Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Japanese Use Wild Monkeys To Track Radiation

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the nuclear-plant-of-the-apes dept.

Science 85

PolygamousRanchKid writes "Scientists in Japan are taking a novel approach to measuring the impact of radiation in a forest affected by the Fukushima nuclear crisis: enlisting the help of local wild monkeys. Takayuki Takahashi, a professor of robotic technology at Fukushima University, told CNN Wednesday his team was working on a collar fitted with a dosimeter to measure radiation levels that could be fitted to the monkeys before they are released back into the wild. Takahashi said the experiment would help researchers understand how radiation in the forest can affect human beings, as well as wild animals. While human scientists have been monitoring radiation levels from the air, the use of monkey 'assistants' will give them a clearer idea of conditions on the ground."

cancel ×

85 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I think I've seen the movie (5, Funny)

FairAndHateful (2522378) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380468)

Isn't this kind of where King Kong comes from?

Not in the original (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380572)

Not in the original, which took place on a remote island in the 1930s. There weren't many nuclera power plants around then.

Re:I think I've seen the movie (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380818)

No, but Godzilla did...

Re:I think I've seen the movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38381256)

More like Project X [wikipedia.org]

A movie about apes exposure to radiation.

Where have I heard this story before? (3, Funny)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380472)

Where have I heard this story before? Monkeys, nuclear radiation...

Oh yeah, every Japanese monster movie ever made!

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380534)

Make the cunts responsible for the catastrophe go in. Monkeys are sentient, clever, emotional, sympathetic, empathetic relatives to ourselves and it's sickening that they're doing this. I'm not some bleeding heart PETA nut, but I am someone who has a hard time slaughtering or abusing or even eating animals that have displayed traits that suggest there's a lot more to them than, say, a fucking potato or a chicken. This is just fucking wrong. Then again, what should I expect from people that slaughter whales and can them up on a ship under the guise of "scientific research". At least they're not the Chinese. Then, they'd be chopping up the monkeys to give harder erections to a bunch of fucking retards.

umm, the monkeys were already there (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380640)

It's not like they transported monkeys from other areas and threw them into the radiation.

and do you realize that almost EVERY animal hunts and eats each other? do you REALLY think most animals live bucolic lives just frolicking in the jungle? no, they are savagely slaughtering each other for food. you would not want to be an animal in the wild, it literally IS a jungle out there for them.

Re:umm, the monkeys were already there (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382578)

and do you realize that almost EVERY animal hunts and eats each other? do you REALLY think most animals live bucolic lives just frolicking in the jungle? no, they are savagely slaughtering each other for food. you would not want to be an animal in the wild, it literally IS a jungle out there for them.

Everybody's doing it! Therefore, it's objectively okay for us to do it!

Re:umm, the monkeys were already there (2)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 2 years ago | (#38383032)

Everybody's doing it! Therefore, it's objectively okay for us to do it!

Seems logical...

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (3, Informative)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380644)

So which bit don't you like?

The bit where they catch a monkey already in the forest in question and let it go again?

Or the bit where instead of having recatch the monkey they make it so that the collar just falls off?

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380648)

AC, I don't give a fuck!

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (5, Insightful)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381426)

Make the cunts responsible for the catastrophe go in.

As long as we send in everyone responsible. For example, the nuclear luddites would need to be sent as well. After all, they're the ones who prevented fuel rod recycling or the construction of new reactors.

But I imagine that somehow you'll only consider "responsible" some subset of people who you happen to disagree with. Responsibility only sticks to the enemy.

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (4, Informative)

nojayuk (567177) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381768)

Japan reprocesses fuel rods. It has just completed building a large facility at Rokkaisho to deal with about 800 tonnes of fuel rods a year. Previously it sent fuel rods to Britain to be reprocessed as well as processing rods at a smaller prototype plant at Tokai. It does have a backlog of rods in store to deal with though.

Several reactors in Japan were built from the 1980s onwards -- the newest Japanese reactor, Tomari-3, a type-3 PWR in Hokkaido only started up for the first time in December 2009.

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38384728)

Two things to note. First, the reprocessing couldn't keep up with the supply. I don't know if the new plant can, but it's only been around for two years and certainly would not have been a factor in whether or not Fukushima kept fuel rods on site.

