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Airport Security: Thermal Lie-Detectors, Cloned Sniffer Dogs

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the with-liberty-and-strip-searches-for-all dept.

Security 101

PolygamousRanchKid writes with this quote from CNN about the future of airport security: "Earlier this year, the International Air Transport Association demonstrated its vision for the 'checkpoint of the future' — a series of neon-lit tunnels, each equipped with an array of eye-scanners, x-ray machines, and metal and liquid detectors. ... 'Known Travelers,' (those who have completed background checks with government authorities) for instance, will cruise through the light blue security corridor with little more than an ID check, while those guided through the yellow 'Enhanced' corridor will be subjected to an array of iris scans and sensitive contraband detectors. ... Feeling guilty? Got something to hide? A team of UK-based researchers claim to have developed a thermal lie-detection camera that can automatically spot a burning conscience. ... Professor Byeong-chun Lee, who established his reputation in 2005 as the driving force behind the world's first ever dog clone, has bought a new breed of super-sniffers to South Korea's Incheon Airport. They may look like an ordinary pack of golden Labrador Retrievers, but these dogs are all genetically identical to 'Chase,' a dog whose legendary snout kept him top of Incheon's drug-detection rankings right up until his retirement in 2007."

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Oh, god... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174484)

Please don't give the TSA any ideas!

Re:Oh, god... (5, Funny)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174536)

Looks too efficient for TSA, their dream is a luggage shredder instead of a x-ray scanner, and a wipeout style obstacle course(that you have to run naked, with live streams to the public internet filming it all) with blaring sirens and powertripping functionaries with bullwhips lining the course to drive the herds onwards.
Contracted at a cost of $12 billions, annually.

Re:Oh, god... (4, Funny)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174692)

They didnt mention it, but that is exactly what the "red corridor" will consist of.

Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (4, Interesting)

fyngyrz (762201) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174750)

I'm simply not going to them any more. Society has turned them into a manifestation of cowardice and the very worst possible kind of decision-making. I won't support the industry any longer, at least insofar as I have a choice (I'm referring here to the use of my taxes, something out of my control.)

I feel bad for those of you who must fly, I really do. All the jokes we used to make about the nazi's and the soviets and "papers, please", have come home to roost.

I wonder how much longer we'll be free to drive without being subjected to this kind of thing?

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (3, Informative)

El Torico (732160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174814)

It's even worse than the "papers, please" that we all know and fear. The TSA goons don't even know what they are looking at. I told one at Dulles Airport that my Common Access Card was in my wallet so I wasn't going to just hand my wallet over to him. He just gave me a blank stare for a second and then said, "What do you mean you won't give me your wallet?"
I pulled out my CAC and explained what it was to him and why I just couldn't hand it over. In order to get through the checkpoint, I gave him my wallet and CAC after demanding that another TSA agent observe him while he had it. Yes, it's wasn't a win over the TSA, but at least two of those bureaucrats know what a Common Access Card is now.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174996)

Why did you have to give them your wallet?

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (1)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175078)

Because they work for the goverment

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (1)

El Torico (732160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175112)

Basically, that's it. The TSA guy never provided any reference to any law or regulation; he just repeated himself until I agreed. At least the other TSA guy watched the first one.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (1)

jftitan (736933) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175530)

I cant wait for the first government worker security clearance/pay-grade fights begin at these checkpoints.

    See what happens when someone who works in another form of government gets harassed or someone they are with gets the treatment by TSA. "I've got a GS something something security clearance, I fucking have a paygrade 10x what you make you Fucking TSA overpaid rental cop!" When a TSA supervisor arrives, the same pissed off government employee takes the next TSA agent to task because they are STILL lower level government paid autobots.

    This is where i have a very strange irk when I see US servicemen in uniform AND with badges in sight, get the same treatment as common passengers. About a year ago, even Airline Pilots had to go through the same TSA treatment. Yet the way we handle these things its like we need to create a law that stops this. Versus realizing, this never existed in the first place until this agency was formed. The problems we have today are much like problems we have had since the dawn of time, yet we have to make some form of government agency to make sure the newly created rules apply.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38187386)

I've never been allowed to bring a wallet through a backscatter x-ray. You have to either put your wallet on the security belt before you step into the backscatter, or you have to hand it over for separate inspection after the backscatter.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (2)

Plugh (27537) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175136)

...or, you could fight against the tyranny. Thousands of are are... and we're winning [freestateproject.org]

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175860)

Wait, I travel quite a bit (admittedly not through Dulles), and I've never had to give over my wallet.. just an article of ID. Is this common practice?

