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Oklahoma Hit By Its Strongest-Ever Recorded Quake

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the damage-reports-from-the-onion dept.

Earth 202

First time accepted submitter Wheelie_boy writes "No word yet on hell freezing over, but Oklahoma experienced a 5.6 magnitude earthquake early Sunday morning. This is the largest quake ever recorded in the state. Only minor damage and no casualties have been reported."

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Wow (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965098)

Headline: strongest-ever quake causes minimal damages and hurts no one.

Why is this on /. ?

Re:Wow (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965222)

Because Fracking?

We have angered the Gods! (runs)

Re:Wow (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965314)

I was going to suggest Climate Change. They sucked all the water out of the aquifers which causes this then that, blah blah blah.

But it seems Fracking is the new go to "cause" of everything.

Of course, you can always blame Bush if you have nothing better.

Re:Wow (0)

phrostie (121428) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965318)

+1 funny

Re:Wow (2, Informative)

Lakitu (136170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965634)

http://www.springerlink.com/content/u315626k2071q0j0/ [springerlink.com]

Abstract
In China, the earthquakes induced by water injection have occurred in four oil fields including the Renqiu oil field, and in two mines. Production of oil from the Renqiu oil field began in 1975 and the injection of water into the oil field commenced in July 1976. The induced earthquakes have been occurring in the area for the past 17 years, since December 1976. The controlled experiments of water injection showed the cause and effect relation between water injection and earthquakes. Source parameters such as source dimension, seismic moment and stress drop of a large number of the induced earthquakes, andQ factor for the area have been determined. The results indicate that the stress drop varies from 0.2 to 3.0 bar and theQ factor has an average value of 75.0. The low-stress drop and lowQ factor values imply that the earthquakes are caused by the brittle fracture of weak rocks under low ambient stresses, due to a decrease in their strength because of the injection of water. The induced earthquakes are unevenly distributed in the oil field. The northern part of the oil field, where the reservoir rocks are characterized by low porosity and low permeability, exhibits high seismic activity with the largest earthquake registering a magnitude of 4.5 and about 68% of the total number of induced earthquakes in this part. Whereas, the southern part of the oil field with higher porosity and higher permeability is characterized by low seismic activity with the largest earthquake registering a magnitude of 2.5 and only 4% of the total number of earthquakes which occurred in this part. These features of the focal region suggest that larger earthquakes may not occur in the Renqiu oil field area.

Re:Wow (1)

Barsteward (969998) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965906)

can't blame Bush - its all those homo-sexuals having immoral fun that has angered god

Re:Wow (0)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966230)

Yeah, because there's obviously another explanation for this [dailyyonder.com] .

They have dug deep, too deep ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37966456)

+50 sword against Balrog's - check
+10 "leather private's protector" - check

Ok, now I just need the machine from Captain America, and a few friends with an invisible jet.
And a Mago...
any hobbits in the area ?

At least it isn't another Apple article. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965256)

I'm just grateful that it isn't yet another Apple article.

Re:Wow (1)

mmarlett (520340) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965302)

Strongest ever in Oklahoma. Headline says "its strongest-ever recorded quake." But the summary is wrong where it says early Sunday morning — it was about 10 p.m. I am in Wichita, Kansas (roughly 160 miles away from the epicenter) and felt the quake quite noticeably. It was like a train went past my house without making any noise. It rattled the walls.

Yup, time is totally wrong (1)

AtariDatacenter (31657) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965364)

It was Saturday evening. Don't know how Sunday got mixed into this unless they were looking at UTC or something.

Re:Yup, time is totally wrong (1)

mmarlett (520340) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965466)

Yeah, I'm sure that's what it was: it was early Sunday morning in England.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965326)

Because it's an intraplate earthquake, and intraplate quakes are scientifically interesting. I doubt the quake was a result of fracking--more likely associated with the midcontinent rift (a billion year old rift system).

Re:Wow (1)

Dunega (901960) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965338)

To piss you off, now shut up.

Re:Wow (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965470)

Headline: strongest-ever quake causes minimal damages and hurts no one.

Why is this on /. ?

