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IE6 Almost Dead In the US

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the premature-graying-in-programmers-reduced dept.

Internet Explorer 335

SharkLaser writes "Microsoft, and the whole tech world, is celebrating the fact that use of Internet Explorer 6 has dropped below one percent in the US. 'Time to pop open the champagne because, based on the latest data from Net Applications, IE6 usage in the US has now officially dropped below 1 per cent!,' said Roger Capriotti, director of Internet Explorer marketing. 'IE6 has been the punch line of browser jokes for a while, and we've been as eager as anyone to see it go away.'"

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335 comments

No reason to celebrate now. (4, Insightful)

dmesg0 (1342071) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584544)

I'll celebrate when usage of all versions of IE drops below 1 percent.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (5, Funny)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584548)

I'll celebrate when netcraft confirms it.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (4, Funny)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584638)

I'll celebrate when netcraft confirms it.

An instance where Netcraft rightly should be confirming something. My head exploded.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (5, Funny)

drobety (2429764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584810)

An instance of someone able to write and post a message after his head exploded. This ... I don't ...

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (5, Informative)

DCTech (2545590) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584554)

Why? IE9 is a completely good browser. It's on par with Chrome, but in fact it offers even more features and security than Firefox does currently, like sandboxing. It's also standards compliant and supports HTML5. There's nothing to hate about IE9.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584586)

It's also the only browser that supports GPOs. Firefox had somewhat of a start, but it's not officially supported and they keep changing the damn thing.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584766)

You can successfully run an organization without having a GPO for everything, trust me.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (4, Funny)

Tridus (79566) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584814)

You can also successfully run an organization without computers. What's your point?

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38585044)

Only if you like inefficiency or not using Windows.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (5, Funny)

dmesg0 (1342071) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584594)

Why? IE9 is a completely good browser. It's on par with Chrome, but in fact it offers even more features and security than Firefox does currently, like sandboxing. It's also standards compliant and supports HTML5. There's nothing to hate about IE9.

OK, you convinced me, I'll try it immediately. Does it come as .deb or .rpm? Or maybe I should compile it from source?

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584624)

Look everyone, this guy invented a new joke! A funny one too! HAHA!

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (2)

Bigos (857389) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584644)

It's not so simple. Before compiling and packaging, you have to disassemble if first.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584752)

This isn't Linux, you won't need to spend 10 hours compiling just to use basic features that other OSes have had for years.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584818)

brains and intelligence don't come as a .deb or .rpm either
Guess that explains what happened to you.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584854)

If you will celebrate when IE usage drops below 1% as in your previous post, but you can't use it yourself, only a few situations suggest themselves.

1) You have to make HTML work in many browsers
2) You're anti-Microsoft but have stopped caring why
3) Going for +5 funny moderation but not actually contributing anything

Whatever it is, you're not helping, so for all of the people who think like you:

When IE 6 and 7 are no longer around, life will be a lot easier for web developers. Even with things like jQuery, you can't do all the things you might like to do if you expect IE6/7 visitors.

If you don't use it, but you do visit websites, you should be happy that IE6 is going away, and support IE9 as the lesser of 4 evils, if only because it makes better things possible. Without IE6, or if it was quickly replaced with IE7, the web would be a far more pleasant place. IF nothing else, little time would be spent on trying to figure out why your website is written to the standard, but sucks in the most used browser, leaving more time for actual work.

We should celebrate IE9, even if we don't want to.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

Tim4444 (1122173) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584890)

Don't be silly. IE isn't something you install. It's actually one with the operating system.

Question is, if standards compliance and cutting edge features are so important to OP, why didn't he switch to something better long ago instead of waiting for IE to finally catch up? Maybe he doesn't know how to install software and he only uses what comes with the OS. I'll bet he's a huge Paint and Notepad fan too!

Best viewed with a browser other than yours (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585042)

Question is, if standards compliance and cutting edge features are so important to OP, why didn't he switch to something better long ago instead of waiting for IE to finally catch up?

