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Good Disk Library Solutions?

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the keeping-order dept.

Media 371

First time submitter fikx writes "How do Slashdotters manage large collections of disks? I'm hoping for a way to manage a large collection of movies that would give me menu type access to the content, and the only consumer device left seems to be the Sony disk changer, which is discontinued. I would have thought that handling disks would have been a solved problem and on sale in many forms, but I guess not. Have Slashdotters found or built solutions? Or has this problem gone the way of the typewriter?"

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371 comments

I think the generally accepted solution (5, Informative)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183376)

... is to rip everything to a large hard disk and set up some sort of media center.

let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the way o (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183404)

of doing that and if say you have blu rays that like 25-50GB per disk.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183428)

I've watched 720p movies that were compressed down to 400-700 MB and were still an order of magnitude better than DVD quality.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183450)

Handbrake takes care of DRM for DVDs. For Blu-Ray use MakeMKV to extract the disc from DRM, then Handbrake to bring the file size down to 5 to 10 GB depending on the quality you want.

I'm amazed anyone DOESN'T rip their discs. Who wants to be forced to wade through stupid menus and messages that you can't skip?

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183508)

Mod Parent Up!

Signed, A Different AC

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (2)

PktLoss (647983) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183560)

Is there a good option (for mac preferably) that will rip a DVD after looking it up in some database (like CDDB) to get the names and indexing information correct. Ripping is easy enough, but I'm tired of choosing all the chapters for each episode when ripping season 3 of whatever. The last time I let RipIt have a go at a DVD I ended up with Battlestar Galactica disc 2 starting half way through the third episode.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183640)

Huh? ripit, in its basic mode of operation, creates a decrypted, clean copy of a dvd, without any bogus sectors etc. That's it. Why would it do what you claim is beyond me, perhaps it's a bug. I haven't used ripit's compress feature, so perhaps you're referring to that?

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (4, Informative)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183724)

He's asking for more than just a decrypted copy of a DVD.

He wants the same thing that is commonplace and expected for a music CD: something that detects all the tracks and matches them up to content titles. Clearly he wants something that can sort out a pile of Buffy DVDs, correctly label season, episode and title names and possibly fetch extra metadata.

A simple ripper doesn't do that.

Besides Kaledescape, I am not aware of anything that does.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38184046)

Apple's prohibited programs fulfilling some of those requirements from being sold in the AppStore. Off the AppStore, however, there are some solutions. You might look into iVI, though it seems targeted at the anime audience. http://www.southpolesoftware.com/iVI/iVI.php [southpolesoftware.com]

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (2)

Florian Weimer (88405) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183566)

I'm amazed anyone DOESN'T rip their discs. Who wants to be forced to wade through stupid menus and messages that you can't skip?

The two are unrelated, actually. There a players which offer unconditional skipping and which use the disc directly.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38184014)

I'm amazed anyone DOESN'T rip their discs. Who wants to be forced to wade through stupid menus and messages that you can't skip?

The two are unrelated, actually. There a players which offer unconditional skipping and which use the disc directly.

What player would this be?

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0, Flamebait)

ternarybit (1363339) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183706)

Because as much as I hate and disagree with it, breaking DRM is illegal in the US under the DMCA, and there are still some of us who grudgingly but respectfully honor the rule of law.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (2)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183744)

That only applies to copy protection and CSS isn't copy protection. Moreover it only applies to effective copy protection and CSS definitely isn't effective at controlling copies by any definition one might want to apply.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183910)

Totally wrong. DeCSS is illegal in the US. Circumventing anything protected, no matter how weak the scheme, is illegal thanks to the DMCA. There are tiny exclusions for cellphones, but that's it.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (4, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183830)

I'm glad more 18th century Bostonians didn't think like you.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (4, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183860)

and there are still some of us who grudgingly but respectfully honor the rule of law.

Citation needed.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183880)

That law isn't kicking in until you give those files (or discs) to someone else.

However, I don't blame you for not wanting to be seen downloading the tools to do it.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183722)

"Handbrake takes care of DRM for DVDs."

