Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Megaupload.com Shut Down, Founder Charged With Piracy

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the who-needs-SOPA dept.

Music 1005

zacharye writes "Federal prosecutors in Virginia have shut down notorious file-sharing site Megaupload.com and charged the service's founder with violating piracy laws. The Associated Press broke the story on Thursday, reporting that the indictment accuses Megaupload.com's owner with costing copyright holders including record labels and movie studios more than $500 million in lost revenue."

cancel ×

1005 comments

U.S. law is the new international law (5, Informative)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753126)

The summary doesn't mention it, but none of those indicted or arrested were U.S. citizens or had likely even ever set foot on U.S. soil. Even if you're in another country, you had better make sure you're not violating U.S. law. Here's a full list of those foreigners who foolishly thought they weren't under U.S. jurisdiction (from the DOJ website [justice.gov] ):

Kim Dotcom, aka Kim Schmitz and Kim Tim Jim Vestor, 37, a resident of both Hong Kong and New Zealand. Dotcom founded Megaupload Limited and is the director and sole shareholder of Vestor Limited, which has been used to hold his ownership interests in the Mega-affiliated sites.

Finn Batato, 38, a citizen and resident of Germany, who is the chief marketing officer;

Julius Bencko, 35, a citizen and resident of Slovakia, who is the graphic designer;

Sven Echternach, 39, a citizen and resident of Germany, who is the head of business development;

Mathias Ortmann, 40, a citizen of Germany and resident of both Germany and Hong Kong, who is the chief technical officer, co-founder and director;

Andrus Nomm, 32, a citizen of Estonia and resident of both Turkey and Estonia, who is a software programmer and head of the development software division;

Bram van der Kolk, aka Bramos, 29, a Dutch citizen and resident of both the Netherlands and New Zealand, who oversees programming and the underlying network structure for the Mega conspiracy websites.

Dotcom, Batato, Ortmann and van der Kolk were arrested today in Auckland, New Zealand, by New Zealand authorities, who executed provisional arrest warrants requested by the United States. Bencko, Echternach and Nomm remain at large.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753142)

Most will confuse this with a SOPA action, which will make it that much easier to hype.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753274)

Actually, this is a good argument for why we don't need SOPA/PIPA.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753408)

Actually, this is a good argument for why we don't need SOPA/PIPA.

My thinking exactly.

Present laws should be shown to fail before new laws, which are effectively wrecking balls to swat mosquitos, are enacted.

Timing is certainly insteresting. Is this meant to underscore that point? Could be...

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (-1, Troll)

FightFreedomOfSpeach (2555058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753150)

Not surprising

There's a brief article about him [wikipedia.org] on Wikipedia. He's an old hacker who made money by inside trading and later set up the Mega* sites brand with Megaupload, Megavideo and Megaporn along others. On Google Video there's 6 years old video when he goes to Monaco grand prix and spends $10 million over the weekend for all kinds of parties.

He's been awfully silent lately, but lately he bought NZ$30 million mansion from New Zealand and got residency there. After that he sponsored $500,000 fireworks for capital of NZ in celebration of residency. All that with the money he made from piracy.

It's also been "industry" standard to know that Megaupload is very nice for piracy uploaders. I have despited it, and still some people do it - Megaupload has always been the "one". Other one is MediaFire, though there are even more notorious ones. It's only good - criminals are taken to court and jail so companies can again produce goods and software and they don't have to see the widespread piracy that is going on. U.S. is right on about this, despite what you would think (and I will probably get modden down for saying this, but..)

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753216)

All that with the money he made from piracy.

Or by running a useful business. Come on, they have an advertisement with a bunch of artists about how useful their site is for their work. Some people using Google to find unauthorized files doesn't mean Schmidt's money is "made from piracy".

