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New Kind of Metal Theorized To Be In the Earth's Lower Mantle

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the does-it-burn-as-well-as-dead-dinosaurs dept.

Science 117

slew writes "This article talks about a study accepted to Physical Review Letters which theorizes that iron oxide goes through an insulator/metal phase change with high temperature and pressure. Originally it was thought to be a crystalline structure change, but now apparently it is theorized to be a new type of metallic state. This discovery might offer new insight on how the earth's magnetic field operates."

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first post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446710)

yeeeaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh

Well done (0)

Saintwolf (1224524) | about 2 years ago | (#38446854)

I'm sure your parents are /extremely/ proud of you...

Oh yeah!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446744)

1. ?
2. ?
3. ?
4. Profit!

Wholesale prices? (0)

flyneye (84093) | about 2 years ago | (#38446748)

Hmm, the jewelry market is all atwitter. Diamonds formed under high pressure mounted on a ring formed under high pressure. I'm sure the ol' lady will put ME under pressure to get her one.

Re:Wholesale prices? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447108)

Glad you married a high maintenance gold digger.

My wife hates diamonds. And why would a woman want a common rock like a diamond on her?

Re:Wholesale prices? (2)

nedlohs (1335013) | about 2 years ago | (#38448176)

Because they sparkle, something which most people consider pretty (hence the use of things that sparkle in lots of decorative items).

Re:Wholesale prices? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38449166)

My wife is morally opposed to things which sparkle at the cost of environmental damage, and human rights abuse.

Re:Wholesale prices? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about 2 years ago | (#38449650)

That's fine but the question wasn't about "your wife" it was about "a woman". Lots of people couldn't give a shit about environmental damage and human rights abuses and neither do lots of women.

Re:Wholesale prices? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#38449686)

Lots of people are shitty people.

Re:Wholesale prices? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38451344)

This point is not what is under debate.

Why don't they just ... (5, Funny)

umberjon (2471326) | about 2 years ago | (#38446772)

dig a hole?

Re:Why don't they just ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446782)

-1 retarded

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38449028)

-1 hater. Don't hate that he's modded up, and you are modded down.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446798)

Because they don't have enough unobtainium.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

pgpalmer (2015142) | about 2 years ago | (#38452378)

The stuff invented by a washed-up inventor living in the desert, or the stuff buried underground on a distant planet?

Re:Why don't they just ... (2)

Penguinshit (591885) | about 2 years ago | (#38446806)

...and create a new volcano.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

JazzLad (935151) | about 2 years ago | (#38450776)

Fracking [wikipedia.org] is perfectly safe, right? Why don't we use that method?


(set irony detector to maximum before modding, please)

Re:Why don't they just ... (5, Informative)

Ironhandx (1762146) | about 2 years ago | (#38446812)

Because they are theorizing about layers of the core from which we can't even get a core sample, let alone a good look at. Deepest hole ever drilled is something like 12km and the depth at which this shit is is more in the 1000-2000km range than the 12km range.

It should be noted that the reason that they had to stop @ 12km was that we havent been able to engineer any drill bits that can withstand the heat much below that. 15km is the theorized maximum drill depth with current technology but no one has even gotten close to that. Last attempt was still over 2km off.

Re:Why don't they just ... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446830)

But they've gotten to the center... I saw it in that film.

Re:Why don't they just ... (2, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#38446880)

And I read it in the autobiography of that Jules Verne guy. He did a lot of cool stuff in all his autobiographies. Changed his name a lot too...

Re:Why don't they just ... (3, Funny)

rossdee (243626) | about 2 years ago | (#38447062)

They never did get to the Centre. (Arne Saknussen claimed he did, but there is no proof)
They got as far down as the Liddenbruch Sea, but when they tried going futher down, they found a big rock had fallen and blocked further descent.
After deciding to blow it up and setting the charge, they put out to sea for safety. with the explosion the sea poured into the hole, their raft was sucked into it too. they went down a bit but then there was a volcanic eruption and they got blown up through Mt Etna
So they went back to Germany, Axel married Grauben, and they lived happily ever after.

Re:Why don't they just ... (3, Interesting)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#38447208)

scrooge got to the middle. and saved the earth..

Re:Why don't they just ... (3, Interesting)

Rick17JJ (744063) | about 2 years ago | (#38450748)

I also read about it in Tarzan at the Earths core by Edgar Rice Burroughs. That book describes how the Earth is hollow, with openings to the inhabitable inner world at the north and south poles.