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (1)

El Torico (732160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38178490)

I certainly hope not. It's the first time that I've had to give them my wallet at any airport.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (0)

dave420 (699308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175574)

Equating the TSA to the "papers, please" mentality of the Nazis and the USSR is doing a great disservice to all three. I'm all for hyperbole, indeed it's the absolute best, but your comparison is incredibly cheap.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38178990)

Shut the fuck up, TSA shill.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175932)

It's gone far beyond the nazis at this point really. It seems they would be really proud of some of the ways the goverments now strip away rights and enforce control on people these days.

Too bad digging one up and asking them what they thought wouldnt do any good. It might be entertaining. In a sad sad way.

Re:Know what'll make airports REALLY safe for me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38191630)

I'm simply not going to them any more. Society has turned them into a manifestation of cowardice and the very worst possible kind of decision-making. I won't support the industry any longer, at least insofar as I have a choice (I'm referring here to the use of my taxes, something out of my control.)

I feel bad for those of you who must fly, I really do. All the jokes we used to make about the nazi's and the soviets and "papers, please", have come home to roost.

I wonder how much longer we'll be free to drive without being subjected to this kind of thing?

hellno dont do id

Re:Oh, god... (1)

GarryFre (886347) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175162)

I predict a sudden rise in incidents of hysterical blindness.

Re:Oh, god... (1)

sco08y (615665) | more than 2 years ago | (#38179196)

Looks too efficient for TSA, their dream is a luggage shredder instead of a x-ray scanner, and a wipeout style obstacle course(that you have to run naked, with live streams to the public internet filming it all) with blaring sirens and powertripping functionaries with bullwhips lining the course to drive the herds onwards.

Contracted at a cost of $12 billions, annually.

Nah, you're confusing management and the rank and file. Your typical TSO's fantasy looks more like this:

On Monday Bob gets a promotion, with a brand new uniform with a designer jacket, cooler boots and shades, and just loaded with ribbons and medals and bangles and crap, and of course there are all kinds of speeches and celebration. Then Tuesday and Wednesday Bob does some security training which would, naturally, include a reflexive fire course, advanced driver's course, and a computer hacking course. Bob arrives at the airport for work Thursday, and spends the morning talking to his friends, and walking around dispensing wisdom and guidance to the clueless herds. He arrives at a terminal and checks bags for a few minutes, until some suspicious individual just doesn't look right... All the machines pass him, but Bob has a gut feeling that this individual is suspicious, and then he notices a bulge and says, "Sir... I just need... to check that bag one more time." Naturally, the suspicious individual knows he's caught, tries to run for it, and Bob takes him out with a few well-placed kung fu moves. The rest of Thursday is spent with Bob assisting a joint federal taskforce in taking down the terrorist organization he's just uncovered.

And, of course, Bob doesn't work Fridays.

Re:Oh, god... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38182618)

What's efficient about pseudo-science lie detectors and what do drug sniffing dogs have to do with protecting planes?

Re:Oh, god... (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174582)

Oh, they have their own plans; FTFA:

In the United States, the Transport Security Administration (TSA) is not just relying on fancy gadgets and genetically enhanced nostrils to improve security: it's turning to good old-fashioned human instinct.

Behavioural Detection Officers (BDOs) have been trained to engage passengers in casual conversation in an effort to weed out suspicious behavior.

There is no word if the TSA plans to clone BDOs, like Korean Sniffer Dogs . . .

Re:Oh, god... (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174696)

Cloning is illegal in the USA.

Re:Oh, god... (3, Funny)

Merls the Sneaky (1031058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174870)

Human cloning is banned. Expect the new batch of cloned TSA agents in approximately fifteen years.

Re:Oh, god... (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175230)

Human cloning is banned. Expect the new batch of cloned TSA agents in approximately fifteen years.

Well, the obvious solution to this is to hybridize a TSA agent with the super nosed Labrador Retriever clone. You get the perfect employee - works for treats and an occasional pat on the head, can sniff out anything from marijuana to C4, lives about 10 years so no long term Social Security / Medicare costs and is one hell of a lot cuter than the vast majority of current TSA agents.

What's not to like?

Re:Oh, god... (2)

phorm (591458) | more than 2 years ago | (#38176232)

What's not to like?

Crotch sniffing?

That's better than ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38177188)

... the current situation of crotch groping!

Re:Oh, god... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38177520)

Already been done [ytmnd.com] with Jeff Goldblum. If they can cross Goldblum with a yellow lab, a generic TSA agent and golden retriever should be NOTHING.

Re:Oh, god... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175426)

Good thing that the moral weight of doing something as objectionable as cloning animals is significantly lightened if you just pay others for having done the same act!

Re:Oh, god... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175526)

10 years in prison for thought-crime.

Unfortunately... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174492)

Unfortunately the terrorists have been using the same tactics. Having made a cloned cross-breed of the Underwear-Bomber and Shoe-Bomber, TSA officials are now being instructed to pay careful attention to bombs between the ankles and hips.

