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Finnish ISP Forced To Block the Pirate Bay

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the if-you-can't-beat-them-ban-them dept.

Censorship 168

Apotekaren writes "The Finnish ISP Elisa has been forced to block several domains leading to the infamous torrent-tracker site The Pirate Bay following a court case initiated by IFPI Finland... The Helsinki District Court ruled in favor of IFPI Finland in October, but the ISP resisted implementing the block until today because of the terms of the block not being specific enough. The ISP is calling the block 'temporary' and is appealing the court decision." Analysis from Torrent Freak shows that the block is probably easily circumvented.

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168 comments

Not only domains (5, Interesting)

DCTech (2545590) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637358)

The block was for IP's too, so you can't just change your DNS. You have to use some proxy service, or VPN, which makes it harder. And they also blocked one of EFF Finland sites as collateral damage.

Just as a side note, before all the usual "haha it's already circumvented" comments come in. They don't care about that, they just want to make it harder for casual people to pirate. That's what DRM does, too. It's why all those "DRM can always be cracked, somehow" comments are stupid too. The main purpose is to make it harder for casual people.

Re:Not only domains (5, Insightful)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637456)

DRM doesn't stop casual people from pirating when they can go to thepiratebay (or wherever) and get the movie pre-cracked. The guys who get the original movie have to crack it, but once done, no one else has to care. Blocking the IP addresses are slightly more effective in that way.

Re:Not only domains (1, Redundant)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637576)

Blocking the IP addresses are slightly more effective in that way.

It's still completely ineffective because IP addresses change, proxies like thepiratebay.ee will get you there as well, and private or tor DNS will always get you where you want to go.

Re:Not only domains (2)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638156)

IP addresses are a limited commodity that cost $, granted a lot less if ipv6 ever rolls out, but until then, banning an IP is pretty damn effective to prevent the host from doing much, the browser (user) can still use a proxy to circumvent though. Also, once you hit the swarm w the torrent file, I doubt all those IPs are banned :) Finland is just trying to be like us (USA) w our SOPA bs. But what they don't realize is it's the blind (RIAA) leading the blind (congressmen) over here and nobody behind sopa can probably DE-acronym IP or DNS.

Re:Not only domains (5, Interesting)

Vanderhoth (1582661) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637492)

The problem is when "the casual user" buys something with a DRM that prevents them from using the product, maliciously disables their machine and they can't get any help from customer support.

That's when "The casual" user learns to circumvent DRM by pirating everything before wasting their money to get the shaft after the fact. At least that was my story.

Re:Not only domains (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637802)

I bought a DVD with DRM and it would play in my DVD player but not on my computer so I returned it as defective. I'll keep doing that until they figure out that it costs them more to add drm than not.

Re:Not only domains (4, Insightful)

dainbug (678555) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637828)

Thank you! Ditto. I'm still trying to get legally purchased movies to run on my legally purchased equipment.

As the entertainment industry tries to completely control every aspect of their product and how consumers can use them, more and more star systems will slip through their grasp.

Re:Not only domains (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638114)

Princess Leia: The more you tighten your grip, Tarkin, the more star systems will slip through your fingers.
Governor Tarkin: Not after we demonstrate the capabilities of this station.

Re:Not only domains (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638304)

Yes. Thank you. Because no one on /. got the reference....

Re:Not only domains (2)

JosKarith (757063) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638326)

"Not after we demonstrate the capabilities of this SOPA act."
TFTFY (Though I'm not sure even the Empire would stoop so low...)

Re:Not only domains (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638360)

Sadly enough, Skyrim from tpb = no steam, Skyrim pre-order = mass steam. For those that don't know steam is a game launcher that likes to advertise whenever it feels like it, the equivalent of some of the android apps that use ads to make money, but a little bit more annoying. It's not a deal breaker, but better w/o. I'm sure there's a solution somewhere in all this mess ;)

Re:Not only domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38639344)

I haven't bought anything more recent than Fallout New Vegas on Steam so maybe it has to do with new games, but I've never seen any ads from Steam.

Re:Not only domains (2)

synapse7 (1075571) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638498)

Watching my brother try to play blueray discs on a PC looked like a bit of a science project. Among the issues he had with finding a compatible player, audio would only be output through HDMI and his amp/receiver does not have an HDMI input, so he was running audio out from the TV back to the amp. If the TV did not have an audio out, a "cracked" video may have been the only solution, besides buying new components.