In that book, Jason Gridley decided to build a rigid airship, using helium, with sufficient range to fly through the polar opening to the inner world and back. But, he was unsure how to build a hull that was sufficiently strong and light that could survive the conditions along the way. Not sure how to solve that problem, he traveled to the jungles of Africa to ask Tarzan for his advice. Fortunately, Tarzan had recently heard about a nearby lake-dwelling tribe that was using canoes made of a metal that was as strong as steel and as light as cork.

The book said that inner world had accidentally been discovered previously by David Innes and Abner Perry who had been planning to look for anthracite coal with their newly invented mechanical prospector. But, on their trial voyage, their steering mechanism jammed and they accidentally drilled 500 miles down into the Earth's core, reaching the hollow inner world. Perry remained behind, while Innes made the difficult trip back to the surface. The book does not mention them having any problems with the drilling mechanism becoming too hot.

Jason and Tarzan went on to build their 997 foot long airship from harbenite. Jason knew that Tarzan's skills would prove useful one the reached the Earth's core.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

jandrese (485) | about 2 years ago | (#38450802)

That summary gave me brain damage.

Re:Why don't they just ... (3, Interesting)

jamesh (87723) | about 2 years ago | (#38446864)

I'm guessing it would be easier to simulate the pressure and temperature of this part of the core than to actually go there...

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446992)

They should develop some ultra heatsink / drillbit for the next attempt.
That should get past 15.

Eh, to hell with it. GIANT. LASER. CANNON. Sharks optional.
But make it thick enough so the insides could then be made hollow for an elevator or some nonsense.
That'd be extremely costly, but it could possibly work to a better extent if done right.
But it still won't be able to deal with the fact that a huge amount of pressure now has a huge straw to fly up, essentially.
It'll be like Mentos in Coke, only (more) dangerous and (much more) damaging to the body.

But really:
1) ship with omni-directional force-field (which we still haven't really got round to building large-scale due to power demands)
2) ship hull made out of a future implementation of that 1-way metamaterial that was created, hopefully created from the most reflective material we know of. (not sure what that is, I only know of titanium dioxide as one of the whitest materials I think)
A strong enough force-field to repel such pressures would probably also require a portable fusion drive, or a huge cable from a surface fusion reactor. Other methods probably won't ever be able to power such an energy-thirsty piece of hardware.
Then you'd have to deal with actually making it not omni-directional at all since if you had a force-field at the center of the ship capable of pushing away the pressures of the core, it'd equally be capable of ripping the entire ship apart.
So you would need to place such a device on the outsides of the ship, and figure out how to absorb said field in the ship since if you never it'd push itself OFF the ship!

It'll be a huge engineering and science nightmare to get right. It will require loads of disciplines working on it, probably one of the biggest projects since LHC, if not bigger. And this is only guessing at the future evolution of current knowledge, could still be impossible. We know EM fields can repel stuff, but the requirements for macro-scale are dangerous at those levels.
You will never touch the core of Gaia and vaporize to become one.

I'll stick with the Sodium model.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | about 2 years ago | (#38448828)

I would just go with a General Products Hull #2.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 2 years ago | (#38449272)

I would just go with a General Products Hull #2.

You'd get a great view too.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

tombeard (126886) | about 2 years ago | (#38451334)

Remember your propulsion system is mounted on the outside, so you have to come up with a drive system that can take the heat and pressure.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

folderol (1965326) | about 2 years ago | (#38449878)

but would the get authorisation from the hindmost?

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

Gilmoure (18428) | about 2 years ago | (#38449926)

Use some nuke pumped x-ray lasers mounted on the nose and point her downward? Hot Needle of Inquiry indeed!

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

cyborg_monkey (150790) | about 2 years ago | (#38447146)

you're a moron.

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447284)

But but but computers are like so much more powerful now than when they drilled that hole! We totally have like the technology to colonize the core too!

Yes, that was typical Space Nutter logic. Pretty tragic, eh?

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447374)

Space Race II! First nation to the center of the earth gets their nuclear proliferation of choice!!

Deepest hole ever drilled (5, Informative)

mistigri (152379) | about 2 years ago | (#38447406)

The Kola Superdeep Borehole is the deepest, reaching 12,262 metres (40,230 ft).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kola_Superdeep_Borehole [wikipedia.org]

Re:Deepest hole ever drilled (1)

Ironhandx (1762146) | about 2 years ago | (#38448520)

I'm sorry, twelve and a quarter kilometres, which still fits with my "They were still over 2km off the 15km mark"

Thanks for the link though.

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447550)

If the Romulans can do it, why can't we?

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38449976)

I'm sorry, the wooshing noise over your head must have been deafening.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 2 years ago | (#38450256)

any drill bits that can withstand the heat much below that

Is this geothermal heat (combined with the heat of drilling, I assume)?