Possibly because potential customers won't form a good opinion of an organization whose web site states: "Your ten-year-old web browser must be upgraded to current web standards. Please install Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, or the Google Chrome Frame plug-in for Internet Explorer to continue." For one thing, "please install a plug-in to continue" is a tactic that fake antivirus software has used to social-engineer itself onto users' computers. For another, if it's a B2B site (a business selling to businesses), an employee in a heavily locked-down IT environment might not be able to convince IT to authorize the installation of Chrome, Firefox, Opera, or Chrome Frame. Either way, the viewer will quickly end up on a competitor's web site.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584930)

No, it's for a browser for people who have lives.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

v1 (525388) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584950)

OK, you convinced me, I'll try it immediately. Does it come as .deb or .rpm? Or maybe I should compile it from source?

No, IE9 implements the most advanced security model, not found in Chrome or Firefox, it's called "Security by Obscurity". That way, even in the highly unlikely chance there's a security-related bug, nobody will ever find it. So they won't be releasing the source code, for your protection.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585010)

As opposed to the Linux security model, which is "it's open-source, so if there were any exploits they'd be fixed already"? I don't like IE 9, but it has great improvements in security, as did IE 8 before it.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584614)

Well, there's the whole Bill Gates = Antichrist thing going on too.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584738)

How long did it take you to find the grave of that dead horse? Never mind the fact you pulled it out to beat on it yet again.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584656)

Well there is the part where it is horrible in it's standards compliance with html 5, which I believe is going to be a huge roadblock to html 5 actually starting widespread usage due to Microsoft's continual high market share. Other then microsoft's bogus tests where they specifically rig it to be 99.9%, every test I have seen has shown IE9 to meet 40-60% of html 5, while chrome and FF 80-100%.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584780)

Are you talking about adopted standards or draft standards?

De facto standards (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585060)

If Microsoft's product is the most prominent shipping product that doesn't follow the draft standard, and Microsoft doesn't have a supermajority market share in this segment, then I'd consider the standard to have been de facto adopted.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584664)

Why? IE9 is a completely good browser. It's on par with Chrome, but in fact it offers even more features and security than Firefox does currently, like sandboxing. It's also standards compliant and supports HTML5. There's nothing to hate about IE9.

Except that it's just a newer version of the same fucking browser and by the same god damn monopolistic company that got the entire Web in a rut, which it has only finally gotten out of in the last few years. Fuck IE9.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1, Informative)

DCTech (2545590) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584730)

Back in the day Internet Explorer saved us everyone from the non-standard shit Netscape was trying to pull out. I guess you're too young to remember those days. If it wasn't for IE the web would be much worse now.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584768)

it is not just a new version, this is practically completely different browser, its faster than FF and Chrome, it starts faster, it even uses less memory, it was first browser to support 64bit mode ( for people asking why is that important just look memory usage of browsers today, my browser with 200-300 opened tabs goes way above 4GB of ram ) it supports standards like HTML5 almost like FireFox, if not better, i must say Microsoft really learned how to make browsers it seems

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (3, Insightful)

ozbon (99708) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584870)

And how many of those "200-300" opened tabs do you actually use on a regular (daily/hourly) basis? Personally, I've never really found a use for more than about 10-15 tabs at once - when going through a news reader and wanting to read individual articles, which get 'new-tabbed' - and even then I close them once I'm done.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584984)

Just for interest's sake, I've just counted and I've got 54 tabs open, all relevent to my current work and interests. I closed about 20 earlier when I finished a particular task.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584694)

Well, there are the IE 9 font rendering bugs with Helvetica, Times, & Courier where it just shows nothing. Then there are general font issues with other fonts. Then there are still IE 9 specific layout issues that do not exist with other browsers. Two different modes with IE 9 for dealing with CSS and layout. Poor printing. Table cell layout issues. No support for unencumbered video formats. But those are just a few reasons to hate IE 9 from someone who mostly ignores it.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (5, Insightful)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584700)

IE9 is a completely good browser.

I wouldn't know. IE9 breaks websites that work in IE6, IE7, IE8, Firefox and Webkit-based browsers.

I have the same feelings towards IE9 that I have towards 7 and 8 -- Microsoft's "better" browser is still not good enough.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (2, Informative)

netsavior (627338) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584722)

I don't want to like IE9, because MS is the company we love to hate... but I vastly prefer it to chrome.