We'll never win.

Re:Unfortunately... (1)

planimal (2454610) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174518)

also deep inside the anus

Please share (1)

abuelos84 (1340505) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174494)

What in god's name are this people smoking??
A "guilty feeling" detector? wtf?
I want a little of that grass, please...

Re:Please share (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174558)

An excellent way to justify singling out Chinese tourists if ever I saw one.

Re:Please share (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174560)

Just being herded through that bright yellow tunnel would freak me out enough to set off all the alarms in the building.

Re:Please share (1)

GarryFre (886347) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175204)

They're paranoid! Are you sure you want that kind of grass?

When flying while feeling guilty is outlawed (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174508)

then only sociopath will fly.

Re:When flying while feeling guilty is outlawed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174978)

>A team of UK-based researchers claim to have developed a thermal lie-detection camera that can automatically spot a burning conscience.

Except for sociopaths.

Re:When flying while feeling guilty is outlawed (2)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175186)

Or, put another way, except for most terrorists. After all, if they had even a modicum of guilt, they wouldn't commit such atrocities. Therefore, without even looking at this technology, we can fairly definitively state that it cannot possibly be effective at preventing terrorist attacks of any sort.

That won't stop the TSA from spending billions of dollars to buy them and install them in airports across the country, though, and this is why our government is going broke. Want to shave of 8.1 billion dollars of ugly pork barrel spending? Dismantle the TSA.

Re:When flying while feeling guilty is outlawed (1)

meerling (1487879) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175536)

I'll put that right there with my perpetual motion machine. Sure you can detect ir, and lying for some people may cause a discernable alteration, but I'd bet it's nothing compared to the standard variations of the vast sea of inherited characteristics of humanity, combined with the multiple and growing stress factors involved in airport 'security' these days. At best that system could probably only give a highly trained examiner in laboratory conditions a 2 or 3% improvement over random chance at detecting lies, and we all know that TSA personnel don't even qualify as moderately trained in this stuff.

Wonder how it would work on my family, considering my wife and daughters temperatures are about 2 full degrees higher than mine. And to be honest, I don't react well to being grilled by anyone. My daughter on the other hand is a little nuclear meltdown on her own that loves telling made up stories to everyone about anything. She seems to consider being questioned nothing but an opportunity to spin tales based on whatever questions she's asked. You should try asking her where she left her shoes sometime. So far she hasn't claimed ninjas were involved, she tends to save those for events involving presents rather than missing clothes.

Great (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174516)

Go ahead, put this in the airports, see if I care. Bring that crap near my beloved train stations, and we will have a problem.

Re:Great (2)

jon_doh2.0 (2097642) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175976)

So, you're that person in the US taking the train? Don't you know that is reminiscent of European style socialism, you unpatriotic individual, you.

"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (4, Interesting)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174546)

Herded, you mean. Why do you people continue to put up with this crap? And don't try to tell me it's only in the USA. Europe was doing intrusive "screening" long before the USA started: we used to be criticised by Europeans for having "lax security" because we allowed people to get on airplanes without first proving that they were not armed criminals.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (2)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174574)

Because when even many liberals don't see what's wrong with it those of us that do end up with no representation. I'm going to be flying again in a couple months and I'm going to take a plane out of Canada because I'm not interested in putting up with that unconstitutional crap.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (3, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174654)

Which liberals would you be referring to? The majority of politicians in the United States are conservatives, with varying degrees of conservatism. Long before the TSA, so-called "liberals" in the United States government so no problem with our prison population or the enormous power that the law enforcement agencies in this country have amassed. You already have no representation -- when will you start voting third party or perhaps running your own campaign?

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (1)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174800)

don't blame me i voted for kodos

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (2)

jo42 (227475) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174866)

The majority of politicians in the United States are conservatives

When did being a 'conservative' become equivalent to a head-up-yer arse fascist?

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175816)

When did being a 'conservative' become equivalent to a head-up-yer arse fascist?

When the majority of conservatives started acting like head-up-yer-arse fascists, probably? If I had to pinpoint it, I'd say about a week after 9/11.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (1)

ProfanityHead (198878) | more than 2 years ago | (#38177788)

When did being a 'conservative' become equivalent to a head-up-yer arse fascist?

1980. Ronald Reagan became president.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (2)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174904)

> Which liberals would you be referring to?

Most of those I know. They kvetch about abuses but they can't see that the entire program is fundamentally wrong.

> You already have no representation...

I am, unfortunately, in a very small minority. Whlle many (though still a minority) dislike TSA and friends they don't seem to consider it important enough to have much effect on their votes or their behavior. They also would never, ever vote for a Republican and so the Republicans write them off while the Democrats take them for granted. Meanwhile, the supporters of the "war on terror" make it clear that being sound on security is critical for their support. Thus I have as much representation as does any menber of a small fringe minority. That's democracy (and yes, we do have democracy here. It just isn't the magic potion you want to believe it is).

