×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Teens Share Passwords As a Form of Intimacy

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the generation-share dept.

Privacy 533

nonprofiteer writes "The New York Times claims that the hot new trend among teenagers in love is to share passwords to their email and Facebook accounts, as the ultimate form of trust. According to Pew, 33% of teens surveyed say they do this. One expert says the pressure to share passwords is akin to the pressure to have sex. Forbes says don't do it! 'There is something pure and romantic about the idea of sharing everything, and having no secrets from one another. But it's romantic the same way that Romeo and Juliet is romantic, in a tragic, horrible, everyone-is-miserable-and-dies-at-the-end kind of way.' Sam Biddle at Gizmodo writes about which passwords are okay to share (like Netflix), but says to stay away from handing over email or Facebook passwords. 'We all need whatever scraps of privacy we have left, and your email is just that.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

533 comments

You don't understand, I LOVE HIM!!! (5, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749494)

You're just a jealous bitch, mom! You don't understand that Daniel and me are going to last FOREVER!! I HATE YOU!!! I HATE YOU!!

Re:You don't understand, I LOVE HIM!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749788)

Does this outcome occur before or after the significant other has had time to open a new account on DeFacedBook.com?

How many 'tragically' lost PhaseBook accounts will it take before FaceBook offers a biometric option for account recovery?

Re:You don't understand, I LOVE HIM!!! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749816)

"Honey, he just wants to sleep with you to get your password. Just give him a blow job and leave him. That'll show him!"

Re:You don't understand, I LOVE HIM!!! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38750012)

Clearly her password is "omgi3>daniel"

Netflix (4, Interesting)

ShakaUVM (157947) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749500)

Wait, it's okay to share your Netflix password...?

I can think of at least three reasons why that's a bad idea.

Re:Netflix (1)

ryanov (193048) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749632)

Yeah, and unnecessary. What is the positive here?

Re:Netflix (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749768)

Yeah, and unnecessary. What is the positive here?

Whooo! Who put that movie in my queue?

For the Lulz, of course...

Re:Netflix (4, Insightful)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749906)

There is no real positive here. This is just like sending naked photos of yourself to your bf/gf. It makes no damn sense to *give* someone blackmail material on you that can be copied easily and posted for the whole world to see if they get pissed at you. They do it because there is the short term feeling of trust shared between them, but with no conception of the long term consequences involved. In a way it's like the Romeo and Juliet syndrome: even though we have never had another relationship, we know we are perfect for one another, so you're not allowed to take any precautions, because otherwise it means you don't actually love me. You have to go whatever extreme I do, because we are in True Love, whether that be giving away passwords or committing suicide.

tl;dr: Teens think because they know more than babies do that they know everything. They haven't got a clue.

Re:Netflix (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749886)

Wait, it's okay to share your Netflix password...?

I can think of at least three reasons why that's a bad idea.

Well, if they're cohabitating with you, then maybe you do want to share the Netflix password because you want to watch a movie together. That is, unless you set your Netflix client to remember your password for you so your significant other could use Netflix without knowing the password.

Re:Netflix (2)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750028)

Wait, it's okay to share your Netflix password...?
I can think of at least three reasons why that's a bad idea.

Busty Trannies 1 (aka Dude looks like a lady)
Busty Trannies 2 (aka This time she's hung)
Busty Trannies 3 (aka The lady gets his man)

Teens do a lot of dumb stuff. (4, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749510)

Not sure why this is news. There's a reason your record is expunged when you turn 18. Perhaps the same should apply to online accounts.

Re:Teens do a lot of dumb stuff. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749552)

It isnt expunged when you turn 18. It is sealed but still exists and can be accessed depending on the circumstance.

Re:Teens do a lot of dumb stuff. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749868)

Teens do a lot of dumb stuff

Yeah but there is a difference between normal teen stuff like having unprotected sex and stuff that can cause serious harm in their later life like sharing passwords.

Re:Teens do a lot of dumb stuff. (2)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750004)

Bah. When I was a Teen, and I shared my Password as a form of intimacy I would have gotten a response at best "Your such a Nerd!" (Back then a Nerd wasn't good) at worse she would walk away from you, and place a restraining order on you because you were just too weird.

