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73 comments

Jet Jaguar? Is that you? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38275830)

>According tot he researchers,
He mother never really love him.

It's the same guy, I'm positive.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cxV8Bf8ND4

Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38275842)

Now the only thing that stands in the way is government red tape.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38275880)

Now the only thing that stands in the way is government red tape.

Government is bad, blah blah blah. Nevermind that governments are responsible for much of this fundamental research. Through public schools, public institutions and grants. Blah blah blah, shut up.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38275892)

Now the only thing that stands in the way is government red tape.

Government is bad, blah blah blah. Nevermind that governments are responsible for much of this fundamental research. Through public schools, public institutions and grants. Blah blah blah, shut up.

Apparently you are not familiar with the concept of too much of a good thing being bad for you. :-)

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38275982)

Now the only thing that stands in the way is government red tape.

Government is bad, blah blah blah. Nevermind that governments are responsible for much of this fundamental research. Through public schools, public institutions and grants. Blah blah blah, shut up.

It does good things but some of the worst sociopathic people are attracted to the positions of authority it offers. They tend to do things for the wrong reasons. They tend to make easy things hard by adding politically inspired layers of complexity to what could have been straightforward. In the case of patents and copyright and the like they tend to overwhelmingly support corporations at the expense of voters and taxpayers. Government also tends to be ever-expanding for its own sake with no end in sight, no clear goal that says "ok now we have enough government, time to stop expanding".

Especially the public schools you mention, they are a joke. The number of teachers has remained relatively static in the last few decades while the number of administrators has skyrocketed (i.e. a factor of 10-20) and that is why they always need more money, not because they are buying more classroom materials to deliver a better education. Want to look at the high school dropout rate? No? How about the number of graduates who cannot read and write at a 12th-grade level, or at all? No? Not convenient for your position? That's because the NEA is in control, not any standard of excellence.

Government does good things. There are also terrible qualities about it that could be addressed, improved, and reformed. Stop looking at the world in black and white, both of you. Seriously. That mentality is part of why we have such a screwed up world today. It's the thinking of a fanatic.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (0, Offtopic)

blue trane (110704) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276392)

And biz is better? The number of middle managers has been expanding while productivity means that the number of actual ppl doing the work decreases. But biz has to support all that dead weight of managers who do not contribute any value except in terms of ppl skills, pretending to be busy when the boss is around, schmoozing, etc.

Look up the definition of sociopathy; it fits corporations' charters. Corporations don't care about people or emotions, they just want to use people to increase profits.

We the ppl control the government. We get to elect our representatives, or use direct methods such as referendums. I trust government much more than I trust the sociopathic corporation CEO who doesn't swear to uphold the Constitution, doesn't care about the General Welfare, wants to restrict the freedom of speech of anyone speaking against him or his company, and lies to cover up mistakes by his company (salmonella outbreaks, loss of data to hacking, etc.).

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (1, Informative)

mldi (1598123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38277232)

We the ppl control the government. We get to elect our representatives, or use direct methods such as referendums.

That's what they'd like you to think. Dictators love elections.

It doesn't matter who's in control. If they get too powerful, it's time to think twice about the situation. And guess where we're at now?

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (1)

nobodie (1555367) | more than 2 years ago | (#38289894)

where we are at now is, because of the meme you are using/ projecting/ supporting, a country run not by the elected government or reasonable officials but instead by the corporations who pay rich people to shape public policy to suit short term gain for the corporations. If we had the same government that we had in the 50s and 60s we would have governmental control of the corporations in a way that protects us from the destructive effects of what we see going on around us today.

As you clean out your desk in tears, rage and confusion, remember that you supported the process that led to your loss.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (0)

xstonedogx (814876) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276398)

Aren't you afraid if you continue to suppress the strawmen that they will rise in revolt against you?

I'm game, though.

Government has done good things, blah blah blah. Nevermind that we have no idea how that money might otherwise have been spent. Blah blah blah, this is fun.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (3, Insightful)

OldHawk777 (19923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38280324)

The government over the last 40 years has proportionally cut funding to all theoretical and applied science, medicine, and engineering. If BigBiz-Brother is not interested in the research outcome, then no funding comes from BigBiz-Brother. BigBiz-Brother will fund interpretations and falsifications of research results for more corporate-welfare laws. The cure for big-profit diseases is close to impossible (almost accidental) in the present environment, but treatments for big-profit diseases are very innovative, competitive, and highly profitable.