Dunno, just to see if someone tries to blame global warming? Maybe on Fark... ^_^

Re:Wow (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965750)

There's a pretty good chance it was related to global warming, though not caused by it.
Look up how fracking causes earthquakes, and how much fracking is going on in OK.

Re:Wow (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965562)

It's an earthquake. Geology nerds like that kind of stuff.

I'm sure the editors are sorry that you wasted your valuable time reading an article written for a different kind of nerd.

Re:Wow (4, Interesting)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965570)

Because we don't get earthquakes in this part of the world. Ever. There was an earthquake just SE of San Antonio, Texas - the second ever recorded, and about 5 miles from an active fracking operation. Fracking is a really screwy operation that a lot of countries have banned because it causes a lot of problems and earthquakes.

Re:Wow (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37966038)

My dad worked in the industry for years and years through KS, OK and TX. He went on many many frack jobs that, in my memory, go back to at least the mid '70's. Please do not link an earthquake today to an active frack job just next door. Or in the case of the San Antonio "second ever recorded" to the active project. I know it is easy to link the two in your mind but these jobs have been happening for decades without an increase of seismic activity so just realize sometimes it can just be circumstantial connection.

Re:Wow (1)

webdog314 (960286) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966416)

Not that I necessarily believe these quakes are the result of fracking (WAY too small a data set), but did it ever occur to you that the seismic changes caused by fracking could indeed take decades before they become present?

That is extremely doubtful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37966122)

There is no part of the world which has no earthquake at all. Ever. What is probably the case is that most earthquake are so low in intensity as to be sensible only by instrumentation.

Re:Wow (0)

BagOCrap (980854) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966226)

Because we don't get earthquakes in this part of the world. Ever. There was an earthquake just SE of San Antonio, Texas - the second ever recorded, and about 5 miles from an active fucking operation. Fucking is a really screwy operation that a lot of countries have banned because it causes a lot of problems and earthquakes.

There, fixed that for you!

Re:Wow (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37966390)

Really, no earthquakes in central OK ever? Crazy that it's historically one of the more active areas in the country.

Oh yeah, you're just talking out your ass. Sorry, continue on.

Re:Wow (2)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966724)

Fracking is a really screwy operation that a lot of countries have banned because it causes a lot of problems and earthquakes.

Please compare the relative depths of fracking operations and the faults upon which earthquakes occur.

And I'd be pretty surprised if the New Madrid quake didn't rattle Oklahoma since it rang church bells in Boston.

Re:Wow (1)

polymeris (902231) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965596)

Because it was Oklahoma? If it was Japan, Sumatra or Chile it wouldn't be news, but even a small quake like this is a strange occurrence in the center-south of North America.

IMO more interesting than yet another smartphone non-story, anyways.

Re:Wow (1)

RCL (891376) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965838)

I know that's stupid and tinfoil hattish, but one might think that some country found a way to control quakes and is testing it. First Japan, then East Coast of the USA, then Turkey, now geographical center of USA.

I'd advise Israeli and Californians to intensify training people how to survive major quakes, just in case.

Re:Wow (1)

RCL (891376) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965872)

Well, actually there has already been unusual quake [ynetnews.com] in Israel this year. Perhaps Mother Earth is shaking people off?

I was in this thing... (1)

DangerOnTheRanger (2373156) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965108)

... Kind of scary if you've never been in an earthquake before. However, I was in a magnitude 6.0 earthquake a while ago in California, so this didn't seem too bad. The really wild thing is, I've now weathered a fire, an earthquake, and a tornado all in the same house. Maybe it's time to consider moving? :)

Re:I was in this thing... (2)

GrumpySteen (1250194) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965264)

Are you kidding? Your house is clearly under some sort of magic spell that prevents it from being destroyed!!

Re:I was in this thing... (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965268)

i heard tsunamis are da bomb !

Re:I was in this thing... (1)

DangerOnTheRanger (2373156) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965474)

It's unlikely one will hit Oklahoma, you know. ;)

Re:I was in this thing... (1)

stephathome (1862868) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966084)

Too true, and if one eve hit Oklahoma, we'd have a lot more to worry about than just a tsunami.

