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Hacker Tries To Land IT Job At Marriott Via Extortion

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the you-have-not-thought-this-through dept.

Security 218

wiredmikey writes "A tough global economy has certainly created challenges for many people looking for jobs, but one Hungarian man took things to another level in an effort to gain employment at hotel giant Marriott International. On Wednesday, the 26-year-old man pleaded guilty to charges that he hacked into Marriott computer systems and threatened to reveal confidential company information if Marriott didn't offer him a job. Assuming his efforts were working, with the possibility of a new job with Marriott in his sights, the hacker arrived at Washington Dulles Airport on Jan. 17, 2011, using an airline ticket purchased by Marriott for him. He thought he would be attending a job interview with Marriott personnel. Unbeknown to him, he was actually being 'interviewed' by a Secret Service agent posing as a Marriott employee."

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218 comments

The fool! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180236)

He should've used Guru Meditation instead!

Re:The fool! (2)

rvw (755107) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181158)

He should've used Guru Meditation instead!

Still comes in handy for the next ten year or so.

Typical (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180240)

Non-amerikan being subjected to the laws of a country he doesn't live in.

Fucking assholes

Re:Typical (5, Informative)

igreaterthanu (1942456) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180256)

He entered American soil, so American laws apply to him.

Re:Typical (2)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180858)

It's not like hacking is legal in Hungary. Although I guess it would take longer to prosecute him in Hungary, knowing the glacial pace of the Hungarian justice system.

Re:Typical (1)

rvw (755107) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181134)

He entered American soil, so American laws apply to him.

And now he checked into another hotel...

Re:Typical (4, Interesting)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181576)

You missed what the AC was trying to say, though one can certainly understand why. In another Slashdot article [slashdot.org] many were outraged that a non Thai citizen was subjected to Thai laws (actually, he turned out to have dual citizenship.) Those same people will likely, in many cases, argue the opposite here of course ;-)

Willing risk taker (4, Informative)

gd2shoe (747932) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180268)

He went to a country where he knew he had broken the law. He had to know that arrest and prosecution was one of the possible outcomes.

He gambled. He lost.

Re:Willing risk taker (4, Insightful)

jamesh (87723) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180330)

He went to a country where he knew he had broken the law. He had to know that arrest and prosecution was one of the possible outcomes.

He gambled. He lost.

I'm not sure how he could imagine it turning out any other way...

"Well Mr Nemeth... you sure pulled a fast one on us. I guess we have no choice but to give you a job. Normally in these situations we'd just pay you a few million dollars to keep quiet but if it's a job you want then I guess we have to give in to your demands".

Not going to happen. If nothing else it's cheaper just to make him disappear

Re:Willing risk taker (0, Troll)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180374)

He gambled. He lost.

Are you sure?

In Hungary, they send their unemployed to hard labor camps to get any government assist.

He would have gone from unemployed Hungarian resident to Hungarian resident with a free trip to the US, now he gets a free taxpayer-paid vacation in an American prison for 5 or 10 years with no hard labor required.

It's a gamble regarding what the economy will be like after that, but his employment problem is solved.

There are no labour camps in Hungary (5, Informative)

caius112 (1385067) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180588)

In Hungary, they send their unemployed to hard labor camps to get any government assist.

I believe the proposed legislation says that after six months of being on unemployment benefit, you must do 4 hours of public service a day to continue to receive said benefit. Hungary is a member of the European Union, there are no forced labour camps or any such Stalinist nonsense (which doesn't mean there isn't massive corruption etc., but that's another issue). Next time please inform yourself before posting idiotic shit.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (5, Interesting)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180684)

It is a "hard labour camp" in the sense that you're required to work there if you want to eat, i.e. if you want to live. You won't be shot or beaten for not working - you'll just be left to die - but the outcome is the same. It's healthy to see that you have Stalin as a yardstick for what counts as going too far, right? And even in the gulag, reduction of rations or transfer were often the punishments given to those who refused to work. No transport costs, either.

Europe is gradually introducing an underclass in each state by turning jobseekers' allowances into a pay well below minimum wage in exchange for doing government work or work for private companies which have the government's favour. This underclass replaces labourers which used to be, well, paid a regular wage for what is regular work. The UK, for example, has recently begun Work Programme, and was last week planning to add to this a scheme whereby the government pays a proportion of certain employees' wages for a fixed amount of time so employers don't have to. It's all about special interests keeping a cheap fund of desperate workers.

Doesn't that make all jobs hard labour camps? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180816)

Doesn't that make all jobs hard labour camps?