I was an out cast partially because I had an Internet account of my own, with Email. When I explained why I liked it they just looked at me if I was from outer space.

Oddly enough By my Sr. Year things started to change and the Internet stated to become cool, as well I started to become a little more popular, but by that time I was use to being unpopular and I didn't welcome this new popularity.

Let them crash and burn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38750006)

Experience is the best (and sometimes only) teacher.

Forbes says don't do it! (2)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750068)

Yes, thanks Forbes. I'm sure all five of your teen readers will heed your sage advice

TOS (2, Insightful)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749512)

Plus it's usually a thundering Terms of Service violation.

Re:TOS (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749684)

Exactly this. Post all over your Facebook account that you share all your passwords with your BF/GF then see how quickly your credit card company does the weasel dance if you ever have to make a claim for identity fraud. For my sins I did a couple of months working on phone support for the company that supports several large banks/CC companies and their policy was an instant "sorry, goodbye" if you suggested you'd shared your login details or pin number (your heart would sink when they admitted they lost their wallet and their card was in there along with their pin number scribbled on a post-it).

XKCD (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749518)

XKCD covered this years ago http://xkcd.com/215/

Re:XKCD (0)

Eil (82413) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749834)

Um, no? Since when is deleting a user from a system the same thing as giving them your personal passwords?

Re:XKCD (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749934)

you realize there is additional text when you hover the mouse over the picture right?

Organized trolling campaign by GreatBunzinni (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749526)

GreatBunzinni [slashdot.org] has been posting anonymous accusations [slashdot.org] listing a whole bunch of Slashdot accounts as being part of a marketing campaign for Microsoft, without any evidence. GreatBunzinni has accidentally outed himself [slashdot.org] as this anonymous poster. Half the accounts he attacks don't even post pro-Microsoft rhetoric. The one thing they appear to have in common is that they have been critical of Google in the past. GreatBunzinni has been using multiple accounts to post these "shill" accusations, such as Galestar [slashdot.org], NicknameOne [slashdot.org], and flurp [slashdot.org].

That's not the problem. The problem is that moderators gave him +5 Informative and are now modding down the accused, even for legitimate posts. Metamoderation is supposed to address this by filtering out the bad moderators, but clearly it's not working.

This "shill" crap that has been flying around lately has to stop. It's restricting a variety of viewpoints from participating on the site and creating an echo chamber.

Re:Organized trolling campaign by GreatBunzinni (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749688)

Why haven't you fucked yourself yet, faggot?

Re:Organized trolling campaign by GreatBunzinni (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749740)

Do you seriously not see the irony of these stupid posts you keep making?

Re:Organized trolling campaign by GreatBunzinni (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38750062)

Meta-moderation doesn't work well because meta-mods rarely are able or willing to get the full context of the comment or the moderation and will likely be unwilling to intervene. I find when I meta-moderate, I try and mark undeserved Troll and Flamebaits, sometimes Underrateds, but I don't think I have ever voted to call out Insightfuls, and only rarely Informatives (when I know they are wrong about actual, discernible facts).

I could be wrong, though. I don't have enough data to study just how effective a system it actually is, that's just how I see the process working.

I can't remember my husband's passwords (4, Interesting)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749534)

And vice versa. He's a number guy, I'm a language person. So his passwords are long strings of numbers, and mine are long strings of words and symbols.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749638)

I can rest assured that my girlfriend will never remember my oft-used password "Soviet Russia Beowulf Netcraft Libraries of Congress"

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (-1, Flamebait)

ciaohound (118419) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749640)

Hey, baby, I'm a language guy, know what I mean, nudge, nudge.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749766)

*facepalm* And this, my friend, is why so few people here admit to being female.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (4, Insightful)

glodime (1015179) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749824)

She's married, asshole. And if she weren't, I'm sure she didn't come to Slashdot to be facetiously and pseudonymously hit on.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749870)

She probably didn't come here to be earnestly and pseudonymously white-knighted by desperate nerds either, but here you are anyway.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749938)

Usually I just roll my eyes and ignore it, but I wanted to thank you for your gallantry here.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (3, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749822)

Why did you exchange passwords in the first place? There's never a good reason to share passwords. If it ever seems like a good idea to share a password, that's a symptom of a poorly developed user permissions system.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749898)

Why bother with more than one Pandora account when you like the same music?