Second, while there was some construction of reactors, there was also a wave of cancellations around 2000. Five plants from 1994 to 2003 were cancelled. While some of these probably wouldn't be active by 2011, those plants, even if they were merely under construction would have been incentive to continue with the decommissioning of the Fukushima plant.

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (5, Interesting)

DrBoumBoum (926687) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381850)

After all, they're the ones who prevented fuel rod recycling or the construction of new reactors.

Any citation to back that crap up? From what I understand fuel recycling has been hampered by technical complexity (breeder reactors), fear of uncontrollable proliferation in a full-scale Pu economy and non-competitivity in face of cheap uranium and oil. And the first obstacle in the construction of new reactors has always been that extending the operational life of existing ones, as was done in Japan and is currently done in Russia, is by far the most profitable move.

From my point of view one of the most serious obstacle against the credibility of nuclear energy is probably the smug and haughty attitude of those innumerable assholes ready to deny at any cost the shortcomings of their pet technology and to wipe off any legitimate concern as necessarily coming from so-called "ludites" and "joe-six-packs". Are you certain that you are not the blind idiot here?

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (4, Interesting)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38383892)

Any citation to back that crap up?

Five plants under planning or construction were abandoned from 1994-2003. The decision to extend the life of the Fukushima plant came later. It's also worth noting that the next generation fast breeder plant at Rokkasho has experienced significant opposition to its opening despite being the only real way to recycle fuel rods in Japan (aside from the prototype plant at Joyo, which apparently is much smaller). And that the waste ponds at Fukushima did contribute to the severity of the accident.

From my point of view one of the most serious obstacle against the credibility of nuclear energy is probably the smug and haughty attitude of those innumerable assholes ready to deny at any cost the shortcomings of their pet technology and to wipe off any legitimate concern as necessarily coming from so-called "ludites" and "joe-six-packs". Are you certain that you are not the blind idiot here?

And why does that indicate anything other than a problem on your part? You might not have noticed, but this is Slashdot. We have a fine tradition of smug and haughty argument. The world manages to survive somehow. I don't see anything magical about nuclear power that should exclude it from public discourse or a treatment by the attitude.

Witness for example, the very post I was replying to. A smug and haughty AC demands that the very people "responsible" for the Fukushima accident be the subjects of testing rather than cute, fluffy monkeyys. I merely pointed out, in kind, the fundamental error in that statement, namely, that responsibility adheres to far more than the villains of the day.

Why don't you go ahead and complain to everyone doing this? Not just the people you disagree with? I see no reason why I should disarm my rhetoric, just because I happen to be on the wrong side in a public debate.

Fuel rod Luddites? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38385306)

I thought that the cost of reprocessing outweighed the cost of new rods. So we get new rods and a pile of yuck that nobody Luddites or nuke fanboys really want to touch.

Re:Fuel rod Luddites? (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38385350)

Cost of reprocessing includes political obstruction.

Re:Where have I heard this story before? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38383402)

Though I agree with the general outrage of the parent I wouldn't mod this up. But come on why is this flame bait?

king knog vs godzilla? (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382516)

king knog vs godzilla?

But what about the (monkey) children!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380492)

How long will it take before PETA starts crying murder with this?

Re:But what about the (monkey) children!? (1)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381524)

According to TFA, they are mostly talking about animals who may already have been impacted by the reactor.

Think of the [monkey] children! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380496)

$100 says 3 hours til PETA starts crying murder on this.

Anyone have 2 hours?

Re:Think of the [monkey] children! (5, Funny)

walkerp1 (523460) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380512)

Anyone else want to gather about 100 irradiated monkeys and send them to PETA for some tlc?

Re:Think of the [monkey] children! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380892)

I was just thinking that myself. Peta's argument would be round them up and give them chemo, then release them somewhere else! Jokes aside, this is an environmental tragedy but if they can get some kind of useful info from the monkeys, then fair enough.

Re:Think of the [monkey] children! (1)

walkerp1 (523460) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380922)

Peta's argument would be round them up and give them chemo, then release them somewhere else! Jokes aside, this is an environmental tragedy but if they can get some kind of useful info from the monkeys, then fair enough.

Yeah, I'm a real nuke-u-lar fanboi, but I love the tasty animals too. Perhaps we'll advance veterinary science a bit because of this. When the chips are down, you take your victories where you can.

So, no Shakespeare then? (3, Funny)

PopeAlien (164869) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380510)

I'm guessing if they gave them a room full of a million typewriters they'd actually just scream and hurl feces.

