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Apple Security Chief Steps Down After iPhone Gaffe

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the don't-go-to-bars-any-more dept.

Iphone 93

Trailrunner7 writes "Apple's vice president of global security has reportedly stepped down, roughly two months after the surfacing of news reports that an iPhone prototype had gone missing for the second time in less than two years. John Theriault, who came to Apple from Pfizer and was a former FBI agent, has retired in the wake of controversy regarding the device's disappearance and the subsequent efforts to track it down. Apple did not return a request for comment. Nevertheless, Theriault's departure follows a public relations dustup that began when an Apple employee left the prototype at a bar in San Francisco."

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93 comments

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968272)

Hardly his fault.

Re:Really? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969824)

At least they didn't 'suicide' him this time.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37972002)

Oh look, Apple fanboïs modding posts down because they deny Apple's factories in China stage suicides for employees who leak information.
What's wrong fanboïs, can't take a joke? Let's hope Apple comes out with an iLaugh soon so you can stop being so uptight when people push your single button!

Lululemon-Apple murder (1, Interesting)

mozumder (178398) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970678)

I think this has more to do with the Lululemon murder verdict on wednesday than the iPhone 4.

Summary: Self-absorbed Apple store employees ignore screams from a neighboring store where a girl was being murdered: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/whats-scarier-the-slaying-or-the-bystanders-who-heard-and-did-nothing/2011/10/31/gIQA9y2tZM_story.html [washingtonpost.com]

There's probably a massive lawsuit coming Apple's way about this.

Re:Lululemon-Apple murder (1)

milkmage (795746) | more than 2 years ago | (#38043870)

wait, you think the VP of Security for Apple is somehow supposed to be aware of a street crime 3000 miles away from Cupertino?

citizens are under no (legal) obligation to report a crime or intervene in any way. if you SAW a murder, you're under no obligation to even cooperate with the authorities unless you're served a subpoena.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misprision_of_felony [wikipedia.org]
With the development of the modern law, this crime has been discarded in many jurisdictions, and is generally only applied against persons placed in a special position of authority or responsibility. In this case, the offence of misfeasance in public office or malfeasance in public office may be considered instead. For example, corrections officers who stand idly by while drug trafficking occurs within the prison may be prosecuted for this crime.

he stepped down because it was bad PR.

Hmmm (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968278)

he should have used Find my iPhone.

Re:Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37976102)

As funny as that is... it makes perfect sense to me. It would not only be able to track the location of the phone (roughly), but also disable access to it at the very least.

You would think that on these prototype phones, they'd have installed an app that can lock out features or add an extra layer of security to the phone to prevent tampering and data access. I'm sure "there's an app for that" somewhere.

But what more could he have done? (2, Insightful)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968290)

Kudos to him for taking responsibility, but:

The one iPhone was lost at a bar.

Is he saying that he should have had 2 security men following each Apple employee around during work and outside of work?

I'm sure there was more than one person working on the next version of the iPhone at that point.

And security can promulgate all the edicts they want, but people who "have work to do" either have them overturned or find a way a around them.

Seriously, what more could he have done short of implementing a police state?

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

MF4218 (1320441) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968320)

Not have allowed sociable people test out the prototype? Evaluate each employee in terms of likelihood to leave something on a table? There's always a way to do things better.

Re:But what more could he have done? (2)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968374)

That's silly, the obvious answer is to just glue the phone to the employee. Also attach it via some sort of leash.

Re:But what more could he have done? (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968428)

That's silly, the obvious answer is to just glue the phone to the employee. Also attach it via some sort of leash.

Nonsense - we've seen the real solution right here on Slashdot.

Cut off one of the employee's arms and replace it with a prosthetic. Then embed the phone in the prosthetic.

Re:But what more could he have done? (4, Funny)

sp1nl0ck (241836) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968614)

As far as putting the devices on a leash is concerned, maybe the employees who lost them didn't want to pay for tethering.

stop makeing them in china so bribing need more (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969002)

stop makeing them in china so bribing people will need more then just paying some one 10K-20K.

That is where some of apple leak have came from.

