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Martian Rocks Land In Morocco

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the never-been-jealous-of-morocco-before dept.

Mars 95

Hugh Pickens writes "Scientists have confirmed chemically a recent and rare invasion from Mars with 15 pounds of fresh Martian rocks falling in Morocco last July. A special committee of meteorite experts, which includes some NASA scientists, confirmed the test results Tuesday certifying that the meteorites recently collected came from Mars. The biggest rock weighs more than 2 pounds. Astronomers think that millions of years ago something big smashed into Mars that sent fragments hurtling through the solar system. Occasionally, some fall on Earth."

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No tripods? (3, Funny)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38731670)

Ok, someone had to say it.

The chances of anything coming from Mars... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38731690)

are a million to one, he said.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38731738)

But still, they come.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (0)

TheInternetGuy (2006682) | more than 2 years ago | (#38731884)

This is the problem with any probability that is not time quantified. I often see the same problem when people are discussing earth quakes tsunamis, nuclear accidents and so on.

If the odds are a million to one for something happening during a life-time or a year , second is very different.

If the odds are a million to one for something to happen every millionth second, one might assume that said event will occur rather frequently

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (5, Informative)

Ransom1969 (786580) | more than 2 years ago | (#38731996)

These folks are quoting War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells, InternetGuy. It's a joke.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (1)

TheInternetGuy (2006682) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732304)

I realized that they were quoting something, didn't know it was War of the Worlds but thought it was some new meme thanks.

The points about non time quantified probabilities still stand though.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732456)

> I realized that they were quoting something, didn't know it was War of the Worlds but thought it was some new meme thanks.

It wasn't before, but it probably is now.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (2)

TheInternetGuy (2006682) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732928)

>It wasn't before, but it probably is now.

In the whispering voice of Sir David Attenborough:

- What we are witnessing here is something truly amazing. Be real quiet now and you will see how a new internet meme is born into this world. The interesting thing about these memes, is that no one knows when they are born, how long they will live, but some have been known to be kept a live for extended periods of time in protected environments such as Slashdot. The chances of actually witnessing the birth of a meme, is so very rare it might just happen once in a million.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (1)

quenda (644621) | more than 2 years ago | (#38738192)

It wasn't before, but it probably is now.

The chances of this becoming a new internet meme are ... inconceivable!

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732490)

No-one hams it up like Phil Lynott and David Essex. I got the Live version for christmas and it's utter pants compared to the original.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (1)

DarthBart (640519) | more than 2 years ago | (#38734394)

Meh. Nothing beats Jeff Wayne's musical version. Richard Burton *is* the Journalist as far as I'm concerned and the invasion cannot happen without Justin Hayward doing the vocals.

Re:The chances of anything coming from Mars... (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 2 years ago | (#38734596)

Ooooo-Laaah

Re:No tripods? (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732930)

Ok, someone had to say it.

As long as Tom Cruise isn't involved I'm ok with it.

Re:No tripods? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733166)

Lose Tom, keep Dakota.

Re:No tripods? (2)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733016)

Nope, dipods. Budget cuts.

Re:No tripods? (2)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733290)

> Nope, dipods. Budget cuts.

"This Thing I saw! How can I describe it? A monstrous tripod, higher than many houses, striding over... no wait... bipod... Staggering over... Aaaand, it just fell down. As a war machine, that doesn't seem very practical."

Darned budget cuts.

Re:No tripods? (2)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733316)

Note that humans are dipod/bipod walkers, and we don't fall down, except maybe Gerold Ford.

Re:No tripods? (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733578)

Nor are we three stories tall.

Re:No tripods? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38734472)

*You're* not, maybe.

(on an unrelated note, when is Zappos finally going to start carrying size 55s?)

Re:No tripods? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38743304)

Welcome to Slashdot, Shaq!

Re:No tripods? (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#38735470)

Nope, dipods. Budget cuts.

iPods then.

They are evil, I've seen their little white tentacles creeping into people's brains and making them act like twitchy zombies.