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

poity (465672) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753314)

Before anyone gets voted up to the stratosphere or down to oblivion here, we should remind ourselves that there is no way to tell how legitimately or illegitimately he made his money until a breakdown of his income is published.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (-1, Troll)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753384)

So let's go ahead and post a breakdown of your income to make sure that you made your money legitimately.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753492)

Before anyone gets voted up to the stratosphere or down to oblivion here, we should remind ourselves that there is no way to tell how legitimately or illegitimately he made his money until a breakdown of his income is published.

And we'll probably be a lot older and following other stories by the time that comes out...

In today's news, aliens land in Los Angeles ans proclaim L. Ron Hubbard totally slanders them in his Church of Scientology writings and they plan to sue. Tom Cruise was unavailable for comment as he was squashed flat by the alien ship landing.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753336)

Exactly. I have used services like that to move large files between offices. There are plenty of legitimate uses for sites like these. These bastards should be forced to go after the uploaders. But they are too damn lazy, and know damn well there is no payday at the end, and not from common sense, but from EXPERIENCE.

Ban the use of faucets! (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753290)

How dare people drink their tap water! After all, how are bottled water companies expected to turn a profit when people can just turn a knob on their faucet and get water on their own?

Re:Ban the use of faucets! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753402)

Do those taps run directly into the bottling plants tanks? No? Then it's not the same thing, is it, dumbfuck?

Re:Ban the use of faucets! (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753528)

But because you are using tap water, they are loosing revenues, a lot of revenue. So, sorry, you are guilty.

Re:Ban the use of faucets! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753432)

When you move out of your parents' house, you'll find out that tap water isn't actually free.

Re:Ban the use of faucets! (5, Insightful)

shentino (1139071) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753462)

Sadly, if bottled water companies had enough lobbying power this would probably be a viable reality.

Time and time again big business has proven that it will do whatever it can get away with to make money, and ethical and sometimes even legal impediments prove to be no real obstacle.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (1, Insightful)

Oakey (311319) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753378)

"All that with the money he made from piracy."

When will the FBI shutting down all those US based Usenet providers offering high speeds and 1000 day retention on binaries? No one is honestly paying $10-$40 a month for text articles, are they?

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (4, Insightful)

VAElynx (2001046) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753440)

A man that made his money off "piracy" is any day more likeable than those who make equivalent sums by exploiting workers. Nobody seems to complain in those cases, though.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753498)

From your description, he is not taken to the court, but the site is. So if all they have against him is only this site, they actually have nothing, not even the right to close the site, or to prosecute him, as this site is NOT USA hosted.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (3, Insightful)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753182)

SOPA might as well be called iDMCA because it basically takes the DMCA Takedown system to an international level. (I.E. If a TLD won't take down a piracy site, ban the whole TLD from the US Internet.) Maybe what we should trade for that is a punitive damages clause added for incorrect DMCA letters.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (-1, Troll)

Widowwolf (779548) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753454)

Wait so you are gonna use an Icon that's synonymous with apple to make it international...Hater

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (3, Interesting)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753198)

But they used server located in the US.

If you stand in Mexico and use a remote control car to rob a bank in the US, the US will come after you..and visa versa.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753318)

I'm just glad it doesn't work the other way around. I could put swastikas all over my website on some server in Germany, confident that the FBI would laugh at Germany if they tried to have an American citizen arrested and deported.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (2)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753396)

No, I don't think they would. They might demand that MEXICAN authorities go after you, and failure to do so would cause an international incident, but they can't come after you directly. This action is outrageous.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753426)

Really?

So, If I am in southern Texas and see a Mexican climbing over the fence, between the two countries, I then shoot him as he tops the fence and his body falls into Mexico who has jurisdiction?

The bullet entered the skull in Texas and exited in Mexico
The body is on the Mexican side
The crime of shooting him happened in Texas.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (4, Insightful)

Skarecrow77 (1714214) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753298)

and people think Ron Paul is the crazy one for wanting America's fingers out of other country's pies.

This sort of thing is going to spark widespread international hatred for the United States. No, not the general dislike that many countries have for us now, but honest-to-god hatred. Look what good things came out of that situation in the mideast.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753380)

If you don't think the exact same scenario would happen under Paul, you really are crazy.

