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Christmas Always On Sunday? Researchers Propose New Calendar

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the metric-holidays dept.

News 725

An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered a way to make time stand still — at least when it comes to the yearly calendar. Using computer programs and mathematical formulas, an astrophysicist and an economist have created a new calendar in which each new 12-month period is identical to the one which came before, and remains that way from one year to the next in perpetuity."

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725 comments

Christmas (2, Funny)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508488)

is not for grinches, you can't have my day off.

Everything would be on the same day every year... (4, Insightful)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508586)

... except equinoxes and solstices...

Eff that... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508494)

My birthday would always be on Monday.

Not a bad idea but... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508506)

How about we work on the adoption of the metric system first. It makes more sense and means more in the long run.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (0, Offtopic)

sneakyimp (1161443) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508524)

mod parent up.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508550)

Or star trek like translators that convert units in real time, so each of us can be maximally free to use whatever system we choose.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508644)

And then get to work about removing some redundancy with the time zones. No one needs summer time. Or normal time. Your choice as to which to remove, really.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508658)

adopt the metric system?

strip this man of his citizenship!

Re:Not a bad idea but... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508742)

I don't understand why it makes more sense... 10 is a terrible number.... 12 is better but 60 is much better.... we should scrap both systems and go to a base 12 or base 60 system.... even the Babylonians knew this.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508830)

It's an old battle between anatomy (having 10 fingers) and pure mathematics (factorization).

Re:Not a bad idea but... (1)

DoctorFrog (556179) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509058)

Binary is the way to go; it is the only irreducible base system.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (4, Informative)

CaptainLard (1902452) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508864)

We almost got there in the late 70's. Fortunately, Reagan swooped in to save us from having to drive 370 kilosocialists from DC to NY. But you're in luck. If you really want to use the metric system exclusively in the US, just join the military ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_States [wikipedia.org] )

Re:Not a bad idea but... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508976)

It wasn't Reagan, per se, but the fact that there is so much military hardware out there and being maintained
already the the conversion of theses systems are darn near impossible. It's not a matter of replacing a 1/4"x20
bolt with a "metric" equivalent measurement; all of those engineering drawings, etc, would have to be converted.
Plus all of the supporting tooling, etc. At the time (70's) it would have been far easier to convert the world to
U.S. standards.
Reagan just tabled the obvious.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (2)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509072)

Military?
I thought they were already pretty much metric.

Socialist pig! (4, Insightful)

RobinEggs (1453925) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508906)

How about we work on the adoption of the metric system first.

Never gonna happen. There are too many politically conservative idiots, like my mom, who believe attempts at converting to metric represent a "socialist" conspiracy, and almost literally scream at any attempt to remove Imperial units in favor of metric.

Socialist? The fucking metric system? Seriously?

The government already tried to phase in metric sometime in the 1970s, if I recall, emphasizing it in schools and installing additional signage on highways with metric speeds and distances. People responded to this with caterwauling and by shooting the road signs into tatters. Dave Barry summed up the final results the best:

Thus the metric system did not really catch on in the States, unless you count the increasing popularity of the nine-millimeter bullet.

Re:Socialist pig! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38509048)

There are too many politically conservative idiots
 
Oh, you mean like my parents? The ones who claim that the metric system is confusing and useless? Yeah, they're Democrats, asshole. My mom will break into tears talking about how the Kennedys sacrificed themselves to the greater good of the nation.
 
So go fuck yourself, you fucking narrow minded fucktard.

YEAH!!!1!!!!!1!!!1!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38509122)

YEAH!1!!!1!! What he said, you FUCK FUCK Liberal FUCKTARD!!!!

The government isn't willing to force it (4, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509088)

And that is what it takes. The government loves metric, all government contracts are done in metric (like surveying and so on, something I worked in for a time). However they won't ram it down people's throats which is what you have to do. People will whine and bitch. Hell my grandpa STILL whines and bitches sometimes. He's Canadian and over 80 years old so he remembers when Canada was on the Imperial system. He still uses it often when talking about various things.

