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UK University Creates First Inkjet-Printed Graphene Circuit

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the yeah-but-the-ink-costs-will-kill-ya dept.

United Kingdom 60

MrSeb writes with this ExtremeTech excerpt aimed at the graphene enthusiasts out there: "You can add another crazy characteristic to graphene's ever-expanding list of 'wonder material' properties: It can now be used to create flexible, transparent thin-film transistors. ... using an inkjet printer. The discovery comes from researchers at the University of Cambridge, UK, who were trying to ameliorate the lackluster performance of existing inkjet-printed electronics. It's already possible to print standard CMOS transistors using different ferroelectric polymer inks, but the resultant circuit is so slow that it can't actually function as a computer. If graphene could replace or augment the interconnects or transistors, these circuits would be a lot faster — and that's what these Cambridge engineers have done. Furthermore, if you didn't think that was cool enough, the graphene-based ink that they've developed is transparent, too."

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60 comments

hao are y (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173280)

hi herro hao are yoou

Re: hao are y (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173304)

hi nao

Re: hao are y (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38177438)

ni hao sha gua!

Re: hao are y (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181026)

prease to show papers, gweilo

Pros and cons (2)

hamsolo474 (2477796) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173300)

well i think this is a great idea, printable circuits would make it much easier for the electronics hobbiest to build electronics. perhaps with printable circuits people might begin printing their circuits to look like their schematics. On the cons side its this sort of confusing technology that delayed me and i think stopped other people all together from attempting electronics, i was always interested in electronics but whenever i would crack open a commerical device to look at the circuits and attempt to gain some form of understanding as to how it works, the circuit would be laid out in some space saving non reabable/understandable design. this makes the circuits look overly complex and thus scares away people who otherwise might try their hand at it.

Re:Pros and cons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173324)

Where is the reference to IBM?

Re:Pros and cons (4, Interesting)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173528)

I can see a rather clever toy being made using this technology.

Imagine for a moment, that you have a simple robot chasis like hardware platform, with a flat ribbin cable type connector that is really really wide (like the kind that attaches the keyboard inside a laptop, or the ribbon going to the optical head assy of a dvd drive, only much wider.). It is meant to accept all the electronic innards of the robot other than actuators and external ports and battery pack on a printed sheet of slightly textured plastic, that has a commercially inlaid edge connector on one side that fits the really wide flat ribbon connector, and on the other a specially notched corner, or some other orientation feature.

The sheet is meant to be cleaned, like a dry erase board, but with a special solvent. This makes the sheets reusable.

The printer loads the sheets, which could be printed on both sides if desired, and prints circuits and traces that lead to the inlaid metal edge connector pads.

The idea is as a hobby electronics toy for enthusiasts and advanced school children. A kind of "build your own robot" kit with modular servos and sensors that attach to the simplified chasis a little like legos, and with an extremely low cost roll your own logic board that you print on the special plastic sheet. Since the circuit components are all inkjetted, component cost would be minimal: just the cost of the ink.

Anything from novelty antennas to special logic could be printed on the sheets.

I could really see such a toy being a fantastic learning aid, especially in a school setting. The limiting factors would be feature size, circuit impedence, and physical realestate on the printed sheet. While probably slower than an arduino, it would offer quite a bit more customization options, especially if it came with some design software that had sample patterns for apus, memory cell circuits, and various logic gates and simple IC units.

Re:Pros and cons (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174776)

Since the circuit components are all inkjetted, component cost would be minimal: just the cost of the ink.

Heh, have you priced any inkjet cartridges recently? :)

Re:Pros and cons (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175750)

Considering that graphene is realy inexpensive (you produce quite a bit od it when writing with a standard pencil)...

You are quite right about the issue though. The idea is to keep that cost low, or the toy wouold be substantially less popular. The idea is to make money on the accessories, not the consumables. (New sensors, actuators, battery p0acks, etc.)

Re:Pros and cons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38176278)

is it really graphene you're producing or just multiple layers (at best) of graphite?

UK University??? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173322)

I don't need someone to tell me where Cambridge is.

Re:UK University??? (4, Informative)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173364)

The US also has a Cambridge and built a University there.

Re:UK University??? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173538)

Interesting. I wonder where they go the idea?