For *some* DVDs. It doesn't handle all of them because the producers of the DVDs keep updating their bogus DRM techniques and thus it is a constant arms race. And it is genuinely bogus, because that's what most of these techniques do: insert bogus sectors and other trickery that trips up a simple ripping program but not most DVD players (and the ones that don't work are collateral damage). Why the media producers bother to keep throwing money at a problem that people will just find a way around in order to use the product they have already bought is beyond my understanding. Do they really think they're stopping anything by spending all that money on DRM? And, no thank you, I don't want to disclose all sorts of unnecessary personal information in order to activate a digital copy that isn't ripped the way I want it anyway.

These days it's easier for a pirate to set up a movie library than a legitimate purchaser, and that situation *sucks*.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (4, Informative)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183848)

Anything that Handbrake can't handle, AnyDVD will.

There are really very few DVDs that you will need to use AnyDVD for. There have been a few failed attempts at extra copy protection on DVDs. However, for the most part it's mainly Disney disks that will give you trouble.

The vast majority of DVDs won't give you trouble.

However, since you're going to need AnyDVD for BluRays anyways you've got that as a backup option.

+...yeah. It's easier to pirate than use modern video media to it's full potential.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183832)

The main problem is the storage requirements you need when you start treating your DVD/blu-ray discs like CDs and rip them all. You very rapidly need several TB or storage through something like a NAS. You'll want that with some kind of RAID, now look at the costs! Just not going to happen for all but the enthusiast for many years yet.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183998)

RAID can be done in software. So it doesn't have to be inherently expensive. You aren't trying to be Pixar. You're just (maybe) trying to make multiple disks look like one disk.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38184002)

3 TB of hard drive is roughly 270 euro here. With ripped movies, that's 300+ movies, less than one euro per movie. And having the entire media collection available with XBMC directly on the TV/projector using a 2,4 GHz mini-keyboard to control the computer is nothing short of amazing.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183470)

wow. so wait a couple months for prices to come back down and THEN rip them.

even with a worst-case scenario of 50Gb/disk, a 3Tb drive is going to hold 60 disks.

OTOH, if you're ripping dvds as the question implies, then figure 8Gb/disk which is about 6x as many or call it 350 movies.

That's with zero compression too.

/unless you're just trolling
//then carry on.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

ThorGod (456163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183476)

of doing that and if say you have blu rays that like 25-50GB per disk.

That's a really good point. BD movies would fill a tb drive in 20-40 movies. That's bad, but not crippling. I doubt a carrousel BD changer for 20-40 disks would be much cheaper (and you can always expand a FS).

I still think backing physical content up on HDs and then long-term storing the physical copies wins.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183494)

At 50GB/disk, you can still get 40 movies on a single 2TB drive. Even with the hard disk shortage, this is an affordable solution. In reality, you can delete all the extras when you rip and get far more movies on the drive, or you can even re-encode. Though I use FreeBSD with ZFS to add disks in pairs for redundancy, a Windows Media box can also work well, as it has a way to add capacity... a co-worker of mine goes this route, though I think ZFS has him intrigued.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (2)

sirdude (578412) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183506)

While the price of HDDs have gone up only recently, it's a temporary "action-of-god" hike which will dissipate shortly (January?). Besides that, HDDs are dirt cheap. It's unlikely that the OP is talking about blu-rays as people who want a disc database usually have multiple (usually ripped/leeched/home) movies on each disc.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183734)

Like many commodity shortages this one is aggravated by hoarding. The hoarders will likely suffer as they usually do, by overpaying. Some few will make a killing by gouging late hoarders. Eventually things straighten out.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183536)

Encode to h.264 before copying to hard drive. SD movies range from 800 Mb to 2 Gb each. HD range from 2 to 5 Gb -- Lord of the Rings notwithstanding.

A pair of 2 Tb hard drives and XBMC ot the OpenELEC variant and problem solved with more than enough room for all your music, too.