My first complaint: Chrome's gigantic header is 18 pixels taller than IE, on my netbook that extra 3% of the tiny screen that is unusable for content is kind of a big deal.
There are chrome add ons to make the URL textbox into a combo box with recently visited pages, something that has been standard in browsers since like 1998, and pretty much the only way I am used to browsing. I guess it feels weird to have to use some third party extension (That doesn't work perfectly) to add my most used feature, when it is not an obscure or weird feature.
Home. There is no home button... I know I can search from the address bar, but I vastly prefer to just hit the home button and search on google's homepage... I mean, I want to give your site more traffic, don't make that harder on your own browser. 5 years ago I never would have thought I would be saying this, but with firefox completely ruined to the point of being unusably slow and buggy, and with chrome being the monstrosity of user interface that it is... IE9 is the only browser that I like right now.

Alt+Home (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584836)

Home. There is no home button

Alt+Home works fine in every copy of Chrome that I've tried. You mentioned that you have a netbook; it might even be easier to hit Alt+Home than to move the cursor up to the Home button with a trackpad.

Re:Alt+Home (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585076)

It's a great advantage to know the keyboard shortcuts, but it seems that every new version of every browser keeps removing more and more useful parts of the UI. Like in IE... why would you remove the entire menu bar by default-- ostensibly to increase available real estate-- then have a "favorites" toolbar with only one useful button on it as the only means to access your bookmarks?

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (5, Insightful)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584904)

I don't want to like IE9, because MS is the company we love to hate... but I vastly prefer it to chrome.

My first complaint: Chrome's gigantic header is 18 pixels taller than IE, on my netbook that extra 3% of the tiny screen that is unusable for content is kind of a big deal.

Message from a guy who usually uses a decent sized monitor with a desktop:

PLEASE use a browser designed for netbooks instead of telling browser makers to design browsers for your pathetically small screen! Some of us actually appreciate a decently-sized interface.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (4, Insightful)

webheaded (997188) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584906)

My first complaint: Chrome's gigantic header is 18 pixels taller than IE, on my netbook that extra 3% of the tiny screen that is unusable for content is kind of a big deal.

Are you actually being serious right now? 18 pixels? I honestly thought this post was starting off as a funny joke and then you kept going. Seriously just...people like you are infuriating. You find the most ridiculous shit to complain about. I'm serious. This stupid war over the height of the header has gotten ridiculous now.

Maybe the browser makers should just make a "netbook mode" and stop forcing those of us with large monitors use this tiny ass interface that makes it a pain in the ass to do things. It is the same reason people are pissed off at GNOME. One size does not fit all. A user with a 24" screen running at 1080 does not have the same needs as the guy with a 10" netbook running at 1024x600 or the guy with the Android tablet.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (4, Informative)

avgjoe62 (558860) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584982)

I've seen your post before, but on the off chance that you're not just getting paid to copy and paste, let me tell you that there IS a home button in Chrome.

Click on "Customize and Control Google Chrome" (the wrench in the upper right corner).

Click on "Options" (about two-thirds down in the list of choices, fifth from the bottom).

On the first page that opens, "Basics", in the third section down, "Toolbar", check the box for "Show Home Button".

Close out the options page and the "Home" icon will now be in your toolbar.

Wrong, IE9 sucks (4, Interesting)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584802)

I posted a comment almost identical to yours this year praising IE9, but today IE9 is not a good browser.
It's an old and crusty browser, because you know web stuff moves THAT fast.

As usual IE is tightly bound to windows, and yet again particular versions of windows. IE9 supports some HTML5 stuff sure. It also supports canvas, but canvas is useless without requestAnimationFrame. Session history management, asyncronous external Javascript, native Regex form validation

http://caniuse.com/ [caniuse.com] for the complete list of how embarrassingly old IE9 is.
So sorry, but your comment is around 9 months out of date.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

james_van (2241758) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584954)

there may be nothing to hate, and IE9 may very well be a good, solid browser. however, microsoft has sullied the waters so badly over the past ~15 years that it's gonna take a whole lot more than one good browser before i get back on that horse. maybe when IE12 drops and 9-12 have all been really good, standards compliant, secure, pretty, etc., then i might consider using a microsoft browser again. meanwhile, FF has a decent track record (not great, but it's been alright and overall i like it), chrome has been rock solid, heck even opera has made a pretty respectable showing in the areas that count. no reason to change now, just cause microsoft got one right. i'll stick with consistent winners, thank you.

Nope (4, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584960)

Since you got modded up so high, I think you also need to be taken down a notch.