Re:stop makeing them in china so bribing need more (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969200)

Sure, show us the source.

Re:But what more could he have done? (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968366)

The better question might be "what less could he have done"?

The 'controversy' over the handling of the lost iPhone includes the bit where Apple security flacks allegedly impersonated police officers in order to conduct an illicit search of somebody's house...

For a company of Apple's stature, with extensive offshore manufacturing and significant interest from both highly-visible tech-rumor-bloggers and 3rd party accessory makers who want to have their tooling done before the competition, the leak level is pretty good. Getting the company embroiled in a potentially messy criminal case, though, is one of those 'career limiting' moves...

Re:But what more could he have done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37970460)

You're an idiot. Anyone can turn up to your house and search it if they have your permission. They only need a warrant if you don't give permission. The person gave permission for the Apple detectives to search his house. Good day sir.

Re:But what more could he have done? (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970846)

The truth of the allegations is unknown, at present; but 'consent' obtained by fraud, deception, or coercion is not generally recognized as valid. And, of course, impersonation of a police officer is a crime in itself in California.
We don't know whether the situation played out as alleged; but if it did, it amounted to criminal activity...

Re:But what more could he have done? (5, Insightful)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968372)

The issue is not so much that a prototype was lost, but how they handled the retrieval efforts, passing themselves off as police, making immigration threats...

Re:But what more could he have done? (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968384)

Arguably, if Apple wanted the investigation to have been conducted in accordance with US law, they wouldn't have hired an FBI agent...

Good Grief. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969810)

We only have the word of the guy who "found" the phone (and then denied any knowledge of it when that was obviously not the truth) that these guys claimed to be cops.

Certainly the Apple Recovery Team was aggressive and intimidating, but there is really no trustworthy evidence they broke the law.

On the other hand we have a guy who "found" an expensive iPhone at a bar, took it home, failed to do anything to find the owner, and then disposed of it when it looked like the authorities were closing in. Not really the actions of someone who's words I would take at face value.

You'll note that this guy did NOT "lawyer up" and sue Apple for whatever it is the Apple Thugs did. Why do you suppose that is?

And, by the way, where is the phone NOW?

Re:Good Grief. (1)

flosofl (626809) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969930)

He did in fact "lawyer up". His lawyer is currently in talks with Apple, and from a legal standpoint pushing the head of security out the door is going to look pretty bad for Apple.

Re:Good Grief. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970122)

...and from a legal standpoint pushing the head of security out the door is going to look pretty bad for Apple.

Nonsense.

From a legal standpoint, it doesn't matter one way or the other if Apple fired the head security dude, and indeed what they fired him for is pure speculation. What matters are the facts . Not how the facts "look", but what the facts are.

The Court does not care how the facts "look". the Court cares what the facts are .

At this point we really don't know all the facts, but there is really no particular reason to believe a guy who "found" an expensive piece of electronics and declined to do the honorable thing and look for the owner.

If we are going to talk about how things "look", seriously, the guy that "found" the phone did not exactly behave in an honest and honorable way. What it "looks" like to me is that he "found" this phone, and rather than contacting the bar or the police, decided to see if he could profit from having "found" this phone, either by selling it to some less than honest Web site, on eBay, or down at the corner. But as the phone became "hotter" (being a stolen item, it was "hot" already), he decided to ditch it and lie lie lie.

Seriously, Apple didn't pick some random address and show up. I know there is a lot of Apple Hate here, but come on.

Disclosure: I do not work for Apple, and do not own any Apple hardware. In fact, I've never owned any Apple hardware. Can't afford that shiny stuff.

Re:Good Grief. (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970258)

I have no reason to be impressed by the moral fiber of the "finder"; but we have SFPD's confirmation [cnet.com] that(just as the "finder" originally claimed, before any independent confirmation was available) that four of their people accompanied two of Apple's to the address given, that the two Apple people went inside to look, and that none of the SFPD did. We also know that the contact information allegedly provided by the Apple agent at the time matched those of an Apple agent on Linkedin, who promptly nuked his profile after the story appeared(which doesn't prove that he didn't look the details up in order to add flavor to his story; but is interesting). That doesn't tell us what was said at the scene; but it isn't as though our questionably fibrous friend made the incident up: we just don't know whether he embellished it.