The price of the drives is nothing compared to the replacement cost of all the movies.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183558)

DRM is broken. Rips of the main movie, depending on compression/resizing/length can be done in 1GB - 5GB. Disk prices are higher than they used to be, and I don't know where you are, but a 3TB disk is not unreasonable in my neck of the woods.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183684)

$50+ for a 1 TB drive currently. Easily put 40-50 films on a single drive if blu-ray, way more than that if DVD. I have a 10 TB setup that serves up all media. Most people won't need even that close.

DRM - easily defeated now.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183704)

BluRay jukeboxes aren't exactly cheap either. Plus the software isn't very widespread. DVD jukeboxes had the exact same problems which is why it became more common to see people rip everything.

Furthermore, the DRM of your disks is still going to limit you with a physical jukebox solution. It's still there and getting in the way.

The only way around that really is to just get rid of the DRM to begin with.

People have put together hard drive based solutions specifically because they don't like DRM limitations and are cost conscious.

Re:let's see DRM, high cost of HDD's get in the wa (1, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183852)

Niether Blu Ray or DVD are compressed for storage, they are compressed to fill their respective discs. Please keep this in mind for all future conversations involving home media theaters and internet streaming.

Re:I think the generally accepted solution (1)

Local ID10T (790134) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183418)

... is to rip everything to a large hard disk and set up some sort of media center.

Absolutely. Rip it to your format of choice, and put the discs in a box in the garage... in case you have a HD failure and need to re-rip them or want to re-rip them in a different format later. Alternatively, sell/give away/throw out the discs after ripping and when you need another copy buy/download another copy.

Re:I think the generally accepted solution (0)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183420)

which is why I refuse to buy BD equip or discs.

they are too expensive (in storage) to rip. and if you bit-reduce them, why even bother? plus, you HELP sony each time you buy that stuff via license fees. I DO NOT WANT TO EVER HELP SONY. EVER.

dvd and upsampling works great and there is no drm to speak of (funny how that is; 10+ yrs ago, drm on dvd was 'hard' but now its single-click ripping and truly mindless to get working well).

storing dvd's on disk farms is not so bad. I would never think to do this with BD.

it amazes me that I still find audio guys who love to have dusty shelves of cd's instead of storing ALL of them in flac on a single hard drive. you can't store all your movies on a single drive but its extremely possible to do that with even huge cd collections and still fit on a TB class single disk drive.

to save space (and movers costs each time I might have to move) I have thrown out my jewel boxes and kept only the paper inserts and put the discs into sleeved albums. you can tell I never directly play discs anymore. no need to!

Re:I think the generally accepted solution (1)

HTMLSpinnr (531389) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183530)

Bit reducing the video, and capturing core audio (DD out of TrueHD, for example) works just fine for most movies. On most displays you won't notice the difference at a constant quality of RF21 or 22 (using HandBrake in an .h264 encoded MKV as an example). I can tolerate a few GB in storage compared to the whole deal. When I want the full experience, then I'll break out the actual disc, but my kids don't care if some of Tinkerbell's finest detail is slightly obscured through compression, when the trade-off is that they can pick any movie we own any time w/o damaging the original disc.

Re:I think the generally accepted solution (0)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183526)

Which is why I was confused when it was repeatedly spelled "disk" in TFA. I thought they'd already come to the correct conclusion, and wondered where I could get a disk changer too.

Re:I think the generally accepted solution (2)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183916)

Disc = British English spelling.
Disk = American spelling.
Applies to hard drives, CD's, DVDs and every other circular thing.

The way it is spelt should not imply anything about the nature of the thing itself, only the origin of the person writing about it.

Re:I think the generally accepted solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183962)

It takes FOREVER to do this, but is well worth it in the end; just be sure to think about backups; backups backups backups... so you never have to do it again; if I ever have to re-rip my library of hundreds of disks I will cry, maybe literally.

The only misery with Windows with their damn inability of their built in backup software to back up to disks with 4k sectors.

It's easy to get 3TB RAID internal and get yourself into a jam for something to back up to. Sure you can buy a 3TB external... with 4k sectors. I'm using Macrium Reflect, I run a full backup periodically and then schedule incrementals nightly, but I am sure there are other products and options out there as well. I suppose you could set up a second internal RAID for backing up to, but that seems even more expensive...