Re:UK University??? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173584)

It's a franchise. Australia is due to open one soon.

Re:UK University??? (1)

ioshhdflwuegfh (1067182) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173592)

The US also has a Cambridge and built a University there.

Thanks dbill, that was like really insightful and stuff.

Re:UK University??? (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173774)

Thanks for the sarcasm, but it's an international forum here and it's not obvious to everyone.

Re:UK University??? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174326)

Cambridge University is almost 1000 years old and is one of the worlds best Universities. If it was MIT the title wouldn't be "A US University" would it?

Re:UK University??? (1)

PReDiToR (687141) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174594)

It's not "international," it's Americo-centric.

This is not a criticism.

And even the high-up fruit that we get on this site might not be aware of the knowledge centres of Airstrip One.

Re:UK University??? (4, Informative)

MasterPatricko (1414887) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173604)

The first president (Henry Dunster), the first benefactor (John Harvard), and the first schoolmaster (Nathaniel Eaton) of Harvard were all Cambridge University alumni, as was the then ruling (and first) governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, John Winthrop.

Not alumni (2)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175142)

Although Cambridge has given up and now uses the American term in fundraising, they were not in fact U of C alumni (and nor am I, to declare an interest). That's because if you go to Cambridge and graduate, you remain a member of the University for life or until the Senate votes you off, though obviously with no official title and unpaid. Same with Oxford.

Technically, therefore, Harvard was founded by members of the University of Cambridge.

The old joke is that graduates of Oxford intend to run the country (which they almost invariably do) while graduates of Cambridge don't care who runs the country so long as they get to do something interesting. Given how immensely successful Harvard has been, the rule obviously applied in this case.

Re:UK University??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173988)

I think the 'UK' part of the title made it made painfully obvious to which Cambridge the submitter is referring.

Given the international reputation of Cambridge University, I'm surprised by this comment, even from American readers. It's comparable to your Harvard over here.

Cambridge vs Cambridge... (1)

feranick (858651) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175438)

The real first Cambridge is the UK one. Cambridge, MA, USA was founded by students of the University of Cambridge, UK in the new world. Harvard was established first. Much later, MIT decided to make Cambridge. MA its own home. Despite these two giants, the University of Cambridge is a world leading university. Discounting it as a "UK University???" only shows utter ignorance.

Re:UK University??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38199298)

The US also has a Cambridge and built two Universities there.

FTFY.

University of Kentucky (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174608)

It is especially confusing because the University of Kentucky is referred to as UK in the states. Though I guess UK University would be redundant in that instance.

Doesn't surprise me (3, Interesting)

jd (1658) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173356)

This was a matter of time, given that they could do regular transistors and graphene is much simpler. What will be interesting, however, is what people do with this. There have been all kinds of interesting attempts at novel engineering (liquid crystal memories, for example) that either never got funded to completion or ended up going nowhere.

The latter is as it should be. There is no point in research if you know the results beforehand. It is merely fraud to only do what you know will work. The former is typical bigotry against those who actually do the real work in society.

Re:Doesn't surprise me (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173512)

That's why I fucked it up your asshole.

Re:Doesn't surprise me (3, Insightful)

ultranova (717540) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174222)

What will be interesting, however, is what people do with this.

Probably nothing. Inkjets tend to have their jets clog, which in turn leads to imperfections which render the circuit inoperative. While this can in part be helped by printing larger features, the resolution is already pretty low, and that makes the effective resolution - and thus the amount of components you can fit on a paper - even lower.

In short, in all but the most specialized applications it's better to just get a regular chip.

Re:Doesn't surprise me (1)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175542)


In short, in all but the most specialized applications it's better to just get a regular chip.

If by "specialised" you mean new, I'd agree with you. I'm sure people said the exact same thing when the CPU first was created, but nobody would consider a CPU specialised any more. What's specialised now could easily become the largest number of chips produced very quickly.

If this technology pans out as described, these little chips aren't going to replace silicon chips, they'll be used for applications where a silicon chip is either impractical because of expense, or too fragile. Silicon chips have been around far too long and developed far too much for anything to directly replace them.

Just an OS issue (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173470)

"but the resultant circuit is so slow that it can't actually function as a computer"

They just need to upgrade to Windows 7.