  1. There is no way you'd say IE9 was on par with Chrome if you were a developer or even just peaked under the hood. Javascript performance is pathetic.
  2. "Security features" never amount to actual security. Sounds good in the marketing blurb though.
  3. HTML5 is not a tickbox. It's a collection of features, and IE has the worst support today.
  4. I suggest we pre-emptively hate it, because we're going to get STUCK with it.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (1)

drobety (2429764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584966)

There is a case I stumbled upon in which IE9 behaves differently than FF/Chrome/Opera, which forces me to warn users that IE doesn't display properly the page. It appears IE9 doesn't interpret properly 'white-space: pre-wrap' (while other browsers do), it unfortunately does collapse newline characters, while it should not, as per w3.org [w3.org]. (of course, prior versions of IE have even more problems.)

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (3, Insightful)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584970)

Why? IE9 is a completely good browser.

At the time, Internet Explorer 6 was a good browser too. The problem is that Microsoft have shown that they are willing to abuse their market share in anti-competitive ways. When Internet Explorer 6 had a dominant position in the web browser market, they killed development on the project and held the web back for years. Microsoft can't be trusted with browsers.

It's also standards compliant and supports HTML5.

No, it doesn't support HTML 5. Nothing does. HTML 5 isn't finished. At best you can say it has partial, unfinished support for HTML 5. And if Microsoft decide it's in their best interests to hold the web back again, that's what we'll be stuck with until Internet Explorer loses market share.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (2)

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584976)

Why? IE9 is a completely good browser. It's on par with Chrome, but in fact it offers even more features and security than Firefox does currently, like sandboxing. It's also standards compliant and supports HTML5. There's nothing to hate about IE9.

I recently had to blow away and reinstall Win7 on one of the test boxes, so I thought I'd see what happens if you go online with IE9 instead of my usual default of Firefox 3.6.x + NoScript. Went to a few web sites and got bombarded with animated ads and flashing doodads like it was Idiocracy. Switched to the first few pr0n sites that popped up in Google (since I was reformatting from scratch and it was in a DMZ reserved for experimentation I wanted to see how bad it could get) and it was like the generic web experience above but now with tons of popups with sound (note to self, disable speakers before trying this) and no doubt all manner of malware crawling all over the system before I shut the machine down and wiped the drive.

So yes, IE9 has better security technology than Firefox, but it still makes the web an absolute cesspit to browse.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38585008)

As a javascript developer, I could not agree less. It's also more on par with ff4 or so than chrome. Not bad but not good enough.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (2)

bondsbw (888959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584604)

This is good enough for me. IE 6 was an abomination and was a main representative of Microsoft back in the old days without enough competition to force compliance to the various HTML-related standards. Firefox started a good fight during this very long period, and eventually led to Microsoft creating IE 7, 8, and 9 with much better standards compliance.

Good riddance.

They should have used Fire (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584610)

...and no, that's not an acronym for some Yet Another Language/framework/etc. I mean real fire...as in flame thrower.

First sentence doesn't go in the subject line... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584844)

They should have used Fire...and no, that's not an acronym for some Yet Another Language/framework/etc. I mean real fire...as in flame thrower.

I say they should nuke that site browser from orbit.... it's the only way to be sure.

Bring out your dead browser (3, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584760)

IE6: I'm not dead!
MORTICIAN: What?
MS: Nothing -- here's your nine pence.
IE6: I'm not dead!
MORTICIAN: Here -- he says he's not dead!
MS: Yes, he is.
IE6: I'm not!
MORTICIAN: He isn't.
MS: Well, he will be soon, he's very ill.
IE6: I'm getting better!
MS: No, you're not -- you'll be stone dead in a moment.
MORTICIAN: Oh, I can't take him like that -- it's against regulations.
IE6: I don't want to go in the cart!
MS: Oh, don't be such a baby.
MORTICIAN: I can't take him...
IE6: I feel fine!
MS: Oh, do us a favor...
MORTICIAN: I can't.
MS: Well, can you hang around a couple of minutes? He won't be long.
MORTICIAN: Naaah, I got to go on to Robinson's -- they've lost nine today.
MS: Well, when is your next round?
MORTICIAN: Thursday.
IE6: I think I'll go for a walk.
MS: You're not fooling anyone y'know. Look, isn't there something you can do?
IE6: I feel happy... I feel happy.
            [whop]
MS: Ah, thanks very much.
MORTICIAN: Not at all. See you on Thursday.
MS: Right.
[clop clop]
MORTICIAN: Who's that then?
MS: I don't know.
MORTICIAN: Must be a king.
MS: Why?
MORTICIAN: He hasn't got shit all over him.