Re:Doesn't that make all jobs hard labour camps? (3, Interesting)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181070)

Is a specific job immediately assigned to you with scant regards for your abilities and disabilities? Is starvation the only (legal) alternative to this job? Are worker protections not applicable for this job?

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180830)

Indeed; and the new upcoming laws will make it much more harsher. If you refuse the given job (which may be some pure shit, especially if a mental or phisical illness is not taken into account) then all your unemployment benefits will be revoked.

My mother, who has 12 iron spikes in her spine and can hardly walk is living in fear for losing her little disability pension, which she indeed may loose, since it took ten years to acknowledge them by the authorities.

Yes, an American prison IS an option.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181104)

especially if a mental or phisical illness is not taken into account) then all your unemployment benefits will be revoked.

In case of mental or physical illness there are other benefits that should cover your basic needs (at least in an ideal world, current reality is a bit different, but then we should work at that). Unemployment benefits should apply to those that are capable of doing work but are for whatever reason temporarily without. A gradual reduction of the benefit and requiring some form of community service to be performed to retain full benefits help make sure that people don't just live off the benefits while they would be perfectly capable of taking care of themselves if they actively pursued a new job.

On the other hand the "community service" can also easily turn into an industry of its own. Leading to work that could have created jobs in the private sector is now done by uncompetitively cheap subsidized workers.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (5, Insightful)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180840)

"It is a "hard labour camp" in the sense that you're required to work there if you want to eat, i.e. if you want to live. You won't be shot or beaten for not working - you'll just be left to die - but the outcome is the same."

It's nice to see that you know so much about the system that hasn't even put into law.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180926)

"It is a "hard labour camp" in the sense that you're required to work there if you want to eat, i.e. if you want to live. You won't be shot or beaten for not working - you'll just be left to die - but the outcome is the same."

It's nice to see that you know so much about the system that hasn't even put into law.

I don't know the details so have no idea if this guy is being paranoid or his issues are justified, but regardless I propose that we do NOT wait until it's law to object if there's an injustice.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (2)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181044)

My take on the issue is that the problem is the sub-minimal wage allowance, nothing else. There's a rampant fraud going on in the Hungarian social system, where we have 800k people taking disabled pension, people being on unemployment benefits while taking black market jobs etc.

Also, the current government has the habit of publicizing half baked proposals, and even making the party infighting public. (See the educational laws, where Zoltán Pokorni objected against the proposals, and the law still haven't gone through although the propsals being public for 6 months).

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

kanto (1851816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180934)

It is a "hard labour camp" in the sense that you're required to work there if you want to eat, i.e. if you want to live. You won't be shot or beaten for not working - you'll just be left to die - but the outcome is the same. It's healthy to see that you have Stalin as a yardstick for what counts as going too far, right? And even in the gulag, reduction of rations or transfer were often the punishments given to those who refused to work. No transport costs, either.

Europe is gradually introducing an underclass in each state by turning jobseekers' allowances into a pay well below minimum wage in exchange for doing government work or work for private companies which have the government's favour. This underclass replaces labourers which used to be, well, paid a regular wage for what is regular work. The UK, for example, has recently begun Work Programme, and was last week planning to add to this a scheme whereby the government pays a proportion of certain employees' wages for a fixed amount of time so employers don't have to. It's all about special interests keeping a cheap fund of desperate workers.

I am with you in that there are serious issues with the private sector getting the benefits of these programs or free labor competing with legitimate companies, but at the same time there are other issues to think about.

For one, the job of the unemployed is to find work; probably in most countries you will lose unemployment benefits if you refuse any work and isn't that the same thing as what you so casually deem a "hard labour camp". Of course in most cases this doesn't mean you're "dead" because there are often other welfare programs paying/giving you the minimum you need.

Having legions of unemployed doing absolutely nothing is the biggest waste of all since it's adding to the class of "terminally unemployed" who'll never be able to fully take part in society and earn wages of any sort. Seems like something has to be done, if for no other reason than to give the people a wakeup call.

p.s. I don't think your Stalin yardstick comment is representative of the original use.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (4, Insightful)

owlstead (636356) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181014)

I think the fallacy here is that people want to stay unemployed. I don't think they want to. Its just that they are not brought up to build their own private enterprises (a risky venture indeed - without a really good plan you will fail). After some time trying to get a job (failure after failure) you will get into a situation where you keep with the status quo. This is a very human thing to do, any healthy human will look for stability in his life. Add to that the current market where oodles of people are unemployed and yes, you will have oodles of people - especially long term unemployed - staying at home.