Cool, but effective? (2)

pryoplasm (809342) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173480)

I like the idea of a transparent circuit, however when it comes to troubleshooting it or trying to find a break in it, transparent might not be the best thing...

still, interesting. I am wondering if they can add something to the graphene to make it more visible without taking away some of graphenes properties...

Re:Cool, but effective? (3, Insightful)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173578)

Have you ever tried troubleshooting a microprocessor off the assembly line?

I think you're thinking in terms of replacing the circuit board etching kits for hobbiests. Sure, transparency would put a minor kink in that use, but not a show stopper.

(And I'm sure we can both think of cool things to do with the transparency.)

It would be interesting to know how much various pigments interferred with the electrical properties, of course. Home printing of circuit boards (circuit papers?) would definitely make a lot of projects easier, particularly when the active components can also be printed on, perhaps in the same pass.

Lo-res LSI.

Re:Cool, but effective? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173926)

I like the idea of a transparent circuit, however when it comes to troubleshooting it or trying to find a break in it, transparent might not be the best thing...

If you crack open the case of a modern CPU or microcontroller you will see that it's not too easy to find the different parts either.
You can usually find the internal memory (Cache in the case of CPU's and Flash/SRAM in the case of microcontrollers.) pretyy easy since they usually cover several square millimeters with the same pattern repeated over and over again but to be able to identify the other parts you pretty much need to have seen/constructed that particular design before.
With transparant electronics it would be possible to first print color-coded background for the different CPU parts before printing the electronics on top of this.
While it doesn't have any application in consumer electronics it would be pretty cool for educational purposes. That way you could easily find and measure on a microcontroller during code execution to see how signals propagate through the ALU each clock cycle.

Re:Cool, but effective? (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175390)

If transparent in visible light, is the circuit visible in UV light or other wavelengths?

target apps (2)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173594)

6809 processor on a sheet of paper.

And could we squeeze in a 6821, and a 6847? (Still lots of NTSC TVs not in the land fills. Intel deserves to die for HDCP.)

Capacitive keyboard? (Not a whole lot worse than the chiclet keyboards.)

Re:target apps (1)

Lazarian (906722) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175104)

Even better: print out an OLED screen along with a fully functional Radio Shack Color Computer. You could play Dungeons of Daggorath right on a sheet of paper.

I love that machine. I still have one :)

Re:target apps (1)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 2 years ago | (#38250080)

Wish I could afford to ship mine across the ocean. :-/

(Wish I had a place to keep it here. Not sure if my kids would appreciate it, though.)

Re:target apps (4, Interesting)

Almost-Retired (637760) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175462)

"63C09 processor on a sheet of paper."

There, I fixed it for you. You see the 6309 was the result of Hitachi obtaining a permission to build a 6809 that was a functional clone of the 6809, but had to call it something else other than its being a cmos 6809 chip, and were enjoined from ever saying there was a difference other than the resultant design was in cmos.

But something odd happened on the way to the foundry. When the 6809's op-codes were put into a map whose x/y was the value of the nibbles, there was quite a number of 'holes', so Hitachi filled them in with enhanced feature op-codes. Op-codes it remained for the users to discover because even when disclosed, Hitachi was prevented from even confirming their existence. Such things as several more accumulator registers (E,F, and Q which meant A,B,E,F combined for 32 bits), and where the 6809 had some mul functions that gave 16 bit answers, the 6309 had a new 16x16 multiply with a 32 bit answer, and a divide of 16 bits into 32 bits with a 16 bit answer and a 16 bit remainder in 39 clocks worst case. Loads and stores could be 32 bits wide, a slight speedup because it skiped an instruction fetch in the middle, and a switchable ability to pipe line the next instruction fetch during an otherwise idle bus cycle which made it about 10% faster because you actually had to turn it off by a write to the MD register.

The net result for the color computers OS9 operation system was, when combined with some bug fixing, nearly twice as fast at the same clock speed. FWIW, I have one in my 'coco3', running right now. We call it Nitros9 now. Community supported.

If this 'sheet of paper' can get to a 2 mhz clock speed, I can see newer developments made even easier already.
A notebook coco3 for instance. Just turn the 'page' to run a different test configuration. :)

Cheers, Gene

rogue engineers at hitachi (1)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 2 years ago | (#38250050)

Yeah, I thought the 6309 was cool, too.