Presently it is un-American, when corporate-welfare will be adversely impacted, to cure any big-profit diseases ; Hence, the government is not adding much to the deficit for cures that would disrupt the global economy for the plutocrats.

I heard someone say that poor-people make much better lab-rats for testing expensive treatments.

Governance of BigBiz-Brother is a possible reality, but not likely for US.
Governance of US by BigBiz-Brother politician-proxies is a present actuality.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (1)

Plugh (27537) | more than 2 years ago | (#38281658)

Quoth AC:
Government is bad, blah blah blah. Nevermind that governments are responsible for much of this fundamental research. Through public schools, public institutions and grants. Blah blah blah, shut up

For everyone who fundamentally disagrees with this person, don't bother debating him on the internet.
Join [freestateproject.org] the rest of us in Real Life.
We're here, waiting to welcome you HOME

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (1)

mcavic (2007672) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276228)

The government is standing in the way of IPv6 adoption? I didn't even realize.

Re:Septins are to Antibiotics as IPv6 is to IPv4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38279062)

Two microbes enter, one... no microbes leave.

Prevention as well (2)

erick99 (743982) | more than 2 years ago | (#38275852)

Perhaps, if this approach ends up working, not only could it be used for treating diseases but possible could be used to prevent diseases by somehow encoding them into genes. Not sure if you would do that just for folks who have a history of a disease or offer such a solution to a larger group much in the way we do inoculation for disease.

Re:Prevention as well (4, Insightful)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38275904)

Yes, program your genes to build cages around cells. What could go wrong with that?

Well, except for the fact that the majority of cells in the human body aren't, technically, human at all. There are more bacterial cells [scientificamerican.com] than human ones. So, snarky comments aside, that would be extremely dangerous. You might be able to select only dangerous cells, but I very much doubt it. Not genetically, anyways. Anti-bacterial agents need to be targeted specifically, or you can do more harm than good.

Re:Prevention as well (1)

erick99 (743982) | more than 2 years ago | (#38275914)

I agree with everything you said. But it still intrigues me and it could still be a part of another solution that needed the last piece of a puzzle. But, yes, there would be a lot of not-so-good unintended consequences.

Re:Prevention as well (5, Informative)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276230)

I have to laugh at you and the grandparent... all I can say is RTFA! :)

Our cells already use septins to build cages around bacterial pathogens - this research just is the first time someone has observed it in human cells. The talk of new drugs is in how to artificially encourage this behavior.

Re:Prevention as well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276278)

Clearly you do not understand biology please stop talking as if you are an authority. Your conclusions are completely wrong.

Re:Prevention as well (2)

mrxak (727974) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276626)

Certainly an interesting article, but while I don't claim to be an expert, your understanding seems more limited than mine. The bacteria your link discusses are very different than the ones being talked about in TFA. Your bacteria are rather helpful, and they aren't invading human cells and screwing them up. The ones being talked about in TFA are doing significant harm and the cells' natural defense mechanism is what's being researched.

Actually, the use of these special walls talked about in TFA might have less side effects than broad spectrum antibiotics used today, which go and kill those helpful bacteria living in your guts indiscriminately. Some medicine that encourages septins would probably only target harmful bacteria invading human cells.

Prison (4, Funny)

cyachallenge (2521604) | more than 2 years ago | (#38275856)

"I ain't done nuffin! Letme out bitches!"

Re:Prison (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#38275900)

More like Death Row in Texas, since they get "broken down" later. That broken down part might inform our Death Row approach, though: maybe instead of chemical poisoning we can digest them with enzymes in a giant Venus fly trap?

It's Magic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38275860)

I saw this on the magic school bus years ago.....

Our amazing bodies (5, Interesting)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 2 years ago | (#38275944)

Our bodies continue to amaze me. So complex systems, so adaptable and flexible. And the second amazing part is of course that we are able to "see" those molecular processes, can figure out how it happens, and subsequently manipulate it.