That's probably what I'd do too.

Re:So, no Shakespeare then? (1)

eljefe6a (2289776) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380562)

No, those Shakespearean monkeys are still under my employ.

Re:So, no Shakespeare then? (4, Funny)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380816)

if they gave them a room full of a million typewriters they'd actually just scream and hurl feces. That's probably what I'd do too.

You win my vote for most concise explanation for Slashdot ever.

Re:So, no Shakespeare then? (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380822)

I'm guessing if they gave them a room full of a million typewriters they'd actually just scream and hurl feces.

That's probably what I'd do too.

Another day at the Daily Planet of the Apes.

Random sentence maker on an evolver maybe? (1)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381194)

I think we've all created a random sentence maker in our programming careers.

But what we haven't done is let it go loose on the web, and allow people to vote them up/down

I think with some creativity, you could even go,"Do these two sentences fit next to each other?" And that could create the next version of the website: Assembled Phrases voted up/down. Which as you understand could lead to the next voted thing: Do you like this paragraph +/-?

The real problem with this website is you're taking something silly and trying to be serious/professional with it. The work you'd need to put in the site is non trivial. Yet, it could be so worth it :P

"Wild Monkeys"? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380514)

A euphamism for Gaigin.

Ergo, the Imperial Nipponise use humans of other races to track radiation doasage.

LOL at the Imperial Nipponise.

Ippon = First Humans = Nipponise.

Chugoku = Second Humans = Chinese

Sangoku = Third Humans = Everybody else.

The peoples of Fukushima are traditionally and geneticallty Sangoku, not Ipponise.

Ah So da.

Re:"Wild Monkeys"? (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381626)

ya learn somethin' new everyday....

Re:"Wild Monkeys"? (1)

MLease (652529) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381738)

The amusing thing is that this means that God (or the gods) got worse at it the more practice He/They got....

First ninjas, then robots, now monkeys? (1)

mmmmbeer (107215) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380518)

Japan has everything cool!

Ugh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380540)

Can people ACTUALLY be this stupid?

so depressing

Re:Ugh... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380624)

I'm with you. None of these morons have even read TFS. These monkeys aren't being moved to irradiated areas, they're using the monkeys to measure radiation where the monkeys already are.

Re:Ugh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38383046)

I'm holding out for next year's supply "irradiated ninja robot monkeys".

Why use a collar? (1)

GeoffSmith1981 (795607) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380550)

Just use a scale based on how much they glow.

Japan's Newest Robotic Innovation: Monkeys! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380614)

Finally those decades of research are paying off.

I for one (1)

wadeal (884828) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380626)

Welcome our irradiated primate overlords. So this is how Planet of the Apes happened.

I am pretty sure monkeys agree with that (1)

tokul (682258) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380634)

Or maybe we should send author of this idea together with some monkey. If monkey can go there, then human should be able to follow it.

Re:I am pretty sure monkeys agree with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38381262)

If monkey can go there

Of course the monkey can go "there", seeing that "there" is WHERE IT'S ALREADY LIVING. TFS isn't that difficult to read.

Planet of the Apes? (1)

trodofor (1002830) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380700)

I think we now know how the Planet of the Apes ACTUALLY started...

Isn't this kind of...inhumane? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380744)

C'mon, don't the Japanese have some sort of fancy robots to do this kind of work instead of using living creatures that can be harmed? They can make all sorts of dolls that men can use to have lifelike sexual experiences, but they cant use robots to patrol around the area to detect radiation levels?

Ha! Old school (3, Funny)

dhungan (1253846) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380774)

Our wild monkeys track money. And rule us too.

This is real, people. (3, Insightful)

jtnix (173853) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380780)

Excuse me, but how is this tagged 'Idle'? And what's with the Planet Of The Ape jokes which is derivative of complete fiction?

This is a real country with a real populace.

Seems like a significant research technique for an original scenario, mutation jokes be damned.

Re:This is real, people. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380802)

I agree. Mutation jokes are fine, but move this story out of idle; it isn't.

Re:This is real, people. (1)

macshit (157376) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380810)

I agree. Mutation jokes are fine, but move this story out of idle; it isn't.

Lighten up (3, Insightful)

Riktov (632) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380814)

Bah. I live in Japan, was born here, and will probably die here; hopefully from old age, perhaps from radiation or from earthquakes, who knows?