Again, none of this suggests anything in favor of the guy's character; but it does provide a degree of corroboration for his claims, from a source that would have no obvious interest in corroborating a false allegation of their involvement...

Re:Good Grief. (1)

arkenian (1560563) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970550)

I think it doesn't really matter whether what they did was legal or not... It really comes down to this. Even if we grant that Apple wasn't thrilled with the phone being lost... there is NO DAMN QUESTION that, being apple, if a phone is going to go missing, they want all the articles to be about how cool the phone is, not about them coming in the heavy during the retrieval.

Re:Good Grief. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#37971086)

No one has said the Apple Thugs didn't accompany the real cops and no one has said they didn't ask for and receive permission to search the apartment (which is certainly NOT something I would have ever allowed). Nothing you have said comes within 10 miles of supporting the contention that these Apple Thugs misrepresented themselves, we have only the word of someone who's honesty is already suspect.

Re:But what more could he have done? (5, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968394)

This may have more to do with the second 'lost' iPhone which was handled very poorly by all reports.

You don't impersonate police officers, by omission or commission. You don't pretend it is an episode of CSI or a rerun of 'Enemy of the State". Apple has never been forthcoming about what happened (if anything). Sounds like a screw up from the folks running the show.

Re:But what more could he have done? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968982)

You don't impersonate police officers, by omission or commission. You don't pretend it is an episode of CSI or a rerun of 'Enemy of the State".

The guy was a former FBI agent. The FBI has been breaking the law with impunity for many years. Why should Apple be any different?

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

stackOVFL (1791898) | more than 2 years ago | (#37974096)

Actually they did not impersonate police officers. Two Apple security investigators were accompanied by four SFPD officers: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2011-09-02/tech/30127561_1_gizmodo-iphone-sf-weekly [businessinsider.com]

UPDATE: The San Francisco Police department has changed its story -- it now says that 4 officers accompanied 2 Apple investigators. The officers stayed outside while the investigators searched CalderÃn's home, which is presumably why there was no paperwork filed.

Re:But what more could he have done? (3, Interesting)

nightfell (2480334) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968430)

It wasn't the fact that the iPhones were lost. It's possible there were different policies he could have implemented, but the risk of loss is impossible to circumvent. I suspect this has to do with the way the losses were handled after the fact.

Impersonating police officers (through deceptive statements and actions, even if never explicitly claiming to be a police officer or wearing a police uniform or badge, thus technically avoiding criminal misconduct) is certainly something Apple management is not comfortable with. Given his past professional career, this seems like something ingrained into his security style, and wouldn't be a practice he would be able to sufficiently alter in the future.

Frankly, although I'm sure he's good at what he does, it's good that he left Apple. The two just weren't a good fit.

Re:But what more could he have done? (5, Funny)

404 Clue Not Found (763556) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969370)

Impersonating police officers (through deceptive statements and actions, even if never explicitly claiming to be a police officer or wearing a police uniform or badge, thus technically avoiding criminal misconduct) is certainly something Apple management is not comfortable with. Given his past professional career, this seems like something ingrained into his security style, and wouldn't be a practice he would be able to sufficiently alter in the future.

Frankly, although I'm sure he's good at what he does, it's good that he left Apple. The two just weren't a good fit.

I hear the music industry's hiring...

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968466)

Make sure hardware doesn't leave the building. Lots of companies have protocols like security counts that are highly secure... banks, military...

Re:But what more could he have done? (3, Informative)

Sancho (17056) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968482)

They wanted them to leave the building. They needed to be tested in a variety of conditions, not just all in relatively small location.

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968676)

Well then my theory is wrong. I stand corrected.

Re:But what more could he have done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37971202)

Hey, what's this? Isn't the standard practice that if you're wrong you should disappear from the conversation without saying a thing. ;)

Re:But what more could he have done? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968534)

This is how you end up with really shitty phones.