Re:Not only domains (3, Interesting)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637496)

DRM has already failed... the vendor-lock-in situations with iTunes and PlaysForSure and lack of compatibility with MP3-only devices brought it down. Now, almost all music stores are Watermarked MP3... you can copy it on your own devices all you want, you just can't offer it to others without your watermark that can be traced back to you being spread.

Re:Not only domains (3, Informative)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637822)

I bought the same mp3 twice from Amazon on two different accounts and compared them - bit for bit the same, so I guess this doesn't apply to all.

Re:Not only domains (3, Insightful)

ddxexex (1664191) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638058)

But did you use a different credit card as well? A user account for Amazon can easily be filled with fake info, but credit card info is harder to make up, so I wouldn't be surprised if the watermarking was done by credit card or something.

Re:Not only domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638192)

This seems like crazy talk. I have multiple cards and could pay for ANYTHING with ANY of these cards. Not to mention getting new cards are different numbers, so it is feasible to buy something and have a new card that night.

Tying to form of payment seems like an exercise in futility.

Re:Not only domains (1)

Golddess (1361003) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638630)

I have multiple cards and could pay for ANYTHING with ANY of these cards.

Exactly. You have multiple cards. Or in other words, all your cards can be used to uniquely identify you. Not your spouse, your best friend, a co-worker, some random dude on the street. You.

Not to mention getting new cards are different numbers, so it is feasible to buy something and have a new card that night.

And some places allow you to request one-time numbers that can only be used at a particular place/time for a specific amount. But it would still link back to you.

Now all that said, I don't know what all Amazon could/would do. Could they call up Visa and ask "hey, I need the info of the person who had this number on this date"? Could they block future transactions with that number? If it was a one-time number, is there a way to block all one-time numbers that link back to the same base account?

And don't get me wrong, I can think of at least one method where watermarking based on form of payment would be futile (gift cards). But watermarking based on credit card used certainly isn't one of them, and would seem to be less futile than watermarking based on account.

Re:Not only domains (1)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638202)

Not sure about the credit card. In any case, I've used the mp3's on 4 different devices with no problems, including Windows and Linux, so I am pretty sure there is nothing evil in them.

Re:Not only domains (1)

PIBM (588930) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638578)

It's not evil; a watermark is something very hard to detect, and that is often tailored to the specific user it's sent to, so that those who made it know how to find it and detect it, thus if a copy is made, the watermark will still be there and by detecting it they can match it to the user who broke out with it. A good watermark will resist a lot of different changes. Check the one put on movie soundtrack, that prevents them from being played back on playstation 3 or such if it's copied.. They've showed that cutting through the sound at random interval, changing the pitch, degrading the quality a lot, inverting the channels, and such, would not prevent the watermark from being detected, and the playback stopped.

Anyway, it's hard to believe they would go at that length on distributed mp3s, as those who share them the most are certainly not paying 1$ for them!

Re:Not only domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638252)

Amazon don't allow the same card on two accounts.

Re:Not only domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637522)

You can switch on TOR, though, as long as the exit node is not in Finland. Or doesn't this work?

Re:Not only domains (1)

KingMotley (944240) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637878)

TOR acts as a proxy, so yes.

Re:Not only domains (1)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638708)

It does. And it is -besides pseudo-anonymization- exactly what TOR is made for. I guess TOR will gain a lot of popularity in certain parts of northern Europe soon.

Re:Not only domains (4, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637632)

Sure, but those convoluted circumvention techniques tend to get wrapped into simple point and click tools for the masses. Say for example small service for Swedes to run that'll proxy just TPB and share the proxy as a "seed" on a torrent and a Firefox plugin to pick a proxy at random to use just for that site. Let them try banning all dynamic IP ranges in Sweden, that'll go over well... just as an example.

Re:Not only domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38639180)

Exactly.

The UAE has a China-like filter implemented.
Nobody gives a fuck.
Because everybody has a VPN. For $5 a month. Full speed of your ISP. Based wherever the fuck you want.
My friend there even has two. And plans on getting a third one (Ok, they have a bit more money there.), because the countries they are based in started to censor too.

He is not a computer expert. He is just your average gamer. Sure, you get some lag, but it's piss-easy. You order it online on a website that is inside the great wall. You pay via credit card. And they give you a program to download and install that does the rest. Your grandma could do it.