And of course this complexity and flexibility is not limited to the human body but basically all life forms on this planet. The more we learn about life, the more amazing it becomes.

Re:Our amazing bodies (5, Funny)

viperidaenz (2515578) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276000)

Thats what happens when you're got ~3 billion years of evolution (or 6000 years of creation, if you're moderately retarded)

Re:Our amazing bodies (2)

wvmarle (1070040) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276052)

Part of the amazing part is that life managed to start one way or another and that such evolution could take place to begin with. Even the simplest life forms (such as viruses - though I know there is discussion going on about whether they should be classified as "living" to begin with) on earth are already really complex.

Re:Our amazing bodies (2)

viperidaenz (2515578) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276224)

Life just adapts to exploit all possible resources. Viruses have just adapted to exploit living cells. Why do you need to expend your own resources reproducing when you can hijack the resources of other cells?

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

mldi (1598123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38277260)

Life just adapts to exploit all possible resources.

Wrong. Nothing adapts. What you see is what survived based on traits that were randomly mutated.

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 2 years ago | (#38278822)

Survival based on traits that were randomly mutated is adaptation.

Or rather, adaptation is "a change by which an organism or species becomes better suited to its environment"; the reason doesn't matter.

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

mldi (1598123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38316902)

Survival based on traits that were randomly mutated is adaptation.

No it's not.

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

mldi (1598123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38317082)

Life just adapts to exploit all possible resources.

It's not the correct use for that particular sentence, and that's what I had a problem with. But I could just be splitting hairs, here.

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276078)

Thats what happens when you're got ~3 billion years of evolution (or 6000 years of creation, if you're extremely retarded)

FTFY

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

mldi (1598123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38277298)

Thats what happens when you're got ~3 billion years of evolution (or 6000 years of creation, if you're moderately retarded)

Pfffft. It was 6 days of creation, you ignorant clod!

Re:Our amazing bodies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38279844)

This. How did 6 days become 6000 years?

Re:Our amazing bodies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38278280)

Evolution can't be that great, it still hasn't gotten rid of creationists yet. :P

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

cyachallenge (2521604) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276026)

Our bodies continue to amaze me. So complex systems, so adaptable and flexible. And the second amazing part is of course that we are able to "see" those molecular processes, can figure out how it happens, and subsequently manipulate it. And of course this complexity and flexibility is not limited to the human body but basically all life forms on this planet. The more we learn about life, the more amazing it becomes.

We're never able to grasp anything in the body completely. We had detailed maps of anatomy in the middle ages, but we had no proper theory on how the body worked. Most of us look back at the four humors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humorism/ [wikipedia.org]) and laugh. Agreed, biology is amazing.

Re:Our amazing bodies (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276088)

Our bodies continue to amaze me.

They continue to disappoint me.

If you take a single bullet in a seemingly insignificant area and don't receive treatment, you'll probably die. Your teeth are incredibly fragile (brushing too hard is bad, most people get cavities, etc). Your bones are fragile. Everything about the human body is fragile.

Weak and pathetic. That probably applies to most other creatures as well.

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (1, Interesting)

fnj (64210) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276718)

The body has two eyes, two nostrils, two ears, two kidneys, two lungs, two testes or ovaries. Makes sense.

OK, so why does it have only ONE HEART and ONE TRACHEA? Huh? Huh? How much sense does that make? Whether you believe in evolution or intelligent design, makes no difference, that just doesn't figure. Just about the two most short term vital organs in the body. Yeah, I know, the brain. That's why I said "just about." But I can see why there is only one brain. Think about it.

Actually, it seems to me that this fact boosts intelligent design. It's very possible to conceive an intelligent designer who plays tricks. But since when does evolution play tricks? Two hearts and two tracheae would be a very strong survival trait. Even a single trachea completely SEPARATE FROM THE GODDAM FOOD INTAKE would be a strong survival trait. Just imagine the man in the restaurant who has two trachea and inhales a chunk of food and gets one of his two tracheae plugged. "Oh damn! I've gone and plugged a trachea again. I'll have to get that looked at next week."