Re:I was in this thing... (2)

S.O.B. (136083) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965376)

I'd wait until after the locusts and frogs.

Re:I was in this thing... (1)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965572)

You should probably stay where you are. What else could possibly go wrong?

Re:I was in this thing... (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965810)

I've seen people who've been in earthquakes before panic in a 5.0, and run out into the streets... from the safety of a high rise building which is built with dampeners in the basement and is intended to withstand an 8.5 according to code (there's a fault line that runs directly down the street behind the building I work in, hence the code requiring that).... would have been funny if one of 'em got hit by a falling roofing tile from the building next door, since that high rise was the safest place you could be in such a quake.... Earthquakes trigger something primal in people, and even people who've experienced them before will sometimes go into a fight-or-flight mode when they're caught in one.

Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (-1, Troll)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965116)

I clicked on this headline expecting to read about a 9.5 or something of that magnitude, but it turns out 'largest ever recorded quake' means 'largest ever recorded in that region'

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965130)

"its strongest-Ever Recorded" Learn to read.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965152)

Oops, that's my bad. Please mod accordingly.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

Hotweed Music (2017854) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965136)

Not that it isn't boring news, but the "its" the in title implies "in that region"

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965138)

Seriously, 5.6 is lame after having felt the Tohoku quake earlier this year...

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965160)

Meh, I bet even a 7.8 I've been in was laughable compared to that one.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

polymeris (902231) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965640)

Now you have ruined my opportunity to downplay the quake by bragging about my experience of the Maule quake (a measly Mw 8.8). Satisfied?

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (2)

ddxexex (1664191) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965142)

To be fair, it does use the possessive "its" to specify that it's Oklahoma's strongest earthquake, but still probably not especially newsworthy on a tech site.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965166)

It is highly relevant because all the fracking conspiracy theorists hang out here. In fact I'm surprised no one has blamed this quake on it yet.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965216)

I know! It's time we blame this quake on something a lot more aligned with reality: God's rage at gays and socialism.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

malilo (799198) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965800)

We all know Oklahoma is a hotbed of wild-eyed liberalism, too.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (2)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965374)

But at least we know the industry apologists are on faster.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965762)

They should be. They get paid to do it.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965408)

In fact I'm surprised no one has blamed this quake on it yet.

Because the real culprit is right in front of our tentacles [wikimedia.org] .

Wriggle in fear, miserable humanoids!

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

onepoint (301486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965442)

What I would like to find out is ... did this type of shaking provide a benefit to many of the older dried wells ( or low production wells ), I'm thinking that the shaking could have caused compression on the old drained wells.

Also, an earthquake of this magnitude might be the cause of the years of draining oil. I've always understood that there are minor quakes in drilling/pumping fields, but maybe a slightly larger one ( 2.0 to 3.0 is what I know as common ) of 5.0 might be something that we need to look forward to in drilling zones.

   

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965782)

Given the extremely high correlation between fracking and earthquakes, are you suggesting the mechanism runs the other way, and future earthquakes cause fracking in the past?

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965984)

I know, right!!! Those nutters at the Oklahoma Geological Survey really need to get a grip:

http://www.ogs.ou.edu/pubsscanned/openfile/OF1_2011.pdf [ou.edu]

The gubment has too much undue influence in our great nation of the US OF A. Clearly, Obamacare is the cause of these quakes.

Re:Way to serve up ads, Slashdot (1)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965620)

Well, there's fracking. This was a shallow quake and all.

Also, if you are far enough away, eastern Oklahoma and the New Madrid fault line look very close to each other. And stories about the beginnings of the Mississippi Rift Valley are appropriate to the average developmental age of slashdot's readers and their interest in weird fictions.

So the story sort of fits here. About as well as many of slashdot's other stories.

Re:Way to serve up ads, dude (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965170)

I clicked on this post expecting to see some sort of epic snark, and all I got was someone with piss-poor reading comprehension skills.

Lemme guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965172)

Fracking?

Re:Lemme guess (1)

kanguro (1237830) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965286)

He was probably referring to Hans Rudolf "Frack" Mauch, one of two ice skaters in the ice skating duo Frick and Frack

I'm in OK right now, felt the quake last night. (2)

claytongulick (725397) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965208)

I'm in OK for business, and the quake got me out of bed last night.