Personally, doing community service for the government is a good thing, and I think it is healthy thing to do (especially if given a job in the morning only), and does not replace other payed jobs. Private enterprises however should stay the hell out, because you will have "slave labour" in a short time. You cannot trust the private companies to do or stay good all the time. Even then, you will have to keep a good eye on the people in charge, because if there is power involved (especially if it is "follow instructions or loose all benefits") it will be abused in no time whatsoever.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (3, Insightful)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181052)

What you say about private enterprise is absolutely true, and your proposal is much better than Britain's where private enterprise is already dismissing "proper" employees so it can take on free labour. But shouldn't the government pay a fair wage for labour too?

Yes, prioritise the long term unemployed by offering them (part time - so as many people can be involved as possible) community service positions first. Yes, support their training. But then pay them as you would pay any other man or woman with a job.

Volunteer work is volunteer. Labour which you have to provide in order to receive some money is paid work, however the government tries to handwave it. If it were genuine compulsory community service - in the style e.g. of Spain's former alternative to the Mili - then it would be required of every able-bodied citizen, not just those receiving certain allowances.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181276)

The current governments cannot afford fair wages instead of benefits unfortunately. Social benefits, especially in Europe, is a huge factor in financing a country, second after keeping the financial industry alive. Besides, in that case you would go to a true soviet kind of handling things.

The way to handle unemployed, in my opinion, is to have them working on something that is usefull, but out of reach of the current budget. And there are oodles of things that can be done. Creating nicer neighbourhoods, creating new parks/forests, helping the elderly (supervised and voluntarily of course), helping with open source products, etc. etc. etc. If these were created as "proper" jobs, then you would end up with a communist kind of workforce, which is *not* a good thing.

Of course, training people should be top priority first. But training is not the same thing as doing something you can directly see the benefits of.

IMHO these kind of things don't always have to be voluntary. As I said before, people are most of the time against change. Sometimes you have to help people do something that goes against their wishes in the first place, even though it is, ultimately, for their own benefit. The trick is to keep some flexibility so that e.g. people can change their work environment afterwards. Otherwise the persons involved will feel oppressed, and that's not going to help in the long run.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181488)

The current governments cannot afford fair wages instead of benefits unfortunately.

Governments claim lots of things. The problem is not a lack of money (one man's debt is another man's credit) but that money is increasingly being channeled towards special interests in every sector.

Social benefits, especially in Europe, is a huge factor in financing a country, second after keeping the financial industry alive.

Welfare in the sense of unemployment, disability and child allowances (excluding education) [ukpublicspending.co.uk] make up about 16% of the UK budget - and that's factoring in the huge inefficiencies made by contracting work out to state-capitalist organisations such as ATOS.

The way to handle unemployed, in my opinion, is to have them working on something that is usefull, but out of reach of the current budget. And there are oodles of things that can be done. Creating nicer neighbourhoods, creating new parks/forests, helping the elderly (supervised and voluntarily of course), helping with open source products, etc. etc. etc.

Do they have to look for work 8 hours a day as well, or are you suggesting that the government take back the responsibility for helping people find jobs (public or private sector)?

Paid workers and genuine volunteers already do the above things. If society cannot find enough volunteers but wants certain work to be done then it can cough up the money to pay people to do it. Again, there is not a lack of money, there is just ever-growing inequality. Put bluntly: the rich can pay higher taxes to pay the unemployed to make their community better. If we can force the poor to be "volunteers" then we can force the rich to be "philanthropists", right?

you would end up with a communist kind of workforce, which is *not* a good thing.

What's good is what alleviates the suffering of the people in the short and long term. If your definition of "communist" (which I guess isn't the same as mine) applies then who cares?

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181164)

"I think the fallacy here is that people want to stay unemployed. I don't think they want to."

Even before the financial crisis there were a lot of people working in the black market* and drawing unemployed benefits as well/getting disabled pension. Of course the financial crisis made things worse, as there are quite a few people legitimately using the unemployment benefits, however it's hard to tell them apart.

* moslty due to the employer, who wants to cheat taxes, and shares some of the saved money with the employee

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181314)

As far as I know, the larger percentage of people that receive benefits are not creating a substantial amount of money through black market jobs. This goes for almost any country. There is just one single thing worse than attacking the black market economy: to criminalize or punish the persons that receive a benefit because they are eligible for it. Even then, many of the people that do work in the black market do so because they see no other way out.

As you (possibly) implied, the way to attack the black market is to punish the employers, not the employees - even if just for practical reasons.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181514)

Yes - because if you're working in an illegal job, the very first thing you should do is put up a big flag asking the local government and social services to investigate you and see if you are worthy of benefits...

