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Leap Second Coming In June, 2012

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the they're-calling-it-a-time-step dept.

Earth 142

Zoxed writes "IERS have just announced a leap second due at midnight, June 30th this year. Are your systems ready?" The last leap second added was at the end of 2008.

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142 comments

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Mayans (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596026)

The *LAST* leap second occured in 2012

white men (1)

stoolpigeon (454276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597036)

will be screwed

Re:Mayans (1)

steelfood (895457) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597144)

The end of the world timer now might be perpetually stuck at 00:01. It might throw the prediction off completely. And this only because we decided to push our clocks back by one second.

Re:Mayans (1)

sadler121 (735320) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597438)

I thought the timer was perpetually stuck at 5:02 PM on the 22 April, 2011?

Re:Mayans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597596)

Winston Churchill always wondered why.

Short Notice (3, Funny)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596058)

I demand at least 3^10x8 seconds advance warning.

Re:Short Notice (2)

smi.james.th (1706780) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596222)

I demand at least 3x10^8 seconds advance warning.

FTFY

Re:Short Notice (2)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597006)

Killjoy.

3^10x8 = 472392 seconds or about 5.5 days.

Re:Short Notice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596228)

You have it. It's not like they waited until June 25th for this or anything.

Re:Short Notice (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596474)

You have 1.5*10^7 seconds warning (seconds until 30th June).

Roads? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596064)

Where We're Going We Don't Need Roads!

I won't care (4, Informative)

aglider (2435074) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596094)

I use NTP [wikipedia.org] on my systems!
They fix the timers, I got mine fixed. Automagically!

Re:I won't care (1)

Defenestrar (1773808) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596210)

NTP is great if you can get it for your platform, but I can't find a Turing tape of it anywhere for my mechanical watch!

Re:I won't care (2)

peragrin (659227) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596666)

I have yet to find a watch that doesnt drift a couple of seconds every year anyways

So i am in the habit of simply resetting everything when i adjust for DST.

I know this because i set one watch to GPS time and find it loses or gains a second every month. This has proven true countless times over the decade with hundreds of watches.

Re:I won't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38598438)

You are aware that GPS time and UTC are off by several seconds, right?

Why would you worry about your watch gaining or losing a few seconds when even when it's "accurate" you're going to be 15 seconds ahead of most people?

That said, as another poster said, look into a watch that syncs over radio... I prefer the Citizen Skyhawk line: https://www.google.com/search?q=citizen+skyhawk [google.com]

Re:I won't care (2)

Clueless Moron (548336) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598770)

The GPS protocol includes the UTC offset, so all GPS units report UTC time.

Re:I won't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38598990)

The pedant in me wants to remind you that you said GPS time, not "the time displayed on a GPS unit". ;)

My real reason for this response is to inform you that not *all* GPS units do this. I have been burned in the past because different stages of pre/post processed GPS out of some units do and don't factor in the 15 seconds (granted, this was 13 seconds at the time... it was awhile ago). Since then, I always double-check for an offset when I'm mucking about with GPS and timing.

Re:I won't care (1)

Clueless Moron (548336) | more than 2 years ago | (#38599930)

The $GPRMC sentence is required by NMEA-0183 to report UTC.

What brand module did you find that did not do this? I'd like to be sure to avoid it...

Re:I won't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38600610)

A Novatel DL4+ receiver combined with a Honeywell AG58 type IMU. I don't recall the specific stage at which the offset is not applied, but I think it may be in the raw PDC files. As I recall, by the time post-processing is complete, the correction factor IS applied, but I was mucking about in the processing stream and hit a region before it got applied. I will absolutely grant that this is a corner case, as this is not really ever going to be a typical consumer-level issue. :)

I'm not familiar with NMEA-0183 and don't know if it applies to the sort of hardware I was using.

Re:I won't care (3, Funny)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 2 years ago | (#38600246)

I have yet to find a watch that doesnt drift a couple of seconds every year anyways

SLOW DOWN!

Re:I won't care (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597046)

I found one here: Mechanical Watch NTP Client [wikipedia.org]

**==** Warning /|\ NSFW **==** (-1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 2 years ago | (#38599940)

Warning! Above post links to content of a sexual nature! NSFW.

Re:I won't care (4, Informative)

Soft (266615) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596440)

Not just NTP; the reference implementation. On the machines I checked last time around, those with the reference implementation handled time correctly; those with OpenNTPD just ignored the leap second and resynchronized later. I'll check again next summer, we'll see what happens.

Re:I won't care (2)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596900)

> Not just NTP; the reference implementation.