Re:No reason to celebrate now. (2)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584964)

Pretty funny to watch a company spend a billion dollars to get people to use something ... then another billion to get them to stop using it.

A cheer goes up (4, Funny)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584550)

Every web designer celebrates for 10 minutes. Then back to work on the CSS for that pesky div.

Re:A cheer goes up (0)

DCTech (2545590) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584578)

One thing I hate about CSS is that you can't just have good column style layout with it. It's just not designed for that. I still have to keep using tables with some stuff. And, on top of that, tables are much easier too.

Re:A cheer goes up (2, Interesting)

Phrogman (80473) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584692)

My problem with CSS is fairly simple overall:
* With tables I can see how things are laid out on the page from the HTML itself, clearly and succinctly. I do have to retype things and its not always clear, nor is it perfectly reproduced in all browsers, but its close enough. I can do complex layouts quite easily.
* With CSS, I have to constantly have a seperate page open containing the CSS, and its not inherently clear in the HTML how things are being laid out on the page. I must reference back and forth.

I think CSS makes sense as a concept, but the reality is really quite annoying for the most part. I see it as a triumph of the designers and artists over the developer.

I am using CSS but reluctantly. I prefer tables as development time for a page was easily 20x faster for me. I can think in tables. I cannot think in CSS at all.

Get off my lawn :P

Re:A cheer goes up (4, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584932)

its not inherently clear in the HTML how things are being laid out on the page

It's not supposed to be clear from the HTML alone. It's supposed to be that you can swap the CSS and have the document laid out differently.

Re:A cheer goes up (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584996)

Tables, I'm told, are evil. So are 'GOTO's and Visual Basic. They could bring the end of the World.

Since it's 2012, on Dec 21st, someone will publish a webpage that's formatted with tables, with a VB.net back end and instead of using VB's OOP features, they will use only 'GOTO's.

That's what the Mayans never mentioned when they created their calendar.

Re:A cheer goes up (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585072)

With tables I can see how things are laid out on the page from the HTML itself, clearly and succinctly.

LOL, well it is sort of a design goal of CSS to make it so that you have no idea how HTML will render by looking only at the HTML - separation of content and layout. Something tells me that your application won't benefit from this :)

No harm using straight HTML and tables for you...

Re:A cheer goes up (2)

unapersson (38207) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585096)

Not sure about the other browsers, but Firefox at least implements its table support using CSS.

So the CSS properties are there to do it: "display: table", "display: table-row", etc. Which means you can get table-style presentation without polluting the mark-up with tables for layout. Table based layouts filled code with so much unnecessary garbage that distracted from the content, CSS keeps that out of the way and in a re-usable form.

I can remember when designers and artists hated CSS and preferred using Dreamweaver to chop up their photoshop images to create a layout so they could have it pixel perfect in every browser. CSS has always been very developer friendly: multiple css files imported as needed, ease of templating, id/class referencing etc.

And try looking at a table based layout in a graphical browser that doesn't support tables. Get off my lawn indeed :-)

Subjective (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584576)

The day to pop the champagne is when you don't have to treate IE6 as a supported browser. The day to pop the Dom Perignon is when you can set a policy of only supporting recent versions of any browser.

Re:Subjective (1)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584816)

A lot of websites I've used throw up w/ IE6 - it's not like it's something web page designers have to support. As for supporting the most recent versions, how does one work that w/ Firefox and their prolific versions? Plus, if they drop support for IE8, then doesn't that imply that anyone still on XP is out of luck, unless they switch browsers?

Re:Subjective (1)

slackware 3.6 (2524328) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585064)

People can install every stupid piece of software out there but when it comes to browsers, oh no I can't download and install the newest version of my browser of choice. And if the computer illiterates are still using XP for much longer it is proof that HDD manufactures have done a bang up job making that old 80 GB ide drive and computer manufacturers are using quality parts. Come on people XP is over 10 years old.

Re:Subjective (1)

masternerdguy (2468142) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584952)

Why can't you? If I ran a web service I'd gladly inform people their browser is too old to be supported.