I think you will find only a very few, short-lived criminal careers where that is the case.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (2)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181018)

For one, the job of the unemployed is to find work; probably in most countries you will lose unemployment benefits if you refuse any work and isn't that the same thing as what you so casually deem a "hard labour camp".

Most countries don't require you to take up the first above-board job you can find - certainly not initially. They also provide protections against various forms of maltreatment in employment. The new Work Programmes are not regarded as employment and do not come with the same protections.

Also, yes, the unemployed are today required to look for work to receive jobseeker allowances (this has always struck me as inefficient - whatever happened to proper government-supported labour exchanges?). But this itself isn't exploitative as there is no labour being extracted. The underlying problem with labour camps is that they are regarded as a highly profitable alternative to properly treating your fellow man. Once they have become acceptable it requires a sweeping philosophical change to halt their expansion.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181032)

Of course there are similarities between "hard labour camps" and any scheme for the unemployed. But there are equally as many differences, and the monstrosities performed in the former makes any discussion moot. That's why bringing up WWII and the holocaust is considered harmful to discussions. It is not to deny that they have happened, it is because it makes a structured discussion about the actual subject impossible.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181064)

Of course there are similarities between A and B. But there are equally as many differences, and emotionally charged descriptor of outcome for A makes any discussion moot.

Concentrate on the similarities of philosophy. Egregiously inhumane outcomes are consequences, not causes.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181190)

It is a "hard labour camp" in the sense that you're required to work there if you want to eat

Egad!!! What a horrible concept!!! &lt/sarcasm>

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (0)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181236)

The 1930s were... well, I'll leave your state-provided education to calculate.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181502)

You are really a stupid fucking troll. Go away with your nazi-comparisons, especially now that others pointed out that you are talking out of your ass about regulations which are only proposed and not even finalized proposals.

Troll elsewhere.

Re:There are no labour camps in Hungary (4, Insightful)

makomk (752139) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181604)

In the UK, they're actually getting people to do what would normally be minimum wage work at supermarkets and the like in order to get welfare payments. Then when more minimum-wage workers get laid off from those supermarkets, they have to work for no wage and receive sub-minimum-wage welfare payments that the Government pays for instead. It's nuts but very profitable for the supermarkets. (Oh, and at least some of those workers have to pay out of their own pockets for uniforms!)

Re:Willing risk taker (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180624)

Not so fast. There used to be a pattern where someone discovered a flaw, disclosed it to the owners of the affected system and offered to help. Many companies in that situation actively try to get the hacker to accept money in order to make the situation look like extortion.

To the hacker it looks more like this: "I found a problem with their system. I told them about it so that they can fix it, because I am a nice guy with good intentions who doesn't want to sell this information on the black market. If they need help fixing the problem, I can do that, but I don't work for free."

Needless to say, it doesn't work that way. Many mostly harmless nerds have been caught in that trap and it usually doesn't end well. In some high profile cases, young hackers have committed suicide after they took the bait money and got arrested.

Hackers and wannabes would be well-advised to never disclose flaws to an affected company directly. If you stumble upon something, talk to the CCC or the EFF and never ever accept money or anything else (job offer, etc.) from the affected company.

Re:Willing risk taker (1)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180988)

I'm always pretty willing to accept the possibility that a big company is screwing over a little guy. Also that what's in a news article which has likely been inspired by the big company's publicity people shouldn't be taken at face value. Looking at this story however, he sent malware by mail and got it installed on their computers. That's at least two pretty big lines crossed over. A) The line of illegality; even if someone tells you to send malware by mail, it's still very likely to be illegal and it's likely that they are ripping you off if they claim they have the right to allow you to do that. Virus samples, for example, should be extremely carefully handled. B) the line of stupidity. You never break into someone else's system without written permission from someone very senior. If this existed we would have heard.

Re:Typical (1)

WegianWarrior (649800) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180328)

I usually don't feed the trolls and the idiots, but I'm bored this morning...

On the most basic level, committing a crime in a foreign country puts you at odds with the justice system in that country; if you're a citizen of county A and commit a crime in country B and the police from country B catches (or extradites you) you will face court and possible jail time in country B, not in country A where you are from.

So while having the offended party (Marriott in this case) pay for his ticket to fly over might be considered entrapment in a number of jurisdictions, it's perfectly legal in the US. His crime was to hack the Marriott, his downfall was his stupidity to travel to the US afterwards.

Re:Typical (4, Informative)

lxs (131946) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180614)

This isn't entrapment.
He wasn't lured into comitting the crime. He was lured into getting himself arrested.

Re:Typical (5, Informative)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180682)

So while having the offended party (Marriott in this case) pay for his ticket to fly over might be considered entrapment in a number of jurisdictions, it's perfectly legal in the US.