Is the problem that it's too hard to pump coolant down there to keep the drill cool? I really have no idea what the temps are like at that depth - does water flash to steam?

Or maybe it's not hot enough and they just wind up with a pool of really hot water and incredible challenges to pump it back up? I can't imagine pumping water 12km straight up. Actually, any engineering achievement (like this drill) that is 12km tall is hella impressive to start with.

Re:Why don't they just ... (1)

datavirtue (1104259) | about 2 years ago | (#38450690)

But, but...in Ninja Turtles....they....[runs to his room crying]

Re:Why don't they just ... (2)

umberjon (2471326) | about 2 years ago | (#38446868)

dig a hole?

Damn, I knew I should have put a smiley at the end.

Re:Why don't they just ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38452030)

Didn't you learn anything from minecraft?!!! You DO NOT dig just straight down! There could be lava under there!

The earth... (4, Funny)

jimmydigital (267697) | about 2 years ago | (#38446844)

... is so metal!

Re:The earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447076)

I wonder if we in Norway can get dibs on it since we are in the heavy metal industry.

Re:The earth... (1)

quietlikeachurch (984657) | about 2 years ago | (#38447236)

Only if it's black. Looks more white to me.

Re:The earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38448092)

it's obviously nu-metal

Re:The earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38448566)

ooof..

Re:The earth... (2)

Gilmoure (18428) | about 2 years ago | (#38449936)

nü-mëtäl

FTFY

its hard to get (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446888)

because it unobtainium

Re:its hard to get (0)

Talderas (1212466) | about 2 years ago | (#38446928)

But... why did we go to Pandora then?

Re:its hard to get (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447092)

Because they have the illustrius and oh so rare Unobtainium. We just have funky rust at our core.

Re:its hard to get (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447902)

Well, that and that blue hottie, Neytiri.

Re:its hard to get (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447716)

Bzzz. Adamantium.

Re:its hard to get (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | about 2 years ago | (#38447740)

No, it's allotropic iron! We can power starshs and form the Lensmen!

I'm old. :-(

Re:its hard to get (1)

rgbatduke (1231380) | about 2 years ago | (#38447840)

You are old. Do you think any "X" could be hanging around down there? As a physicist I have long wanted to experience an acceleration of c (the speed of light) driven by the awesome power of a disintegrating copper bar. Only I can't figure out how.

rgb

Re:its hard to get (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#38448328)

Lysergic acid diethylamide is probably the easiest way.

Re:its hard to get (1)

rgbatduke (1231380) | about 2 years ago | (#38451520)

Ah, so it divides out by the missing time dimension, does it? Or are you suggesting that I spread LSD onto a copper bar and... hmm, that might just work, might it not. At least if I was listening to Pink Floyd -- Set your Controls for the Heart of the Sun -- at the time.

Procedure (1)

fyngyrz (762201) | about 2 years ago | (#38451598)

You need to start with a copper bathtub. Did you do that? No, you bloody well didn't. Kids today. There are no shortcuts!

Re:Procedure (1)

rgbatduke (1231380) | about 2 years ago | (#38451814)

Oh, I'm not a "kid". I'm old too. Although if I were going to start, I would start by building a whatistron, if only I could figure out what a whatsitron was. I mean, cyclotron check, bevatron check, synchrotron check, but whatsitron? Hard to even figure out what he has in mind, there... and Blackie Duquesne isn't around to give me the blueprints...

rgb

Re:its hard to get (1)

lennier (44736) | about 2 years ago | (#38453344)

No, it's allotropic iron! We can power starshs and form the Lensmen!

I'm old. :-(

It checks to nineteen decimals! Break out the Bergenholms and DeLameters.

Ooh (-1, Offtopic)

eyenot (102141) | about 2 years ago | (#38446918)

And dragons, too, faery grantmother?

LARGE BOOBAGE - WANNA TAKE A RIDE ?? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38446958)

Fire it on up and let's cruise a while
Leave your troubles far behind

You can hedge your bet on a clean Corvette
To get you there right on time

Now if you're ready to dive into over-drive
Baby the green lights are on

It's like you're running your brain on some high octane
Every time she reaches fully blown

Won't you take that ride ride ride ride on Heavy Metal
It's the only way that you can travel down that road
Satisfied fied fied fied, on heavy metal
Baby won't you ride, ride it until it explodes

Heavy Metal

My oh my, how this lady can fly
Once she starts rollin' beneath you

You know you just can't lose
The way she moves
You wait for her to finally release you

It's not a big surprise to feel your temperature rise
You've got a touch of redline fever

Cause there is just one cure that we know for sure
You just become a heavy metal believer

Won't you take that ride ride ride ride on heavy metal
It's the only way that you can travel down that road
Satisfied fied fied fied, on heavy metal
Baby won't you ride, ride it until it explodes

Heavy Metal

Re:LARGE BOOBAGE - WANNA TAKE A RIDE ?? (0)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#38447078)

Sounds like someone has been cheesing again. Poor cats.