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (1)

Chris Hodges (670481) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750044)

Sharing an amazon account within the family for kindle content makes a lot of sense - but keep a dedicated account for the purpose.

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (2)

DriedClexler (814907) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749956)

How could a long string of words and symbols be hard to remember? I mean, most of us here are like your husband, but what kind of string are you talking about? What's an example?

Re:I can't remember my husband's passwords (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38750026)

hunter2

There is hope for the future. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749538)

This seems like a good trend in my opinion. After getting burned hardcore in relationships that go bad, maybe people will take password security more seriously by the time they get to the workforrce.

Savages (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749544)

"Civilization is the progress toward a society of privacy. The savage's whole existence is public, ruled by the laws of his tribe. Civilization is the process of setting man free from men."
Ayn Rand

Re:Savages (5, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749804)

"Civilization is the progress toward a society of privacy. The savage's whole existence is public, ruled by the laws of his tribe. Civilization is the process of setting man free from men."
Ayn Rand

Sounds like that woman had a lot of issues. Hope everything worked out for her.

1/3 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749566)

33%? Did they poll 3 teenagers?

MySpace generation (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749582)

I remember countless moronic dramas of high school kids claiming that their MySpace had been "hacked". By which they mean, they'd shared the password with all their friends and acquaintances... and one of their 50 odd fellow schoolmates changed their profile and changed their password.

Surely, though, this should really be a prompt for people to have more intelligent permissions systems for web services. We handle shared bank accounts just fine, so why haven't websites and other online services come up with family accounts, sub-accounts and so on other than as an 'enterprise' feature? Proper security starts at home.

Re:MySpace generation (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749864)

I remember countless moronic dramas of high school kids claiming that their MySpace had been "hacked". By which they mean, they'd shared the password with all their friends and acquaintances... and one of their 50 odd fellow schoolmates changed their profile and changed their password.

Surely, though, this should really be a prompt for people to have more intelligent permissions systems for web services. We handle shared bank accounts just fine, so why haven't websites and other online services come up with family accounts, sub-accounts and so on other than as an 'enterprise' feature? Proper security starts at home.

Sub accounts? At home? For the demographic that couldn't handle setting up a MySpace page so people didn't have seizures viewing it?

Your ideas intrigue me and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Can we just encourage old vices instead? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749584)

I'd much rather my kids be having sex than sharing passwords.

What next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749592)

Pin code and the 3-digit CC security number?

Re:What next? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750064)

That probably cost as much as getting married living together for a time and getting divorced. For every girlfriend.

Remeber kids, stay safe and legal! (5, Interesting)

davidwr (791652) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749600)

Remember kiddies, using your ex-boyfriend's social networking password can be a felony!

Heck, even using your current boyfriend's passwords with his permission may be a felony in certain circumstances, especially if a financial transaction, medical-history-information, or intentional deception of anyone is involved.

Re:Remeber kids, stay safe and legal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749746)

Regardless of content it would still be illegal, even with permission from the significant other. The account provider/site did not give permission, the SO's permission is irrelevant and has no authority.

Re:Remeber kids, stay safe and legal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749832)

Regardless of content it would still be illegal, even with permission from the significant other. The account provider/site did not give permission, the SO's permission is irrelevant and has no authority.

Sharing of passwords, any passwords, is a stupid, stupid idea. You should never do it, under any circumstances.

That said, your attitude is far more dangerous and worrying. The account provider/site has no authority to grant or deny permission to how I share my accounts. The provider is like a bank. The building may be theirs, but the money I deposit is mine. The account is mine. I can do as I please, and will continue to do as I please despite their illusions of power.

It just so happens that I'm not an idiot, so I choose to never share my passwords.

How stupid (3, Insightful)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749602)

And in other news...divorce [divorcerate.org] continues skyrocketing,

Seriously kids, realize that your significant other can lock you out of your own accounts on breakup, and you can't recover everything via your phone #, pretty sure like... netflix, email providers that aren't google.