I also can understand people's resistance, to an extent, because for normal activities it isn't helpful. Metric really only starts to show you how cool it is when you do things like inter-unit conversions. Things like "How much energy will I need to boil a liter of water?" and so on. For every day use, all you need is to have a sense of how much a unit is. Buying meat is no harder or easier in pounds or kilograms, you just need to have a sense for how much each is so you can ask for an appropriate amount.

Thus it remains a hard sell, and so the government has to force it if they want to make it happen. At a federal level, that is pretty well impossible.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (0)

jdpars (1480913) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508918)

Messing with calendars has disastrous effects. Seriously. It's a weird thing to study, but those who do do not see good coming from making the calendar "just a little bit better."

Re:Not a bad idea but... (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508924)

How about we work on the adoption of the metric system first. It makes more sense and means more in the long run.

I thought most manufacturing already used the metric system, so what does it matter? And if you want to buy a 355 mL can of Coke instead of a 12 ounce one, more power to you ... both figures are right there on the label, so you can take your pick.

Re:Not a bad idea but... (1)

CheshireDragon (1183095) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508942)

Wasn't this tried a few times? Last I remember it was in the 90s sometime and it only lasted for about a day or two because the idiots couldn't figure out the conversion.
"OMG I WTF does 3.77L translate too!?" ..."A gallon stupid!"

Re:Not a bad idea but... (1)

GumphMaster (772693) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509140)

3.77 litres: A bit short of a US Gallon (3.785 litres) and well short of an Imperial Gallon (4.546 litres).

Re:Not a bad idea but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508966)

How about we always make it on a Monday? No? That's because it would mean giving worker-drones the day off... if we put it on Sunday, they are already being allowed the weekend.

In a nutshell: (5, Informative)

White Flame (1074973) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508540)

Jan 1 = Sunday, 30 days
Feb 1 = Tuesday, 30 days
Mar 1 = Thursday, 31 days

Apr 1 = Sunday, 30 days
May 1 = Tuesday, 30 days
Jun 1 = Thursday, 31 days ...

Then every 5-6 years, there's a leap *week* at the end of the year after December called Xtr, so Xtr 1, 2015 through Xtr 7, 2015 would exist as valid dates (in whatever order your country uses).

Re:In a nutshell: (2)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508646)

I believe that is what the Egypt- based cultures do already. Typically they have 28 day months, with a catch-up month every 7 years when the constellations are a whole month early.

Of course in almost all the cultures that do that the extra month is timed so that it can be a "celebration" month... Our current culture would never handle 4 whole weeks of shutdown like that.

Re:In a nutshell: (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509054)

Hebrew calendar does this, on either a 17 or 22 year cycle (I can't remember which, off the top of my head).

Re:In a nutshell: (2)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509128)

Our culture can't even seem to handle an entire day anymore. That's a real shame considering that it REALLY needs to take some time to reflect once in a while.

Re:In a nutshell: (1)

hondo77 (324058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508700)

No April Fool's Day jokes at work anymore? Rubbish!

Fix the real problem... (5, Funny)

linatux (63153) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508912)

Simply adjust the earth's orbit so we have exactly 360 days on a year!

I was with them until (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509098)

this part: "In addition to advocating the adoption of this new calendar, Hanke and Henry encourage the abolition of world time zones and the adoption of “Universal Time” (formerly known as Greenwich Mean Time) in order to synchronize dates and times worldwide, streamlining international business."

Again? (1)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508542)

But that trick never works!

Re:Again? (1)

ecotax (303198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508672)

This time it can't possibly go wrong, with such a beautiful website!

Re:Again: Y2K in a bigger way (5, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508908)

The thought of going through every program looking for date logic that needs a total re-write yet AGAIN would be enough to make me change careers and take up tree farming.

There are billions of programs that need fixing, and every single one of them would need fixing by hand. There is no quick fix for date calculations and validations of dates, to say nothing of the mess that would be made of historical records and current contracts. Another monstrous boondoggle for no gain but a lot of pain.

Look, just as no one uses the metric system because of the inertia involved, no one would use this system either. We've solved all the major problems with the current system, there are no serious problems left that can't be solved with a 4 line rhyme, and a $2.95 calendar.
We all know its a goofie calendar and we've all made our peace with it, and there is nothing significant to be gained by messing with it.