Need to get my... (1)

BlackHornet (2526072) | about 2 years ago | (#38447072)

...diamond pickaxe ready,

How to experimentally verify? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447212)

They theorize that iron oxide becomes metallic at 1.4 million atmospheres (140 GPa) while also at ~2,200 deg C. If i'm not mistaken, is this P-T range way outside the capabilities of a diamond anvil press? Would this have to be an impact or laser shock experiment?

Re:How to experimentally verify? (4, Interesting)

sensei moreh (868829) | about 2 years ago | (#38447476)

Back when I was in grad school, high-end diamond anvil cells were typically achieving pressures on the order of 1 Mbar; so 140 GPa certainly sounds reasonable. Laser heating should enable one to get to 2200 deg C and beyond quite easily. I only got to play with our cell at room temperature.

Re:How to experimentally verify? (2)

fnj (64210) | about 2 years ago | (#38447618)

But diamond is a ridiculously excellent thermal conductor. Are you sure the diamond anvil won't suck the heat away? It also seems to me that the metal gasket in the diamond anvil would probably get pretty wasted at 2200 C. If you heat the whole diamond, what's going to happen to the supporting structure?

Re:How to experimentally verify? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447952)

Diamond also burns at 900C, so better make sure the oxide part of the iron doesn't want to oxide the diamond.

Re:How to experimentally verify? (1)

sensei moreh (868829) | about 2 years ago | (#38448128)

That's done by flooding the area around the cell with an inert gas.

Re:How to experimentally verify? (1)

sensei moreh (868829) | about 2 years ago | (#38448208)

I never worked with a laser heating system, but the idea is to use a frequency to which the diamonds are transparent. The quantity of test material within the cell is small enough that the total amount of heat absorbed by the test material is extremely small.

would make sense though, no? (2, Funny)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | about 2 years ago | (#38447242)

Gravity comes from a magnetic field, and that is produced because we have a big magnet like metal compound inside the earth, and I know that crystal is not able to become magnetized, so it all makes sense to me!

Re:would make sense though, no? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447444)

Since when is gravity magnetism?

Re:would make sense though, no? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38448458)

You know, Grabbity. The force that grabs and hangs on to things. Magnets have it and pull metal things to them, the Earth has a magnetic field and pulls you to itself, therefore the force of grabbity must come from that magnetic field. (But why do you keep misspelling grabbity? Don't you know there's no "V" in the word "grab"?)

Re:would make sense though, no? (2)

AshtangiMan (684031) | about 2 years ago | (#38448870)

My kingdom for a mod point you funny funny coward.

Re:would make sense though, no? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38449808)

+1 funny

Re:would make sense though, no? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38451406)

And I am sure after they prove the existence is the Diggs Boson Grabbity will be unified with its fellow force, "Diggity".

Re:would make sense though, no? (1)

lennier (44736) | about 2 years ago | (#38453418)

But why do you keep misspelling grabbity?

Obviously he calls it gravity because magnets combine the force of grabbity with the force of shovity.

Magnets are tricksy. Just like laser pointers.

Re:would make sense though, no? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447570)

"Gravity comes from a magnetic field"

Um, no.

Iron Insulator (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38447398)

Wonder if this will have any impact on microchip manufacturing?

Errm , its not actually a metal (2)

Viol8 (599362) | about 2 years ago | (#38447502)

Its just a metal compound that conducts under these conditions. As they say, it doesn't even change its structure.

Re:Errm , its not actually a metal (2)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#38448388)

The term "metal" refers as much to the physical properties of the substance as it does to structure or composition. It basically just means you have a cloud of free electrons (oversimplification). Although it depends on exactly how you define it, the term can apply to compounds or substances in certain states which are otherwise not metallic (such as hydrogen: not a metal in the conventional sense, but can theoretically become one). The fact it doesn't change structure but still exhibits metallic properties is part of why this is surprising.

Ho hum... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38448032)

This is a *press release* folks. It describes in detail what was and was not found and what part of that is new. The answer is NOT MUCH NEW HERE. What's unfortunate is that when the press picks something like this up, they strip off the "boring stuff" and make it into the breakthrough it's not. Read the release: The metalizaiton of iron oxide at high pressure was known. What is new is the its crystal structure does not change. That's why it's in Phys Rev B and not Nature.