I grabbed clothes and rushed downstairs ready to get out of the building, if needed, but when I got down there no one else was panicking or anything, so I supposed I was the only one who over-reacted. It was about 11pm.

It was pretty intense - I lived near San Diego for six years, and felt plenty of tremors, but the quake last night was the scariest I've felt. Possibly because I wasn't on the ground floor of the hotel.

Other than that, it wasn't a big deal. No one was streaming from the hotel and there weren't throngs of people screaming. There were lots of people calling the front desk asking if there had been an accident (no one could believe that it was a quake).

Interestingly, there was another quake the night before as well, a 4.2 (the guy at the front desk told me). That one didn't even wake me up though.

Re:I'm in OK right now, felt the quake last night. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965284)

I have lived in OK (Tulsa area) off and on since 1986 - more on than off.

I remember only feeling 2 earthquakes. One a bit more than a year ago (I think) where everyone thought a truck had hit the building and the one last night. The one last night went on for about 45-60 seconds and really rattled my place.

I think that the reason you did not see people streaming from buildings or doing anything is because nobody knows what they are supposed to do in an earthquake.

I will be real interested in finding out just how deep it was. I did see something about being only 3 miles deep. But that could have been an earlier quake. If it was 3 miles deep it might have been triggered by fracking. Wells sometimes go that deep but generally not in OK.

Re:I'm in OK right now, felt the quake last night. (1)

Think less! (1144499) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966036)

Exactly what I was thinking. I remember growing up in CA and being taught the earth quake drill in preschool and first grade. Correct response to something like an earth quake needs to come from instinct. If the instinct isn't there, you're left with the higher brain asking, "Duh... what's going on? Am I supposed to do something?", and never getting an answer. Rationalization and cognitive brain function are great for day-to-day, but they're about as useful for fight/flight as an 18-wheeler is helpful in moving to the house across the street. It's not that the case that the other people were cool and collected, it's that they were deer in the headlights.

Re:I'm in OK right now, felt the quake last night. (1)

qwertyatwork (668720) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966542)

There was another one, 4.5 I think at 4:00am. I live in Tulsa and even knowing there was an earthquake earlier in day, it took a while for the thought to even occur to me.

Shale Oil Fracking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965212)

Here we go again. Climate Change: The Sequel pitting NY Times/Washington Post/NPR vs. talk radio/conservative think tanks.

God smiting the bible belt (1, Flamebait)

plopez (54068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965234)

Earth quakes, tornados, floods, etc. It's just God smiting the them for mean spirited politics and wacko religious views. Not that God hates those people mind you. He just doesn't approve of their "lifestyle".

Re:God smiting the bible belt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965410)

And by that statement, you've judged over all bible-belt people, including Oklahomans, some of whose "lifestyles" are probably much better than yours. Congratulations, fundamentalist atheist!

Re:God smiting the bible belt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965414)

Hey, don't lump me in with the bible thumpers. Also, stay tuned. I think there's a hurricane and burning hale scheduled for later this week. Should be awesome.

Re:God smiting the bible belt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965512)

It's just God smiting the them for mean spirited politics and wacko religious views.

Does that include the earthquake that stuck just south of Washington DC earlier this year?

Re:God smiting the bible belt (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965524)

at least with an earthquake all your stuff is in the same county,

Re:God smiting the bible belt (1)

shbazjinkens (776313) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965558)

Earth quakes, tornados, floods, etc. It's just God smiting the them for mean spirited politics and wacko religious views. Not that God hates those people mind you. He just doesn't approve of their "lifestyle".

It's interesting to me how easy it is to start with the "us and them" attitudes when you never leave one given region.

Re:God smiting the bible belt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965858)

Outside of Tulsa, Oklahoma City and maybe Stillwater, Oklahoma is pretty inline with a lot of stereotypes. In a lot of Oklahoma you will find fundamental religious and political views along with poverty.

Re:God smiting the bible belt (-1, Flamebait)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965624)

He just doesn't approve of their "lifestyle".