Entrapment in the US law sense happens when someone persuades you to commit a crime that otherwise you wouldn't have committed. US authorities are not allowed to do that, and it is a decent defense if you can show that some US authoritiy did this. It's not a defense if a private company does it.

But that didn't happen here. The crime was already in progress (the hacking had happened, and the extortion was in progress), so even if the US police had concocted this plan, it would have been absolutely fair game to find and catch a criminal.

Re:Typical (1)

gutnor (872759) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181366)

It's not a defense if a private company does it.

Off topic, but that makes you think twice about privatisation of everything and the effect of small government could have on individual liberty. If the police is using contractors like the army does for example, does that mean they can use entrapment ? Chilly sunday, I think I'll go back to bed.

Re:Typical (1)

arbiter1 (1204146) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180384)

it is definitely an outta the box way to try to get a job but when you" threatened to reveal confidential company information". That is fire that you are playing with if that company just decides to file charges. But even finding a flaw and telling them about it can be bad like that one guy in Australia i think it was, he found a hole told the company about it, kept the info on the hole off the web. They turned around and sued him for the money it would cost them to fix it.

Secret Service (4, Insightful)

Michael Woodhams (112247) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180252)

Why is the Secret Service involved? This doesn't seem to involve currency or protection of VIPs.

Re:Secret Service (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180260)

Why is the Department of Homeland Security involved with copyright enforcement? They even went so much as to go to Disney's Headquarters to proclaim their involvement.

Re:Secret Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180276)

They are needed to make sure his orange overalls fit correctly.

Re:Secret Service (5, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180288)

The USSS is also the anti-fraud agency, including computer and phone fraud, probably because it heavily related to financial crimes. In 2009 there was an expansion of that as well.

So when it comes to fraud/extortion type things, particularly as they relate to computers, the USSS is probably the agency that handles it.

Re:Secret Service (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180406)

They also investigate counterfeiting of US currency, among other things. In any case, the USSS is not to be toyed with. This Hungarian hacker was really stupid to (1) ask for a job with the company he was attempting to extort and (2) actually transport his physical body willingly to the United States. Hasn't he heard of GITMO? He will be extremely lucky if he is charged with just fraud and extortion and not "financial terrorism" or some such. Either way the g-men are going to make an example of this guy, especially after years of attacks by eastern European hackers that have defrauded US companies and citizens of many millions of dollars.

Re:Secret Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180954)

Because he used an Artifact to hack Marriott.

Re:Secret Service (3, Informative)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181278)

The SS was the anti-counterfeit department of the treasury long before "protecting the president" became its job.

Re:Secret Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181406)

Why is the Secret Service involved? This doesn't seem to involve currency or protection of VIPs.

They probably want to give him a job and keep it quiet.

I'm sure the Gov can use more hackers, especially when they can hold this crime over his head.

IT Darwin awards? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180254)

I wonder if there is an equivalent of Darwin awards for IT/Geek/Nerd stuf...

Re:IT Darwin awards? (1)

rvw (755107) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181170)

I wonder if there is an equivalent of Darwin awards for IT/Geek/Nerd stuf...

Doesn't qualify. If he had extorted Osama Bin Laden (who was still alive then), like in "give me a job or I tell the CIA where you live", then he might have had a chance...

Re:IT Darwin awards? (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181642)

"I wonder if there is an equivalent of Darwin awards for IT/Geek/Nerd stuf..."

"Doesn't qualify."

Not yet, but maybe he'll get lucky and get stabbed in jail ;-)

Exit Strategy? (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180264)

One wonders what this guy had in mind as his best case scenario in this endeavor.
How did he think this was going to turn out, and in what world does he get to keep the job and his freedom and the money?

Re:Exit Strategy? (1)

rvw (755107) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181192)

One wonders what this guy had in mind as his best case scenario in this endeavor.
How did he think this was going to turn out, and in what world does he get to keep the job and his freedom and the money?

He lived in the world called Hungary. Maybe he should have tried his luck at home. Considering the corruption over there, he might have had a chance to get hired because of his creative thinking, if he had chosen the right company with the right corrupt manager who would have been clever enough to recognize his talent.