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276922)

The limitation of evolution is this: each successive version needs to be a slight modification on the previous version. Some forward and backward compatibility is available.

Way back, we more or less worked as worms. A two layer set of cells shaped as a tube: one set inside the tube, which specialized in taking food in one end, digesting it, and spitting the waste out the other end, and the other outside the tube, protecting the organism, sensing for sources and danger, and working out which way to point. Bilateral symmetry is great for this: You have an advantage over predators since it's equally likely you'll go one way vs. the other, rather than having an obvious preference for, say, left turns. Why not higher orders of symmetry, say trilateral? Because we evolved in a gravity field, so mutations that take advantage of up and down (top-mount legs aren't that useful) tend to get kept while those that prefer left over right don't.

So why one trachea? Because when we swam, the gill system worked the best. It was more or less self-balancing and redundant where it needed to be: at the oxygen exchangers. Plus it reused the existing tech of single-intake. If you have two mouths, either you're buying twice as many parts just to eat twice as fast (could you even?) or you just lost the ability to eat larger things. So since there was little benefit in two mouths, it got abandoned. A twin-trachea setup would require a more complex (read: easier to break) epiglottis, and have balancing issues. So it got ditched: it cost too much to get rid of the single point of failure.

Also, having the mouth route to both the esophagus and trachea as another feature: safety! See, food goes in the opening that leads to the esophagus. Now if the food gets stuck, the folks with the trachea and esophagus routed to the mouth have an advantage: they can use the lungs to blow the blockage free. There are other features: cilia move contaminants out of the lungs to get trapped by nasal mucus and routed down to the esophagus: with two mouths, the breathing one would have to get thing all the way out to the outside by itself, and contaminants that entered via the eating mouth could only be kicked out one way: throwing up. So we'd leave a trail of phlegm and vomit for predators to find. Then there's how the sense of smell augments the sense of taste because they share the airway, which again makes you more survivable...

All the paired items you name derive from the bilateral symmetry modification. They arose on the sides of the worm, and here we are. The brain is rather bilaterally symmetric itself, and quite redundant. You might have noticed the slot in the middle?

As for one heart: multiple hearts have been tried! The aforementioned worms eventually evolved to have several hearts. Problem is, they're weak, and put together they won't move the needed blood volume at the needed pressure. The single-heart design is simply more optimized: it's lighter for its capacity and you need no complex regulation system to coordinate them to prevent one's mistiming from blowing out the valves on the other.

Again, if you were designing from scratch, you could do a better design. Whether it can be packed into 46 chromosomes without being cancer-riddled is TBD, of course. But that's more evidence that evolution is at fault: the "small changes a step at a time" plan won over the "rewrite from scratch so it will be better" way, because you had to survive, even in intermediate forms. A lot like software, really.

BTW, if one of your trachea gets plugged, don't wait a week. You'll be immediately down half your lung capacity, you'll only have one lung with which to blow the chunk out, you'll have to coordinate both sides so you don't blow the chunk out one and into the other, and all the time you wait the bacteria in there are going to be going to town turning anything of you they can eat into more of them. So yeah, things that encourage procrastination might get you killed (read: make you less survivable).

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (2)

jovius (974690) | more than 2 years ago | (#38279312)

The limitation of evolution is this: each successive version needs to be a slight modification on the previous version.

I'd add that practically infinite amount of modifications have provided to be unsuccesful - it's a blind process. The strength lies in diversity. The more diverse the gene pool the readier the pool is to confront even relatively sudden changes, because a lot of variations are readily available.

The ID/Creationists only see the one perfect path because of their religious belief. It would not be right for them to say that god makes 99 wrong decisions per 1 right, because it would degrade the image of an omnipotent entity.

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (1)

Phyvo (876321) | more than 2 years ago | (#38279374)

"Bilateral symmetry is great for this: You have an advantage over predators since it's equally likely you'll go one way vs. the other, rather than having an obvious preference for, say, left turns."

I'm pretty sure that it's very common for prey animals like fish to actually prefer turning one direction over the other to escape and that many predators have actually adapted to this behavior, preferring to strike from a position where the prey animal will flee closer to them.