How DARE the earth not revolve around the sun in even multiples of is revolution upon its axis!.

Re:Again: Y2K in a bigger way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38509082)

Look, just as no one uses the metric system because of the inertia involved

Look, just as no one exists outside the United States inside your mind...

nerds (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508544)

NERDS!!!!

An extra week in December? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508546)

They deal with the non-integer number of days in a year by occasionally adding an extra week in December. So on some years you may experience the 36th of December.

Re:An extra week in December? (1)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508642)

I can hear it now, "is this year ever going to eeeennnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnd?!"

Not only the non-integer days in a year, they're mostly making up for their round number months not quite matching, otherwise they would only need an extra week every ~ 30 years

Re:An extra week in December? (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508978)

They deal with the non-integer number of days in a year by occasionally adding an extra week in December. So on some years you may experience the 36th of December.

Which of course implies a greater degree of imprecision for the other 4 years. If you chop days out of years 1 thru 4 so as to have 7 days to tack onto every 5th, it sort of seems counter productive as far as keeping things in sync with the solar system.

Its sort of a sign of the arrogance of mankind that they are willing to say screw the facts, lets make it easier to count on our fingers.

Please god when can we switch to this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508552)

And the metric system and end daylight savings time? PLEASE!!!

This idea brought to you by ... (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508568)

Ocean Marketing.

Re:This idea brought to you by ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508850)

FU, this calendar is going to be a hit at SSXW. You child.

Lunar anyone? (0)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508580)

Or we could just use a lunar calendar instead of a solar one and not have to worry about crap like leap years.

Re:Lunar anyone? (3, Insightful)

nwf (25607) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508592)

Or we could just use a lunar calendar instead of a solar one and not have to worry about crap like leap years.

Except August will eventually be winter in the Northern Hemisphere. People like things happening in the same seasons.

Way too much free time. (2, Insightful)

pro151 (2021702) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508584)

On their hands and not enough important problems in the world to occupy their pointy little heads.

Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508598)

Their proposed calendar has 4 quarters each of 91 days (30 + 30 +_31).

Problem 4 x 91 = 364, not 365! There is a day missing.

183 years later and Christmas will be 6 months adrift.

That is not a calendar. That is an attempt at a calendar, just like the other calendars his article was rubbishing.

#fail.

Re:Just one problem (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508648)

There's a leap week built in for that.

Re:Just one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508816)

There's a leap week built in for that.

So the point is : why keep a perfectly working calendar thats accurate to 1 day in 3000 years for one in which we have to introduce a leap week every couple of years.
I guess that people never learn the old adage "don't fix what works". If you try you almost always end up with something that works like shit. Thats a lesson the IT industry should take to heart.

And you thought Y2K bug was bad (5, Insightful)

GeneralTurgidson (2464452) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508604)

Have fun reprogramming everything, developers!

Re:And you thought Y2K bug was bad (4, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508778)

You mean, "make money reprogramming everything." I wouldn't be surprised if the IT Consulting industry was behind this idea. Checking code for Y2K was big bucks . . . let's add a leap week, and break some more stuff intentionally!

Re:And you thought Y2K bug was bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508814)

Won't bother me. I keep all my (modern) dates in unixtime and localize them at the edges only, by a call to something I don't maintain.

Each 12-month period is not identical (4, Informative)

rminsk (831757) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508606)

...have created a new calendar in which each new 12-month period is identical to the one which came before, and remains that way from one year to the next in perpetuity.

and then later in the article

This adjustment was necessary in order to deal with the same knotty problem that makes designing an effective and practical new calendar such a challenge: the fact that each Earth year is 365.2422 days long. Hanke and Henry deal with those extra “pieces” of days by dropping leap years entirely in favor of an extra week added at the end of December every five or six years.

So it does not remain consistant from one year to the next.

Uhhh... yeah.... (2)

supersat (639745) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508608)

First they say:

"Our calendar would simplify financial calculations and eliminate what we call the 'rip off' factor," explains Hanke. "Determining how much interest accrues on mortgages, bonds, forward rate agreements, swaps and others, day counts are required. Our current calendar is full of anomalies that have led to the establishment of a wide range of conventions that attempt to simplify interest calculations. Our proposed permanent calendar has a predictable 91-day quarterly pattern of two months of 30 days and a third month of 31 days, which does away with the need for artificial day count conventions."