Or Chrony.

OpenNTPD (4, Informative)

klapaucjusz (1167407) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598176)

OpenNTPD just ignored the leap second

OpenNTPD has clearly been written by someone who doesn't understand NTP. For example, it advertises incorrect root delay and disperson [debian.org] values, which can cause clients to fail to achieve a majority vote, or to pick the wrong peer to synchronise against. (Earlier versions were even worse, they advertised themselves as being at stratum 0, which could cause synchronisation loops; this has thankfully been fixed, but it doesn't inspire much confidence in the authors' competence.)

I've also found OpenNTP to fail to regulate the local clock on dodgy hardware (it would oscillate wildly, with an amplitude of 3 seconds or so), in situations where the reference ntpd coped just fine.

Folks, do yourself and everyone a favour -- run the reference NTP [ntp.org] , run chrony [tuxfamily.org] , heck, run some SNTP client [icarus.com] , but please avoid OpenNTPD.

Re:OpenNTPD (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38600236)

I have written most of OpenNTPD. Besides a lot of other stuff.

And to be honest, I am sick and tired of wasting energy on each and every unfounded accusation someone posts somewhere. So I won't go into detail.

First of, portable or native OpenNTPD (native = the one that comes with OpenBSD)? That is a drastic difference, not just because the portable is ancient (if anyone cares, please maintain the portable, I'll happily put it up. And not just promises, I got a lot of them).

Then, looking at ntpd alone doesn't cut it. OpenNTPD uses a different approach than most (all?) others, it leaves the timekeeping to the kernel where it belongs. And we adjusted the kernel subsystem for it on OpenBSD.

and just one thing i want to pick out of the unfounded accusations:
"I've also found OpenNTP to fail to regulate the local clock on dodgy hardware"
that isn't OpenNTPD failing, that is your system's adjtime(2) failing.

And now excuse me please, I prefer to spend my free time on writing code or with my friends.

Re:OpenNTPD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38600638)

hmm, second trial, seems like my first comment didn't make it, i usually don't spend time on slashdot.

I wrote most of OpenNTPD. And a lot of other stuff. So i won't go into detail here.

I am sick and tired of replying to unfounded accusations someone posts somewhere. talk is cheap. if you cared you had sent diffs. but then you had to actually read the code.

first of, portable or native (=the one that comes with OpenBSD)? That is a vast difference, and not just because the portable is ancient (lack of maintainer, feel free to jump in).

just looking at ntpd itself doesn't cut it anyway. OpenNTPD uses a different approach than most (all?) others, it leaves timekeeping to the kernel where it belongs. We adjusted the kernel side subsystem on OpenBSD.

just one point i want to pick out:
    "I've also found OpenNTP to fail to regulate the local clock on dodgy hardware"
that is not OpenNTPD failing, that is your system's adjtime(2) failing.

and now excuse me please, i prefer to spend my free time on writing code or with my friends.

henning

Re:OpenNTPD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38601254)

Your inability to figure out how a commenting system works gives me great reason to trust your product.

Re:I won't care (1)

mcavic (2007672) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596742)

1000 ms is a pretty big drift, so I assume NTP will have to step the clock and resynchronize. I'm not too worried about it, though. :)

Re:I won't care (1)

mcavic (2007672) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596758)

Actually, I believe WWVB has a leap second provision. I don't know if the NTP protocol does or not.

Re:I won't care (1)

klapaucjusz (1167407) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598208)

I don't know if the NTP protocol does [have a leap second provision].

Yes it does -- that's what the LI (Leap Indicator) field is for.

Re:I won't care (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596924)

It's provided for in the protocol and in the software. NTP (and Chrony) will simply insert an extra second.

has to corrects my code (0)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596120)

if (($mon == 5) && ($mday==30)) {
   $sec = $sec + 1;
} else {
   $sec = $sec;
}

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

MetalliQaZ (539913) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596180)

I think that would double every second for the entire day. Be more specific.

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596266)

Not only that, but this bug would kick in every year on June 30.

Also... why the else clause? A good compiler will *probably*... no make that *hopefully* optimize that away...

Christ that guy sucks!

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596652)

Not only that, but this bug would kick in every year on June 30.

Also... why the else clause? A good compiler will *probably*... no make that *hopefully* optimize that away...

Christ that guy sucks!

I saw that too, then I thought, "It's Perl, do I really think that I know what it does?"

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Ossifer (703813) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597920)

Looks like May 30th to my human brain... Who's got the brain that came up with the idea of having months start at zero, but day of month start at one?!?!