Re:No tripods? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38742704)

No tripods. But definitely more rock-o's.

They Certainly Do Get Around (5, Funny)

sehlat (180760) | more than 2 years ago | (#38731684)

"Like Webster's Dictionary They're Morocco Bound..."

Re:They Certainly Do Get Around (0)

Kittenman (971447) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732006)

Or, like a complete set of Shakespeare you buy at the corner drugstore for 1.98 ... (I'm here for you ...)

Re:They Certainly Do Get Around (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732904)

my dictionaries are bound in Fine Corinthian Leather

Re:They Certainly Do Get Around (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38735482)

So is your mother!

The chances of anything coming from mars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38731688)

... are a million to one, but still, they come!

cheaper than... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38731694)

phobos grunt I guess... probably pours salt into the wounds of the russian space program.

Organized trolling campaign on Slashdot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38731882)

GreatBunzinni [slashdot.org] has been posting anonymous accusations [slashdot.org] listing a whole bunch of people as being part of some marketing campaign for Microsoft. He has accidentally outed himself [slashdot.org] as this anonymous poster, and half the accounts he lists don't even post pro-Microsoft rhetoric. In fact, the theme of the accounts seems to be that they have been critical of Google at some point in the past.

That's not the problem. The problem is that moderators gave him +5 Informative and are regularly modding down these people, even for legitimate posts. Metamoderation is supposed to address this problem and filter out the bad moderators, but clearly it's not working.

This "shill" crap that has been flying around lately has to stop It's restricting certain viewpoints from participating on the site and creating an echo chamber.

Re:Organized trolling campaign on Slashdot (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732314)

And your solution to this is to post more anonymous accusations?

And people wonder... (-1)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38731966)

Why we doubt climate scientists...

Seriously, how the heck do they know these rocks came from Mars? Why couldn't they be from some asteroid that passed by and hit the moon. I mean the moon is full of craters, so I assume it's been hit once or twice. And I'm sure a good hit could have sent such debris into long orbits.

This is like me finding a pair of old eye glasses and exclaiming they must have been Ben Franklins since he wore eye glasses.

Re:And people wonder... (5, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732106)

It takes a special kind of person to assume they're making blind judgements (like yourself) and not acting with evidence.

how the heck do they know these rocks came from Mars?

Who knows? We could find out, but you've already concluded that they're just making shit up so there's no point to investigating I suppose.

I mean the moon is full of craters, so I assume it's been hit once or twice. And I'm sure a good hit could have sent such debris into long orbits.

Lunar rocks have a very well known composition. I'm sure it's possible to discern between Lunar, Earth, Martian, and non-planetary rocks. But you've got no clue how nor have you looked up any possible means of identifying them so it's all just hokum, right?

This is like me finding a pair of old eye glasses and exclaiming they must have been Ben Franklins since he wore eye glasses.

Is it really? Do you suppose they would do something so stupid, when they could readily be countered?

My brain hurts now. Thanks.

Re:And people wonder... (3, Informative)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732484)

Don't get me wrong, I agree with you. That said, it is worthwhile to question so-called experts to find out how they came to their conclusions, rather than saying, "Gosh, he's smarter than me--he's get letters after his name and everything!" At the very least, you learn something.

Of course, if he had RTFA, he might have a clue about how these people determined that these rocks came from Mars:

Scientists can tell when meteorites are from Mars because they know what the Martian atmosphere is made of, thanks to numerous probes sent there. The chemical signature of the rocks and the Martian air match, Irving said. Another clue is that because planets like Mars are more geologically active, its rocks tend to be much younger - millions of years old instead of hundreds of millions or more - than those from the moon or asteroids.

So, no, it's not like they said, "A rock fell from the sky! It must have been from Mars!"

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732772)

Another clue is that because planets like Mars are more geologically active?