And on the other hand there is always Linux, but having that on a media PC pretty much writes off Netflix, which I also use; always options... and tradeoffs...

Yes, typewriter (3, Informative)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183380)

Rip discs. Use media center application.

Re:Yes, typewriter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183458)

yes but he still has to store the originals somewhere.

Re:Yes, typewriter (2)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183490)

No, he doesn't. He just has to keep the receipts for the purchases.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183800)

No, he does, receipts only demonstrate that you've paid for the discs, they don't demonstrate that you still own them. For instance receipts could still be retained if one sold the discs or gave them away.

Re:Yes, typewriter (2)

Tomato42 (2416694) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183532)

Cardboard boxes with year written on them won't be enough? They will only be needed again if the HDDs fail, just use RAID6 (as you should if you have more than 5 disks) and not only it will become unlikely but you also gain a place to store backups from your regular PC.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183768)

Put them in a box.

Alternately, dispose of original packaging and just keep the inserts and covers. The physical disks themselves can compress down quite nicely.

Boxed sets also compress nicely. They make special "banker boxes" you can use for this. Get some nice deep shelves and just shove them in a corner.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183492)

Same here. Just wish my system could do it faster. The sooner I get rid of my physical DVDs, the better.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183826)

I am, at this moment, trying to salvage a 2TB drive with a corrupted filesystem, that was almost corked with blu ray rips. I've recovered about 90% of the material so far, but it's clear I'll be employing my encoding skillz again.
I would say don't get rid of your physical discs just yet; find a place for safe keeping. Hard drives fail, OSes fail, file systems fail. And yes, when the price of hard drives comes back down to something within my financial reach, I'll be soft-RAIDing all those bloody media drives.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183514)

Really Geeky Solution should involve a noisy robotic arm, huge metallic shelves, Raspberry Pi, Linux and Darth Vader voice synth :)

Re:Yes, typewriter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183990)

If it doesn't interface with a Kinect then no one cares how good your Darth Vader synth is.

Re:Yes, typewriter (2)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183610)

Precisely. Even at today's prices, it's still pretty affordable to set up a fault-tolerant array with several tb of storage. Most 1080 movies compress to 8-10 gigs without much loss of quality. That's 100 HD movies per tb of storage, give or take.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183784)

Many movies don't do justice to the extra data used to encode a BD version. A lot of content isn't available in high definition to begin with..

Regardless of how you manage your disks you might want to peruse a review or two before you shell out extra money for a new version of something that you likely already have or can get dirt cheap.

Re:Yes, typewriter (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183786)

Why fault tolerance? He still has all the disks?

Re:Yes, typewriter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183900)

time value of money

specifically, "price of doubling hard disk capacity for RAID1" vs "time spent re-ripping shitload of discs"

Jukebox (3)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183392)

Googling for cd rom jukebox first hit in shopping is a 100 disc cd/dvd jukebox with usb and dasychainable for ~150 bucks each. other than that ISO's and a fat NAS

Re:Jukebox (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183794)

That represents 900G of storage space tops.

Plus you need the software that can manage that device.

Re:Jukebox (1)

fikx (704101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183970)

The first hit I get is to the Kintronics page [kintronics.com] which seems data center oriented and I couldn't find the prices or ordering info beyond "contact us". I assume I missed part of the site...

Kaleidescape (4, Informative)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183436)

How big is your budget?

http://www.kaleidescape.com/ [kaleidescape.com]
http://www.kaleidescape.com/products/ [kaleidescape.com]

Beautiful stuff. Flawless operation. Drains your bank account.

Re:Kaleidescape (2)

hipp5 (1635263) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183718)

Beautiful stuff. Flawless operation. Drains your bank account.

They gotta make their money now before the business model evaporates in 10 years.

Re:Kaleidescape (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183758)

About the only problem I have is that they sell exclusively via distributors. I really dislike hardware that I can't simply order online... I mean, you can get a $50k custom-built server spec'd and ordered online, their stuff isn't any different so why can't one buy it directly?!