Re:has to corrects my code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38599644)

Christ that guy sucks!

You were warned by the self-description: not just "Average Joe" but also "Sixpack"... Yeah, I'd never hire him either.

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 2 years ago | (#38600326)

Also... why the else clause? A good compiler will *probably*... no make that *hopefully* optimize that away...

PHP is not compiled! But that code won't be run anyway, it is just taking up 21 bytes of RAM but no cycles.

Re:has to corrects my code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596186)

else {
  $sec = $sec;
}

Hm.

Re:has to corrects my code (4, Funny)

Eraesr (1629799) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596260)

php coders. pah.

Re:has to corrects my code (2)

Noread (2270278) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596384)

php scripters. pah.

FTFY

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Myopic (18616) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596220)

$sec = $sec + (($mon==5) && ($mday = 30));

Re:has to corrects my code (2)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596366)

Ugh. You have reminded me why I left Perl behind for a language that has strict typing.

sec += (mon == 5 && mday == 30 ? 1 : 0);

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 2 years ago | (#38599278)

Ugh. You have reminded me why I left Perl behind for a language that has strict typing.

sec += (mon == 5 && mday == 30 ? 1 : 0);

umm you mean ?

sec += ((mon == 5 && mday == 30 && hour ==0 && min == 0 && sec == 0 year == leapyear) ? 2 : 1);

Still, that is pretty ugly but at least it works. Other wise time will only advance by 1 second every 4 years!

Re:has to corrects my code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38599414)

sec += ((mon == 5 && mday == 30 && hour ==0 && min == 0 && sec == 0 && year == leapyear) ? 2 : 1);

oops

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596372)

And in 2013.... (and 2014, and 2015, and 2016....)?

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Myopic (18616) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597456)

Don't make the mistake of assuming this code runs forever in a loop.

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597754)

Well, it is going to have to run at least once a day in order to work.

Which means once a day every year it is going to fuck up.

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Myopic (18616) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598134)

I accept your chiding, but don't let it rise to actual criticism. Humorous pedantry is one thing, but you don't have enough information for real pedantry. For instance, without seeing the whole program, you don't know whether the immediate previous line of code was

if($year==2012) {

You also don't know if this is code only run during May, June, July, August, and September of 2012, as a special process. So again, ha ha, I laugh with you for ways to make jokes about silly tidbits of code posted to an unimportant story on Slashdot, but the criticism isn't capital-V Valid.

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

Dhalka226 (559740) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596790)

Lost an equal sign there; your code is incrementing every day in month 5 (and also every year).

Re:has to corrects my code (2)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596346)

Well, I think we now have a good example of how NOT to code.

Re:has to corrects my code (2)

skoval (921501) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596630)

Wait a minute. Isn't this the code that documents itself?

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

cod3r_ (2031620) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596704)

the beauty of perl is that you can do things wrong but the outcome will somehow be right.. perl just knows what to do when u screw up

Re:has to corrects my code (4, Funny)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596938)

That's because the perl interpreter sends each script to Larry Wall for review and correction.

Re:has to corrects my code (1)

cod3r_ (2031620) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597270)

hahahahah

Ready? (1)

DC2088 (2343764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596174)

Of course! My systems are second-to-none. You should see what it clocks in at - not exactly a minute set of figures! That's if you have the time..

A matter of time.... (3, Funny)

Vhaldera (1269312) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596244)

One small step for man; one leap second for computer systems?

Re:A matter of time.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596412)

One small step for man; one leap second for computerkind.

Listen to WWV in North America (4, Interesting)

Clueless Moron (548336) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596306)

On 5, 10, 15 or 20 MHz: at 00:00Z you will hear minute consisting of 61 seconds.

If you happen to have a radio controlled timepiece, this will also be your chance to see if they handle the leap second conversion or took the lazy way out and just rely on the next time sync fix the time.

00:00UTC June 30th 2012 is a Saturday evening in North America. What better way to celebrate a Saturday night?

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (5, Funny)

SomeoneGotMyNick (200685) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596442)

00:00UTC June 30th 2012 is a Saturday evening in North America. What better way to celebrate a Saturday night?

Decisions, decisions....

I was going to watch my grass grow instead, but your suggestion sounds more promising. It won't tie up the entire night for any other activities I may plan for that weekend.

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (1)

fph il quozientatore (971015) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597066)

Are you sure? June 30th is Saturday, so it should be a Friday night. Unless I am miscounting some leap day in between...