Wha..?
More geologically active than what?
Another baseless comparison, methinks

captcha: 'obvious'

Re:And people wonder... (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733028)

for fuck's sake, it's not at all worthwhile for scientists to have to spend most of their time with politics.

peer review exists so [b]actual scientists[/b] can question results, rather than wasting everybody's time asking questions that were answered years ago, but the people asking the questions are too dumb and lazy to look up themselves (and develop the background necessary to understand the citations).

the sheer fucking arrogance of people to think they, with their complete lack of expertise, should be afforded equal time and effort to what the peer review process gets.

if scientists had to behave like politicians, they'd have achieved exactly as much as politicians - we'd still be poking each other with bronze tipped spears, and that only if the uninitiated could grasp the advantage of alloying copper and tin.

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38733554)

I used to peer review, but then I took an arrow to the knee

Re:And people wonder... (2)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733802)

Yes, because we all know that scientists never error and always agree.

Science is not some priesthood that never has to explain to the people who pay their salaries, and need merely agree with themselves. If their explanation can't be communicated to your average college educated person than perhaps they have to rethink it.

The chemical signature of the rocks and the Martian air match

How many core samples of Mars do we have to determine the atmosphere centuries ago when these rocks were supposedly blasted from the martian surface? What the composition of the atmosphere is today has nothing to do with conditions at that time unless you assume an absolutely static planet.

Mars are more geologically active, its rocks tend to be much younger

How can you determine the age of a rock that was blasted from the surface by a meteor strike without resort to sample from the surrounding area. Such huge impacts can mimic a more recent formation as the rock is essentially melted and reformed in the ejecta.

These scientists are GUESSING, and the others come along and use their guesses as a basis for claims that can't be proven, and which is all based on the original conjecture. There isn't a single rock on earth that can be stated with absolute certainty to have come from Mars. All we have is hard to explain rocks being found in hard to explain places.

There were firm conclusion about the surface of the moon that were proven utterly false upon the return of moon rocks. The entire field of study was re-written by the return of the moon rocks. [cosmosmagazine.com] The history of Mars as we know it has been largely rewritten since the several landers have touched down. And still we are dealing with this planet at the end of a sensor stack, with no real material in hand.

There is arrogance here, but its not to be found in the common man in the street asking questions. Its in the assumptions and flat out assertions that can't be proven, the utter arrogance of denying any responsibility to offer an explanation on the grounds that scientists are some how above having to do that.

Hib! Hub! Hoop! How! (1)

eyenot (102141) | more than 2 years ago | (#38738794)

That does it! We HAVE to invade Mars if we're going to defeat these phantoms! Blow it all up!

Re:And people wonder... (1, Insightful)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733168)

Okay, so let's see. Mars is a large rock. Big enough to have atmosphere. What is Mars' atmosphere made up of? Mars rock.

So let's say an asteroid that was formed in our solar system is of similar material to Mars. Oh, but Mars has activity, what's this mean. Melted rock? magma from it's core?

What similarities would exist in a rock that came from a collision of asteroids made up of similar material (which is probably fairly likely) as Mars?

Just saying...

Mind you, I'm not saying the rocks are not from Mars. But I really don't think we've got the data to make such conclusions. And I tend to chalk it up to "I want to get published Mommy".

It's the matter of "case closed" we're not open to alternatives or other thoughts. That's what I'm getting sick of. It's not the science I studied as a kid. Sure you could postulate an idea, test it, conclude that there was a potentiality. But in a game this big, such absolutes are in my book foolish.

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38735306)

Cut them a slack, man! Guy's trying to make a living! You think it's easy being an astrogeologist? How many wanted ads for astrogeologists do you see in your local newspaper?

Re:And people wonder... (1)

mr_lizard13 (882373) | more than 2 years ago | (#38736692)

Mind you, I'm not saying the rocks are not from Mars. But I really don't think we've got the data to make such conclusions. And I tend to chalk it up to "I want to get published Mommy".

It's the matter of "case closed" we're not open to alternatives or other thoughts. That's what I'm getting sick of. It's not the science I studied as a kid. Sure you could postulate an idea, test it, conclude that there was a potentiality. But in a game this big, such absolutes are in my book foolish.