Which is odd because Jesus certainly did approve of homosexuality. Apart from using a Roman centurion and his lover as an example of a good relationship it is fairly obvious that Jesus himself was gay or at least bisexual. He hung around with naked young men and moved in with his lover (John).

Christians seem to be in denial about this, which is not surprising when you consider Jesus is usually portrayed as being Caucasian too.

Re:God smiting the bible belt (1)

daath93 (1356187) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965992)

Okay, I call bullshit. Where is your historical source? I simply don't trust revisionist history without some sort of historical source.

Homo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37966044)

Wow. Talk about your homoerotic fantasies...

Re:God smiting the bible belt (1)

Splab (574204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966074)

It's quite unlikely we will ever know if he was one way or the other, the bible(s) where written long after he passed away; it is much more likely it's what the writer wanted to be portraied.

Re:God smiting the bible belt (1)

PwnzerDragoon (2014464) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966290)

[Citation needed]

No, really. I've read the bible more than once, and I'd really like to know what I'm missing.

Sorry for the Alarm (1)

knapper_tech (813569) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965290)

If I had known moving to Tulsa would cause earthquakes I would have just come sooner.

So, this is the new Slashdot? (2)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965344)

I can't help but notice that Slashdot has been posting more and more non-stories. I also can't help but notice that this started right after CmdrTaco left. So, this is pretty much how it's going to be from now on, eh? Some stories about Nokia or Apple, mixed in with a healthy dose of correct politics and ordinary news. An earthquake where no nuclear plants were damaged?

Re:So, this is the new Slashdot? (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965462)

"An earthquake where no nuclear plants were damaged?"

None DETECTABLY damaged, SO FAR! (huddles in fear)

Re:So, this is the new Slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965578)

PUSSY!

Risks versus California maybe not that much less? (4, Interesting)

Gavin Scott (15916) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965348)

This is a good reminder that earthquakes do eventually occur in many places that we like to think of as earthquake-proof, even if they're rare.

Having recently moved to the Chicago area from California, I find myself having to learn to live with the vague feeling of unease that's caused by the fact that the most popular building style here seems to be "big pile of bricks".

If an earthquake of substantial size ever does hit you in an area where they are rare enough that there's no pressure to make building codes stronger, then chances are your odds of dying will be a lot greater than if you lived in California where the new buildings are all very safe and the old buildings have at least been tested a few times.

So while living in the mid-west etc. greatly reduces your chance of experiencing a large earthquake, the reduction in risk for actually dying in an earthquake is probably not as large as people like to think.

G.

Re:Risks versus California maybe not that much les (2)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965432)

You build to suit the prevailing conditions. Here on the west coast of Scotland, we don't build to withstand earthquakes but we do build to withstand regular 140mph winds.

Re:Risks versus California maybe not that much les (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966382)

This is a good reminder that earthquakes do eventually occur in many places that we like to think of as earthquake-proof, even if they're rare.

Especially if people are expending a lot of fracking [google.com] time in Oklahoma...

Stampede? (2)

Kenshin (43036) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965368)

Are there sure it wasn't a stampede? Because I was under the assumption that only two things come from Oklahoma, and earthquakes aren't one of them.

Re:Stampede? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965422)

No, that was just your mom running back into the kitchen, Ken. If you ventured upstairs every now and then, you wouldn't hear her rushing to do your laundry, and you would know what she was up to. Just saying.
 
--Bobby Malda
Captcha awesome

Re:Stampede? (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965476)

"... and I've got horns."

OK, I'm not really from OK.

Re:Stampede? (1)

wmbetts (1306001) | more than 2 years ago | (#37966012)

You're thinking of Texas.

also (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965478)

There've been a bunch of helicopters swarming the area for a couple of weeks now. Coincidence? I think not.

Earthquakes have a sense of humor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965480)

I lived in CA for 20 years, and never felt an earthquake. I get stationed in Oklahoma, and six months later, BAM. Earthquake. xD

it woke me up (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965498)

i went to sleep about 9:45 and just before 11:00 PM i wake up to the house rattling, i thought it was a low flying helicopter looking for something so i turn over and go back to sleep, then this morning i see the earthquake news all over the place.

i knew it could not be tanks rolling through the neighborhood because the sound was missing the metallic squeak that tanks have

Re:it woke me up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965670)

Tanks roll through your neighborhood?