That's what it will become like anyway: A darknet of VPN connections.

Fuck the "content" Nazis! It's a war. And they will be exterminated!

Re:Not only domains (5, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637674)

I doubt that blocking EFF was 'collateral' damage. Pretty sure sure it was intentional. EFF is an enemy of the (corporate) state.

Re:Not only domains (1)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638740)

I don't think so. Blocking EFF is likely to backfire. And don't forget that EFF was one of the initiators of the TOR project...

Re:Not only domains (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 2 years ago | (#38639468)

Blocking EFF is all but certainly collateral. The list was given by authorities, and they have a history with messing this stuff up in the past, such as blocking activist sites when making child porn block lists. In general, police around here prefers not to piss people off without reason, it's a cultural thing. Police is very respected here in Finland, in large part because it makes an effort no to abuse its rights.

We're finns are far more confused as to why this blocking order went through in the first place as there is a known ECJ decision which specifically makes such block lists illegal and finnish courts take painstaking effort to be in compliance with ECJ. Sound like our justice system did something that it's known to do at times again - be slow as hell. We have several convicting judgments from ECJ in relation to "people not getting their business done in court in timely matter" unfortunately, and this seems to be one of them, as ECJ's decision came in the end of 2011.

Re:Not only domains (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637704)

The main purpose is to make it harder for casual people.

This is good. The casual people are a bigger voting block that the tech-savvy. What needs to happen is that quite a few of these casual people get pissed off enough to make this a point coming the next elections.

Re:Not only domains (0)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637708)

The Movie Industries are worried because more people are switch from Cable to Internet TV, which can lead to more pirating. Once you purchase something like an AppleTV or GoogleTV device and learn that you can watch videos stored on your PC or Laptop. Lot's of people will start downloading and copying movies to play on your Streaming Set Top Box. Almost any idiot can download a movie using Bit Torrent, or they can find some kid to do it for them. Most of the folks I know who have teenagers already know how to do this.

Re:Not only domains (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637960)

The Movie Industries are worried because more people are switch from Cable to Internet TV, which can lead to more pirating.

How would the switch to internet TV lead to more pirating? Most people have the internet and cable; it's the cable companies that would worry, not Hollywood.

I've been using my TV for a monitor for ten years using an S-Video cable (no, I don't have a hi-def).

I posited to my 83 year old mother that the new TV they got recently had HDMI ports and she could plug her computer into it and ditch cable. There was no way to convince her -- and she's no luddite, she was using spreadsheets 35 years ago when she still worked.

Re:Not only domains (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638524)

I submit the example of My Mother. She is a typical not-very-tech-savvy consumer. She isn't dumb - she's a university graduate, and very good at what she does - but just has no skill with technology or desire to learn. Right now she can't even handle plugging an HDMI lead into the side of her laptop - the notion of selecting an input on the TV confuses her. DVDs, though, she understands: You buy a disc, you put it in the slot, a movie comes on. She even has to get me to rip her (legitimatly-purchased) DVDs onto her iPhone.

Now imagine Internet TV gets really popular. All those My Mothers with computers perminantly hooked up to their TV... suddenly, getting pirated media on the big screen is no harder than buying it legally. Actually, it's easier: No messing around with payments, or ratings, or time-limited deals. Internet TV would eliminate much of the technological complexity of playing pirated media, much as Videolan made it possible to just download and play just about any media file on a computer in seconds without having to become an expert on containers, codecs and plugins.

Re:Not only domains (1)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#38639042)

My two year old knows how to operate the Roku and watch shows she likes. It's the easiest thing to use.

Re:Not only domains (1)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#38639024)

Cable companies control what content you get. Internet Boxes have a hard time with this because they just provide the box. Roku is a good example, with all the hidden channels, some can stream copyright content.

Re:Not only domains (2)

MacDork (560499) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637860)

The problem is independent film makers! If just anybody can distribute their movie online and make a forture, why would they sell their movie to Paramount for a pennance? [yahoo.com]

Re:Not only domains (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638090)

I don't think you said what you thought you said. You said "If just anybody can distribute their movie online and make a forture, why would they sell their movie to Paramount for a confession [wikipedia.org]

Did you mean pittance? [google.com]

Dew knot truss yore spill checker.

Re:Not only domains (2)

Taty'sEyes (2373326) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638444)

I'm still trying to figure out what a "forture" is....