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38598506)

Yes, you are correct. June 30 is a Saturday. So in North America the second would be added on Friday, June 29 at 3pm AKST, 4pm PST, 5pm MST, 6pm CST, 7pm EST, 8pm AST, or 8:30pm NST

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (1)

Clueless Moron (548336) | more than 2 years ago | (#38600068)

The leap second is at the end of June 30th. From the IERS bulletin:

2012 June 30, 23h 59m 59s
2012 June 30, 23h 59m 60s
2012 July 1, 0h 0m 0s

So be sure to enjoy your extra long Saturday.

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596456)

On 5, 10, 15 or 20 MHz: at 00:00Z you will hear minute consisting of 61 seconds.

If you happen to have a radio controlled timepiece, this will also be your chance to see if they handle the leap second conversion or took the lazy way out and just rely on the next time sync fix the time.

00:00UTC June 30th 2012 is a Saturday evening in North America. What better way to celebrate a Saturday night?

The sad part is, I really can't think of a better way to celebrate a Saturday night.

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596604)

Ain't no party like a leap second party, 'cause a leap second party... is really short.

Re:Listen to WWV in North America (2)

spaceyhackerlady (462530) | more than 2 years ago | (#38599868)

I've listened to a couple of leap seconds on WWV. I've recorded them too. I think I need to get out more. They sound like tick...tick...tick...(silence 23:59:59)...(silence 23:59:60)...BEEP (00:00:00)...tick...tick...tick...

...laura

Ridiculous government intervention (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596526)

Anybody else getting sick and tired of the government doing crap like this? It's like when Congress decided a few years back to change the start and end dates for Daylight Savings Time. I still have VCRs and computers that change to DST on the "wrong" days now because of this garbage.

Congress and the federal government: LEAVE THE DATE AND TIME ALONE. It's just fine without your intervention. This is why I am supporting Ron Paul in the 2012 elections -- he recognizes that there is a Constitutional role for the federal government. And screwing around with people's clocks is not in the Constitution.

Re:Ridiculous government intervention (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596592)

Hmmm, mildly clever troll? Or just further proof that Ron Paul is supported by really stupid people?

Americanocentricism speaks again ! (2)

vikingpower (768921) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596606)

IERS stands for INTERNATIONAL Earth Rotation and Reference System.

Has NOTHING AT ALL to do with the US government. Pah !

Re:Americanocentricism speaks again ! (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597024)

IERS stands for INTERNATIONAL Earth Rotation and Reference System.

Meanwhile, At Stately Mel Gibson Manner..... GEMMA BACK MY SECOND!

YOU ARE ALL EDUCATED STUPID! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 2 years ago | (#38599112)

wat, no luv for Gene Ray all up in this thread?!!! For shame.
I never did understand what irradiating genetic material had to do with the natural timeframe of reality, but then, I'm not one of dem there big brains with a website on teh intarwebs.

Re:Ridiculous government intervention (1)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596658)

Hmm perhaps there are these things "things" such as computers, atomic clocks, disciplined oscillators, what have you, that simply do not jibe with Pope Gregory's calendar?

Just maybe?

Oh for fucks sake why did I even reply?

Re:Ridiculous government intervention (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596944)

Pope Gregory has just issued a papal bull. You are to go to hell.

Re:Ridiculous government intervention (1)

vikingpower (768921) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597044)

Oh for fucks sake why did I even reply?

I thought the same thing, after seeing that the 1-level-up post came from an AC. SIGH

Re:Ridiculous government intervention (1)

Eunuchswear (210685) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598812)

Replying to undo mod - tried to do "funny" but saw some paultard had already done "insightful". WTF!

on second of my life (1)

cod3r_ (2031620) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596600)

that i wont get back.. tho i lost like 30 seconds of my life reading this story and commenting..

Re:on second of my life (2)

Antarius (542615) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596990)

Such a pity you didn't invest that extra second in checking your spelling and grammar. =p

It's a hassle, but a tiny one... (4, Interesting)

ElVee (208723) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596644)

Leap seconds are a tiny bit of problem when you have to time-stamp transactions coming in from all over the globe and keep them in date/time order. Some OSes don't support leap seconds, which complicates matters. We have the procedures documented from the last time this happened in 2008, but, of course, we've changed OS, DB and message queue vendors since then, so nothing applies anymore.

Time to spin up a new project and pay some high-priced consultants a lot of money to rewrite the procedures documentation yet again. I suspect we'll take the coward's way out and shut down processing for a minute before until a minute after and resync the clocks in the interim.

That will, of course, be charged to our SLA downtime, which will affect everyone's performance reviews at the end of the year. All this for a single goddamn second.