> ...when will you start voting third party...

I've been voting third party (and writing-in when possible) for more than forty years. Most of the third parties are full of kooks, though.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175018)

The majority of politicians in the United States are conservatives, with varying degrees of conservatism.

Seriously? National healthcare is conservative? Deficit spending is conservative? The TSA is conservative? Big government is conservative?

I don't think you understand what the word "conservative" means.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175164)

There are few conservatives in office in the US. Sorry that everyone doesn't fit in a nice little slot that servers your narrow minded ideals.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174794)

What liberals? You mean the ones who voted to enlarge and extend the PATRIOT Act? You mean the ones who want to ban records due to content? You mean the ones who talk about environmentalism but use as much power as any 50 of the common peasants, er, I mean citizens? Those liberals?
 
What we've termed as liberals in the US are the same as every other politician. I wouldn't use the term conservatives either as the conservatives in the US are a hollow shell of what a real conservative is. Instead we have two sides of the same coin. They use the little R or D tags to keep gimps in line much in the same way that professional wrestling used the "good buys/bad guys" teams to keep 8 year olds buying into their crap. And it works. No corporation in this country could hope for this level of success as what the Republicans and Democrats gained in getting you people to think they're really two separate parties.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174848)

those of us that do end up with no representation

You live in a democracy[1]. Run for office. Represent yourself.

[1]: Yes yes, representative democratic republic.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (1)

Anonymus (2267354) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174796)

Have you traveled outside the US?

European airports don't do any of this shit, and in fact just banned the x-ray machines. And yet, they could still probably criticize American airports for "lax security" because all of this is just security theater and does fuck all to actually secure the flight.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (2)

Anonymus (2267354) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174802)

I should say "didn't do any of this shit before American flights started requiring all incoming flights to do it" because there is a lot of crap one has to go through now. My local airport just has a separate terminal specifically for American and Israeli flights so they can keep the bullshit to a minimum for passengers flying to less paranoid destinations.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181738)

I am reminded of a trip I took a few years ago. I had arrived in Paris and was going through the security checkpoint in the airport. I placed my bag on the xray machine and as I was taking my shoes off, I noticed the two security guards laughing at me. When I walked through the metal detector, it went off. One of the guards asked me if I had a belt on or something, which of course I did but forgot to remove. All he asked is that I lift my jacket to show him and he waved me through without having to go back through the metal detector.

That is how it should be at an airport checkpoint. No suspicion without reason, no having to take off clothes, no crotch grabs and no crazy naked pedophile machines.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175708)

I put up with it because I don't know what else to do. I fly over 100K miles per year for work - no choice if I want to keep my job. If I could find political candidates who were opposed to this sort of thing, I'd vote for them.

Re:"...guided through the 'Enhanced' corridor..." (1)

zyzko (6739) | more than 2 years ago | (#38176764)

Herded, you mean. Why do you people continue to put up with this crap? And don't try to tell me it's only in the USA. Europe was doing intrusive "screening" long before the USA started: we used to be criticised by Europeans for having "lax security" because we allowed people to get on airplanes without first proving that they were not armed criminals.

Europe has its own problems, to simplify things (hey, isn't that what discussing on Internet is for?) historically it has been that in Europe, you have passports, are required to have a social security number and uniquely identified and once you are cleared you are free to travel. See the Schengen treaty. This of course involves all kinds of nasty stuff of information exchange between authorities but it has been quite non-intrusive - if you have a passport from Schengen country and are not on Interpol/Europol list you have quite a clear passage. Same has been true for "outsiders" entering EU - once you are in and cleared a few basic database checks you are ok to travel without difficulty.

Then enter 9/11 and the security hysteria. Now we have the worst of both worlds - the USA is demanding passanger information from EU (in addition to which it has collected before, plus fingerprinting and photographs) and EU has to implement the intrusive technical measures; visit Schipol, Amsterdam for an example, the nudescanners and extra checks are only for USA-bound flights because USA requires them.

So - we now have the pat-this, register that, screen-your-shoes of USA (where "serial numbering" of people has been and is a great big scary no-no) and the data collecting tradition of Europe (bio-passports, RFID:s, possibility to abuse on global travel databases) combined. If you ask me this is a) a huge money sink and b) a disaster waiting to happen.

Large databases of people ("proving you are not armed criminal") is problematic, yes. Can it be abused, yes. Is it foolproof, no way. Does it prevent cross-border crime (remember, Europe is not as tight union as the USA yet and there are internal treaties inside- and outside EU states), yes, somewhat, and it has to be done, and USA is doing exactly the same but you just have dozens of different data sources because "GUID for people" is scary shit. Combine these approaches and watch the mess boiling...