HOSTS "hardcodes" SHOULD "blow by" DNSBLs (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38639460)

"The block was for IP's too, so you can't just change your DNS. You have to use some proxy service, or VPN, which makes it harder." - by DCTech (2545590) on Monday January 09, @10:06AM (#38637358)

IF this is implemented via DNSBL (DNS Block Lists) in addition to DNS request logs, then, this MAY work also, to "get around it":

DATA FOR HOSTS RESOLUTION of DOMAINS/SUBDOMAINS, FROM -> http://torrentfreak.com/the-pirate-bay-shows-futility-of-domain-and-dns-blocks-120109/ [torrentfreak.com]

---

1.) "Ping" each of these:

www.piratebay.am, piratebay.net, www.piratebay.net, www.piratebay.no, piratebay.no, piratebay.se, www.piratebay.se, suprnova.com, www.suprnova.com, themusicbay.com, www.themusicbay.com, themusicbay.net, www.themusicbay.net, themusicbay.org, www.themusicbay.org, thepiratebay.am,www.thepiratebay.am, www.thepiratebay.com, thepiratebay.com, thepiratebay.gl, www.thepiratebay.gl, thepiratebay.net, www.thepiratebay.net, www.thepiratebay.se, thepiratebay.se, www.piraattilahti.fi, piraattilahti.fi, thepiratepay.org.nyud.net

To get their correct IP address...

2.) Then embed them "hardcoded" thus, in a custom HOSTS file, like so (e.g. with 1st one):

194.71.107.15 www.piratebay.am

(That's the IP address I get back from "pinging" them, your result MAY vary... so, test to be more sure!)

---

* That SHOULD work, depending on HOW they block it actually, such as DNSBL's (but, there's various methods OTHER than DNSBL too)...

APK

P.S.=> However, IF this is going on & NOT by DNSBL blocking filtering (data from SAME link above):

IP addresses to be blocked:

194.71.107.15
194.71.107.19
194.71.107.18

Then, HOSTS will not work either (they only work for host-domain names/canonical names for sites, not IP addresses), BUT, alternate DNS's still may though I'd suspect, @ least if DNSBL's are used for the blocking!

(That is, until the alternate DNS', legit ones that is, get what I suspect is being put into place in DNSBL's), or TOR etc. ...

* Still, it's BEST to NOT "pirate" music, film, etc. from online, imo @ least...

... apk

And so it begins... (5, Interesting)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637362)

I'm frankly surprised that you can still type in thepiratebay.org in the U.S. and still get anything other than "Sorry, this site has been blocked by your ISP due to legal requirements." Hell, I'm surprised it's still even legal to show it in a search engine. Years ago, I expected the blocking to start much sooner. It's still coming though. Of course, when it is blocked, this will just set off an arms race where proxy sites and government/ISP's battle it out for a while, possibly leading as far as proxy blocking and maybe even deep packet inspection. But it's nice to have it without having to hack around a block, at least for now.

And it's particularly sad to see a country like Finland, traditionally pretty strong on free speech and consumer rights, sink to this level. Of course, the Finnish reputation for has become somewhat tarnished in recent years, with the unfortunate prosecution of Jussi Halla-aho [wikipedia.org] , and the government's increasing deference to the EU and U.S. on intellectual property issues.

Re:And so it begins... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637534)

I fully expect the "Internet" to be a footnote in history when the people got out of their little box for a few years and were quickly re-contained. Unless a technology comes along to allow worldwide communication without a governable infrastructure, we're screwed.

Re:And so it begins... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637620)

I fully expect the "Internet" to be a footnote in history...

Dude, I've been saying for 20 years that the Internet is a fad that will be over in a week.

Re:And so it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637716)

Even Prince declared the Internet is dead ... That's gotta mean something!

Re:And so it begins... (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637952)

Well, he is royalty after all.

Re:And so it begins... (1)

hene (866198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637804)

don't worry, I hear they have this hacker satellite network coming. It will put man into moon and everything..

Re:And so it begins... (3, Interesting)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638476)

If everyone had a wifi router forwarding packets, the only people who would need corporate infrastructure would be those way out in the sticks. The genie is out of the bottle, and he'll be hard to put back in. One presient sci-fi writer saw the internet coming and the "dangers" of uncensored communication and information retrieval. A Logic Named Joe, 1946. Its text is on the internet, but Google seems to only point to where you can buy this public domain work (copyright expired, not renewed).