Rationale from the article (4, Interesting)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753302)

The indictment was returned in the Eastern District of Virginia, which claimed jurisdiction in part because some of the alleged pirated materials were hosted on leased servers in Ashburn, Va.

To play devil's advocate here: most Slashdot readers contend that music and movie industries should stop complaining and instead "adapt their business models", because their world has been irrevocably changed by technology. You could also say that that same technology has very much changed the way criminals do their dirty work, by allowing a person in one country to administer a server or hack a system on the other side of the world, and law enforcement officials need to adapt accordingly.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (3, Informative)

hawks5999 (588198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753348)

If you are going to be accused of piracy, hope that you live in one of these non-extradition treaty countries: Bhutan Botswana Brunei Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad China Comoros Djibouti Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Gabon Guinea Guinea Bissau Indonesia Iran Ivory Coast Jordan Kuwait Laos Lebanon Libya Madagascar Mali Maldives Mauritania Mongolia Morocco Mozambique Nepal Niger Oman Qatar Russia Rwanda Samoa Sao Tome e Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Somalia Sudan Syria Togo Tunisia Uganda United Arab Emirates Vanuatu Vietnam Yemen Yemen South Zaire

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753482)

I'm surprised North Korea and Iran are not on that list.

Re:U.S. law is the new international law (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753368)

Kim Dotcom, aka Kim Schmitz and Kim Tim Jim Vestor, 37, a resident of both Hong Kong and New Zealand. Dotcom founded Megaupload Limited and is the director and sole shareholder of Vestor Limited, which has been used to hold his ownership interests in the Mega-affiliated sites.

...his name was seriously Kim Dotcom? Or rather, he willingly changed his last name to "Dotcom"?

Okay, the other guys, they're free to go in my book. Kim, though, should be arrested for that last name alone.

File Lockers don't work... (3, Insightful)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753130)

Anybody surprised by this story must be new here. File Lockers like MP3.com have been shut down regularly for ages now. You can't have an online database of content that isn't secured right...

The Internet should be P2P (2, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753228)

There should not be "sites" to shut down; the Internet was designed to be P2P and should be P2P. Unfortunately, we failed to develop P2P networking to the same extent that we developed the web, so now we are vulnerable to this sort of thing.

Re:The Internet should be P2P (4, Insightful)

sirlark (1676276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753300)

Tell that to my ISP, who won't let me run a 'server' as part of my terms and conditions...

Re:The Internet should be P2P (2, Insightful)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753306)

Such software exists: it's called Bittorrent.

Re:File Lockers don't work... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753340)

yeah, what about youtube then?

right. (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753146)

"holders including record labels and movie studios more than $500 million in lost revenue."
my ass.

Re:right. (5, Insightful)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753230)

I was actually surprised by that figure. It actually seems low given the people who came up with it.

Considering the past history of ludicrously high damage claims and the huge amount of infringing content they probably actually have, I figured they'd be making up new words to describe the number they came up with...

Re:right. (3, Insightful)

Oakey (311319) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753448)

Well this is the same industry that can't even make a profit from massive Blockbusters like Star Wars and Forrest Gump. I mean, every film released is just a huge unprofitable loss after unprofitable loss which is why people like David Prowse and Winston Groom have yet to see their share of the profits. It honestly makes you wonder why Hollywood bothers making films when a film that costs £55million to make and takes in $657million in sales still makes a $64million loss.

I think Hollywood has bigger things to worry about than piracy, like maximising profits as any legitimate business would.

Re:right. (2, Informative)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753246)

You bet your ass they make sure that the lamestream media parrots those numbers as often as possible. Never mind that they've been proven, over and over again, to be utter bullshit. And notice how Chris Dodd et al keep referring to it as "theft"? Heaven forbid that CBS, or CNN suddenly grasp the real issue is an industry that is genuinely threatened by advancing technology and that industry's choice to pursue legal measures to prop up their outmoded business model instead of actually competing.