I can't tell if you're trolling or being stupid. I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you're not trolling.

You might not have the data, but the scientist team did. Thanks to their work we know the chemical composition of Mars rock. It's distinctive from Earth rock and moon rock. There is conclusive proof that these rocks are from Mars. What have you got up your sleeve that suggests the findings of this study are flawed?

As for the science you studied at school - I'm glad I didn't attend the same school as you. Science seeks to find the truth - it does so without being discriminative, and it does so conclusively. Anything can have "potentiality" - it's scientific study that allows us to prove.

If you have something to discredit this study, then by all means, let's all take a look.

Re:And people wonder... (1)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733004)

Happens all the time....people like a name. Hype is the game. It's what brings in the grant money and tenure.

So YES, absolutely. I believe that on mere conjecture of some similarities between - oh wait. We don't have any Martian rocks to test here on Earth.

Oh but we do have some rovers who've tested some aspects of Martian soil. See x & y is in both the rock we found on earth and in Mars.

Therefore, we know in our smartness that this is Martian.

Heck, the assumptions of how solar systems are arranged are being shattered. And are turning out to be different than we've hypothesized.

No, this is junk science. There is NOT enought data to make such a conclusion. To claim "this rock came from off planet, either an asteroid debris, or perhaps blown off from a nearby neighboring planet".

That I CAN accept...

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38742784)

Congratulations! You are the most moronic idiot ever to grace the surface of this planet. Just because you are too stupid and lazy to study things or even look them up on Google, doesn't mean that scientists who, uh, do science for a living, share your stupendous lack of intellect.

Re:And people wonder... (1)

cthulhu11 (842924) | more than 2 years ago | (#38735416)

Is it really? Do you suppose they would do something so stupid, when they could readily be countered?

While I do accept that we have meteorites that originated on various other bodies, in answer to the above I have to write "Why not? The Chinese regularly fake fossils".

Re:And people wonder... (5, Insightful)

omganton (2554342) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732136)

"Scientists have confirmed chemically..." This seems to sum it up pretty well. The constituents of Mars differ from that of Earth, the Moon, or any other rocky entity that we scan, test or study. We know the Moon was once a part of Earth because it shares similar chemical makeup to that of Earth. That being said, the eons that have passed, and more precisely, the organic alterations that have taken place on Earth have modified the chemical makeup of Earth's crust enough to differentiate between a sample collected here or there. While it could be coincidence, you could equate this to finding a MacDonald's cup across the street from McDonald's. Could it have come from another McDonald's? Sure, but it probably came from the closest one, and it sure as hell didn't come from the Burger King down the street.

Re:And people wonder... (1)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733092)

We know the Moon was once a part of Earth because it shares similar chemical makeup to that of Earth.

Really, I am sure there are quite a few who will debate that fact. And if we visit and asteroid and determine it has similar chemical make-up. Must we conclude the asteroid came from Earth as well?

Or would it make more sense to conclude that it was a collection of mass that was available in our solar system. And not necessary derived from our little body of rock at all?

Re:And people wonder... (1)

omganton (2554342) | more than 2 years ago | (#38734358)

It's not a matter of what it's made of, it's a matter of how much of each constituent is present.

Much of the matter on Mars and Earth are similar, however the proportions are different. We know that any rock that has been on Mars for any great length of time (relative to the solar system) will have a certain percentage of certain chemical compounds due to the entropy of the matter and atmosphere. The same can be said for Earth, Mercury or any other rocky body that we have data on.

The Moon is a special circumstance, as it shared the Earth's entropy for a very long time prior to the great impact that dislodged the matter that eventually coalesced into Earth's rings and subsequent Moon. Because the chemical makeup and percentage of chemical compounds of the Moon is similar to that of Earth prior to organic life, we can assume it's local origin.

You said " if we visit and asteroid and determine it has similar chemical make-up. Must we conclude the asteroid came from Earth as well?" - if this ever happened, we might assume it came from Earth. You've never heard of this because it's never happened. We've found hundreds of thousands of meteorites and asteroids that have the same basic compounds as Earth, but none that share a makeup consistent with that of Earth. This is because they came from the same pile of matter the the solar system formed from, but they're evolutionary chain progressed differently.