But it was not the direction Motorola intended to take the 6809, and may have played a part in their decision to leave the 6809 and return to single-stack architecture in their embedded products.

OS-9/6809 was cool, too.

I spent (wasted?) a lot of time trying to build an OS/run-time that combined the position independence of OS-9 with a split stack parameter passing paradigm. The 6809 just didn't quite have enough resources for that. (And the 6309 took the design the wrong direction for that.)

Still fascinated by the design of the 6809, still not sure why.

Re:rogue engineers at hitachi (1)

Almost-Retired (637760) | more than 2 years ago | (#38251050)

(And the 6309 took the design the wrong direction for that.)

Maybe, but having those additional commands and register resources sure made optimizing the os9 code a bunch easier. Enough that it is about twice as fast as os9 was now because we fixed some bugs in the process, then ported the bugfixes back to the 6809 versions. We now build nitros9 for either cpu from the same src's.

  I did the initial and next couple of rbf.mn conversions myself. Plus I re-wrote the serial mouse driver just 3 years ago. The project is now called nitros9, and disk images to install it and make new boot disks are downloadable from the sourceforge site, and all the tools to rebuild it for winders/mac/linux are available from OpenCoco too. That is called "Toolshed". I keep a repo clone of both here on this machine.

Which direction would you have taken the 6309?

Thanks & Cheers, Gene

Re:rogue engineers at hitachi (1)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 2 years ago | (#38264344)

Well, now I don't remember. Did the 6309 expand DP?

Anyway, I'd have started by expanded the index registers, to make it possible to directly address a reasonably wide pixel display buffer and such. (Per the 68HC16 or whatever that was/is.) Widened DP to make it possible to reasonably use it to base process local variables in a large process space. Added another index register (and kept the U) to ease direct execution of p-machine or Forth kinds of intermediate code. Stuff in that vein.

OS-9 is cool, but I kept running into walls, subconsciously expecting the full Unix functionality in the tools. Didn't have the sense to just go out and buy a PC to use developing tools for OS-9, kept trying to bootstrap the tools on the native arch.

Say, is there anywhere still making real (as opposed to gate array) 63/809s? I'd sure rather teach my kids microcontrollers on the 6809 than on the 8080.

Re:rogue engineers at hitachi (1)

Almost-Retired (637760) | more than 2 years ago | (#38269050)

>Well, now I don't remember. Did the 6309 expand DP?
No, it was still an 8 bit register.
>Anyway, I'd have started by expanded the index registers, to make it possible to directly address a reasonably wide pixel display buffer and such. (Per the 68HC16 or whatever that was/is.) Widened DP to make it possible to reasonably use it to base process local variables in a large process space. Added another index register (and kept the U) to ease direct execution of p-machine or Forth kinds of intermediate code. Stuff in that vein.

And likely that would not have fit in the register decoding scheme. The extra registers/accumulators it got were, if my memory is correct:

A mode register, called MD, setting or clearing a couple of bits of that could switch the speedup stuffs on/off, so that with everything off, which was not the default, it ran exactly like the 6809 to preserve timing loops and such. The default mode had the instruction prefetch enabled. There was another bit too, but I don't recall its function ATM.

2 new 8 bit accumulator registers, E & F, with 16 bit load/store when addressed as W, and all 4 for 32 bit load/stores when addressed as Q which loaded or stored ABEF in that byte order. Data moves were a little faster since it didn't need a 2nd instruction fetch to load or store 32 bits.

Level 2 os9 brought us the ability to address 2 megabytes of main memory, but tandy didn't build the hardware into the GIME chip for the last 2 bits, so the stock coco3 has only a 512k memory capability. Tony DiStefano made a kit that added the last 2 bits expanding that to 2024K (decimal) and I have one of those kits in my coco3. The paging scheme within the S-U-X-Y accessible range puts any 8k block of that main memory into any 8k block of the processors 64k address space. So when I wrote 'myram', a ramdisk, only an 8k block of that memory was mapped into cpu space at any one microsecond, but the whole thing was available transparently to a program using /r0 as its virtual disk drive. However it is not noticeably faster than /dd or /s1, which are a pair of 1Gb seagate hawk scsi drives accessed by a Cloud9 TC^3 controller in the mpi's slot 2 (base 0 numbering). To move a megabyte from either storage medium is about (6309) 11 or (6809) 13 seconds and is controlled by how fast the cpu can do a block move. The diff between myram and everybody else's is that myram self formats to whatever size in 8k blocks is set in the 'cyl' variable in the descriptor, doing this in about 50 milliseconds before allowing the first access, and the deiniz operation returns every byte to the free memory pool. Very transparent to the user.