We need some people to check on this stuff (2)

P-niiice (1703362) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753276)

Wouldn't it be great to have this army of people who reported on news stories and debunked claims and checked facts and stuff? They could learn to write real well and provide us news that we could use to decide on issues in a fair manner. Ideally they wouldn't totally swallow ludicrous claims like this 500 gazillion loss due to Megaupload for example. One man can dream I guess.

Re:We need some people to check on this stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753382)

And once SOPA V1.1 passes their websites will get shutdown for all sorts of copyright violations and you'll never hear the news.

$500 million for bad movies? (2)

RobertRCleveland (2547974) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753282)

Exactly. I think you describe where they pulled that number from. No way $500 million. Megaupload was a warez and porn locker. It's the torrent hosters who have the movies and music.

Re:right. (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753510)

Indeed.

Your own ass is more valuable than the garbage they try to sell me.

Dick Morris (5, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753156)

It almost comes off as intentional that this occurred the day after the SOPA protests. It looks like the battles over copyright infringement are finally coming to a head. This will all get resolved one way or another.

Dick Morris is a former Clinton advisor and a regular Fox News commentator, but he actually wrote what I think is a rational, well-worded message about everything that's been happening:

---

Dear Friend,

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) is just the kind of bill that could cripple Internet freedom in the name of a good cause. Everybody agrees that we need to battle online piracy of movies, books, TV shows and such. If piracy spreads, nobody will create anything because their work will be pirated as soon as it is finished.

But...this legislation, with its draconian enforcement powers, uses an atomic bomb to solve a problem best left to educated action by responsible individuals and normal litigation. The collateral damage from this bill could destroy Internet freedom.

The bill would let the Justice Department and copyright holders to get court orders against websites they accuse of enabling or encouraging copyright infringement. It could stop search engines from linking to such sites and require service providers to block access to them.

It should be called the Camel's Nose In the Tent Act (CNITA). It would criminalize the Internet and make search engines the enforcers of copyright laws. It opens the tent to federal regulation and judicial activism that could drive search engines and internet service providers into bankruptcy through excessive court judgments and liability.

There is a remedy: Public education. None of us wants to kill off artistic creation. Each of us realizes that by abusing the system to get the goodies for free, we risk eliminating the goodies. We don't litter because we don't want to ruin our environment. We don't run red lights because we don't want traffic chaos. We wear seatbelts because we want to live. Law enforcement plays a role, but the greater influence is an educated public.

Copyright infringers can't make it if we don't buy it. Consumers need to realize that we will kill the golden goose if we steal his eggs! The way to regulate the internet is to use it sensibly and wisely and not to let Congress and the Justice Department in the door.

Thanks,

Dick Morris

Re:Dick Morris (2)

Shakrai (717556) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753248)

It almost comes off as intentional that this occurred the day after the SOPA protests

I highly doubt one had to do with the other. The Feds don't casually put together a criminal case; they take their time and line up all the ducks before they pull the trigger. That's one of the reasons why Federal cases have a substantially higher conviction rate than State ones. One of the lawyers around here could provide an exact number but if I recall correctly >90% of Federal indictments wind up with either a conviction or guilty plea.

This investigation was in the pipeline for months. The indictment was likely handed down by a Grand Jury some time ago.

Re:Dick Morris (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753430)

Yeah, the FEDS never engage in POLITICS.

Re:Dick Morris (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753356)

Everybody agrees that we need to battle online piracy of movies, books, TV shows and such.

I'd like to know how they propose to "battle online piracy" without draconian laws.

Re:Dick Morris (2)

SirGarlon (845873) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753400)

Law enforcement plays a role, but the greater influence is an educated public.

This is the most impressively rational thing I have read in relation to public policy in a long time.

The opposite of what pro-SOPA people want (1)

Ameryll (2390886) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753530)

I would think that this would be the exact opposite of what SOPA supporters want. They've successfully shut down a pirate site *without* the extra rights that SOPA and PIPA were supposed to provide. This proves that they don't need further laws, the current ones suffice. (Though most of us would agree that even the current ones are too much)

M-E-G-A Upload To Me Today (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753164)

WHAT??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753168)

I just used it like 5 minutes ago! How could this be? Who's next? Let's crate? Mediafire?