But then they go on to say:

Hanke and Henry deal with those extra âoepiecesâ of days by dropping leap years entirely in favor of an extra week added at the end of December every five or six years. This brings the calendar in sync with the seasonal changes as the Earth circles the sun.

Sounds like they're just shifting the complexity.

Re:Uhhh... yeah.... (2)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508680)

Why is it complex? Just pretend the extra week didn't happen (in effect, we all go on vacation that week).

Re:Uhhh... yeah.... (1)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508702)

Sounds like they're just shifting the complexity.

They wouldn't eliminate it, but they do reduce the problems they identify.

But it turns "when is the summer solstice" into a complicated question.

isn't this old news? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508626)

Didn't Isaac Asimov propose something like this thirty or forty years ago? I have a vague memory that there was a "year day" and "century day" that wasn't a day of the week.

Re:isn't this old news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508684)

This (or some very similar) was already proposed in the 19th century as the "international calender" with an "international day" which was not a day of the week.

Re:isn't this old news? (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509066)

In fact, the question would be what did he need computer simulations for?

But... (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508634)

Halloween is gone. On the plus side, it appears that they've managed to get a lot of the drinking holidays on the weekend.

What, ANOTHER "leap week" calendar? (5, Informative)

dpbsmith (263124) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508656)

There have been many calendar-reform systems proposed, and "leap-weeks" are a common solution. Wikipedia has an article on leap week calendars [wikipedia.org] and lists five advantages and three disadvantages. It, in turn, points to a web page about leap week calendars [hermetic.ch] that details nine of them.

Henry's own web page [jhu.edu] doesn't mention the existence of other leap week calendars. It merely says the Hanke-Henry Permanent Calendar is better than the Gregorian calendar, not why it is better than the nine other leap week calendars. And it doesn't seem to present any particular plan for getting it adopted, beyond saying "It CAN be done, folks, and the decision is YOURS, not mine. Each of you," and the proof that it's feasible is that his mother has adapted to quoting Celsius temperatures. But what's needed is not a better calendar, but a better plan than anyone has heretofore come up with for getting it adopted.

13 Months? (5, Insightful)

hawks5999 (588198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508664)

I've thought that 13 months with 4 weeks each would be so much better. Every year is missing a "day" but it could just be a New Year's Day holiday. The benefit of having a day always being a date would make so many things so much easier. Is humanity past fearing the number 13 so much that we could have a rational calendar?

Re:13 Months? (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508726)

The benefit of having a day always being a date would make so many things so much easier.

But your suggestion doesn't actually solve that problem. If January 1 was a Sunday this year, it will be a Monday next year under your system. Unless you are planning to make the 365th day of the year to be the same day of the week as the previous day (i.e. the year ends with two Saturdays in a row)

Re:13 Months? (1)

hawks5999 (588198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508804)

The last day/first day is not a traditional day. It's an annual day called "festivus" or similar and followed by Jan 1 on Monday (or Sunday - however that shakes out)

Re:13 Months? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508916)

Causing the weeks to have uneven lengths would be unacceptable to people who honor monotheistic days of rest (either you waited an extra day to celebrate it again, or you did it on the "wrong day"), there would be significant push back on that idea.

Re:13 Months? (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508972)

Better would be to keep the weeks as is for the religious purpose, but align the year to always begin on a Sunday. When the year start skews too far, reset it by a full week.

Re:13 Months? (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509056)

You do realize you just described the exact scheme proposed by the article, right?

Re:13 Months? (1)

Fred Ferrigno (122319) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509040)

Just take the extra day each year as another day of rest. Is God going to be pissed that you rested too much?

Re:13 Months? (2)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509078)

The last day/first day is not a traditional day.

Which is the problem: the whole point of leap week calendars is to push calendar reform that starts each year on the same day without running into resistance from major world religions (e.g., Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) that are attached to a seven-day weeks with no breaks in between and which would presumably be unwilling to adopt a calendar for business purposes which caused their regular observances to rotate around the general week (though similar rotation already occurs with regard to the Gregorian calendar for significant annual observances of the same religions, including the religion that instituted that calendar.)