Re:How stupid (3, Interesting)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749670)

Happened to a friend's family a year or two ago. The husband had control of all the accounts. All of them. So he was quietly siphoning funds from his wife's accounts to his own, without telling her, and then took off one day with over six hundred thousand dollars, leaving her with a thousand in her account with the mortgage payment due in a week. That was a very, very, very messy divorce.

Re:How stupid (1)

maple_shaft (1046302) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749980)

If you don't mind my asking, how did that all turn out for your friend? I have seen it happen where my friends wife up and left him, sabatoged his personal accounts and siphoned off all of his money, and the courts still forced him to pay her alimony despite the fact that he didn't cheat and that she worked.

Re:How stupid (0)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750008)

You know somebody who had $600,000 in CASH sitting around? What... the... fuck. And apparently, money didn't buy happiness in that case. Wow.

Re:How stupid (1)

RazzleFrog (537054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750042)

$600K in cash sitting around and yet this still had a mortgage payment. I wonder what the house is worth that you wouldn't just pay it off.

Re:How stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749928)

Not even getting to divorced. I was a member of a WoW guild "shared" by a couple, and they shared accounts to a degree. Nice people individually, but as a couple? One had a rabid ex. The other was a tad unstable, and ended up having a kid with their during this. They went back to their ex. Safe to say, they finally had enough and broke up.

Nobody is denying it was the unstable person's account who personally kicked everyone in front of witnesses and then disbanded the guild. However, according to said witnesses they didn't say anything at all. Said unstable person two hours earlier was in a manic swing to rejuvenate the guild after it was in a bad spot from the java.

Unstable said the ex thrashed the guild using their account. Everyone knows said person was..., well, unstable and going from manic to destructive is in their personality.

Imagine this being done with your financial or other accounts.

Joint Access (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749616)

Sites should provide a way to allow joint access or multiple passwords. The joint password could have all the power of a regular password, except for the ability to change the master password. The trick is to figure out how to make it look like the joint password is a master password. You could present the holder of the joint password with a fake "change master password" screen, and inform the holder of the master password if they attempt to use it. Of course you'd only need to do this if the other person said something like, "No, give me your MASTER password. I really want to be close to you".

It's hard not to think of "electronic condoms" or "faking orgasms" here...

Re:Joint Access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749698)

Sites should provide a way to allow joint access or multiple passwords. The joint password could have all the power of a regular password, except for the ability to change the master password. ...

No. People should realize that privacy (as the summary stated, "what little remains") is incredibly important and should be respected. I've been in more than a few situations where I've actually gotten into arguements because I wouldn't share a password, because it means I have "something to hide."

Right. My life is already plastered around because of Facebook, G+, Twitter and my bank; why should I open the gates a little wider?

Re:Joint Access (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749960)

Doh! I forgot to log in.

Re:Joint Access (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749860)

Sites should provide a way to allow joint access or multiple passwords.

It's called user accounts and permissions. This is yet another reason why "Web 2.0" is a huge step back. This problem has been solved for decades.

This just in! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749636)

Teens do stupid shit!

News at 11.

Mistake in the summary (4, Insightful)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749648)

'We all need an illusion of whatever scraps of privacy we have left, and your email is just that.'"

Because we sure as hell don't have any privacy left anymore.

Re:Mistake in the summary (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749776)

Because we sure as hell don't have any privacy left anymore.

I do. But then again I almost never use Facebook (my profile picture is a self-portrait... of a monkey) and prefer using face-to-face communication if at all possible.

The people who post pictures of themselves drunk and stoned on Facebook? Of course they don't. But they never really should have expected any, either. Anything on the Internet is automatically not private unless you personally ensure it is (i.e. through encryption).

Re:Mistake in the summary (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749946)

What about people posting pictures on their wall, showing YOU drunk and vomiting....oh, i know i know, you did not expect to have any privacy.

Re:Mistake in the summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38750020)

"Webbugs" on this page alone:

scorecardresearch.com
doubleclick.net
twitter.com
google-analytics.com
fb{countrycode}.net

You may have not created an account with any of these services, but they are more than happy to create profiles on you and sell it to third parties anyway.

I'm actually taking a marketing class at the moment, and let me tell you that consumer privacy never comes up...