Re:And people wonder... (1)

Buddy the WIld Geek (978961) | more than 2 years ago | (#38738386)

There are traces of Kryptonite and Vibranium running through them. MUST be from somewhere else.

rock gas inclusions exactly match Mars atmosphere (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 2 years ago | (#38738792)

Mars is mostly CO2 and argon measured from Viking landerss. This is pretty distinctive for the solar system.

Re:And people wonder... (5, Informative)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732232)

Because of their composition, numbnuts. You know, inorganic chemistry is a good place to start.

Start here.

https://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=en&q=mars+meteorites+minerals [google.com]

http://www.imca.cc/mars/martian-meteorites.htm [www.imca.cc]

Try reading something for a change instead of immediately dismissing things you don't instantly understand.

--
BMO

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732620)

Oh. Yeah, good answer.

The rest of us just figured they were bright red.

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732662)

Try reading something for a change instead of immediately dismissing things you don't instantly understand.

--
BMO

Why use your brain when you can Duckspeak?

Re:And people wonder... (2)

mug funky (910186) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733076)

why take advice that could enrich your life when you could check the post AC button and be a douchebag?

Re:And people wonder... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38733958)

No no no!
It's a perfectly valid question. What's so unique about the chemical composition of a rock from Mars that one could categorically say that it came from that planet and no other source?

Mars is an aggregate of rocks from the early solar system, so why wouldn't some of those rocks still be freely drifting around in our solar system? Also, Mars was practically smashed in half in it's early years, why wouldn't it be some of that rubble still floating around?

I've heard it numerous times now that meteorite is "definitely from Mars". One of these times I'd like to hear why they are so sure.

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38736180)

Maybe you should read up on the formation of the solar system, if you are that interested. And while you are at it you may continue reading on the classification of meteorites. But it is just easier to just play dumb and vent you uninformed arse on Slashdot, isn't? Stop expecting everyone to shovel everything down your throat and put some effort in it yourself. This information is all readily available and scientists (or the press for that matter) are not obligated to repeat the basics of their discipline in every article they write just you can wrap your head around it, which wouldn't help anyway.

Re:And people wonder... (1)

kirillart (1111591) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732250)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_meteorite [wikipedia.org] : "These meteorites are thought to be from Mars because they have elemental and isotopic compositions that are similar to rocks and atmosphere gases analyzed by spacecraft on Mars."

Re:And people wonder... (3, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732998)

how the heck do they know these rocks came from Mars?

Well, the "Made on Mars" label is one clue.
   

Re:And people wonder... (1)

Ravon Rodriguez (1074038) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733090)

This is like me finding a pair of old eye glasses and exclaiming they must have been Ben Franklins since he wore eye glasses.

No, it's like you finding a pair of old eye glasses, and exclaiming they must have been Ben Franklin's because they look like glasses he was known to wear, they date to the right time, and have the inscription "BF" on them. Could the scientists be wrong? Sure, but the best evidence suggests that these are in fact Martian rocks.

Re:And people wonder... (1)

reasterling (1942300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38735198)

Obviously, the rocks are red.

Re:And people wonder... (2)

RockDoctor (15477) | more than 2 years ago | (#38736518)

Do you remember when you were in junior school (under-11 age ; whatever you call it in your society) and the nice teacher said "here is your assignment of homework to be done before Friday's lesson in X" (for various values of "X").

And you didn't do do your homework ; you came up with some pathetic excuse like blaming it on your dog digging your granny up so you had to have yet another granny-funeral. And the nice Ms Teacher castigated you in front of the class, calling you a lazy little so-and-so. And you felt bullied by Ms Teacher's unreasonable behaviour, and complained to Mummykins and Daddykins, who came to the school with their friend Mr Expensive from the company of Landshark and Ambulance-Chaser, Attorneys-at-Law ; and the expensive Mr Expensive forced Ms Teacher to apologise to you in front of the class and to pay him lots of money (a little money going to Mummykins and Daddykins, and a smidgin going to you).