Re:And so it begins... (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637748)

Basically we're fucked.. until we can circumvent the ISP and create a true peer to peer internet

Re:And so it begins... (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638548)

Start building. I suggest a shared-store architecture. Latency is hell, but it is much easier to administer without any central authority.

Re:And so it begins... (1)

Tyr07 (2300912) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637760)

Eh, RIAA etc is mostly a media stunt. I'm sure 'derp' down they're using it just to scare people into making a bunch of purchases for awhile and don't care about actually blocking the sites as it still promotes their material.

If they can have websites promoting people into using things for 'free', get used to it, comfortable with it, know it's worth paying for and really don't want to be without it, be it a game, music or otherwise, then SCARE all of them into purchasing the product, it's genius.

Have some faith in capitalism people. They just figured out a clever way to make more money by crushing a few of the little people, but not all of them, as they want them to buy more.

You'll probably notice a pattern where they'll be quiet for awhile, let people save their penny's, let people get more content and marketed to, then bam, another scare of buy it or else.

Re:And so it begins... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638822)

...don't care about actually blocking the sites as it still promotes their material.

The RIAA would have embraced free downloads in order to sell hard copies (CDs etc) were it not for the fact that the internet also promotes their competetion, the independent artist. They have radio, independents don't.

If they can have websites promoting people into using things for 'free', get used to it, comfortable with it, know it's worth paying for

Most movies, music, and books aren't worth paying for.

Have some faith in capitalism people.

Sorry, I refuse to bow to your little green god.

You'll probably notice a pattern where they'll be quiet for awhile, let people save their penny's

The pattern I see is grade school teachers not doing their damned jobs well. Why do you guys put an apostrophe for a plural? It's pennies. Your spell checker dodn't catch it because "the penny's color is copper" is correct. I hope you're not a native English speaker, because "Count your penny's" makes you look like an uneducated, aliterate fool that only another aliterate fool would take seriously.

And before someone jumps on "aliterate", look the word up in Webster's first.

Re:And so it begins... (5, Funny)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637844)

I'm frankly surprised that you can still type in thepiratebay.org in the U.S. and still get anything other than "Sorry, this site has been blocked by your ISP due to legal requirements."

This is absurd. There's no way that they are going to say they are sorry.

Re:And so it begins... (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638778)

Indeed. I would guess that the message would be 'This site has been blocked under US law section xxx.xx.xxx' followed by a suitably intimidating 'Your access has been logged.' Unless they just repurpose the child-porn filter to save money, in which case you wouldn't get any message at all, just a spoofed 404 or 403 page to make it look like the server is at fault.

Re:And so it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637852)

> prosecution of Jussi Halla-aho,

Since he got convicted, perhaps he did say something wrong. From reading the wiki, I would think he sounds fairly racist.

I agree with you on the IP issues however.

Re:And so it begins... (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637970)

Free speech is when you can say something wrong without being prosecuted for it.

Re:And so it begins... (2)

Inda (580031) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638006)

I'm surprised too. I've been warning real life friends and internet associates for too long. They're probably past the point of believing me.

I still download a movie a week. 3 times out of 4, I wish I hadn't. I wish I'd read a book or played a game instead. The wife and daughter go through phases with downloading music. I suspect they are dissapointed with their selections more often than not.

We will give up music and movies if these blocks gain more traction. That's the bottom line. We'd rather do something else with our money.

Blocking live sport is the thing that bothers me most. I watched a game at the weekend. The stadium is less than a mile away from my house but I couldn't get tickets. I ended up watching it on a Canadian TV station over 7,000 miles away.

Something is truely wrong.

Re:And so it begins... (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638562)

I love watching American Football through an Australian feed. The commentators are more well informed than their American counterparts and the commercials aren't nearly as obnoxious. I do agree with you about sports needing to be streamed live. It's a money cow waiting to be milked.

Re:And so it begins... (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638120)

And it's particularly sad to see a country like Finland, traditionally pretty strong on free speech and consumer rights, sink to this level. Of course, the Finnish reputation for has become somewhat tarnished in recent years, with the unfortunate prosecution of Jussi Halla-aho [wikipedia.org] , and the government's increasing deference to the EU and U.S. on intellectual property issues.

Well, atleast the ISp in question is prepared to fight the decision as long as it takes, that's gotta be worth something IMHO. In general ISPs are quite consumer-friendly here and often willing to pursue freedom of speech.