Canine intelligence (1)

Commontwist (2452418) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174562)

Cloning dogs is interesting but just wait until selective breeding makes them smart enough to use bark-to-speech devices.

"Woof." *Cocaine.*
"Grrr..." *Explosives.*
"Bark bark bark! Whine, whine, whine." *Milkbone!!!*

About time! (1)

nullpoint3r (2517992) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174570)

Finally I will safe at an airport!

Re:About time! (2)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175148)

At airport prices you will not safe very much.

Misleading Summary (5, Insightful)

mutherhacker (638199) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174576)

The summary is completely misleading.

According to TFA, thermal-lie detection, the dog clone, the bluetooth passenger tracking and the behavioral detection officers are in no way linked to IATA's vision of the checkpoint of the future. They are just independent developments in transport security but nonetheless irrelevant to IATA.

For everybody's reference IATA is owned and funded by private airline companies. They are not government funded in any way IATA's website [iata.org]

10 free wordpress themes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38174636)

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"Known traveller" lines? (4, Insightful)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174672)

What a load of crap.

Anyone with a security clearance should be ashamed to use such a line for a multitude of reasons. Keep it real, and stand in line with those you are charged with protecting.

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175508)

It's about limited resources. Known travelers aren't exempt from enhanced screening, they just have a lower probability of being selected. Which makes sense because you can't screen everyone, so encourage people to undergo additional screening up front. Why do it? Faster lines. You don't have to do it.

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (1)

blindseer (891256) | more than 2 years ago | (#38179456)

because you can't screen everyone

If they cannot screen everyone then the screening is meaningless. Security only works if every threat is stopped. Think of it this way, would you buy an oven mitt that said on the label it will keep your hand from getting burned 90% of the time?

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (1)

kvezach (1199717) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181110)

Screening is already meaningless. Anyone who knows Bayes' theorem can figure that one out. The prescreening is simply a consequence of the security organizations finding out that they do have to respect reality to some extent: people won't put up with it otherwise.

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175758)

Pre-screening has a number of problems:

Can someone find out why they failed the pre-screen test, and challenge it in court (with the state to pick up legal expenses if the denial was unfounded?)

What guarantee does the traveler have that their data will be kept secure. One of the earlier pre-screeners (clear? fasttrack?) lost a laptop full of unencrypted personal data.

Will political statements be used to deny pre-screened approval? If I organize a legal protest against the TSA, or write a blog in support of a terrorist organization, will I be denied pre-screening? Will the TSA recognize the difference between aiding terrorism, and supporting the political goals of terrorist organizations?

As pre-screening becomes common, especially for wealthy frequent travelers, there will be less political support to make the non pre-screened lines tolerable. Will we start to see multi-hour delays and humiliating searches to compel all travelers to get pre-screened. (Its completely optional: you can "volunteer" to give the TSA a wide range of personal information, or you can stand in line for 3 hours and be body-cavity searched before every flight - your choice....).

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (1)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175852)

Agreed, it's a matter of time before someone's ID gets swiped and the imposter gets waved through with contraband. Of course, the TSA will deny it's their fault for such a gaping hole and try prosecuting the poor sap whose ID got stolen.

Heck, with such a system I'm sure the terrorists will target TSA employees to steal their ID.

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (1)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180060)

Yeah just put your money where your mouth is and charter a flight. The TSA is just for the nobodies the poor and the soon to be ex-middle class, getting you used to your new lifestyle where random strip searches for you and your family are the norm. Where even giving a dirty look to your betters, the rich and greedy, will earn you and your family extended discomfort and humiliation, with repeated strip searches and body probes in your own home.

Perhaps no one has noticed the glaring difference between public flights of the nobodies and private flights of the rich and greedy. You schmucks don't even realise how hot the water is becoming or how close to boiling it really is or how far the whole TSA bullshit thing has crossed the line.

Re:"Known traveller" lines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38176184)

Anyone with a security clearance should be ashamed to use such a line for a multitude of reasons. Keep it real, and stand in line with those you are charged with protecting.

What are you talking about? We've already gone through an expensive process in order to acquire a clearance to do our jobs. Why waste more time and money to screen us every time we go through an airport?

Paranoia for Profiteering (2, Insightful)

failedlogic (627314) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174730)

If I didn't know any better, it seems like the media (still) buys into this idea of intense paranoia it is being sold to by government and private industry. It reminds people that there might be a terrorist on their plane. If there's no security the plane will blow up and you'll die. If there's 1000x more security, no terrorist, but the plane might still crash. Or, I'm willing to bet, 99.999999999% of the time you'll land safe and sound.