Re:Kaleidescape (1)

Kalriath (849904) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183814)

Looks great, but what does it actually cost? I assume it follows the old adage "if you have to ask, it's too much". Seems that you can only get it via stupidly priced "Solution Designer" type folks.

Re:Kaleidescape (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183898)

It costs more than any other available option.

It's highly proprietary. You can't just use any playback client. You must use THEIR playback client. The same goes for jukeboxes and disk packs for their RAID arrays.

What you rip isn't portable. It can't be taken "out of the system".

You can't load your rips onto your phone or tablet.

R.I.P. discs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183464)

rip them all to a RAID5 (recommend RAIDZ with separate intent log disk) or similar array then get a giant trashbag and put all your worthless discs in the landfill where they belong

A hash of stacks of Least Recently Used disks ... (5, Funny)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183468)

... sitting on the living room floor. The system is managed by an ugly bag of mostly water.

Surprising efficient and effective.

Low tech for high brows.

XMBC + HP Desktop with Media Center remote (5, Informative)

GWBasic (900357) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183480)

In March of 2011 I bought an HP desktop that has a media center remote. (It also has a TV tuner, BluRay, and HDMI.)

I installed XMBC, which supports the remote. It provides a great menu to navigate EVERYTHING, isos, avis, mkvs, mp3s, aacs, flacs, and some of those other whacky DVD rip formats.

The only problem is that my hard drive with about 500 gigs of DVD rips crashed! Just make sure to back up everything on a regular basis!

Re:XMBC + HP Desktop with Media Center remote (1)

Local ID10T (790134) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183554)

The only problem is that my hard drive with about 500 gigs of DVD rips crashed! Just make sure to back up everything on a regular basis!

It's easier to re-rip/download than it is to backup media (movies/music).

Re:XMBC + HP Desktop with Media Center remote (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183816)

> It's easier to re-rip/download than it is to backup media (movies/music).

No. It is much more of a bother to rip stuff again.

Backing up your media can be as simply as "cp DiskA/* DiskB".

Messing around with any number of optical disks is going to be more bother than that.

Re:XMBC + HP Desktop with Media Center remote (2)

yodleboy (982200) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183932)

"It's easier to re-rip/download than it is to backup media"

depends. If you're just ripping DVDs and playing the VOB's in some media center that can stream them, then yeah, it's not toooo big a problem. If, however you rip, then re-encode, that's a big pain. I can re-encode most DVDs to MKV in handbrake and get a file size of around 1.5 to 2GB w/ 5.1 and the resulting file is pretty much indistinguishable from the DVD on my 65" DLP. On smaller screens it looks even better. Unfortunately, it runs 45-60 min per encode plus time to rip. I don't have a bleeding edge system, but it is Core i5 @3.2 GHZ w/ 6GB of RAM. It's not really something you want to do more than once (i've got 800+ DVDs) if you can avoid it.

Re:XMBC + HP Desktop with Media Center remote (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183940)

It's easier to re-rip/download than it is to backup media (movies/music).

No. Handling hundreds of discs or torrents to recreate a collection is a lot more job than hooking up another 2-3TB disk and keeping two copies. That is, if you're insisting on keeping a collection, I know more and more that don't at least for movies. They download, watch and delete and if they want to see it again, they'll download it again. Music is different, there you can play it many many times in playlists but movies you see a handful times tops, most actually just once or twice.

Re:XMBC + HP Desktop with Media Center remote (1)

sirsnork (530512) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183762)

I already have a file server, I wanted my media center to be small and silent. So I bought an Apple TV gen2, jailbroke it and dropped XBMC on it.

It's low power, damn near instant on and completely silent. The single only down side is that it'll only play H.264 HD since that's all that's HW accelerated, but I can live with that

Laziness (1, Insightful)

Time_Ngler (564671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183496)

Leave it in disc format and get up and browse your movie collection on a bookshelf for 5 minutes before resuming your sedentary lifestyle sitting motionless for the next 2+ hours. Geez.

Re:Laziness (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183870)

I agree if it's just a matter of laziness, but DVDs in their boxes take a whole lot of space. My books already take a whole wall, if I stored music CDs and DVDs on their boxes I'd have to move out.