Suddenly (0, Flamebait)

vencs (1937504) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753176)

All those slebs [americaspeaksink.com] supporting Mega* sites look like thugs.

Re:Suddenly (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753338)

All those slebs [americaspeaksink.com] supporting Mega* sites look like thugs.

No kidding. Anything endorsed by Kim Kardashian and Kanye West has to be criminally stupid.

Re:Suddenly (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753460)

And all those guys suing them act like thugs.

Just goes to show you should judge a book by its cover.

Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753186)

And here I was, wondering why a video wouldn't load, just a few minutes ago....

Bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753188)

It was only used to upload and download Linux ISOs. They never allowed material to be stored which violated copyright laws !

Who needs SOPA/PIPA? America, F**K YEAH (5, Insightful)

dkathrens77 (1090745) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753190)

The timing of this move is surely intended to send a message to anyone who opposes SOPA/PIPA. And that light to the free world, the USA has made it clear "we don't need no steenkin laws"

Re:Who needs SOPA/PIPA? America, F**K YEAH (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753404)

Megaupload has servers in the US. SOPA/PIPA are supposed to block US clients from accessing international servers.

The Government responds... (4, Insightful)

JaZz0r (612364) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753192)

The People expressed their opinion about SOPA/PIPA. The Government responds with a resounding, "We don't give a shit."

Re:The Government responds... (4, Insightful)

demonbug (309515) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753424)

The People expressed their opinion about SOPA/PIPA. The Government responds with a resounding, "We don't give a shit."

This has nothing to do with SOPA, beyond showing that the government doesn't need it in order to take down (alleged) pirates in other countries. If anything this is the government throwing a bone to the (pissed off) media industry, saying look - we can get these guys without crippling the internet.

Looks something like.. (3, Insightful)

iONiUM (530420) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753200)

Looks strangely familiar [upup-downdown.com] .

In seriousness, why isn't this all over the news? Why just SOPA?

Re:Looks something like.. (3, Informative)

b0bby (201198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753256)

Looks strangely familiar [upup-downdown.com] .

In seriousness, why isn't this all over the news? Why just SOPA?

Because this just happened today. For once, /. is pretty up to date!

Wow, what amazing timing! (5, Funny)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753204)

The very day after uncounted internet sites shut down to protest SOPA/PIPA (which had a profound effect), and some website gets shut down for piracy on the order of a half billion dollars? Darn, if I would've known, I would've had my popcorn and soda ready. Such theatre!

Fuck RIAA/MPAA (5, Insightful)

esocid (946821) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753206)

The $500 million figure is based on speculation by the MAFIAA. Looks like we didn't even have to wait for SOPA/PIPA. It's already here.

I also don't understand how they got the Netherlands to raid their servers...

Re:Fuck RIAA/MPAA (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753512)

They are accused of crimes which are illegal in the Netherlands too (including racketeering and money laundering, according to Computer World).

This is what happens... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753208)

...when corrupt laws don't get passed, or even do get passed.
Not as if they care, they will deal with the backlash later.
This will get worse if SOPA or anything like it passes.

I can't wait for the media industry to collapse. Maybe then content creators will realize they don't need the shit labels.

See you on Tor everybody. It is the only safe place now, but only if everyone gets in on it.
Hope the media companies love helping terrorism get even more secure, because that is all this will do as they push more and more people to encrypted networks.
Oh, wait, that won't be a problem, FBI will just get those backdoors and have control of millions of nodes for free.
Time to blackhole America. Bye.

Something fishy (5, Insightful)

shentino (1139071) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753220)

Interesting that megaupload got nailed so soon after they tried to fight back against UMG's frivolous youtube takedown.

I smell a rat and suspect someone's trying to avoid giving megaupload an edge in their lawsuit.

They're listening to the 99% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753262)

The OWS message got out. They decided to go after the top 1% who are receiving economic rent from stupid laws, and give it to the 99%. Small-timers, start your servers...