Re:13 Months? (1)

Fred Ferrigno (122319) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508956)

The extra day wouldn't be a part of any week. It wouldn't be a Sunday, Monday, or any other day of the week. It'd just be its own day. The calendar would go:

  • Friday, December 27th, 2011
  • Saturday, December 28th, 2011
  • Year Day, 2011
  • Sunday, January 1st, 2012

Re:13 Months? (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509024)

That would be unacceptable to anybody who celebrates a Sabbath on a certain day of the week on every 7th day. Either they must wait 8 days (sin!) or they must do it on the wrong day of the week (sin!). In other words you cannot break the relationship between the weeks and the week days. That's why this calendar was designed the way it was, it preserves the relationship that every 7th day is the same day of the week as before. An alternative that breaks that relationship would be flat-out offensive to millions of people.

Re:13 Months? (2)

Skapare (16644) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508936)

Why do we even need months?

Re:13 Months? (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508944)

Yeah, but the weather is really lousy in Smarch(bonus points for the reference)

On Monday please? (2)

Milharis (2523940) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508692)

Can I have it on Monday rather please?

Re:On Monday please? (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509112)

Can I have it on Monday rather please?

That's the new term for 'GMT+24'.

Obligatory (1)

PeeAitchPee (712652) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508738)

Lousy Smarch weather.

Simpler solution. (5, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508756)

Slow (or speed) the Earth's revolution around the Sun until it takes 360 (or 372) days. Problem solved.

Re:Simpler solution. (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509014)

Once we have a working space elevator, we can attach a mass driver to the end to do precisely that. Until then we need a stop gap solution. (Tongue in cheek).

Re:Simpler solution. (1)

mikeroySoft (1659329) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509136)

How about simply 13 months with 28 days each, plus an extra day every year?

What about Wednesdays? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508764)

What about all of the poor schmucks whose birthday always winds up on a Wednesday, every year, for the rest of their lives?

This fails to improve anything. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508788)

"the new calendar is identical every year... except that, every five or six years, there is a one-week long Mini-Month"

That's not identical every year. That's pretty stupid, actually, and would cause more problems than dealing with moving holidays. There are currently zero computers that currently are set up to deal with an extra "Mini-month" at an irregular interval. e.g. Payroll systems that pay on the 15th and end of the month would need to be changed and have a custom amount for that period. They compare it to the Y2K situation, but it's not analogous; this is not adding two digits to the year, this is a fundamental change in how dates are stored and calculated. They're trying to add an occasional Smarch to the calendar, no one wants it.

Also, it would suck if your birthday was permanently on a Monday.

"Christmas Day will always fall on a Sunday, which will be pleasing to Christians,
but, will also be pleasing to companies who currently lose up to two weeks of work to the Christmas/New Year's annual mess."

No, that would suck for everyone who works. I don't know why they think it would be pleasing for Christians, that doesn't make the least bit of sense.

The entire proposal is just a crackpot dreaming, it fails to be more convenient, his reasoning of the "benefits" is mostly nonsensical.

Copy of article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508798)

Error establishing a database connection

Same issue as with QWERY (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508800)

Something that's sub-optimal (whether calendars or keyboard layouts) not only has to be shown as lacking, but a better option needs to be found that everyone agrees upon - which would realistically take way more work than is worth it.

The new calendar can get in line.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508810)

... behind global metrification.

I have an improved version of the JH calendar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508828)

I've corrected the Hopkins' calendar so that

- people and companies won't have to remember, and make plans for the upcoming "leap week"
- annual time series data will not require a massive correction factor to account for "leap week" years
- equinoxes and solstices will not drift over each 5-6 year period.

I'm calling it "The Calendar We Already Have Today". The unveiling will be in Nice, France (next May, although there may be some confusion about the exact date).

Re:I have an improved version of the JH calendar (1)

zevans (101778) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508914)

Nice? Shurely "Nicaea?"

Just get rid of months (2)

Skapare (16644) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508858)

We don't need months. Just use quarters and call them seasons. Months were traditionally periods of lunar cycles, and aside from certain religious calendars, is really no well aligned with lunar cycles at all. Fundamentally, we just don't need them.