Re:Laziness (1)

fikx (704101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183988)

It's not so much laziness as clutter. the bookshelves take up needed space and I'd hoped discs being common format, someone would have had a solution by now. Just hoping anyway...

Disks types (1)

Tomato42 (2416694) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183510)

It wasn't until the middle of second line that I noticed that the poster was suggesting optical disks.

People actually use optical storage for anything but backups?

Re:Disks types (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183524)

optical disk == disc.

Re:Disks types (1)

mmcuh (1088773) | more than 2 years ago | (#38184044)

They aren't useful for backup either. Hard disks are cheaper and easier to handle, and often last longer.

The only reasonable use for DVDs is for when you need to send a couple of GB to someone with a slow or capped internet connection.

RAID 5 (or RAID 10) in a Custom Built Server (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183518)

If you set up a RAID 5 or a RAID 10 system (redundant array of internal disks) in a custom built PC you can get mass storage going for under $1000 (5-8TB). The menu concern can be solved with software. I am not sure what that software is, but you might want to try giving weezo a shot. (weezo.org)

Dacal changers for 150 disks,supported under Linux (4, Informative)

D4C5CE (578304) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183522)

http://dacal.com.tw/ [dacal.com.tw] with Windows disk database, stackable with USB through ports.
Robot arm optional by DIY ;-) if you take a unit without internal drive (which reduces capacity by 50 disks).

There's a brand new invention (-1, Redundant)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183540)

called a filesystem. And several possible UI (even better than skinning !) called File Managers, which let you list all files on your disk, and , for example, sort them by name, date, director...
Then there's an advanced feature: double-clic on a file, and it starts playing !
There might be patents pending on the whole thing, so use it while you can !

KISS (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183574)

Just put all your movies on a shelf in alphabetical order. If you have LOTS of them, then use a more orderly system [ehow.com] . For the 5 seconds it takes to manually swap out a disc to watch a one or two hour movie, anything else is massive overkill.

Re:KISS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183858)

I kind of agree. While physical discs take some space, all the time arranging disc jukeboxes, ripping movies to HDDs, babysitting a RAID NAS... it's not really worth it.

intriguing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183634)

would have bought one of those CD-ROM wurlitzers for the computer i saw at a comp-expo a few years back ...
unfortunately, still being a virgin at the time and in an asian city ... well, good memories and less crap hardware lying around now.
anyways, the future is a better compressor and bit-torrent methinks?
p.s. @MAFIIA: if you would invent a nice way to "share" data, by putting a serial-number per disk in a database were we PAYING people could register our legit copy .. maybe legit could share legit on the "alternative" MAFIAA bit-torrent? who would then care if my legit DVD is scratched if i can get it(read:DOWNLOAD) from someone who has also a legit copy (that's a funny word)?

Re:intriguing (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38184056)

I have it straight from the horse's mouth: **AA would rather you went to HMV and BOUGHT (read: LICENSED) another copy. They DO NOT LIKE people to be able to back up their own duplicates. That's in violation of their ideal license restrictions and hurtful for their bottom line. This is why we have Macrovision et. al.; why Macrovision go mental at people who sell region-free players exclusively, and why **AA spend SO DAMN MUCH money that isn't theirs, on advertising trying to convince people that copying media that they bought hence to any right-minded individual, own, is a more heinous offence than rape or possibly infanticide.

Manage Collection with ripping (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183642)

I also manage my DVD collection by ripping to HD and then playing of HD with a media center. It's really frustrating that I cannot find a legal way buy the media in format that would allow me not to even buy the DVD.

I honestly only use the DVD's once, after that they sit and gather dust. What a wast of precious earth resources. Quick calculation (40+ Tons ) annually because a couple of movie execs cannot embrace change.
 

Mymovies (1)

CrackP0t (2518624) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183652)

http://mymovies.dk/ [mymovies.dk] installed on a windows home server serving up entire collection to any windows media center client http://slysoft.com/ [slysoft.com] AnyDVD HD for aiding the ripping You can skip the windows home server and put it on any old machine, but if you are going to use windows at home, it is the best backup/restore/server solution

Simple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183668)

Buy for every dvd one of these http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=420 and daisy chain them through usb hubs with your computer.