"The brain is rather bilaterally symmetric itself, and quite redundant. You might have noticed the slot in the middle?"

The brain is actually divided into two parts doing different kinds of work for the sake of efficiency. Experiments have shown that doing so results in a quicker response for prey animals reacting to danger. When the brain halves are not so specialized/divided the prey animal spends far more time frozen in position when confronted by danger.

Interestingly the same design also causes the directional preference in fleeing behavior, meaning that it's better for survival to be fast rather than random.

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (1)

ShooterNeo (555040) | more than 2 years ago | (#38277496)

The trachea is composed of 2 symmetric halves, you could say that there are 2 half tracheas. You might have 2 eyes, but the second eye isn't redundant, it's for depth perception. Same with 2 ears. You need both kidneys under cases of heavy load. Same with needing 2 lungs if you get a UTI. The second testes is a spare, as well as the second ovary, I agree there.

The heart is composed of 2 separate hearts, you just need both to survive. And there's a terrible design flaw here, obviously : the coronary arteries are barely adequate even under ideal conditions.

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38278080)

But I can see why there is only one brain. Think about it.

Pun intended?

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (1)

Java Pimp (98454) | more than 2 years ago | (#38279582)

I used to think the brain was the most amazing organ in the body. But then I thought, look who's telling me that...

Good enough to reproduce before you die (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 2 years ago | (#38278112)

That's all that's required.

How much sense does that make?

Logic? Vanity more like. You are nothing more than a chemical reproduction machine. Don't get above yourself.
 

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (2)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 2 years ago | (#38278614)

OK, so why does it have only ONE HEART and ONE TRACHEA?

I am a Time Lord, you insensitive clod!

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#38278662)

How much sense does that make? Whether you believe in evolution or intelligent design, makes no difference, that just doesn't figure

It does. Evolution tends towards locally optimal solutions for passing on genes. Individual survival is not an important trait. In fact it's a problem, because it means that the new generation competes with the older one, reducing the population turnover rate and slowing the process of evolution (which requires frequent mutations). If 80% of the populations survives long enough to produce offspring then that's great for evolution.

Intelligent design is different. Either your creator hates you or your creator is incompetent. Actually, it makes sense if you read genesis: God created animals after he creates cannabis...

Oh, and there's no reason why you couldn't have multiple brains. We do high availability clustering with computers now - just make sure that both receive the same inputs and they'll be in the same state.

Re:Our amazing bodies - amazingly FLAWED (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38281872)

I'm actually happy I only have one heart and one brain. First, for philosophical reasons. After all, if I can be shot in one of my hearts and survive, that wipes out several thousand years of poetry.

But mainly, having a single heart and a single brain means that when we finally hit the Deus Ex point (latest game, not the earlier ones) it's feasible. If you had 2 hearts, and want to remove most organic tissue to replace it with machinery, the question quickly becomes how many of your hearts you need to retain to provide adequate blood flow to your brain, i.e. the only other organic bit you really want to retain. Of course, you then have to make the call between some sort of stim pack that injects nutrients directly into the bloodstream vs. eating, and that's a whole separate can of worms. Still, as far as I'm concerned, the day when we're 80% machine will be the best day in human history. And I prefer stims. All the nutrition of food with no fat.

(If it wasn't obvious, this is all highly hypothetical. I mean I really do want this personally, but I can see how it's probably a 100-year long process of legal maneuvering and religious objections before we can even get a prototype and I'll never live to see it. With luck, at least my fucking grandkids will have built-in jet packs. Damn religious people.)

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

Nanosphere (1867972) | more than 2 years ago | (#38279056)

Think about this though: the squishy frail material that makes up our bodies is also extremely energy efficient. Yes, it is much easier to damage us but it is likewise much easier to repair and even replicate. Compare that to durable artificial machines, yes they are more durable but compared to us require an extreme amount of energy to repair or replicate.

So you see there is a trade off. We *could* be made of more durable chemicals, but then we would require more time and energy to heal or procreate. So then the next question is which is more important, the durability and longevity of the individual, or the growth rate and adaptability of the collective?