Re:They're listening to the 99% (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753474)

The OWS movement is nothing but a bunch of spoiled rich kids rebelling against mom and dad. They ARE the 1%. Anyone who takes them seriously is a fucking idiot.

Then... who needs SOPA? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753268)

Ok. So they were able to shut this site down, internationally and affect arrests across the globe, without SOPA or PIPA. Didn't they just make our point for us? Existing laws are sufficient, why do we need more?

Re:Then... who needs SOPA? (2)

Issarlk (1429361) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753506)

Because it was so hard! They needed to use justice and all.
Imagine tomorrow with SOPA: all of the hundred of file sharing sites like megaupload could be shut down before the ink on the signature at the bottom of SOPA is dry.

Why do they need SOPA again? (5, Insightful)

DickBreath (207180) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753270)

If they can shut down Megaupload without SOPA, then why do they need SOPA again?

Re:Why do they need SOPA again? (5, Insightful)

Bovius (1243040) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753316)

With SOPA, they can take your site down if you link to (or, presumably, mention) megaupload.com. Think about that one for a minute.

Re:Why do they need SOPA again? (5, Insightful)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753438)

With SOPA, they can take your site down if you link to (or, presumably, mention) megaupload.com. Think about that one for a minute.

Exactly, or even worse, SOPA lets them take your site down if one of your user-generated comments mentions of links to megaupload.com. Remember when it was popular to post the bluray key (if I'm remembering this correctly) on slashdot to spite Sony? Those posts are still accessible. There's no reason Sony couldn't or wouldn't use SOPA to shut down Slashdot. And hey, Google caches those posts, too!

Re:Why do they need SOPA again? (4, Insightful)

Bishop923 (109840) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753464)

MPAA Parenting Tip:

If your dog makes a mess on the floor, remember to punish your children for feeding him.

Re:Why do they need SOPA again? (2)

Dan East (318230) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753366)

Mod parent up. My thoughts exactly. If they can already reach out and both prosecute and shut down sites located in other countries, then why do they need even more power? Less judicial oversight? More power and control to the "copyright holders"?

Re:Why do they need SOPA again? (5, Insightful)

parlancex (1322105) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753386)

The goal of SOPA is to make everyone guilty. Not everyone will be prosecuted, but once everyone is guilty selective prosecution can be used at the discretion of those who wish to silence any unwanted criticism, opposing viewpoints, etc.

Re:Why do they need SOPA again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753394)

So they can shut down google.com, amazon.com, ebay.com, newegg.com, wikipedia.org, and slashdot.org. The internets is a dangerous place!

SOPA RTM coming soon (3, Funny)

Greg2k (1013637) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753272)

Well, this SOPA Release Candidate seems pretty polished...I guess I'll downlo- oh wait.

This is a bummer. (3, Interesting)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753278)

On one hand, these kinds of sites have made it stupidly easy to host and download all sorts of different data, legal and illegal. It's funny how the powers that be think that shutting these guys down will curb piracy when (a) there are so many ways people can get illegal data and (b) new and more anonymous ones will pop up as the older ones fall.

On the other hand, it's not a terribly huge loss on the material scheme of things. There are still plenty of other sites that people can use to host data, including wider-range services like Dropbox and Sugarsync. The other funny thing is that Megaupload et. al. did shut down links to any media that infringed on copyright policies, so it's scary to see how far these laws will go. I'm hoping that Dropbox and partners will not start telling people what can/can't be backed up.

Re:This is a bummer. (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753468)

The other funny thing is that Megaupload et. al. did shut down links to any media that infringed on copyright policies

They may have removed individual links to content, but they did not remove the content, nor all the links to the content.

Guilty... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753280)

...until proven innocent.

Who said.... (0)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753292)

Who said: I TOLD YOU. WHO?

Oh here we go. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753294)

If SOPA passes the internet will be holocausted as the "final solution" to those pesky pirates. If Government ruins laws, why should I respect Godwin's law?