Unraid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183676)

I have 22TB under my unraid storage box with Plex being the front end to it. It's awesome, low maint, reliable and MOST importantly, wife friendly.
I know lots of people stream or whatever, but I too had 500 or so DVD's that I felt weird tossing in favor of Netflix. So I just ripped them and stored them.

Digital Media Library (4, Informative)

Venner (59051) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183694)

I wanted a home theater PC with instant-access to all of my films. My solution was as follows:

(a) Rip all discs to hard drive,
(b) Index and link to files with software solution

In detail:
(a) I chose to go with MakeMKV for most of my ripping. It rips the mpeg2/4 video directly to an mkv file, without reencoding, and you can choose all the tracks you want to go with it. (I.e., some titles I rip multiple audio streams and subtitles, some I take just English 2.0). For me, I just ripped the main title from each film; if I want to see the special features later, I'll take the box down off the shelf and pop the disk in. (Special features don't really matter to me that much.) Each rip averages 3 to 6Gb. Now MKV, while a great file format, isn't compatible with some (especially older) consumer electronics. You can always re-encode, if you really need to make a particular title portable. And for my Blu Ray / HD-DVD titles, I re-encoded anyway. I found a 1080P 6Gb-target-size h.264 two-pass re-encode to be indistinguishable on my 52" TV from the original. In fact, it's probably quite a bit of overkill.

  For storage, I have a couple of 3Tb drives in an external enclosure, with a duplicate unit for backup. (Got them for a song before the manic price gouging going on now started!.) So far, it's holding over 500 titles and several TV series, and plenty of room to grow. And I can always increase capacity.

(b) For keeping track of everything, I eventually went with Collectorz.com Movie Collector. I've tried many solutions, both free and payware, and Movie Collector was the one that fit my needs the best. (There is a lot of good software out there -- look around!) As I ripped my collection in my spare time, I simply scanned in the UPC on the back of each film using an old CueCat barcode scanner. The software then populates all of the data for the film. Once the film was ripped, I simply linked the title in Movie Collector to the video file on the hard drives. Now I can visually browse my entire collection and watch any title at the click of a mouse. And it's nice to be able to go, "Hey, how many Humphrey Bogart movies do I own?" and find out with a simple filter.

What worked for me might or might not fit your needs, but hopefully it gives you ideas.
   

Disk catalogue software.. old school (1)

ajo_arctus (1215290) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183712)

Gosh, disk cataloguing software brings back memories of software we used to keep track of floppies back in the early '90s. I can't find any examples specifically from the Amiga (I definitely had some PD utility to do just this though), but this Windows shareware from the late 90s is a suitably crummy example: http://equi4.com/catfish/ [equi4.com]

When it comes to CDs and DVDs, I now rip them and store the originals in the loft. They go in to iTunes and that make it easy to find them again. It stops the children wrecking the actual disks too. When we're low on space I either upgrade the disk or delete stuff they've lost interest in.

rent... don't buy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183752)

People have DVD collections and claim they like to watch their movies many times.
But if you do the math they'd have to spend a crazy percentage of their time watching movies over and over again to make it worthwhile.
And if they did that, they'd be missing out on the other million things they actually would rather be doing, but don't realize.

Don't be a hoarder... just rent a movie once in a while.

Re:rent... don't buy (1)

stickyboot (845510) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183820)

I would say renting is probably the best advice. People are arguing that ripping the disks to hard drive would be effective, but holly molly, that is going to take a long time, and a crap-load of space, or an even more insane amount of time if it includes encoding the rips, especially if you your collection includes blue-ray discs. If people must hoard, you are better off leaving the ripping to the professionals. They will do a better job, and its an immense waste of time the same way media capturing is. DRM and hoarding mix terribly, so basically your only effective option is getting onto a good semi-private movie torrent site and get your movies for long term storage there.