2nd time an FBI article go "Varnish cache server" (1, Interesting)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180278)

Once up, the article woouldn't load, but gave:

Error 503 Service Unavailable
Service Unavailable
Guru Meditation:
XID: 0000000000 [true number changed]
Varnish cache server

I had never seen the Varnishcache server before. So, I use Google, and one of the first hits is a link to a Slashdot article, also detailing FBI work: http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,26358766 [dslreports.com] [dslreports.com]. Here is their discussion:

reply to antdude
Re: HideMyAss.com Doesn't Hide Logs From the FBI
said by antdude:
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/09/25/0415213/hidemyasscom-doesnt-hide-logs-from-the-fbi [slashdot.org] [slashdot.org]
Link doesn't work for me....
Error 503 Service Unavailable
Service Unavailable
Guru Meditation:
XID: 853827040
Varnish cache server --
GuruGuy

Ok, once is ok. Twice. Hmmm. Three would be a hit.

How do you submit a story that doesn't trigger anything human but only an automatic reconnaissance, or vice versa. It would be fun to see if this follows a pattern.

Re:2nd time an FBI article go "Varnish cache serve (4, Informative)

the linux geek (799780) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180312)

It's been happening all over Slashdot, not just on FBI-related articles. The Slashdot administrators need a more reliable server. You need a qualified mental health professional.

Re:2nd time an FBI article go "Varnish cache serve (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180354)

Chill, this person has already started guru meditation which seems as good a therapy as any.

Re:2nd time an FBI article go "Varnish cache serve (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180568)

Uh, I got it on the main page earlier, before this story was posted. Paranoid much?

Hungary = China? (4, Insightful)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180304)

This sounds very familiar - http://news.slashdot.org/story/11/11/26/206252/china-to-cancel-college-majors-that-dont-pay [slashdot.org]

And a link within http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2010/06/19/smart-young-and-broke.html [thedailybeast.com]

"Guo and an estimated million others like him represent an unprecedented and troublesome development in China: a fast-growing white-collar underclass. Since the ’90s, Chinese universities have doubled their admissions, far outpacing the job market for college grads. This year China’s universities and tech institutes churned out roughly 6.3 million graduates. Many grew up in impoverished rural towns and villages and attended second- or third-tier schools in the provinces, trusting that studying hard would bring them better lives than their parents had. But when they move on and apply for jobs in Beijing or Shanghai or any of China’s other booming metropolises, they get a nasty shock."

So, this Hungarian man this article is about probably belonged to the same class, unemployed with a specialized degree.

Europe and the US have had this situation for thirty years, but for China it must be some shocking news. How many Chinese cyber-crimes more do we (or Chinese hotels) want? We have enough of the Hungarians.

Eastern Europeans... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180342)

Eastern Europeans are the cancer killing Europe, and, as we can see, the rest of the civilized world. We should just nuke the whole fucking region already and be done with it.

Re:Eastern Europeans... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180396)

I miss the time when trolls were creative... or tried even...

Re:Eastern Europeans... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180424)

Do you count Greece as part of East Europe? If so, I agree with you.

Smart? (1)

Jager Dave (1238106) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180350)

Smart enough to hack into an international company's network, but not smart enough to realize that an extortion attempt wouldn't have someone getting him arrested. Where is Darwin when we need him? :|

Re:Smart? (1)

SomePgmr (2021234) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180498)

Too many American movies.

"Brilliant uberhacker kid hijacked our cyberframes! Let's buy him a ridiculous house on the ocean and get him on our side."

In reality... PMITA prison.

Re:Smart? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181002)

Maybe he thinks hacking is one of the important computer skills these companies are desperately looking for.

Dumbass... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180402)

Should have had a dead-man's switch somewhere. If nothing else, someone back in Hungary who publishes the info if anything bad happens to him.

What can I say... he pretty much deserves what he got.

Re:Dumbass... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180558)

I wouldn't be surprised if he does, but it doesn't help him much. If the data gets released his prison sentence just goes from bad to worse... and they're holding him somewhere uncomfortable to convince him he doesn't want more time than he's already looking at.

They just aren't going to let him go on his word that he'll never release it.

Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (4, Interesting)

Required Snark (1702878) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180412)

So a guy tries to extort a jov from a big corporation and gets busted. Meanwhile, corporate extortion is alive and well.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-11-25/business/chi-state-lawmakers-poised-to-act-on-tax-breaks-for-sears-cme-20111125_1_income-tax-tax-credit-cme-group [chicagotribune.com]

CME Group, parent of the Chicago Board of Trade and Chicago Mercantile Exchange, has threatened to leave the state in protest of a temporary increase to the state's corporate income tax rate. The proposal would tax income from just 27.54 percent of electronic transactions on local exchanges, costing the state an estimated $100 million a year.

Sears, for its part, would see a renewal of a special taxing district in Hoffman Estates. This would allow Sears to continue to get a break on local property taxes, although at a lower level. Under the deal, the retailer also would also receive a state incentive package to retain jobs here. That would to include tax credits worth $15 million a year for 10 years, another $150 million in potential tax breaks.