Re:Subjective (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38585030)

And we've found the reason that you will never run a successful web service...

Re:Subjective (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38585048)

Because installing another browser takes so much effort?

The headline should be moe like (0, Redundant)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584600)

"IE 6 is STILL alive, WTF??!!"

I feel sad for the few people left still using it. Probably someone in a big org where some vital piece of software was written only with IE 6 in mind.

Meh (1)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584674)

There comes a time and age when all changes are bad. Also IE9, firefox or chrome are bad when you're happy with IE6.

That beat up old car is still running, and you're also happy with the old TV. All those new things are for younger people. You just have the computer to talk to the grandkids who apparently cannot write a normal letter anymore. Still, that's better than not hearing from them at all.

Re:Meh (1)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584724)

For your sake, I really hope you are mocking what you think are other people's attitudes and that you don't actually live by those ideas. No insult intended.

Re:Meh (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584928)

That beat up old car is still running,

Getting the latest engine technology in a new car is fine with me. At least the auto makers don't move the f*cking steering wheel around for every model year.

Re:The headline should be moe like (1)

ATestR (1060586) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584688)

Very likely. In addition, this number may include the few dev shops that still have to support legacy software for a customer that requires IE6.

1% of 200,000,000 = 2,000,000. Still a lot of copies of IE6.

Re:The headline should be moe like (2)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584782)

I had such a job.

They built their software with programmers and supervisors who thought IE was the internet and everything else was just a passing fad.

Their primary customer was a government agency, run by a central IT subagency about 5 years behind everyone else.........AND PROUD of it. Seriously, I interviewed with the head of the place and he thought it was foolish to go with new things as they were not as sure as what you invested time and money in.

The boss where I worked thought like that too.

I think they both had a point, but as the medical people say "its the dose that makes the poison".

Both of those groups took that anti-change philosophy too far and suffered losses from it.

I think that is poor judgement, fueled by fear of change.

That place still had systems running in foxpro.

Re:The headline should be moe like (1)

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585070)

1% of 200,000,000 = 2,000,000. Still a lot of copies of IE6.

Microsoft's estimate of Windows deployment about five years ago was about a billion installs, and that was without counting pirated copies, which in some countries (e.g. Asia) are huge (look at China with it's ~25% IE6 usage, that's pirated Windows copies). So let's say 2B installs. 1% of 2B is 20M. OTOH 25% of several hundred million or whatever China contributes is still 100M or so. So worldwide there's still an awful lot of IE6 around.

(I'm not sure if your 200M is meant to be US-only to fit the headline, where would a figure of 200M Windows installs for the US come from?).

Re:The headline should be moe like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584764)

Yep, that's me! My organisation still insists on only allowing IE6 on the desktop.

Re:The headline should be moe like (1)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584838)

Take comfort you are not alone. My last job was in an org like that. They even had production software that relied on foxpro, microsoft access and bat files. They were able to get away with it because their customer was a government agency with an authoritarian IT sub-agency that was just as technologically conservative and resistant to change.

The good news is that not all places to work are like that. You go through stress when you leave and find out how far behind you are, but at the same time you also fall in love with your career again as you end up learning new things.

It is dead, zombies just don't die (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584676)

The rest of the 1% I can practically gaurantee you are zombie bots and crawlers that use the MSIE6 engine and are probably out of sight. Case example. The Contextweb ad crawler (which pulls every page as MSIE6) on every ad slot will hit your site once. No matter what your browser is.

There's also numerous spam harvesters that do the same.

Can Another IE 6 Happen? (2)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584704)

In my opinion the debacle of "IE 6" happened because

- Microsoft was all about "embrace & extend" to shut out
    competitors

- Many web designers and even programmers didn't know there was an "internet" beyond IE, Exchange & hotmail

Is it still possible for another "IE 6" to happen?

That is a browser that doesn't follow W3 standards, a browser that becomes incompatible with later versions of itself and such a browser that is kept in use by big orgs because zillions of lines of code were written to work with THAT BROWSER only?

I haven't kept up with IE development, but it seems like Microsoft from IE 7 on has made an effort to get closer to the web development standards everyone else uses.

Even supervisors resistant to change like at my old org are now aware of the existence and popularity of other browsers beyond just IE.