Re:Our amazing bodies (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276266)

Yes. The more AMAZING it becomes, the MORE we should realize that there is INTELLIGENT DESIGN involved! :) Come on, now... don't dismiss it, THINK about it! The more we investigate, the greater complexity we discover! It is far too intricate, far too sophisticated, to have all happened "by accident". To believe THAT takes MUCH MORE FAITH than to believe that there is, indeed, an Intelligent Designer.

Re:Our amazing bodies (1)

andydread (758754) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276538)

The problem with your argument is that belief in evolution does not take faith. It takes evidence, peer reviewed evidence not faith.

Re:Our amazing bodies (2)

BlackSupra (742450) | more than 2 years ago | (#38277198)

It is also amazing to see the cellular processes!

Video of a Neutrophil granulocytes white blood cell chasing a Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by David Rogers, Vanderbilt University 1950s http://www.biochemweb.org/neutrophil.shtml [biochemweb.org] (video mirror http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnlULOjUhSQ [youtube.com] )

This video is taken from a 16-mm movie made in the 1950s by the late David Rogers at Vanderbilt University. It was given to me via Dr. Victor Najjar, Professor Emeritus at Tufts University Medical School and a former colleague of Rogers. It depicts a human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (neutrophil) on a blood film, crawling among red blood cells, notable for their dark color and principally spherical shape. The neutrophil is "chasing" Staphylococcus aureus microorganisms, added to the film. The chemoattractant derived from the microbe is unclear but may be complement fragment C5a, generated by the interaction of antibodies in the blood serum with the complement cascade, and/or bacterial N-formyl peptides. Blood platelets adherent to the underlying glass are also visible. Notable is the characteristic asymmetric shape of the crawling neutrophil with an organelle-excluding leading lamella and a narrowing at the opposite end culminating in a "tail" that the cell appears to drag along. Contraction waves are visible along the surface of the moving cell as it moves forward in a gliding fashion. As the neutrophil relentlessly pursues the microbe it ignores the red cells and platelets. However, its leading edge is sufficiently stiff (elastic) to deform and displace the red cells it bumps into. The internal contents of the neutrophil also move, and granule motion is particularly dynamic near the leading edge. These granules only approach the cell surface membrane when the cell changes direction and redistributes its peripheral "gel." After the neutrophil has engulfed the bacterium, note that the cell's movements become somewhat more jerky, and that it begins to extend more spherical surface projections. These bleb-like protruberances resemble the blebs that form constitutively in the M2 melanoma cells missing the actin filament crosslinking protein filamin-1 (ABP-280) and may be telling us something about the mechanism of membrane protrusion.

        Thomas P. Stossel (Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School), June 22, 1999

Re: amazing bodies (0)

SlovakWakko (1025878) | more than 2 years ago | (#38277768)

...bodies continue to amaze me....so adaptable and flexible...

Wow, that has to be the most erotic comment I've ever read on /. :)

Bethesda knew it all along (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276004)

Uriel Septin was the fiercest warrior of all. He could cage anyone he wanted to.

Re:Bethesda knew it all along (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38276690)

I used to be able to cage anyone I wanted to, but then I took an arrow in the knee.

Bacterial Lobster Traps (4, Interesting)

Joe Torres (939784) | more than 2 years ago | (#38276290)

If you think this is cool, then you should look up the work of Dr. Jason Shear at the University of Texas (http://jshear.cm.utexas.edu/jshear/). His laboratory designs cages/houses/traps for bacteria. One of his papers that I am familiar with is "Probing Prokaryotic Social Behaviors with Bacterial 'Lobster Traps'" (http://mbio.asm.org/content/1/4/e00202-10.full).

SEPT7 is not 7/11/2011 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38278506)

Good to know that Septins have a useful purpose. As far as I knew, septin genes were only good for tripping up excel users if they didn't know to change their column types from General to Text. I'd also like to know the purpose for the membrane-associated ring finger (C3HC4) (MARCH) genes.

Septins (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38286344)

I like how the slashdot dudes know more than the life time scientist working on it.

Alzheimer's? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38286564)

Is that how you develop plaques in the brain?

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