So we know that the Hungarian guy was trying to use what he perceived as his individual power to force Marriott to give him a job. Now we see two large Illinois companies use their real power to skip out on their corporate responsibility to support the state. They consume a lot of state resources, and they use their political influence to be parasites and free loaders. Since they got away with it this time, what's to stop them from deciding that they are going to pay no taxes in the coming years, like GE did last year?

All I see is the rich and powerful get away with de-facto extortion, and the individual getting nailed for trying to extort. One set of laws for the rich, another set for the poor.

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (4, Insightful)

jklovanc (1603149) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180514)

The Corporate threat was to move to a state with a lower tax rate. That is not extortion. It is giving a state a chance to match an offer made by another state. People do it all the time when they buy things and companies advertise that they will match advertised prices. If all other states had a higher tax rate Sears would not be talking about moving.

That is very different than saying they will release confidential information.

Also individuals can do the same thing (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181302)

When you are talking small purchases, no there is usually no room for negotiation. However turns out when purchases get large, you have some power. When I was getting a new A/C for my place I solicited multiple bids. After that I took the bids I liked best in terms of what I was getting, but not in terms of price, and talked to them again. When they found out I had other bids, all of a sudden the price went down. I wasn't "extorting" anyone. I was just giving them a change to be as competitive as possible. I'm not going to pay more than I need to.

Plus let's not pretend like Sears is making out like bandits. Their business has been hurting. Currently their profit margin is slightly negative, meaning they are losing money. In a situation like that, more taxes are not such an affordable thing.

Re:Also individuals can do the same thing (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181434)

No, there is always room for negotiation. If you try to negotiate with Walmart, you won't get anything. But, if you negotiate with Tom, owner of Tom's Toys, you might get a deal.
 
The primary reason no one, at least in the U.S., haggles is because it is no longer socially acceptable,

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (1, Interesting)

Solandri (704621) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180694)

So a guy tries to extort a jov from a big corporation and gets busted. Meanwhile, corporate extortion is alive and well.

If you cannot see the difference between these two, then you are suffering from an entitlement mentality. He is not entitled to a job at Marriott. Illinois is not entitled to have any company (or person) stay within their borders. If he does something to coerce Marriott to give him a job which they don't want to give him, that is fraud. If Illinois does something to coerce the Chicago Mercantile Exchange to stay in the state when they want to leave, that is fraud.

If he were already employed by Marriott and decided to quit, then there is nothing wrong with that. Likewise, if the Chicago Mercantile decides to quit residing in Illinois, there is nothing wrong with that.

Now we see two large Illinois companies use their real power to skip out on their corporate responsibility to support the state. They consume a lot of state resources, and they use their political influence to be parasites and free loaders.

Ever hear of the phrase "No taxation without representation"? It was one of the battle cries of the colonists during the U.S. Revolutionary War. Britain taxed them, but didn't give them representation in government (they didn't get a vote), so they had no say in how those taxes were spent. They felt that was fundamentally unjust, and was something worth fighting and dying for to correct.

Since you're ok with taxing corporations, and in fact see it as their responsibility to help support the state, then surely you must agree that corporations should have representation in government? No? Why not? You agree it's wrong to tax people while denying them representation, right? Our founding fathers were justified in their rebellion, right? But somehow some people have arrived at the belief that corporations should not be considered persons, and should not have any say in government, yet they should be taxed. If that's your belief, then it sounds more like it's government which is the parasite freeloading off of corporations.

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (4, Insightful)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180776)

Nice subtle job of mis-framing, there. Lemme fix that for you: since corporations are in fact already comprised of people who individually are already represented in Congress, why should those people receive twice the representation as anyone who doesn't work for said corporation, by allowing the corporation itself explicit representation?

Gee, how fair-minded of you to propose that one tribe of people should be allowed more representation than others not in that tribe. Is that really your idea of equal representation?

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181474)

Corporations are considered legal entities and have their own interests which are guaranteed to be against the interests of at least some if not all of their employees interests. Corporations are not unions and do not represent the interests of their employees or board of directors.
 
It is a shame you didn't do as good a job of "mis-framing" in your shift from whether this is extortion to political representation.

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (4, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181188)

But somehow some people have arrived at the belief that corporations should not be considered persons

Is a company a human being? Not it is not. Some insane tax related legislation in the USA might suggest it is. If so, it's wrong.

A company's owners and employees are human beings. But not the company itself.

If you can find a distinction between a human being and a person, other than in legislation which has been lobbied for by business I'd like to see it.