Well the teacher was right ; you, Mummykins and Daddykins, and Mr Expensive were all in the wrong (though it's just barely credible that only Mr Expensive knew that at the time). You should have learned to do your fucking homework.

Now, in the words that the nice Ms Teacher should have used back then, "Fuck off and do your homework, you lazy little shit."

I love the smell of education in the morning. [SFX : Ride of the Valkyries.]

Re:And people wonder... (1)

mjr167 (2477430) | more than 2 years ago | (#38737276)

These rocks were stamped "Made on Mars."

Re:And people wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38742634)

And again, ladies and gentlemen, a moron displays his ignorance. Note the breathtaking arrogance of this imbecile making sweeping statements about things he knows absolutely nothing.

The mind boggles. Please, Dear God, let him not procreate.

It seems, (4, Funny)

popeye44 (929152) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732052)

They put one heck of a throwing arm on those Rovers.

Re:It seems, (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733052)

They were aiming for Venus, you insensitive clod!

FOOLS!!! (2)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732094)

THAT'S NO ROCK!!!

(Ok, rest of you reply with some good stuff - I've got nothing)

Re:FOOLS!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732138)

It's martian fecal matter! #amidoingitright

Re:FOOLS!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732836)

ACK! Ack ack ack ackACK ack Ack ACK ack ack!

Re:FOOLS!!! (1)

TheInternetGuy (2006682) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733000)

Its a bit in a very slow martian communications technology. Slow is of course relative, it is lightning fast to the stone-martians.

Mars Attacks! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732132)

K'Breel Jr. addresses the Council:

"Council Members, Friends, Countrymen, Dad: A few Solar orbits ago, we set about on a secret project on the feasibility of attacking the Blue World, using a plan ("Robert Heinlein - The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress") devised by the Blue Worlders themselves. Today I am happy to report that our plan is a smashing success; we have dropped a few test rocks on a place called Morocco. The next phase of our plan involves more rocks, and much heavier rocks, aimed at all of the Blue World's space launching facilities! Glory to Mars! Glory to the Council! Glory to K'Breel!"

Sound like a moive from 2010 (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732156)

Re:Sound like a moive from 2010 (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733032)

Or 1953

Had to.. (0)

RdeCourtney (2034578) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732286)

Had to be done... I for one welcome our Martian rock throwing overlords...

Re:Had to.. (2)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733120)

No! You shouldn't condone the throwing of overlords via solidified minerals. The overlords get bruised up and really ticked.

When? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732294)

Okay, how do they know that the "big smash" happened millions of years ago? Why not a few thousand years ago? Nobody documented it, anyway.

Re:When? (1)

mug funky (910186) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733104)

orbits and things. it's amazing what you can do with mathematics. like CSI finding where a bullet came from in a musical montage with sticks and lasers and low-cut tops.

Re:When? (2)

eyenot (102141) | more than 2 years ago | (#38738848)

so they did a freeze frame, zoom in, and enhance on the rock and found the little sign that says "made in mars".

Re:When? (2)

mug funky (910186) | more than 2 years ago | (#38744148)

finest quality!

superior workmanship!

Some-one should inform them the world is not flat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38732548)

It is completely improbable that a stone fell off Mars (maybe one of the Martians through it at earth), what is far more probable is the meteor has been traveling through space from origin unknown.

Re:Some-one should inform them the world is not fl (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733106)

When something rather big hits a rocky planet, such as Earth, or Mars, it ejects quite a bit of rock up into the air. If the impact was hard enough, some of that rock can even be hurtled clear out of orbit.

I've heard it suggested that even Olympus Mons, with its enormous size, could have ejected immeasurable amounts of Martian rock material into outer space itself when it was still an active volcano as well.

It's chemical composition suggests a Martian origin. It's possible it came from somewhere else, but not terribly likely.