The whole iPhone 4 antenna issue came about because Apple required employees to use cases during field testing, after all.

Re:But what more could he have done? (4, Insightful)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968648)

"Kudos to him for taking responsibility"

How said he is taking responsibility (in the sense of "yes, it's my fault")?

There are two kinds of responsibility-related resignations:
1) As a way to say "I failed, I don't deserve this position".
2) As a way to say "I tried to do my job but the higher ups don't allow me to do it properly: I won't continue under these circumnstances".

No where in the article nor the links there's indication about what's the case here.

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

whisper_jeff (680366) | more than 2 years ago | (#37971890)

There's also "you screwed up so badly that you're going to quit and we'll be done with this or we'll fire you, possibly forcing us to explain why we fired you revealing the extent of your screwup - your choice."

To my knowledge, at least 4 of the 4S's were lost (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968814)

To my knowledge, at least 4 of the 4S's were lost.

In addition, I know it took Apple security days to get back to the reporting person when they reported the phone lost immediately after the loss was noted.

Apple has also been pretty arbitrary on whether or not it fires someone who loses a prototype. My expectation is that there is the strong possibility that if one of the people who was fired for the same thing another employee wasn't fired over, and the only difference was how fast Apple security reacted, they'd have a good case for wrongful termination (yes, this is a hint; you know who you are). I'm afraid I'm a little more cynical than that, and I think that the other correlating factor, how close were the persons RSUs to vesting, probably played a factor in the firings I know about.

Ever since Steve's decline started, it's left all the former Sun middle managers they've hired driving the bus, and the likely destination is the same place Sun ended up in their bus. If their increasingly draconian employee policies don't cause their talent to flee, then Tim Cook's statement that they had "3 years worth of Steve's Ideas" should, since that clock started ticking about one and a half years ago.

-AC

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968858)

"Seriously, what more could he have done short of implementing a police state?"

Oh, I dunno, don't let people take them to a bar?

Re:But what more could he have done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37971066)

Do you know much about field testing phones?

I can tell you it's impossible to do both securely and thoroughly. Every sane company will choose 'thoroughly' since security doesn't really help if your end product sucks.

Re:But what more could he have done? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968964)

Is he saying that he should have had 2 security men following each Apple employee around during work and outside of work?

Or, since this is the iphone we're talking about, use the extensive built-in location tracking to keep track of where your valuable prototypes are.

After all, Apple has been tracking iphone locations for YEARS.

Re:But what more could he have done? (1)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | more than 2 years ago | (#37972402)

Doesn't Apple already consist of a police state?

I thought there slogan was We know what's best for you.

I doubt it's the real reason (1)

Quila (201335) | more than 2 years ago | (#37972850)

Scott Forstall was the guy who convinced Jobs to let his engineers walk around with iPhone prototypes, and he just got a million-share carrot to stay with Apple until 2016.

Re:But what more could he have done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37981976)

In the military, we used to use this advanced technology called a, "dummy cord".

It was a piece of nylon cording that you tied to your rifle, and tied the other end to your ammo belt. When you've been up several nights in a demanding physical environment, (or in this case, probably an overworked Apple employee with too much to drink) you tend to do stupid things like leave your rifle leaning against a tree (iPhone on a bar). Dummy cord solves that rather simply. The only way to lose it at that point is for someone jack you up, or find you passed out, and steal it from you.

If the security chief in question had thought of this, he'd probably still have a job.

Slashdot quote at the bottom of the page (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968404)

They are ill discoverers that think there is no land, when they can see nothing but sea. -- Francis Bacon

Hum, bacon..... <drooling noise> - Homer

usual reason given (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968414)

resigned to spend more time with his lawyers

He left it! (1)

Starsleeper (2499280) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968446)

He left the phone in a bar! Big mistake.

Re:He left it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968550)

Cut him some slack, he was just trying to add a bar to the signal strength.

Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968554)

... on "leaking" things to the world by leaving prototypes (or pre-release models) in bars and then stirring up an immense media circus.

Re:Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968698)

Even after this article you still believe that?