What we have here is law consciously not representing reality, for rich people's benefit.

and should not have any say in government, yet they should be taxed

There is absolutely no reason why a company should not be taxed. It's entirely unrelated to the silly idea that it's a human being.

parasite freeloading off of corporations.

There's nothing stopping corporations conducting their business in international waters, without any government interference or taxation. Hard to see how they make any money though.

There's nothing stopping corporations conducting their business in Somalia, without any government interference or taxation. Hard to see how they make any money though. And hard to see how the owners and employees based there would stay alive long.

Companies rely on the infrastructure, environment and legal structure that governments put there. That's the reason it's OK to tax them.

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181208)

Is a company a human being? Not it is not. Some insane tax related legislation in the USA might suggest it is. If so, it's wrong.

Also remember: One person, one vote. So even if companies counted as human beings, it would be one vote for Microsoft, one for Apple, one for IBM, one for GE, one for the first janitor working at Microsoft, one for the janitor's wife, one for the janitor's eldest son, one for the janitor's eldest daughter, one for his mom, one for his dad, four for the grandparents...

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180728)

And thus it has always been. Everyone knows the cliches "to the victor goes the spoils" and "victors write the history books", but there's another unspoken corollary: "victors write the laws", and also get to choose when and against whom they are actually enforced.

Re:Individual vs. Corportate Extortion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180792)

This isn't even remotely the same. A company can leave any time. They can close down any time they want. They are providing stuff of their own free will, it's not like they have to do anything.

And there the state increased the income tax first. Since one plans the operations of a company for the next four years in advance and then operates within the plan, one gets kinda pissed when some third party having nothing to do with the market suddenly moves the goal posts and then assumes everyone of the people actually providing value just to stay put and take the beating, losing money for no good reason when they could just move on.

I think even telling them that one doesn't like it is a courtesy, they could just have left without giving any notice (which is how it is usually done).

It shocks me (1)

WiiVault (1039946) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180426)

that a person can be smart enough to commit a crime like this, but stupid enough to come to the very country where he can be held liable. Just goes to show that humans can have, and by the same token lack in many different types of intelligence.

Re:It shocks me (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180552)

Nemeth admitted that by using malware sent via email to specific employees at Marriott, he was able install malware on Marriott’s systems, giving him “backdoor” access to Marriott company information.

Geez the guy is actually quite talented. The problem is picking your targets and your customers. Hotels aren't going to give a stuff about their "internal documents" bur actresses with home made porn on their systems will, as will a few large corporations. He should have gone solo and kept his head down.

Re:It shocks me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180644)

Yep, this guy may be smart, but not wise. He should have sold the gained info to Mariott's competitors. Staying at safe distance.
If this info was worthless, Mariott had no incentive either. The federal ass-pounding-prison serves him right.

Re:It shocks me (4, Insightful)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | more than 2 years ago | (#38181524)

I don't see why this should surprise you. This is the general cracker/extortionist mentality at work. It is the "I can get away with anything because the law shouldn't apply to me" mentality that is so often on display here on slashdot, especially when it comes to things like copyright, privacy, and access. It is the hypocrisy of the mindset that allows things like this to happen. "I will break the law and threaten them and then they will bow down before my genius, give me a job while forgiving my transgressions, and not prosecute me because I will be too valuable to them."

Of course... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180480)

In other news, sensitive information relating to Marriott International was release from a computer in Hungary about 24 hours later...

In still other news, the NSA just hired a Hungarian computer hacker.

dead-hand trigger (3, Funny)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180512)

Now just avaiting dead-hand trigger software to release said spicy details into the wild.

Re: dead-hand trigger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180772)

Good Lord Jones! Look how little toilet paper Marriott keeps in their warehouses. Think of the benefits we could realize if we could reduce *our* toilet paper stocks. Jones, we've got to get our hands on their ass wipeage prediction algorithm package. Get our best hackers to contact this chap and see how much he's offering the package for.

Re: dead-hand trigger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38181266)

The person went to America. He is too dumb to have added such a code segment.

Trust (3)

jklovanc (1603149) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180548)

I can see the HR person now;
"So, by hacking us and threatening to divulge confidential information you have shown that you are not trust worthy. You expect us to hire someone we can not trust to be on out premises and roam freely in secure areas? Get real."

Just goes to show (3, Insightful)

DrXym (126579) | more than 2 years ago | (#38180564)

You can be smart and yet incredibly dumb.

Re:Just goes to show (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180826)

Either he wanted into jail, or then he is a crappy hacker.

Also it may be that TFA doesn't tell everything.

So at least (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180654)

he got a home and something to eat for a longer time...

bi3tch (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38180656)

Fly...3on't fear despit3 the
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