This whole article sounds to me like profiteering.

will cruise through the light blue security corridor with little more than an ID check, while those guided through the yellow 'Enhanced' corridor will be subjected to an array of iris scans and sensitive contraband detectors. ... Feeling guilty? Got something to hide? A team of UK-based researchers claim to have developed a thermal lie-detection camera

"the world's first ever dog clone, has bought a new breed of super-sniffers"

Hmmmm.... there;s 3 new growth industries right there. Iris scan, dector, the camera. These enchanced corridors will be built by some government contractor on a no-bid contract. Training these new dogs - the DEA and company will ask for budget increases.

I don't live in the US. If you guys ever implement this, I'm staying out of the US. I'm not going to fly to a country where I have to board an American plane and go through DHS inspection.

If our food, our homes and our cars were to go through this much scrutiny - are the airplanes REALLY checked very often? - then we'd be a lot safer. This is BS and everyone here knows it.

Re:Paranoia for Profiteering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175034)

I bet this is quite a big deal in those deadlocked budget meetings that made the press earlier this week.

When presented with the option to shave a few billion off the budget by not buying cloned dogs and super security corridors, or losing the next election because their opponent can now claim they are soft on terrorism, which do you think they choose?

Spin profiteering for the benefit of liberty? (1)

jago25_98 (566531) | more than 2 years ago | (#38182092)

Is there anything we can do to turn this around?

We know security is driven by profits, can we have liberties driven by profits?

For example, laptops are allowed on planes for business people. What can we learn from this?
I think we can learn that people with the cash will be able to bypass all the security clearing. Certainly we can already do this by private chartering a plane. Perhaps we can look into lowering the cash needing to do so, so that eventually only the very poor have to undergo various scans.

So, laptop computers, were they originally banned? If so how did business go about influencing having them back? That's the process we need to know more about; corrupting the corruptors.

It a compromise but better to have a plan B than nothing.

these ppl should be sent to alaska mining complex. (1)

Mr_Nitro (1174707) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174736)

I think this perfectly show the current level of society and human thinking in modern media hype driven society. Bottom low. To blow up a bunch of persons it just take a bunch of persons... no plane, no train... no anything. Wake up... 'terrorists' will just laugh at our self-inflicted useless and sick expensive 'measures' ...And rich pigs with hands into 'security' business and such bullshit will just get richer.... When too much will be too much...I hope it won't be too late as well.

Trusted traveler ID check (4, Insightful)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174790)

Does anyone think the black market cost of a stolen, forged, or corruptly issued trusted traveler ID will be outside the budget of a terrorist group?

Re:Trusted traveler ID check (3, Interesting)

HBI (604924) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175174)

They don't care since it's all theater anyway. Why else have all the visible paraphernalia? Obscure security mechanisms, ala casinos, would be more effective if one wanted actual security.

The intent was to convince people to fly again after 9/11. So they made it as in your face as possible. The people didn't come back in the numbers which flew before, so they've been tweaking the process since then, both to increase usage and to combat new scares like shoe bombers and underwear bombers. They're lost. They don't know how to fix the problem and continue to make it worse.

They will never give up until forced to.

Re:Trusted traveler ID check (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175562)

The solution is to fight dogmatic nonsense, like religious fundamentalism in ANY form just like the nazis, communists and other psychotic nonsense was fought. All out, Don't placate them, don't support organizations and nit wits that support this kind of thinking, stop thinking that a dogmatist that doesn't think you are a human being can be reasoned with, don't dicta yourself be manipulated by so called intellectuals into thinking their violence is justified because they are oppressed, stop equivocating and stop making excuses for this kind of evil. Take the hard stance and stop playing arm chair quarterback and take a stand for liberty and reason.

These assaults on freedom and liberty, in every form, exist because people don't want to face the hard truth that some people really honestly believe in the insane dogmatic crap their have been brainwashed with to the point where they see no problem killing everyone that stands in the way of their one true way. They don't respect human liberty and consider free choice and personal responsibility as some kind of vile poisonous infection of the brain, to be stomped out to save you from yourself.

Stand up and fight for your liberty. That means going after religious extremists in any form and from every religion as well as the political forces that lack to courage to fight that evil, and instead either fan it for their gain or ignore it for their own purposes and choose to heap more evil upon you as a cheap excuse for solving the problem.

Re:Trusted traveler ID check (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175910)

Does anyone think the black market cost of a stolen, forged, or corruptly issued trusted traveler ID will be outside the budget of a terrorist group?

Considering most of the 9/11 attackers used their real names to board the planes I don't think it is relevant if they can get fake ID or not.

Putting neon on the security theater. (5, Insightful)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 2 years ago | (#38174914)

"International Air Transport Association demonstrated its vision for the 'checkpoint of the future' â" a series of neon-lit tunnels, each equipped with an array of eye-scanners, x-ray machines, and metal and liquid detectors."

Bomb in the lineup before you get to the neon tunnel.