Re:Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969272)

No particular caring one way or the other, but it IS plausible that he left because the marketing concept of 'losing' prototypes was making him look bad and could be seen as a risk to his career in the future.

No idea on how likely that actually is, but if proof positive came out that this was the case i wouldnt be overly shocked by the revelation.

Re:Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (0)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969926)

Even after this article you still believe that?

Yes,

Just because it went wrong does mean that it wasn't intentional.

They had people who could impersonate police officers... available at short notice.

Re:Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970202)

Just because it went wrong does mean that it wasn't intentional.

Right... so... we're right back at zero.

They had people who could impersonate police officers... available at short notice.

... and this couldn't have been for security?

I expected a little more. Seriously. Something like: "Well the guy did have a box of donuts in the car, he was obviously off to a marketing meeting afterwards".

My diagnosis? Slashdot headline poisoning.

Re:Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (1)

flosofl (626809) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969956)

Facts are pesky things if they interfere in your world view. Just look at creationists or 9/11 "truthers" for an example.

Re:Maybe they need to rethink their policy... (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 2 years ago | (#37983906)

Yeah, I mean can you believe that people think that you can't melt steel with jet fuel, and that Apple ever "lose" prototyps by accident?

Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968564)

See? This is why I went with PC and Windows 7.

Re:Security (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968830)

Let me tell you a true story. I had a client who was sick of having to deal with viruses and worms. For years he'd just seen it as par for the course. I persuaded him to get rid of the rotting horses in his office and replace them with PC's running Lunix. This was 2 years ago. I met him recently in a bar and he had nothing but compliments for what I did! Really, Lunix cannot be compared to rotting equines. His employees no longer vomit blood, and the air conditioning is so much cheaper now he doesn't have to leave the windows open to allow the smell of rotting horse to escape. Even if 2012 isn't the year of Lunix on the desktop, at least it will be the year in which my client sees employee fatality rates drop in to double digits. Thank you Linus!

Re:Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969046)

Linus? Don't you mean Lunis?

Yeah, right (1)

l00sr (266426) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968692)

Oh, this is rich. I think they mean, their head of MARKETING stepped down as a blatant MARKETING PLOY to sell more iPhones after his wildly successful STEALTH MARKETING campaign involving fake engineers accidentally-on-purpose forgetting their MARKETING iPhones in MARKETING bars. Well done, sir, well done.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37968824)

The iPhone 4S is indistinguishable from an iPhone 4 while locked. Your suggestion of an intentional leak makes no sense.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969184)

Not entirely true. The iPhone 4S has different breaks in the exterior antenna/molding and the position of the mute switch is slightly different.

Re:Yeah, right (1)

aiken_d (127097) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970172)

Does anyone else even bother reading SHOUTING like this? Usually I skip over the screamers without reading or replying, but just this once I'm curious about anyone who might bother to read it. If you did read it, was in in spite of the screaming or because of it? Is that ever an effective way to communicate?

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37973432)

But you didn't skip over this. Which proves you do bother reading the SHOUTING. PS, I think it is dumb to call it "shouting". Perhaps the parent should use strong tags, but he/she didn't. And it is really silly that someone would get worked up over it.

DON'T YOU THINK SO? I DO! I HOPE YOU HAVE A HEADACHE/HANGOVER SO THIS HURTS MORE.

Will the police help me if I lose my cell phone? (2)

mykos (1627575) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968882)

I would love to have Dial-A-SWAT at my disposal for losing a single cell phone like Apple does.

Re:Will the police help me if I lose my cell phone (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969456)

I would love to have Dial-A-SWAT at my disposal for losing a single cell phone like Apple does.

Yeah? Well, here's how you do it:

  • Start an American technology company.
  • Create a highly successful line of cell phones. If you're at the success level that other companies are changing their designs to be like yours, you're a good chunk of the way there.
  • After three successful generations, do a complete redesign with tantalizing new features.
  • Set up your release schedule to be fairly routine so people know when to expect it. The more time overseas competition will have to deaden the impact of your new device, the more SWAT team members you'll get.