Education (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749654)

We will never be able to keep teenagers from sharing passwords with each other. It's hard wired into them. If you try to forbid it then they'll find creative ways to do so secretly.

The best method is to have Password Sharing Education, where you teach them safe practices regarding Password Sharing. We'll have a virus epidemic if we leave it up to chance.

Clearly Forbes is just too conservative and stuck in his ways. Password Sharing abstinence has never worked, and it never will. And why should he impose his morality on everyone else? Teenagers should be free to share their intimacy through Sharing Passwords, as long as they know the risks involved and have a proper perspective on the meaning of the act.

Sounds ripe for emotional abuse (3, Insightful)

CaptBubba (696284) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749682)

Giving your significant other power over your socialization and friendships on this level just seems like it is going to give even more power to those who abusively control the other partner in their relationships. Not to mention the wonders that will occur if you break up with someone and don't change your password before they upload not-so-flattering pictures and send them to all your friends.

Children acting childish... (5, Insightful)

JustinOpinion (1246824) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749690)

Giving out your password as a demonstration of trust is just silly. I trust my boss with work-related things, but that doesn't mean I give him the passwords to all the servers at work. Why? He doesn't need them. I trust my mom, but I don't give her my bank PIN. Why? She doesn't need it. I trust my girlfriend but I don't give her my gmail password. Why? Because she has no use for it. The difference between strangers and people I trust is that I ~would~ give friends/family secret credentials, if there was a valid need (e.g. I was sick and needed my girlfriend to perform a financial transaction for me). But giving out the details just for fun is illogical, and insecure.

Moreover, it's more a manifestation of a lack of trust. I don't care that I don't know my girlfriend's Facebook password... because I trust her. The only boyfriends/girlfriends who want each other's passwords are those who don't trust each other: they want to check up on what the other one is posting/saying. They don't trust them enough to let them have privacy or private conversations. I've seen this happen (my sister once had a jealous boyfriend who thought she was cheating on him and thus demanded access to her email and Facebook passwords so that he could check for himself... the relationship did not last).

Overall, this whole "if you loved me you'd give me your password" is infantile. The appropriate response is: "If you respected me you wouldn't ask for it."

Re:Children acting childish... (0)

glodime (1015179) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749914)

Bravo. Well written.

Of course, adolescents show no sign of evolving past infantile emotional and logical hangups prior to maturity.

Re:Children acting childish... (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749916)

That would be the difference between A asking B for their password, and B offering A their password. The first instance is a sign of distrust. The second is a sign of trust.

As for your sister, maybe it didn't last because the boyfriend's suspicious were founded. Do you think your sister would tell you if she were banging her next door neighbor while her boyfriend was at work? While there are some people that are unreasonably jealous, more often than not, when someone thinks their significant other is cheating, that is because they either are cheating, or are preparing to.

Re:Children acting childish... (4, Insightful)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750076)

That would be the difference between A asking B for their password, and B offering A their password. The first instance is a sign of distrust. The second is a sign of trust.

No, the second is a sign of a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of healthy human relationships, trust, and individuality. It is pure co-dependence. It's a form of emotional hedging which leads to emotional blackmail -- "I gave you my PASSWORDS! How can you DO this to me!"

It's kids being naive stupid fucks, that's all.

I used to keep two very big secrets from my wife. Those secrets put a terrible strain on our relationship. Eventually, I came out with it, I was met with understanding and forgiveness, and our relationship improved tremendously. I now hold no secrets from my wife, but I sure as hell do not give her my passwords nor does she give me mine. It has nothing to do with trust, it is about PRIVACY. If she wants to know something about me she can always ASK ME.

Re:Children acting childish... (4, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750034)

The problem there is you just posited a perfectly reasonable adult argument.

Teenager brains don't (typically) work that way. There still viewing the world through a flood of hormones and lack of experience.

In the perfect world, we would come up with a system to allow the teenager brain to interact with the real world without too many bad outcomes.

Email is private? (1)

RobinH (124750) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749724)

Who goes around thinking email is private? It goes across public networks in plain text. If you check your email at your significant other's house, everything you see goes through a network device controlled by them.