But hey, monkeys are funny. They are also fascinating.

And I love stupid Planet of the Apes jokes. Even stupid Godzilla and radiation jokes don't bother me. They probably don't bother the researchers either, and they sure as hell don't bother the monkeys. After all, they're monkeys! And get your stinking paws off me you damned dirty apes!

Re:Lighten up (1)

bronney (638318) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381018)

How old are you user 632? :D

Re:Lighten up (1)

Riktov (632) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381104)

Mid-forties; nowhere near old age.

In my comment I was just making the point that I am one of those poor people - ZOMG, I could die any day from an earthquake or radiation poisoning!!! - that the parent poster thinks people should not make jokes in front of.

More radioactive rabid robot monkey jokes, please.

Re:Lighten up (1)

bronney (638318) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381202)

Well I can't wait to see sakura the coming April in Tokyo. So miss Tokyo.

Re:This is real, people. (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382654)

This is a real country with a real populace.

And? Who said otherwise?

While they are at it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38380804)

why not use the radiation to track wild monkeys?

Let's call a spade a spade... (0)

Vegan Cyclist (1650427) | more than 2 years ago | (#38380884)

I wouldn't say the monkeys are really 'helpers', nor are they 'assistants' - we're exploiting them, to learn about the results of our disaster. Yet another example of other creatures having to suffer needlessly due to our choices..

Couldn't the data be collected in other ways? Set up stations in the forests? (Which would probably be cheaper given they could retrieve and reuse them, and be subject to less abuse.)

It might be more useful too, because the sensors are where we want them, not where any of these monkeys happen to wander.

I'm thrilled some consideration is being given to how Fukushima is affecting the habitat and other animals in the area, but let's make it a bit more meaningful by not stressing the animals there any further.. At least it's only three monkeys, according to the article. I'd hate to see a precedent set for more 'monitoring'.

Alright, back to the Planet of the Apes, King Kong and radiation-enhanced monkey overlord jokes. ;)

Re:Let's call a spade a spade... (1)

bronney (638318) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381026)

Inevitably, they will soon find that they needed 12 monkeys to complete the scan.

This is done in the US (1)

jmottram08 (1886654) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381158)

This is done in the US as well. . . at nuclear weapon storage facilities monkeys are released and allowed to live in the areas around the site, yet within the perimeter. They are monitored for radiation levels as a last ditch failsafe test of radiation leakage. My friend was in the national guard and was stationed on such a facility, and the running joke was that they were just protecting the monkeys, not the weapons.

Why monkeys? (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381274)

I guess the question I have is why monkeys?(other than monkeys are awesome of course :P) Is there any advantage to using monkeys over other types of animals, particularly since monkeys are quite social and thus tend to clump together in groups.... Unfortunately TFA doesn't explain why monkeys were chosen.

Re:Why monkeys? (4, Insightful)

bahstid (927038) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381458)

As someone who lives in a mountainous area of Japan, I will hazard a guess:
Japan is not exactly teaming with wildlife choices are:

Bear
Deer
Rabbit
Fox
Tanuki (a dictionary will tell you its a racoon-dog, more to the racoon end of the scale though)
Kamoshika (Hairy mountain goat thing)
Monkey

Throw everything out that hibernates.
Throw out everything that has terrain limitations in very dense bush, or steepness.
Throw out things that are difficult to catch or dangerous.
Think Kamoshika's are protected/endangered are pretty elusive and don't leave the mountains....

Monkeys seem like a good choice, and are probably slightly more similar to us (in case they start showing full blown radiation sickness) than an Andrias japonicus [wikipedia.org]

Re:Why monkeys? (1)

crolix (833807) | more than 2 years ago | (#38384126)

How about Totoro?

Re:Why monkeys? (2)

bahstid (927038) | more than 2 years ago | (#38384252)

The umbrella's get in the way of accurate readings unfortunately.

Novel but not more useful (1)

sociocapitalist (2471722) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381302)

"The creatures are expected to wear the collar for about a month. "

This isn't going to tell them anything they couldn't get by putting dosimeters around the various locations where people would normally be as opposed to the local forests.

Re:Novel but not more useful (1)

rwise2112 (648849) | more than 2 years ago | (#38386596)

I'd say even less useful than tacking the monitors to trees. These monkeys are going to be all over the place, and in the end they'll just get a exposure reading with no way to determine from which area.

wait until the radiation starts to affect them... (4, Funny)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381612)

...you know we're all fucked when the first one says "NO!"

peanuts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38381694)

Did they pay peanuts?

