next year won't be the best of all worlds.

Sounds like Texas Instruments T99/4A of 1982 (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939270)

Sounds like Texas Instruments T99/4A of 1982 - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI99/4A [wikipedia.org]

Release date June, 1981 (99/4 in June, 1979)
Discontinued October, 1983
Operating system TI BASIC
CPU TI TMS9900 @ 3.0 MHz
Memory 256 bytes "scratchpad" RAM + 16 KB VDP (graphics RAM)

Good looking but stood no chance against the brand new 'IBM compatibles'

History repeats itself

Meg's a Moron (1)

r00td00d (831118) | more than 2 years ago | (#37939344)

She ruined the 'mom and pop' environment at eBay, and now she's going to take down the monster at HP from inside it's own walls, one brick at a time.

Time to take HP out back behind the shed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37939416)

...and shoot it.

HP, let's get this straight:

You had a potential runner-up, axed it, burned your bridges with retailers and suppliers and customers all at the same time, and then you want to warp back in time to sell an unsuccessful tablet for even more money than the last tablet you over-priced, all while running an OS that will soon be outdated AND unlike its successor isn't designed for tablet form factors?

Apparently the blow being given to HP execs is of the highest quality...as it has rotted their brains, which are now dripping out their nose.

As the owner of a Touchpad, and the user of an iPad, Pre 2, and iPad2, I can say right now that this is less about HP's engineering, and more about HP's complete management clusterfuck. Sure, HP needs to get a toe into the tablet biz if they want to stay in the consumer market, but fuck-all, they already have a tablet-ready OS that works low-power, and doesn't require fucking Windows.

This isn't about how shitty they treated everyone with the Touchpad, It's about how they keep making dumb decisions. If you're smart, I'd start buying options to short HP stock in a few years.

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