To get back to to 63x09, its being cmos meant little or no heating, so little that once I had pulled the psu stuffs out of mine and it is now powered by the same old AT psu that powers all the drives and the mpi, the heat rise there is, is right over the 2 dimms of memory, and is 2 degrees F!

Looking at the waveforms around this C rated (4mhz) chip in mine, with a 100 mhz scope, tells me it should be capable of operating at a considerably higher speed than the max of 1.79 mhz it does run at. At one point several years ago I was running 2 monitors by way of a WP-RS card in slot 1, which would have isolated that video from the cpu clock speed, and subbing a vco for the crystal that I could crank up to 10 or 20 mhz. But I think that would have been doomed to fail the irreplaceable GIME from over heating, so that never got 'tested'. Putting the video into the GIME torpedoed its power budget, and if I were young enough (I'm 77 now) to consider making a coco4, that would have been excised and put into a dedicated video chip. Something with enough output transistors in the design to pull to either rail in say 1/4 of a clock cycle. The existing GIME has a video output rise or fall time nearly twice the NTSC time of 110 ns, or about 240ns. So it cannot even explore the full bandwidth of an NTSC monitor.

Now, with those 15 kilohertz monitors falling over like fruit flies, vga or better lcd's have taken over, and we have a couple options to translate that not quite NTSC video up to them, one made by the game folks called Jammasoft, and the most recent version of Roy Justice's vga convertor which I am using now. He has done some magic with this effort, resulting in a considerably sharper image on my still crt type VGA monitor, downright pleasant to look at. If he can do one more shrink it could be fitted inside the coco even. Perhaps even now in a stock coco without all the piggy backed stuff sticking up out of mine. :)

>OS-9 is cool, but I kept running into walls, subconsciously expecting the full Unix functionality in the tools. Didn't have the sense to just go out and buy a PC to use developing tools for OS-9, kept trying to bootstrap the tools on the native arch.

We have tried, but since there aren't enough bits left to implement a full ACL in os9, there haven't been any great progress made along those lines. But I will also state that 20 some year ago, os9 was my teacher that taught me what to expect from a unix-like OS, and when I started using the amiga, I railed continuously about the things I could do on the coco that I couldn't do on the supposedly superior amigaos.

But that is all history thanks to a mistake in the basic architecture of amigaos. That was, that any files associated with booting the beast, remained locked forever. Said another way, all the backup sw available, including Diavolo, silently skipped those locked files so they, the most vital files on the system, were never backed up. So there was no way to recover to bare metal from an HD failure. At that point I built a k6-ii box to run redhat 5.0 and never looked back. That was about 6 from scratch box builds ago, this one, a quad core phenom with 4Gb of ram & 4 Tb of drives, is beginning to get 'long in the tooth' so I feel another box build is in my future if I have one. At 77 and diabetic, my warranty expired at least 20 years ago. I am however, still having fun, and have way the hell and gone too many hobbies because I am abouty the best example of an aging, past his prime JOAT you will meet. 63 years of playing in electronics
for a living, 47 of that in broadcast engineering. A C.E.T., decent mechanic, gunsmith, woodworker too.
And all that with an 8th grade education. So I have a GED and a degree from the University of Hard Knocks, which operates out of Alderson-Broddus College.

To see what keeps the old man out of the bars (most of the time), take a look at
<http://coyoteden.dyndns-free.com:85/gene>
But I don't show off the guns there for obvious reasons.

>Say, is there anywhere still making real (as opposed to gate array) 63/809s? I'd sure rather teach my kids microcontrollers on the 6809 than on the 8080.

There are a few places that still have some limited stocks of both chips, google might be your friend there.
I'd look at jameco.com first though. And Mark, at <http://cloud9tech.com> has a few 6309's squirreled away, or can put one in your coco, also has a few coco3's, brand new in the boxes for sale.