"Feeling guilty? Got something to hide? A team of UK-based researchers claim to have developed a thermal lie-detection camera that can automatically spot a burning conscience."

Guilty? Hell no, I'm going to be going to Heaven as a beloved martyr in about five minutes!

Re:Putting neon on the security theater. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175364)

This deserves focus and emphasis. An infared camera and software that detects heat in the brain being used as a lie detector is a bit questionable, but plausable. However, the technology here is by definition undermined by the very probem it's trying to fix. Do you really think these terrorists are about to kill themselves and thousands of innocent civilians? I do too. Guess what though? They don't. To them, they're doing the work of their god, and nothing could be more righteous. I think what they're doing is a line of horse shit, and so does 99% of the rest of the world, but it's not our brains in their head, it's theirs, and that's what we're scanning. These people don't feel any guilt, any remorse, nothing. If anything, they probably feel a sense of pride. By that metric, this system could be retuned to detect pride or happiness - but then anyone who is actually proud of the TSA will get treated like a genuine terrorist, so that won't work either.

The simple truth is that mind reading doesn't work on crazy people. Sorry, but by definition, this will never work.

Re:Putting neon on the security theater. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38179592)

This deserves focus and emphasis. An infared camera and software that detects heat in the brain being used as a lie detector is a bit questionable, but plausable.

Detecting blood flow in the brain? It is *bullshit*.

But I'm certain you want to detect people that are awake or have ability to abstract thought. All the numbskulls out there that clap their hands when they are told you will most likely not have much blood flow to the brain. After all, you don't use it, the body will slow the blood flow to that organ, and you'll get colder temperature.

What these can detect is if you are sweating or have hot flushes or useless things like that. Blood flow to the skin is possible, but not under your skull!

Checkpoint my ass (2)

Mister Liberty (769145) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175080)

So the terrorists will just divert to, what -- football stadiums, railway bridges, turnpikes.
Are there any, btw. -- terrorists I mean.
Or is this meant to control the population at large maybe.
Just asking.

Re:Checkpoint my ass (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175398)

You've just described the perfect win-win scenario for power-drunk politicians and security equipment manufacturers alike. As soon as the new anal-probing security devices are approved for use in air travel, there WILL be an incident at a football stadium, and then at your local mall. We will eventually end up with mandatory government issue biometric sensing, GPS enabled, cellular transmitting spy devices on our persons at all times.

The only part of this that is in question is how long it will take them to make it happen.

Re:Checkpoint my ass (2)

meerling (1487879) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175660)

Targets are easy, and there is no viable way to protect them all. Anyone who's played a lot of the in depth strategy games would know that. For example, this last black friday would make a fantastic terrorist targeting opportunity. I can't see that kind of 'security' garbage being implemented at every major store/sale in the country, can you. Of course, you could also target a public pool during a hot summer, that'll get a couple hundred people easy.
For that matter, why wait till conditions are good, make your own. If you're in a big city, use facebook, twitter, and other things to set up a really huge flashmob, right to your pre-arranged and boobytrapped killingfield. Heck, you could even post the film to youtube for extra awefulness.

You can bet the terrorists have thought of all of these and many other far more devious things. Although it's true that you need to think of things like this to be able to combat it, the problem is there are too many possibilities to cope with. Security needs to be of the soft variety the quietly watches out for abnormal activities. Hard security needs to be placed at infrastructure critical points, and sorry, but civilian passenger flight terminals is NOT one of them. Sure people get crowded in there, but it's not really a lot of people, and there have always been easier targets with a higher 'yield' to terrorists. Attacking a plane or airport tends to be done when there are other concerns involved, otherwise it's a waste of resources. (Not that all terrorists are good at any of that stuff, but enough are.)

The TSA needs to learn/employ real security and lay off the techno-woogie and ball-fondling, but then again, nobody said the TSA was smarter than the terrorists.

Re:Checkpoint my ass (1)

joe_frisch (1366229) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175896)

"checkpoint my ass" is where I'm afraid TSA security will go next..........

Seriously though, I don't think this is a power grab. More likely its just bureaucracy gone mad. TSA will be blamed if there are ANY terrorist incidents on aircraft so they have an incentive to do everything they can think of. In addition, the more money they spend, the larger their bureaucracy grows, and the more important its members feel, so by Parkinson's law they will tend to grow.

Ass clenching walk (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175160)

So, if this is a new, "functional" lie detector, can it be fooled in the similar ways as polygraph, by clenching one's ass? I can already see all the stiff-looking people marching through the checkpoint, and suddenly relaxing when relevant part of check starts.

(Reality is, polygraph and other lie detectors work only as well as the person operating them measures against one being interrogated).

Islam is the excuse (and reason) for all of this (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175170)

Why are there millions of muslims in previously all white countries?