It's more than just a date, it drops timezones (2)

darronb (217897) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508860)

The site is talking about dropping timezones and adopting Universal Time everywhere. (Claiming only people in the middle of the Pacific would be particularly troubled by this)

Wow.

Time Zones... (4, Informative)

Lt.Hawkins (17467) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508872)

Eh, not bad at first glance, but I can't be on board with zapping time zones. As someone who deals with international locations across the globe every single day, its a ton easier to find out "oh, they're 8 hours behind us" vs "Hmm, its 0900 Global. We just had lunch... what are they doing in New York at this time? Its 0900 there too - I think its still dark, but I don't know if its close to dawn or if they just woke up."

Sounds good in theory, but god it would suck.

Birthday Jinx (2)

acjacinto (1170951) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508874)

Should we feel sorry for people born on "Friday the 13th" of January, April, July and October?

Holocene Calendar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508900)

If we used the Holocene calendar as part of a reform, I'd be pleased even if only because it is religion independent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holocene_calendar

Even the Mayans can do better! (2)

Ichoran (106539) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508928)

This is just horrible--breaks nearly every convention in order to fix a nearly trivial bit of mathematics, while introducing significant errors in the process? Yay!

Why should months start of different days of the week? Make them all 28 days long, and you have room for a 13th month.

While we're at it, why don't we go back to the Mayan Haab' calendar [wikipedia.org] . It's more accurate than Gregorian; the only problem is that it shifts a tiny bit from year to year. If you don't like your months drifting, you can fix it by extending Wayeb' by a day every time it gets more than half a day ahead.

no authority (3, Interesting)

dltaylor (7510) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508940)

Who, in the modern world, has George Carlin's ("I have as much authority as the pope; just fewer people believe it.") moxie to force a calendar change? The Muslim, probably conservative Jewish, and other lunar calendar followers aren't going to change (what if THEY all got together and proposed a "universal" calendar?). Americans still aren't rational enough to switch to the metric system of measurement, so they're going to use a more-rational calendar than their current?

Time Changes in Middle of Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38508982)

Here's a citation: "a "9-to-5" job is defined as a 14:00-to-22:00 (14 o'clock to 22 o'clock) job."

This means those of us in CA, OR, WA will have a work day going from 1700 to 0100. Yes, I can see how having the date change in the middle of business hours makes everything so much simpler.

It would cause other problems (2)

Froggels (1724218) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508986)

Such a calendar scheme would have some interesting repercussions for countries such as Germany. Germans do not get Monday off of work if the 25th of December falls on a Saturday. which means that they could also forget about ever getting the first of January or several other holidays off if such a calendar system were to cause current holidays to fall on weekends. Perhaps they would have to adopt the Anglo-Saxon practice of taking a following Monday/Tuesday off which would essentially end up shifting entire holidays by two days in their perspective?

Christmas on Sunday (1)

ThorGod (456163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38508996)

Made the following Monday probably the worst case of "the Mondays" ever...

Okay, All Those Want.. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38509000)

..their birthday to NEVER fall on Saturday (the optimum night for a party), raise your hands.

Anyone? No one? Yeah, that's what I thought...

Ugh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38509022)

This is just an attempt head off the Mayan calendar collapse of the Earth.

While we are at it... (1)

ccguy (1116865) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509034)

If we are going to mess with the calendar no less then let's start with the basics. The day has a length that is related to a significant event so we can leave it as it is.

But do we really want 7 day weeks? I think this needs some thought....:-)

Would... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38509070)

Monday Night Football still be on Mondays?

Oh, come on. (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509090)

They eliminate leap days in favor of an intercalary "leap week" every five or six years, and have the gall to say that they have a "stable calendar that is absolutely identical from year to year."

Well, except for the intercalary week. That couldn't cause any confusion now, could it ?

And, just to make sure they are really ignored, they call for the whole planet to go on UTC. If they had any guts, they would have said TAI. At least that would get
rid of leap seconds.

Asimov's The Last Trump (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38509142)

As good an explanation [wikipedia.org] as any for this reform.

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