I guess the question is are there still web designers and web programmers who code to IE only and organizations that support that........and if so, does it matter, does IE get close enough to standards so it doesn't matter?

Re:Can Another IE 6 Happen? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584812)

Why don't you answer your own questions with your own faults? You admit that you don't keep up on this stuff. Why don't you keep up on it instead of expeting everyone else to be your own question answering lapdog?

Re:Can Another IE 6 Happen? (1)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584972)

I don't keep up with IE development beyond the headlines because I use my energy to make solutions instead of being an "Anonymous Coward" to fling insults at people.

I develop web apps in standards compliant browsers, then take a small amount of time at the unit test level to make sure it works in IE.

This strategy provides me with the gratification of using my time to produce things that make people's lives easier and without having to be concerned with everything Microsoft does.

I suggest you try it.

 

Re:Can Another IE 6 Happen? (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584910)

Is it still possible for another "IE 6" to happen?

That is a browser that doesn't follow W3 standards, a browser that becomes incompatible with later versions of itself and such a browser that is kept in use by big orgs because zillions of lines of code were written to work with THAT BROWSER only?

Yup, been happening for a while - there are loads of web apps being written for Mobile Safari which won't work on anything else, as they are tightly bound to the iOS web app framework.

You can port most of these apps fairly trivially to Androids WebKit, but even then you lose a fair amount of functionality in the process.

Re:Can Another IE 6 Happen? (1)

Tridus (79566) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584912)

Of course another one can happen. IE 6 is just another Netscape 4 in terms of how it handled standards badly, had a lot of its own quirky stuff that people developed for, and then became a shambling zombie refusing to die for years after we wanted it gone.

If MS wanted to really kill IE6... (1)

unixisc (2429386) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584864)

...they should have had a way to automatically upgrade it the moment they detected any of their websites being visited by IE6, or alternatively, send viruses that way to break into it, and work w/ anti-viral vendors to get browser upgrades to be a part of any fix.

IE6 is still around for many (1)

maxbash (1350115) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584882)

I just setup a new computer and had to setup XP mode to run IE6, because my state still has Juvenile Court Web page uses a really old activeX app. The major Hospital and Healthcare organization in the area still uses IE6 on all the doctors computers too. I don't think it dead until you can't find it used in business anymore.

What about internally? (2)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584886)

Do these stats pertain just to use of IE6 on the public internet? Is IE6 still being used a lot more on internal intranets?

The Walking Dead (4, Funny)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584896)

Something tells me that in February when I "tune in" ( okay, download ) to see what happens with "The Walking Dead" I'm going to see a scene with some people from Rick's group running frantically through a building. At one point they are going to dart into a closed room to escape. It will be a computer lab. There will be animated corpses rotting in the chairs. On screen, in front of them will be IE 6 running.

Reminds Of The Old Dinosaur Movies (1)

assertation (1255714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38584922)

IE 6 reminds me of the old pre-Jurassic Park dinosaur movies. In most of them there is a scene where a big monster is shot, but still keeps moving. Some scientist explains that their nervous systems are still so primitive that they don't know they are dead yet and there is a delay between being shot and falling down.

Major sites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38584974)

now simply need to ban them outright and fuck corporate installations that havent fixed their shitty internal app by now.

Never should have "integrated" IE in to Windows (1)

linebackn (131821) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585002)

I would like to take yet another obligatory moment to once again point out that people being "stuck" with IE 6 would not have been such a big deal if it had been a proper independent application rather than "integrated" in to the OS.

People would have been better off designing apps that ran only under Netscape 4! You can run that alongside any newer version and on any newer version of Windows. No such luck with IE (at least not in an officially supported manner)

And because Microsoft made IE 6 part of XP, now they have to support it until XP dies. They didn't think about that back then did they?

That's a lot :( (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38585090)

I read the title as 1E6 -- 1 million -- almost dead in the US and it made me sad.

Can't celebrate yet (1)

RedMage (136286) | more than 2 years ago | (#38585098)

I'll pop the cork when my customers get off IE6. Until then I need to sink development resources into maintaining and testing on IE6, no matter how painful it is.
Unfortunately my customers' IT departments are slow moving and not motivated in moving quickly off XP and IE6. Most of them are understaffed and underfunded and dealing with PC's that are sometimes more than 10 years old. I suppose they have more pressing problems, given that...

C
 

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