Problem - Reaction - Solution.

I don't think more than ONE PERCENT of white people want muslims in their countries (or any non-whites, for that matter), so why are they allowed to stream through our borders, and why are they being PAID to live here (in the form of benefits/welfare, when they have done NOTHING to earn them).

They are here to destroy Western civilisation, and to 'divide and conquer', so that the sociopaths in power can stay in power. Or so they think.

Ultimately it will end up in civil war, in every white country on Earth, once our standard of living has been destroyed so much by the third world invaders, and then the scum in power will have no safe, conveniently all white, countries, left to run and hide in - and BOTH sides of the civil war will be trying to kill them. The non-whites will be trying to kill them simply because they are white, the whites will be trying to kill them because, through their dictatorial edicts which they have FORCED on us all for the past fifty years, they will be responsible for the civil war and destruction of our lives.

I suggest you Slashdot idiots (you know, the ones who believe in man made global warming, etc.) read:

www.prophetofdoom.net

Re:Islam is the excuse (and reason) for all of thi (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 2 years ago | (#38178684)

Why are there millions of muslims in previously all white countries?

Because white people have greatly reduced the number of babies they have..

Save us John Connor (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175210)

If they co-opt the dogs, who will sniff out the Terminators?

Trust Me. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38175484)

Despite my uncontrollable flushing, you should not misconstrue my seething rage at your intrusive accusatory system as a lie. I truly hate it! I truly hate you for being a part of it!

Professor Lee is Evil (0, Troll)

afabbro (33948) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175596)

Experimenting on dogs to get better medical cures is ethically questionable...but just to get better airport dogs?!?

May Professor Lee and his children die of cancer.

probulator (2)

khipu (2511498) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175606)

Oh, they should just install the probulator. At least you'll be treated with dignity.

Government intrusion (2)

Kohath (38547) | more than 2 years ago | (#38175718)

Wow, that government intrusion sounds horrible. Why can't the government just focus on making my health care decisions for me and deciding how much of my income I'll be allowed to keep?

Right path (1)

xenobyte (446878) | more than 2 years ago | (#38176202)

There should be three paths, one for trusted, verified passengers (green), one for people that's 'probably' trusted (orange) and one for everybody else (red).

The green path requires only a simple ID check and a standard metal scanner (portal type). If it beeps a manual scan is conducted with a wand, just like in the pre-9/11 days. Most ordinary civilized people qualify for this.

The orange path has the above plus an enhanced ID check (like green but slower). People with certain backgrounds fits here.

The red path has everything - metal scanners, xray-scanners, body scanners, grope search, plus a very thorough ID check. Any non-professional contact with any form of extremists voids your access upfront. If you are turned away here, you will be removed from the airport right away.

Oh, and these checks are just after check-in, not at the gate or similar.

Yes, this means that certain people cannot travel by air under any circumstances. That is as it should be.

Re:Right path (2)

0111 1110 (518466) | more than 2 years ago | (#38179360)

Yes, this means that certain people cannot travel by air under any circumstances. That is as it should be.

Just as long as you are willing to be one of those people.

Fruad Again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38178750)

From Wikipedia:

Yi Byeong-cheon (Hangeul: , also spelled Lee Byeong-chun), is the veterinary professor at Seoul National University[1] responsible for the 300 million KRW "Toppy" dog cloning program.[2] Yi is a former aide to Hwang Woo-suk, a pioneer in the field with the "Snuppy" clone, who fell from grace after his stem cell research turned out to have been fabricated.[3] Yi is "one of the world's best-known dog cloning experts."[4]

1. "Disgraced scientist says he cloned female dog". MSNBC/Associated Press. 1/7/2007. Retrieved 31 August 2010.
2, Mostrous, Alexi (April 25, 2008). "Seven cloned sniffer dogs named Toppy begin training in South Korea". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 31 August 2010.
3. Kim, Hyung-Jin (25 April 2008). "Cloned sniffer dogs go on show". The Guardian. Retrieved 31 August 2010.
4. Kim, So-hyun (08-08-2008). "Scandal brews over American owner of cloned puppies". The Korea Herald/Asia News Network. Retrieved 31-08-2010.

Seems a case of Fruad again.

++

thermal lie detectors (2)

Nyder (754090) | more than 2 years ago | (#38179578)

The thermal-imaging camera captures variations in facial temperature in response to questioning. "When someone is making something up on the spot, brain activity usually changes and you can detect this through the thermal camera," said professor Hassan Ugail, who leads the research.

Dang, i guess the "bad" people will have to just work out stories ahead of time, so they always have an answer ready.

Just Wondering.. (1)

SuperCharlie (1068072) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183878)

Is there in fact a point here people cant be scared into voluntary submission of their freedoms? I am beginning to think the answer is no.
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