This will also fizzle out "cloud" storage because there be sky pirates up there. We need internet freedom fighters now more than ever, don't ever buy another MPAA/RIAA affilated work again for the rest of your life! Only a multi-decade boycott will put the MAFIAA in their place and have respectable copyright again.

So what are their non .com addresses? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753296)

So life can go on.

Re:So what are their non .com addresses? (1)

Kalriath (849904) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753390)

The servers are in Virginia. You can bet the feds have already raided the colo.

So.... (1, Insightful)

Bishop923 (109840) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753312)

If they can do this, why do they need SOPA again?

ONLY 500 Million? (5, Funny)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753324)

Why not 500 Trillion? They're not even trying hard enough anymore...

Only $500M in damages? (4, Insightful)

Gavin Scott (15916) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753350)

$500M? That's like, what, one .mp3 file these days?

G.

Good (4, Interesting)

ugen (93902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753364)

Megaupload was one of a few (3-4) sites where a cracked copy of my software product was uploaded. They were extremely slow in responding to DMCA request and clearly had interest in continuously providing an obviously illegally obtained copy of the software (because they make money from download fees, essentially re-selling content without paying me). I don't care much for Hollywood, but I do care about software I spend 24/7/365 writing and supporting.

Re:Good (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753450)

what's the name of your software?

Re:Good (0, Troll)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753478)

So you are of the belief that you lost money from every single pirated copy?

Re:Good (5, Interesting)

raynet (51803) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753494)

How long it took for them to respond to your DMCA takedown letter and was the response time within what the DMCA specifies?

ACTA/TPP, SOPA/PIPA, SCOTUS killing the PD (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753372)

When is enough enough? How much more are WE going to take from "OUR" GOVERNMENT, and its agents, who are no more than sock puppets for the entertainment INDUSTRY?

Here are the facts:
1. Copyright is eternal
2. There is no Public Domain except some old books
3. No one is allowed to do anything with copyrighted works
4. This applies world-wide (or else...)

The Entertainment INDUSTRY can easily be put in its corner by bringing copyright terms (and all related rights) down to 20 years.

Arrr Maty's that where the Pron be! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753392)

Twitching, Twitching, Twitching...

And now everybody's crying (2)

TheTruthIs (2499862) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753418)

Because a dude who made 43 millions of $ with mostly illegal content got caught and his business have been taken down.

Forgive my squirrelly ignorance but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753420)

Forgive my squirrelly ignorance of American law, but I thought there was some kind of safe harbour law? Did they do something to void protection under such a law? Or is youtube going down next?

Losses (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753436)

How do they calculate the loss? Every single download counts as full price retail when the item was first released I bet. Certainly not a year later when it get dumped into the bargin bin. 99% things that I have downloaded illegally, I would NEVER have paid a single penny for if unavailable for download. So the copyright holders lost nothing. I buy from the bands and movie makers I like. Most people making a living wage do that. If someone wouldn't have ever had the money to buy something, but downloaded it illegally again the copyright holder lost NOTHING. I think its funny when movie studios complain about illegal dvds being sold in china, most of those chinese could never afford a legal dvd anyway, many would have to work an entire day to earn enough money to buy a single dvd (and probably skip eating for that day). Those losses are fantasy profits!

Begun, the Piracy Wars have (2)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#38753446)

Now lets get those p2pdns technologies to lay waste to copyright laws.

$500 Million in Lost Profit? What Profit? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38753518)

Hollywood Accounting (R) shows that very few movies actually make money, most are money losers.

(Question 1 - Why make movies when all they do is cost you money?)

Every time you see a movie in a theater it costs the studio money. They should stop showing them in expensive theaters, and somehow get them onto someone else's digital servers for distribution into people's houses to see on their personal computers... It would be much cheaper!

(Question 2 - Where do Studios actually make their money?)

Every download actually saves the studios money! Why don't they want us downloading more?

It makes no sense....unless someone is lying about how much profit they are making (and lying about how little downloading is really costing them...)

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...