Okay, once you reach this point, you'll get the 'Dial-A-Swat' service from virtually any city your HQ is in. You're free to lose your phone, then. There are other ways, too, but they all involve that phone being worth millions of dollars.

Re:Will the police help me if I lose my cell phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969720)

So fucking what? My phone is worth more to me then Apples phone is to 'it", because I am a PERSON, a human being. NOT some multinational corporation that has to catch their suicidal 'employees' in nets! But go ahead suck that rich ass, maybe they''ll let you eat at their trough.

Re:Will the police help me if I lose my cell phone (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969800)

So fucking what? My phone is worth more to me then Apples phone is to 'it"...

No, it is not.

Re:Will the police help me if I lose my cell phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37973176)

Excellent. All we need to do is be really ridiculously rich (also become a nonhuman person) and our problems become much more important!

Re:Will the police help me if I lose my cell phone (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37973352)

Excellent. All we need to do is be successful in making cell phones, thus our prototype phone becomes worth millions instead of a couple of hundred, then it's suddenly much more important!

FTFY. Seriously why does Apple hate have such a negative impact on IQs?

Should Have Been Fired (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 2 years ago | (#37968980)

They let this guy "step down". They should have fired his ass -- out of a cannon if necessary -- the day the news broke of his illegal involvement.

Just guessing here ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969076)

... but his biggest problem might have been letting Apple security pose or misrepresent themselves as SF police when searching Calderon's apartment (hence the lawsuit). That's a major no-no in most jurisdictions. In some places, real police are available to moonlight for private security firms (with real badges and uniforms).

The cop union is going to be pissed.

Just another corporation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37969150)

Nothing quite like allowing your employees to learn and grow, and to support them in the process. Thought, now that Jobs is finally gone, things might change.

Nope. Just another corporation.

Re:Just another corporation (1)

amiga3D (567632) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969216)

I doubt it will be for the better. With all of Jobs control freak ways and other foibles, the vision and the spark that made Apple stand out is gone.

This wasn't really over a couple phones (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 2 years ago | (#37969412)

The real reason he resigned was that he let China steal 22 complete Apple "Stoers", including employees and no one noticed.

Re:This wasn't really over a couple phones (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37970330)

Huh?

What if it was a Videotron (Quebecor) phone? (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970788)

It's not like it would be all over TV or the papers (never mind that, someone's knocking on the door)

Oops (1)

MikeURL (890801) | more than 2 years ago | (#37970850)

As a casual observer this takes something that was in my periphery and moves it front and center. Prior to this I was dismissing it all as a publicity stunt. Now I'm assuming they really did lose it, they really wanted it back and they really thought the best way to do that was send hired goons to the dude's house.

Yikes.

Re:Oops (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37972086)

Now I'm assuming ... they really thought the best way to do that was send hired goons to the dude's house.

That is an assumption, and it may be true or not true, we don't know. However, it is a _fact_ that you now make this assumption, which isn't favorable for Apple. And as the chief of Apple's security, you have to try to act in a way so that people don't make that kind of assumption.

check your source (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37971050)

I know it's bad form to actually read TFA, but seriously folks... it's a link to a threatpost article that itself links to fucking apple insider, a rumor blog that is well known for outright making shit up.

the official reason for Theriault's departure is that he's retiring. maybe that's not true, maybe it's really because of the hoopla over the police officer thing, but either way quoting apple insider is like quoting the weekly world news. let's wait until somebody with actual information makes a statement.

oh wait, this is slashdot, where people jump on the "bash apple" and "bash ms" wagons at the drop of a hat. nevermind, proceed as usual.

How does this even happen? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37975576)

I am sure everyone at Apple knows what happens when devices are lost. (I know people who work or worked there and we do not hear about all the lost devices or the subsequent firings, its much more frequent than you see in the news). If I worked there and had one of these devices I would NEVER take it out of the office. Is it really worth risking your job to be able to use your cool new gadget that only a few hundred people can play with? Not to me. Their policies are crazy strict. Unless your specific job requires constant out of the office testing why would you risk your highly desirable job to give free extra testing? The risk/reward is just not there.

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