It's a simple process, really (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381718)

We simply send the monkeys out into the wild, and the ones that encounter large doses of radiation come back and tell us all about it.

Re:It's a simple process, really (1)

bkmoore (1910118) | more than 2 years ago | (#38384154)

...and if they misbehave, we spank the monkey. Bad monkey!

Re:It's a simple process, really (1)

rwise2112 (648849) | more than 2 years ago | (#38386546)

And if the radiation is bad enough, the monkeys will be spanking us in the future!

Comprehension fail (1)

geraud (932452) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381858)

Most posters don't seem to grasp the fact these are local wild monkeys. Not captured monkeys from elswhere released in the irradiated area. And now I bet the next suggestion will be deporting all wildlife from the irradiated area or forcing an anti-radiation suit on them...

Project X (1)

Nexlan (2532460) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381884)

Was anyone else reminded of the Movie Project X?

Brilliant strategy (2)

cvtan (752695) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381902)

And the monkey unemployment problem is solved!

Re:Brilliant strategy (1)

AkkarAnadyr (164341) | more than 2 years ago | (#38387232)

Bah! They're taking jobs away from inner city kids who could benefit from a little real work experience.

Note to Newt:

Order a few crates of those collars for your youth janitorial program. You'll teach them about obedience to authority, and keep property secure from the shiftless, thieving little urchins. Win - Win -Win!

http://cheapuggboots123.com (0)

cheapuggboots123 (2526558) | more than 2 years ago | (#38381920)

I wish you happy holidays in advance!

Re:http://spammyname123.com (1)

joeyadams (1724334) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382258)

Pfft, my mod points expire, right before I get a chance to mark spam.

I blame the recession (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38381986)

..'cos that's what happens when you pay peanuts.

I'll get my coat.

We do too... (1)

neurosys (593311) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382050)

The U.S. Use Wild Monkeys To Track Radiation Too.... They're called Stripclubs.

I call BS (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382244)

They had a monkey escape a lab, and are saying now that they let hi out on purpose to do experiments about what introduction of an animal that is radioactive into the wild would do to the rest of the animals, and maybe even humans.....I don't know but I smell something..... not quite sure what it is.....

2030 (1)

cstacy (534252) | more than 2 years ago | (#38382716)

It was 2013 when they were all finally captured, transported in white trucks, loaded onto wooden fishing boats and banished to the evacuated island of Me-shima. The sullen, glowing creatures, some with open sores and missing hair, were unloaded from their crates by the workers in their hazard isolation suits. The workers were helicoptered onto a waiting ship back to Nagasaki, leaving the radmonkeys miserably exiled to the tiny island, presumably forever.

It has been 17 years, now, but the scientists stopped remotely monitoring the radmonkeys long ago. Budget cuts happened almost immediately, but moreso, everyone wanted to forget about the entire disaster. The "humane" thing had been done for the radmonkeys, after the sickening had been done to them. The novel anti-radiation gene therapy experimentation had not yielded any results, and the radmonkeys became less and less interesting, and more a reminder of so many things gone wrong.

When the initial survey team was dispatched to Me-shima this summer, they expected to find the island a little smaller (owing to the ocean rise from global warming), but perfectly safe. What they were not expecting, were living radmonkeys.

I for one.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38383010)

.. welcome our new glow-in-the-dark monkey overlords.

Cesium snowball fight! 13:00 sharp at the hot springs!

XKCD (1)

ssyladin (458003) | more than 2 years ago | (#38384376)

Am I the only one who is waiting for an xkcd comic to come from this?

Always mount a scratch monkey (1)

MoToMo (17253) | more than 2 years ago | (#38385866)

It's good that the Japanese have learned to always mount scratch monkeys:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratch_monkey [wikipedia.org]

Woh (1)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | more than 2 years ago | (#38388202)

PETAphiles are going to have a field day with this, they don't even like the Japanese dressing up virtual Italian plumbers in a fur suit.

That makes sense (1)

glutenenvy (1248588) | more than 2 years ago | (#38394376)

It is much easier to read a glowing monkey than listen to a Geiger counter. In Japan, I believe wild monkeys are quite often seen as pests so it makes it ok. Now if they could only militarize the cicadia population.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?