There are also several FPGA versions of the whole coco available, but because all the tools aren't available that the Altura or Spartan tools need to run on the pclos I'm running right now, I haven't splurged and bought either board so I can play in that arena. Too many other things to do, like today go saw out a strip of heavy brass and shape it on my milling machine to make a scope mount for a crossbow, and get it done before the deer season ends for good on the 31st. The owner of the bow has a class Y license, meaning he is handicapped somehow and can use a crossbow to hunt. I met him last night, and at that point the handicap was about 2 too many beers. ;-) But he has the sheckles and its a simple enough job for a small cnc milling machine, so... Friend of a good friend sort of thing anyway.

For more info on the 6309 command set, google for Chet Simpson, he did a decode as a student several years ago.

Have fun. I need to get to it while its warm outside.

Cheers, Gene

Just wondering (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173680)

So, will this lead to downloadable (based on open source hardware and OS) devices? And downloadable designs for your devices as well?

Transparent (2)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#38173706)

You could now print an invisible computer onto a piece of paper?

More awesome than can be described.

Re:Transparent (1)

bobaferret (513897) | more than 2 years ago | (#38177092)

I can see the teachers now requesting that students subject their paper to powerful EM pules before using it to take a test. Or printing a wifi enabled cameras on the TP in the girls bathroom.

Hate to be a downer, but... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38173916)

I'll bet it causes cancer.

Re:Hate to be a downer, but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174268)

Only if you stick it up your ass. Am I doing it right?

Re:Hate to be a downer, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175284)

No, you've got it all wrong. You need to smear graphite all over your hands while you handle your food cooked in a teflon coated skillet while sitting on your freshly scotchgarded sofa. THEN you'll have cancer.

Re:Hate to be a downer, but... (1)

GaryOlson (737642) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175408)

I'll bet it causes cancer.

Only if printed on white mice at a circuit density 1000 times higher than normal human circuits.

Wunderbar (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174012)

Oh Graphehe...I wanna have your children.

Really? (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174584)

Inkjet printers are pretty much the bane of all technology. I would strongly prefer that they be used as little as possible.

Re:Really? (1)

wild_berry (448019) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174658)

You like your OLED display? That's inkjet-printed. I figure that Cambridge University has tamed the Inkjet -- the OLED was discovered there, too.

Cheap ones perhaps (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175182)

Have you ever used a high end inkjet printer like a Designjet? Or seen an Indigo working? Or even a high end office inkjet printer like a Ricoh Gelsprinter? (Ours is well over 20000 pages so far and has never blocked or thrown a bad page).

You really cannot compare a disposable bit of plastic with what inkjet technology is capable of. It's like saying that a BMW 5 series is useless for getting anywhere because Chinese kids' tricycles suck.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181534)

Wave your magic wand, click your ruby slippers three times and it will be so.

This + 3d printing (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175180)

Opens up a lot of possibilities ( once the bugs are worked out ). Not only can you make simple mechanical devices, but now you could create control systems for them too.

One of these days PirateBay will be more than music and video .. but torrents for actual 'stuff'..

What does speed have to do with computation? (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175194)

The purist in me has a problem with the wording in the summary and first article.... I mean, it's one thing to say that the resultant circuits are too slow for any practical application as computers, but speed would have absolutely no bearing on whether or not computations can actually be performed with it, making the notion of the circuits being too slow to function as a computer a wholly worthless statement that even at best is very misleading, and at worst outright false.

The first? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175196)

In Thunderbird the partial headline read 'inkjet-printed Grap' and so to me I thought it was...
'UK University Creates First Injet-Printed Crap', but people print crap all the time, what is different about their printed crap?

Before you get too excited... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38179212)

Graphene isn't a semiconductor in the conventional sense, so the transistor-like structures that can be created with it don't have a full-off state. You can do some very interesting things with them, but nothing that looks like VLSI digital circuitry, unless you include conventional semiconductors as well. You'll more likely see it in analog applications, or as a component of VLSI circuits that include silicon as well.

6809 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38182890)

I remember those 6809 can be found in the Web Camera [hkcolordigital.com] , so don't be suprised by this news.

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