Obligatory (3, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#38732952)

In Soviet Russia, Mars lands on you.

Mmm...Martian Rocks... (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733612)

...I can't wait to put them in some wine [slashdot.org] .

Look, up in the sky! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38733656)

"Are we going to Addis Abbaba, Mr. Luthor?"

Chemically Proven? (1)

guitardood (934630) | more than 2 years ago | (#38733664)

I'll bet if we took blood samples we could confirm chemically that somebody's been smoking the ganj. Exactly how in the hell do they know that these rocks that fell from the sky were specifically from Mars? Why not the moon? Venus? Saturn? Shoe-Levy? Oh so sick of these people with their pronouncement of speculation as science fact. I think I should start smoking the ganj.

Re:Chemically Proven? (1)

AlecC (512609) | more than 2 years ago | (#38736352)

They came from somewhere with an atmosphere chemically very similar to Mars. You can tell rocks that have been in an atmosphere from those that have only been in vacuum, and roughly what sort of atmosphere. There is only one place in the solar system with an atmosphere like that. The only alternative is the much wilder one that they crossed interstellar space from a Mars-like planet elsewhere.

Re:Chemically Proven? (1)

Muad'Dave (255648) | more than 2 years ago | (#38739766)

Plus, IIRC, scientists have worked out a gravitational mechanism by which the rocks could have actually made the journey from Mars to Earth. The odds of them coming from elsewhere are very low given transit constraints.

Meteorite Men (0)

Grand Facade (35180) | more than 2 years ago | (#38734188)

must have been really bummed out they did not find them...

Uhm.... Nasa's new budgetary compliment (1)

axlr8or (889713) | more than 2 years ago | (#38734212)

Now, the stuff we want to look at, will eventually just come to us.

Red Planet Rocker (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38734576)

"Martian Rocks Land In Morocco", yup. The little green dude totally killed opening for the Black Keys.
Ambiguous headlines, gotta love 'em.

Martian (1)

luk3Z (1009143) | more than 2 years ago | (#38735562)

So are we martians ?

The Chances of Anything Coming From Mars (1)

stoicio (710327) | more than 2 years ago | (#38737414)

The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one. ....But still they come....

Inverse Theorem:Earth rocks on Mars...Life? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38738482)

This opens the door to the possibility that rocks from Earth could likewise end up on Mars, rocks containing organic material. I'm in no way saying this is proof of that, only that examining how rocks from Mars make it to Earth, could point us to understanding trans planetary pollination. Knowing how often things like this happen would be a correlation to the probability of life on Mars.

Re:Inverse Theorem:Earth rocks on Mars...Life? (1)

cusco (717999) | more than 2 years ago | (#38742352)

The Planetary Society had included a life experiment in the Phobos Grunt mission that just failed. It included tartigrades, fungi, extremophiles, bacteria, and I think some yeasts. The idea was to send it to Mars and back, and check on the viability of the organisms when Phobos Grunt returned. Now all they get to check is how well their container and its contents survive an uncontrolled re-entry.

Something big smashed into Mars (1)

Jeff Archambeault (41488) | more than 2 years ago | (#38740270)

The entrance wound is Hellas Basin and the exit wound is in the neighborhood of Olympus Mons/Tharsis neighborhood.

Deimos is prolly some mars guts, and the projectile is still inside.

Let's see that in CSI graphics!

Are these martian rocks look like theese ones ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38743632)

Mysterious metal ball from space falls in Namibia
December 22nd, 2011
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/12/22/mysterious-metal-ball-from-space-falls-in-namibia/

Other similar cases not in the DIA documents were reported in Argentina and Mexico:

The ‘Space Balls’ – A case of mistaken identity
Dec 27, 2011
http://www.openminds.tv/the-space-balls-a-case-of-mistaken-identity-854/

The Mysterious Case of Two Spheres Falling to Earth in Australia and Brazil
March 28, 2008
http://www.universetoday.com/13387/the-mysterious-case-of-two-spheres-falling-to-earth-in-australia-and-brazil/

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