Re:It's a hassle, but a tiny one... (2)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598110)

I suspect we'll take the coward's way out and shut down processing for a minute before until a minute after and resync the clocks in the interim.

This was how I figured transaction processing would be handled. It sucks that you have to pay high-priced consultants to get that answer; plenty of people would give it to you for free.

That will, of course, be charged to our SLA downtime

I didn't consider this aspect. Thinking about it makes me realize just how stupid a leap second is. A lot of transaction processing requires >99.999% uptime, and even that two minutes (assuming everything goes perfectly smoothly) is expensive. Couldn't they be accumulated and have an extra leap year once every 86400 years?

Re:It's a hassle, but a tiny one... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38599062)

No. Leap days correct rotation of the Earth with its revolution. Leap seconds have an entirely different purpose, correcting atomic time based on caesium with the rotation of the Earth.

There is however International Atomic Time which doesn't use leap seconds, so if you are so desperate to avoid them, you can set your servers to that instead of UTC, and convert for display if needed.

In any case, apparently they are "voting" on whether to continue leap seconds in UTC, with results expected by 2017, so you may get your wish.

Great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38596682)

...I suppose this is going to throw off my mayan calendar?... :(

Excellent excuse (2)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596706)

"Officer. The reason I was driving so fast is that I was trying to adjust my watch using relativistic time dilation."

Re:Excellent excuse (1)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596844)

Wouldn't that cause your car's clock to slow down?

Re:Excellent excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597140)

not if you ride in circles counterclockwise

Re:Excellent excuse (1)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597168)

But if you go around the earth fast enough [wikipedia.org] BACKWARDS, time reverses - and you can reconcile that leap second with your watch.

Re:Excellent excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597184)

For analog watches, you'd only have to slow them down almost a day or almost 12 hours. For digital ones, it depends on how many years they support until they flip over. It might take a while. Guess I'll have to do more speeding.

Re:Excellent excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597296)

Maybe if we all drive west fast enough, we'll speed the rotation of the earth to counteract the need for the leap second?

Re:Excellent excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597870)

If we push the earth away from the sun a bit we can add a whole week and declare it Robot Party Week.

Re:Excellent excuse (1)

timmy.cl (1102617) | more than 2 years ago | (#38598252)

And when we all brake we'll restore the energy back into the earth. At least what the air friction left us with. And, again, the air itself moving and then "braking" will probably destroy our purpose.

Re:Excellent excuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597888)

If you could drive that fast, by the time the cops pulled you over you would be out of their jurisdiction
And probably off the planet too

I work in a corporate environment (5, Funny)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 2 years ago | (#38596902)

I need a lot more warning than this! We won't even be able to have the meeting in time to decide who to invite to the pre-project inception meeting.

Rumor of abolishing leap seconds just two days ago (1)

methamorph (950510) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597114)

Two days ago there were several articles stating that leap second might be abolished: http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=leap-seconds-may-disappear-12-01-02 [scientificamerican.com] "This month the International Telecommunication Union will consider a proposal to abolish leap seconds."

Party time (1)

ddd0004 (1984672) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597182)

Yes!! An extra second for drinking.

Who is Leap? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597372)

Who is this "Leap"? Why is his second coming so important?

UTC and leap seconds (rant) (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38597702)

Hey, did you think gettimeofday returned the number of seconds since the epoch? That a call to gettimeofday would return a value >= to the last call? Well, it doesn't, because it's based on UTC, which is defined as seconds since the epoch, minus leaps seconds.

As a result, a value returned by gettimeofday does not refer 1:1 to a point in time, and the clock will skip a second backwards at random moments (leap seconds happen when IERS says so).

I mean, you could put the leap second logic in the same place timevals are converted to a user-displayable format, like timezones, DST and, i don't know, leap YEARS, but NO, lets be absolutely retarded and break every program in the world that dares to make the assumption that time moves forward. There is also no other way to get the unix time.

Most people don't even know about it, which results in bugs (there was a story about that earlier), but honestly, I consider the systems that work like this broken and not the applications.

breaking "time is an arrow" needed for FTL travel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38600110)

> but NO, lets be absolutely retarded and break every program in the world that dares to make the assumption that time moves forward.

Unfortunately, we no longer can assume this now that we see faster-than-light transport may be on the horizon (viz. Tevatron experiments).

Parse error... (1)

Simon Brooke (45012) | more than 2 years ago | (#38597968)

Is that ((leap second) coming) or (leap (second coming))?

There's a significant difference!

Re:Parse error... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38599156)

Jesus Leapt

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