Re:And so it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638744)

From the beginnings of the "Public" Internet I assumed it was a matter of months/years before everything would be blocked/paywalled/censored.
(that's why I was compelled to download a bunch of stuff: store it and enjoy later when downloading is not possible anymore)

I wouldn't say that after-all it's not the case, just that the corporations were slower than I expected ;)

Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (-1, Flamebait)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637440)

SOPA's an overreaching law, but the The Pirate Bay is one of the main reasons to justify international Internet black holes. SOPA could be called "IDMCA" with the "I" standing for International. It takes the same down-the-server approach as the original law, and the media industry has been successful in getting DMCA-like counterparts passed.

There's a lot wrong with SOPA, but something needs to be done to get rid of TPB.... they're a group of outlaws that has to be stopped.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (4, Insightful)

DC2088 (2343764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637508)

No, they're a torrent tracker. I'm sure you could compile a list of individual users and bother them, though.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637810)

You are nitpicking. If you accept that filesharers are outlaws, then sites specifically designed to make filesharing possible are criminal. Even if not by current laws, but in the common sense or morally, if you will. Either you declare file sharing morally OK, or you accept that both individual users and tracker sites are breaking the law. Otherwise your position is much like what everyone likes to hate — finding loopholes in the laws.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (1)

DC2088 (2343764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637910)

Filesharing is not inherently illegal nor immoral. I do not like the fact that the term "filesharing" is being used to mean "exchanging strictly proprietary media." If users utilize your service to exchange proprietary media, that is on them, not you. So, I'm not nitpicking, no.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (2)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637914)

So what you are saying is Blizzard and the UK government [wikipedia.org] are criminal enterprises?

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638216)

No idea about blizzard, but otherwise yes.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637916)

And your playing semantics. Making needles don't make you responsible for the people injecting illegal drugs or the people who peddle them. A torrent site can be used purely for legitimate reasons.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (1)

DC2088 (2343764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637962)

Brief addendum to my response: Your complaint seems to be akin to "Car owners are speeding and street racing in your vehicles. If these are criminal acts, then so is your manufacturing plant."

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (2)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637996)

Actually, in the common sense or morally, file sharing is MORAL. We share everything, we share air, food, language, knowledge, laws, expeience, etc.... EVERYTHING. And what is funny is if you go to elementary schools you will see this: SHARING IS CARING, so are we teaching our kids something IMMORAL? Nevertheless, instead of calling your common sense, there is actually pretty well documented and tried argument of why sharing is good, and why the copyright was introduced into society in the first place. Translated, just for once try to read some history, and stop "sharing" your half-baked immoral ideas.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638312)

Actually they're not even that, just a repository of .torrent files. The tracker has been offline for quite some time now.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637550)

Sorry but Harry Potter made 1.3b at the box office, forgive me for not feeling sorry for those filthy greedy Jews in the film industry. TPB does very little harm to the film industry.

As for the software industry last time I check Microsoft though got bitch slapped by the EU and so unfortunately DIDNT have the chance to literally takeover the world STILL isn't doing too badly.

That's right there are lots of people out there brain washed into thinking that piracy takes jobs and funds organized crime.

people like you are our problem. (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637610)

so the minority groups that are wanting to control the society for their own profit, want to remove activities of a certain group. and your solution for that is, removing that group ?

boy. i dont know what to say - lucky us, because people like you did not constitute the majority in enlightened segments of society in history so that we were able to progress............ or, stupid you, because you think that removing piratebay would make those minority groups stop trying to control you.

Re:Pirate Bay to blame for SOPA (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638002)

Right, and women are to blame for being raped, because they dressed provocatively, right?

Whatever pirate bay did or didn't do is irrelevant. SOPA rapes the internet.

I certainly hope they don't think.. (5, Funny)

DC2088 (2343764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637490)

... that the matter is Finnished...

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637542)

I just upgraded my Firefox to version 9.0.1

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637710)

Elisa has been forced to block several domains

Is it because of forced to block several domains that you say the matter is Finnished?

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (2)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637870)

... that the matter is Finnished...

Nor way is this over.

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (3, Funny)

DC2088 (2343764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637936)

Cripes, I can't think of any puns. That's what I get for Russian myself.

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (1)

jovius (974690) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638050)

In Soviet Russia, puns think of you!