Felt it in Wichita Falls (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965974)

It hit here at about 10:55PM. The whole house just started moving back and forth gently like a boat on water. It lasted about 15 seconds and there was no sound, but it was a surreal feeling.

Fracking Storage (2)

rabun_bike (905430) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965576)

It could be fracking or the storage of fracking fluids or it could just be basic earth geology. But it is hard to do a cause and effect on earthquakes. Only time will time if more, larger quakes become frequent and can be triangulated back to large operating drilling rigs.

Arkansas isn't waiting to find out. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/07/27/arkansas-commission-votes-to-ban-wells/ [foxnews.com]

Unusual Activity (1)

moj0joj0 (1119977) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965728)

Within the last 5 hours there have been 7 quakes of 3.0 or greater [mibazaar.com] . I lived in that general region for several years and never saw or heard of any activity (not that I was glued to the USGS or anything).

Of course the largest earthquake recorded was on April 4th, 1952 around El Reno, Oklahoma [usgs.gov] . However, if you discount the last 24 hours, there doesn't seem to have been much recent [usgs.gov] activity [usgs.gov] of note in that region of the state (some of the source material is quite dated). Here is more information [usgs.gov] on the region.

Re:Unusual Activity (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965926)

Within the last 5 hours there have been 7 quakes of 3.0 or greater.

Typical for aftershocks of a large earthquake.

Re:Fracking Storage (1)

shbazjinkens (776313) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965764)

FUD. According to a geophysicist buddy, salt-water injection wells have been known to cause earthquakes due to lubrication of fault lines. He doesn't seem to think there's a link to hydrofracturing. I work in the oilfield, I don't think there's a lot of that kind of activity in that area. If you check the satellite maps you can verify that, wells stand out as bright square pads. We would be much more likely to have that happen in the area West of Oklahoma City, where there is LOTS of horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing going on right now, rather than over by Prague, if hydrofracturing actually caused quakes.

Hello? Did someone order a fresh batch of science? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965580)

Come now, nerds. All this talk and no science. How about something from the Oklahoma Geological Survey? They set out to disprove an earlier quake this year was the result of fracking. Instead, they found correlation:
http://www.eenews.net/assets/2011/11/02/document_pm_01.pdf [eenews.net]

Here is some commentary on the report:
http://www.eenews.net/public/eenewspm/2011/11/02/1 [eenews.net]

Re:Hello? Did someone order a fresh batch of scien (2)

polymeris (902231) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965678)

Some experimental geothermal projects in Switzerland & Australia were aborted because people panicked about the possible relationship to small quakes in the area of the hydraulic fracturing.

Really a pity, IMO, a few smallish (Mw 4) quakes are a low price to pay for virtually unlimited and potentially very clean energy.

Re:Hello? Did someone order a fresh batch of scien (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965746)

Meanwhile, another US state banned four fracking waste disposal wells because of the swarms of earthquakes which followed in the area (and greatly reduced once the disposal was stopped). http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/07/27/arkansas-commission-votes-to-ban-wells/ [foxnews.com]

I don't think anyone was too sad to see it stopped. 4.7 quakes are too high of a price to pay to get rid of dirty fracking fluid.

Fracking earthquakes! (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965704)

I have a sinking feeling there's more where that came from....

Funny quote from facebook (1)

codeAlDente (1643257) | more than 2 years ago | (#37965770)

“Thought our neighbor’s donkey had escaped from his pen and was scratching himself on the trailer”

Quake depth 5km, max fracking depth ~3.2km (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37965950)

The quake is too deep to be a result of fracking. As someone who works oil/gas in central oklahoma, I know that the max depth they're fracking at is in the ballpark of 3km and the quake's hypocenter is at approx 5km according to the USGS (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eqinthenews/2011/usb0006klz/). The depth/height that fractures will go here is no where near a 2km, more like a max of a few tenths of a km.

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