Re:Email is private? (3, Insightful)

JustinOpinion (1246824) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749884)

That's kinda silly. If I have a phone conversation in an empty room of a friend's house, then according to you it's not a private communication because I'm having it in a room controlled by someone else, and they could have bugged the room? Or if I write a personal letter in my office at work, it's not private because my employer may have installed a secret monitoring camera?

The fact is that there are social conventions afoot: for example that my friends don't bug their houses and that my employer hasn't installed secret cameras (some of these conventions are in fact backed-up by laws). As such, even though someone ~could~ intercept my communication, it is presumptively private and people who circumvented that would be accused of violating my privacy.

Similarly with networks. It's certainly possible for my friend to keylog their computer, or make copies of all traffic that passes through their router. But most sensible people would assume that this is not happening, and that doing so would be an invasion of the privacy of others.

So, email is private. That doesn't mean it's un-interceptable (neither is postal mail: it's trivial to grab someone else's mail and read it). But those who intercept it are violating privacy. (Of course if privacy is important to you, then you should take extra steps (e.g. encryption). But communications that you target towards a specific person are presumptively private.)

Re:Email is private? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749900)

Most people, even those who work with computers all day, have no idea what "plain text" is.

Re:Email is private? (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750016)

How many teen boys are able to install and support their own linux server/router/dhcp/dns/sniffer???

"Being framed" is just waiting to happen. (1)

whovian (107062) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749756)

Just remember kids, before dumping someone, be sure to fill their account with illegal materials and lewd links!

Might as well. (2)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749772)

If the Feds have access to it, you might as well give your girlfriend access. At least that leaves nothing for the Feds to blackmail you with.

My ex wanted this. (5, Insightful)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749806)

She wanted to monitor my email and everything. Very nosy. I refused and she bitched about not trusting me. Turns out she was a cheating whore and just assumed that I had to be getting some on the side as well. She needed to verify because she could not trust because she was herself untrustworthy and insecure about it. Sharing passwords does not show trust, it shows lack of trust.

And just fuck off (1, Insightful)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749820)

All that eavesdropping, corporate and government spying, data sharing, and people are expected to keep their data away from their loved ones, friends et cetera ? The VERY people who actually have a right and a need to know those information ? And by keeping data away from our CLOSE circle, we are going to make up for the privacy all that eavesdropping, data mining has smoked ?

If you have the balls, as a security advisor/company/activist, take on the government and corporations. not joe joey and susan sue. leave them to share their password.

Re:And just fuck off (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749876)

You, sir, are a moron.

Trust... (1)

smoketetsuo (1652999) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749942)

Talking from personal experience sharing passwords doesn't help nor does it benefit anyone. It's better to trust the other person than to have them give you their password. Also if a person is untrustworthy and are for example cheating they can communicate with their other via means other than the account they've given you a password to. Also If a person has trust issues nothing will comfort them. In addition many people are just too vindictive, immature and such to handle this... relationships especially teenage ones are so fleeting I don't believe they should be doing this. It's bad enough they are sexting each other and when they break up post what they sent each other to get back at each other on the interwebs.

slashdot love (1)

staryc (852301) | more than 2 years ago | (#38749952)

To this day I remember my ex's /. account password, and I logged in once a while ago to see if he changed it. He didn't.

Why isn't Sesame Street teaching us these lessons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38749992)

First no sharing needles, now no sharing passwords. Screw you Elmo.

Nevermind facebook, we need a site to enable better parenting online. Perhaps send a stream of syllable slapping packets to a child's phone, or sets up a PVP punishent flag on any of their WoW characters. Which is now owned by a Chinese panda gold farming ring due to sharing passwords.

My wife knows my root password (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38750032)

But since that's on a shared system, I can't really justify locking her out. Even with the root password, it's way harder to trash a Linux box than a Windows box.

Some perspective (1)

Cochonou (576531) | more than 2 years ago | (#38750048)

You got to put this into perspective. It's not much worse than having a common bank account, or kids: in case of breakup, it can go horribly wrong. But the bottom line is that even in case of breakup, you trust the other one not to act like a total ass.
Of course here, we are talking about teenagers, so the problem is a bit different - in which relationships are much shorter and more passionate. The chances of the shit hitting the fan increases by orders of magnitude.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...