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (4, Funny)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638218)

We should offer a bounty to Sweden the pot. Iraq my brains to think of puns, but Israel hard.

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638290)

Den mark this as Finnished cause although the ISP Es stoniaed, in the end, the judge will be kick in the Nether lands where the sun don't shine.

Re:I certainly hope they don't think.. (2)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638594)

Perhaps donating some money will Sweden the pot?

as expected... (1)

hene (866198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637572)

AnonFinland is attacking Antipiracy.fi and more is coming, they say.

Re:as expected... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637672)

This will change everything

Re:as expected... (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638810)

Or at least prove slightly amusing. Taking down a website wouldn't do much, but you know Anonymous's history of somehow getting their hands on confidential data... maybe something incriminating will leak.

Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637598)

At last something is being done, not just said.

...and a non-Pirate Bay related site got censored. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38637692)

One of the blocked addresses is http://piraattilahti.fi/ (piratebay.fi if you translate it directly). This address, however, does not direct to Pirate Bay. It directs to the same address as effi.org. This is the website of EFF's Finnish cousin, Electronic Frontier Finland.

If this hasn't changed recently, you can only ask how incompetent were the people who implemented the censorship here.

Re:...and a non-Pirate Bay related site got censor (2)

hene (866198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637766)

piraattilahti.fi is not blocked

Re:...and a non-Pirate Bay related site got censor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38639524)

Technically not, but piraattilahti.fi doesn't resolve using Elisa's name servers.

Unfortunately (3, Informative)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637720)

This will include those of us who dont torrent music/movies/games. Some of us torrent to correct social injustices, like having to buy a $100, 100 megabyte program to play blu-rays on the blu-ray drive I legally purchased.

Slightly OT but... (1, Funny)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637858)

Analysis from Torrent Freak shows

I more than LOL'ed but not quite ROFPIMP.

EU laws (3, Insightful)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#38637894)

I'm curious about the legality of blocking another EU site, it is contrary to the single market.

A Finn checking in.. (5, Informative)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638074)

It appears that the block isn't functional yet. I can normally access thepiratebay.org. It's rather hilarious, as I am greeted with a demotivational poster featuring the "sponsor" of the legal action by IFPI.

By the way, if anyone in IFPI is reading: FUCK YOU IFPI YOU USELESS PIECE OF SHIT! HOPE THE INEVITABLE NEW TIMES WIPE YOU UNDER THE GROUND WHERE YOU ALWAYS BELONGED!
Thank you for reading. Also, if you do work for IFPI, please consider a more honourable profession, such as drug trafficking or prostitution.

Re:A Finn checking in.. (2)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638334)

Another Finn. To me the ban seems to be active. The DNS won't resolve TPB.

Re:A Finn checking in.. (1)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638446)

I am currently in Aalto's premises. I don't know which provider they use.

Fuck, this makes me sad :(

Re:A Finn checking in.. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638346)

I may be on a different ISP, but I'm getting a NXDOMAIN and a routing failure there. No sign of redirection to any web pages mentioning IFPI.

Same Finn checking in from home... (1)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 2 years ago | (#38639494)

in my previous post (parent of this) I mentioned that I had still access to TPB. Well that was from our academic network - not sure who the provider is.
Now I am at home, and we use DNA (which, apparently, isn't quite the same as Elisa), and I still can access TPB without issues.

This is strange, because I was under the impression that almost all providers (DNA included) use Elisa's WAN network infrastructure.

So does this mean... (0, Redundant)

mknewman (557587) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638178)

That they are Finnished?

Re:So does this mean... (2)

need4mospd (1146215) | more than 2 years ago | (#38638794)

I don't know, but this joke sure is...

google translate bypasses the blockade (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638392)

Funnily enough if you use google translate and enter thepiratebay.org it'll work just fine. Even translated to finnish as a bonus.

Expect them to block google next...

Easily bypassed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638532)

All of these "blockages" are easily bypassed by using either commercial or free VPN's that are located in a country that isn't blocking the sources. What happens is that the clueless (lawyers, judges, media conglomerates) just make it a bit more inconvenient for everyone.

This is a good thing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38638682)

I'm sure Lady Gaga and Tom Cruise will see HUGE increases in their paychecks, now that all Elisa customers are in line in front of Anttila, to buy culture on CD!

I accidentaly switched to Sonera last month, so I still have hope :D

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