Not new at all (1)

mschaffer (97223) | about 2 years ago | (#38451732)

How can it be new if it's been in the earth all this time?

You fear to theorize those metals. (1)

hort_wort (1401963) | about 2 years ago | (#38448508)

The scientists dug too greedily and too deep.

Re:You fear to theorize those metals. (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | about 2 years ago | (#38449356)

The scientists dug too greedily and too deep.

I dub it "Balrogium"

(plus one Informa7iVe) (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38448672)

What provi3esS the

Great... (1)

CrispyZorro (1809948) | about 2 years ago | (#38449152)

I have had enough new metal for a lifetime. I had finally recovered from the emergence of Limp Bizkit and Papa Roach. If they are looking for a name, they should consider Kornium.

Magnetic Field Operation? (1)

sharkey (16670) | about 2 years ago | (#38449394)

That's all well and good, but how does this affect the timeline for getting unbreakable bones and claws installed?

Re:Magnetic Field Operation? (1)

catmistake (814204) | about 2 years ago | (#38450170)

Magnetic field this and magnetic field that, I don't see what's so important with Earth's magnetic fields. You can't land a plane on it, can't fight a battle on it, can't plow it, livestock can't graze on it, can't go long for a pass down the center of it and you can't sit on your porch, feet up, admiring the Sun setting behind it.

Anyway, the Earth's magnetic field has nothing to do with molten metal at the Earth's core (like... in the ground? How's it gonna do anything there?). Millennia of historical and scientific observation proves the field is meticulously woven by porpoise, whales, migrating birds, Monarch butterflies, and the compass cartel.

Two Words.... (1)

CMYKjunkie (1594319) | about 2 years ago | (#38449508)

...Transparent Aluminum. Mystery solved! Scotty: beam me up.

Call it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38449746)

Unobtainium!

Fitting, no?

A documentary for context (1)

base_chakra (230686) | about 2 years ago | (#38450608)

"The Core" [bbc.co.uk] is a recent, hour-long documentary that provides some illustrative background (and CG) for the iron crystal theory, and explains some of the major difficulties in drilling below the crust. It's an episode of Horizon [bbc.co.uk] , a long-running science documentary series. You can watch the entire episode [youtube.com] in 720p on YouTube.

Cool but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38450800)

What kind of metal are we talking about? Thrash, Doom, Nu or Heavy?

oh well, I bet SLAYER is the only living thing that can play at earth's lower mantle anyway - answered my own question!

Already have a proven theory (0)

PRMan (959735) | about 2 years ago | (#38450904)

It's too bad that nobody has proposed a theory that could be measured for each planet in our solar system and tested against a prior prediction to see if it is accurate. That would be the perfect scientific solution to the problem of planetary magnetic fields.

Or maybe someone has (article from before Voyager launched, summary from after it passed Neptune): Article [creationresearch.org] Summary [icr.org]

One commentator says, "you would have thought we would have given up guessing about planetary magnetic fields after being wrong at nearly every planet in the solar system. . . ."

Re:Already have a proven theory ( is that a fact) (1)

HarryatRock (1494393) | about 2 years ago | (#38451648)

How did this get modded up? didn't follow links eh!
6000 year creationist explaining magnetic fields of planets created as water and transformed into other matter,
and as for fluctuating fields, quoting from linked
The Earth's field could, for example, have decayed steadily from creation to the Flood, reversed rapidly many times during the upheavals of the Flood, and afterwards resumed its steady decay

My God, I'm feeding trolls

Metal at the Earth's Core (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38451302)

Why are we running experiments in these expensive labs when we could just pray to Lemmy and beseech him to go get some for us?

Proof that the realm of K'n-yan really exists! (1)

laejoh (648921) | about 2 years ago | (#38451518)

May I quote an ethnologist : "Through a talisman made of a strange metal given to him by a local chieftain, he unearths a strange cylinder made of the same unidentifiable metal full of hideous engravings and strange hieroglyphics."

Iron oxide is a semiconductor? (1)

gstrickler (920733) | about 2 years ago | (#38451672)

Can't wait for my new rust based electronics. Of course the 3000f operating temperature and 690k ATM pressures might make them unsuitable for mobile electronics.

Re:Iron oxide is a semiconductor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#38451702)

Can't wait for my new rust based electronics. Of course the 3000f operating temperature and 690k ATM pressures might make them unsuitable for mobile electronics.

So that's where Athlon Thunderbirds go when they die!

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  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>