Re:rent... don't buy (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183960)

The disks rip themselves. It's not like you've got to sit there and ferry the bits across the SATA cable. All you have to do is wait for it to finish. If you have multiple disks, just check your PC every once and awhile.

The same goes for transcoding. You start it. It handles itself until it is finished. You are not scribbling numbers by hand on paper or other similar nonsense.

It takes 5 minutes to type in the titles for an entire season of something so names can be properly sorted out. That is the extent of the "manual futzing time".

The rest is just letting the computer do what it's supposed to do: automate things and crunch numbers.

It's nice to have tons of uncut commercial free stuff at your fingertips. It's cheaper than iTunes, more complete than Netflix, and potentially cheaper than cable in the long run.

Rip, store, and XBMC it (3, Informative)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183790)

Rip it, store it on a network storage system that XBMC can access (there are many [wikipedia.org] ), and stream it to your display device. There are many thin-clients you can use as an XBMC box. I personally use an old Acer Aspire Revo (which have since been discontinued). Probably the cheapest device you can use as an XBMC box that's currently available and doesn't look hideous is the Apple TV 2. For $99 with a remote that works out-of-box, you can't really beat that (granted, it can only output up to 720p).

Homebrew Raid (1)

plasticpixel (323537) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183804)

I struggled with this problem too and ended up building a homebrew raid using OpenSolaris and a large CoolerMaster case full of drives. The ZFS filesystem has been bullet proof on this box since 2005. I ripped all my DVDs to ISO format so that I could preserve the DVD menus on those discs. The box sits on my network and is shared via NFS and Samba.

To play back all those movies on my TV, I put my older Mac Mini on it and have it boot up into a default user and start VLC right away. I use VLC Remote on the ipad to access the library that is NFS mounted on the Mac Mini.

The overall experience has been great! Using the iPad, I can browse hundreds of ISO images, select one and it plays within a few seconds.

The iPad remote solution was the final peice to this puzzle as I was previously using a mouse and keyboard to navigate the movies.

Discgear storage units (4, Informative)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183824)

Hard drive solutions are all well and good. But if you are using discrete disks (CD, DVD) for storage, then I highly recommend Discgear Selector [discgear.com] products. While not automatic like a disk changer, finding and getting a disk out is as simple as sliding a knob and lifting the lid. I have several of the larger models.

And you can use the included software to maintain your library index, and print index labels for the containers.

Use a search-engine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183866)

I think the best solution to keep track of my movies is a search-engine. Just download some documents about your movies and put them in a directory. I use rottentomatoes, imdb and wikipedia as my datafiles. This is dependent on taste. You could actually also take down forum-articles about the movies as well if you want, I did that for Firefly and some other important stuff. Then just insert your favorite local search-engine into that directory. I use the built-in engine in Windows because it's not so many files I have to search. If you hypothetically of course have media-files, do a DIR-command and pipe it into a textfile with a dir textfile.txt command. This can be automated so you can do a total listing of more then one disk. This can go into a different search-engine so you can get which disk a file is on if you archive is large. But, because the Harddrive-prices are so high now, I reccomend patience with new purchases. And, always buy disks in 2. Then you can have one disk offline as a backup. Perhaps this solution is overkill, but just wanted to share it.

Old-school - shelve them (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183876)

Do it old-school.

Have bookshelves and sort by whatever works best for you, e.g. genre, title, etc.

OK, so you only get one sorting key, but at bookshelves/DVD-shelves won't be discontinued any time soon.

Oh, and you may want to rip anything you'll watch more than once in the next 12 months and put it on your favorite media player.

Homebuilt DVD carousel (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38183902)

but I'm retiring it out (at my own pace) for a stack of hard disks which have far higher data density.

DVD Fab - Handbrake (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38183942)

I use DVD Fab to remove copy protection, then Handbrake to transcode it to make it watchable on an apple tv, or an ipad (or Windows 7 media player, or VLC). Works great, but some stuff is not automated (titles, pictures, etc). I keep all of my dvds in boxes in the closet, so when the Sony police knock on my door, I have the disks to show them. I don't do blu-ray, though, so I don't know about those issues.

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