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What Happens To Your Files When a Cloud Service Shuts Down?

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the apocalypse-and-doom dept.

Cloud 592

MrSeb writes "Megaupload's shutdown poses an interesting question: What happens to all the files that were stored on the servers? XDA-Developers, for example, has more than 200,000 links to Megaupload — and this morning, they're all broken, with very little hope of them returning. What happens if a similar service, like Dropbox, gets shut down — either through bankruptcy, or federal take-down? Will you be given a chance to download your files, or helped to migrate them to another similar service? What about data stored on enterprise services like Azure or AWS — are they more safe?" And if you're interested, the full indictment against Megaupload is now available.

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Evidence (5, Interesting)

Aryden (1872756) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764386)

As a point, the government will be using all files hosted on those servers as evidence in the case. They will not likely, and are not required to, give access to those files.

Re:Evidence (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764488)

Reminds me of the old saw, "Neither your life nor your property are safe when the legislature is in session."

Re:Evidence (4, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764600)

As a point, the government will be using all files hosted on those servers as evidence in the case. They will not likely, and are not required to, give access to those files.

Yeah, expect a subpeona in the mail.

"Uh, I was so shocked by the news I forgot the password to my 8GB zip file."

"No worries, we have a crack team of security hackers who will have it open in a few minutes if you can't supply it."

"..."

"We'll call upon you if we need you for anything. Bye!" *click* nrrrrr...

*click* diit-doot-doot-deet-diit-doot-deet-doot-deet-doot "Hello, I'd like a ticket to New Zealand! FAST!"

Re:Evidence (5, Insightful)

KhabaLox (1906148) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764678)

Seeing as Dotcom was arrested in NZ, you may want to fly to a less US-friendly locale. I hear Venezuela is lovely this time of year.

Re:Evidence (4, Interesting)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765092)

However, you may wish to relocate somewhere that has a reasonable economy and fewer ill feelings towards the US or its citizens. Accordingly Brazil might be a better choice since it has traditionally given the finger to US extradition requests.

Re:Evidence (3, Insightful)

jdastrup (1075795) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764748)

zip file? Don't you mean RAR? No self-respecting pirate uses zip.

Re:Evidence (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764802)

RAR? What is this the early 2000's? Don't you mean 7Zip?

Re:Evidence (4, Funny)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765110)

I think he mentioned something about "self-respecting"...

Re:Evidence (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38765122)

The only person I know who uses 7Zip is an Oracle consultant.

Re:Evidence (3, Funny)

letherial (1302031) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765074)

""No worries, we have a crack team of security hackers who will have it open in a few minutes if you can't supply it." Well good luck with that, its a truecrypt file disguised as a .zip, the password is 50 characters long, it also requires 10 files all which where destroyed on 'accident' So I hope your supper crack team has alot of crack.

Re:Evidence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764726)

Don't use Amazon's EC that is controlled by U.S. Federal headquarter.

Instead, use worldwide servers of asiatic servers, caribbean servers, etc. They are powerful and not quietly the CPU processes on those servers that normally the Amazon Cloud Computing does.

The problem: shutdowned the server.
The solution: to replicate the servers worldwide.

JCPM: i'm not commiting a crime, i'm proposing an advice of solution to the problem, and not for profiting.

Re:Evidence (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764990)

Rather than lost files,I think people need worry more about being charged with a crime for using the service ,

Re:Evidence (5, Interesting)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765126)

That, in a word, is horseshit.

The legitimate users of the service have lost real property without any intent to do wrong. The takedown was without warning. The folks who lost their legitimate data have had their fourth amendment rights absolutely trampled.

And you think they should be grateful that all they lost was their data, and not their physical freedom?

They are given to slashdot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764396)

They are given to slashdot and are used to make first posts

Is it an interesting question... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764414)

...if the answer is "backup"?

Re:Is it an interesting question... (5, Insightful)

boundary (1226600) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764582)

...if the answer is "backup"?

Everyone has been told time and again that backing up to the cloud is a great idea. A lot of businesses bought into that. The risks of doing just that have now been made abundantly clear. Personally I'm reaching for my DAT.

Re:Is it an interesting question... (5, Insightful)

winkydink (650484) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764818)

Doesn't "backing up to the cloud" mean that you still have the original copy stored locally?

Re:Is it an interesting question... (2)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764982)

It does if you're doing it right. But you could still be screwed if your dog eats your laptop right after your cloud goes poof.

Re:Is it an interesting question... (2)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764850)

I think any source is at risk. Relying on your data being in one location is always a risk.

Using the a cloud data storage location simply adds another layer of redundancy to help prevent you from losing your data. It is probably not the most reliable method, and it is almost certainly not the most secure.

Ummm, (0, Flamebait)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764416)

What the hell do you think happens to them it's like when somebody dies.

-AI

Re:Ummm, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764510)

Well then as long as it's open casket we can simply take them back, right?

Not an issue for Dropbox (5, Informative)

OnTheEdge (136784) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764424)

Good question, but it's not really an issue for Dropbox as that service maintains full local copies on each of the computers I have on my account.

Re:Not an issue for Dropbox (3, Insightful)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764480)

Exactly - redundancy is built into Dropbox, which is one of the benefits of the system and why I use it despite all its flaws.

Re:Not an issue for Dropbox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764760)

Dropbox stores data on Amazon Web Services' S3 - not going away any time soon + the drop box model is based on you having local copies.
Even though I store my data on Dropbox (Amazon S3) I always keep multiple backups copies in multiple locations.

Consider them gone. (5, Insightful)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764430)

If you can afford to lose the data, it's fine to have it in the cloud.

If you can't, you are SOL if you don't have a backup - one that is not in the cloud.

Re:Consider them gone. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764596)

Amen!

Re:Consider them gone. (4, Insightful)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764644)

Yep, this is why on-shore cloud computing will never take off, why would a foreign entity want to put in this position. XDA won't get their hosting back, but I highly doubt they lost anything, it's developers after all. But imagine if your business relied on megaupload, say for high speed downloads of your companies product, you'd be hurting.

Still I don't see how paying uploaders can directly be linked to promoting file sharing. It's still the uploaders choice to make the money via copyrighted material...

And a Third Suggestion (4, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764734)

Well, the summary specifically references a developer's forum where I can sympathize (being a developer) with people modding Android ROMs or whatever and uploading such binaries for distribution to others. I guess the people who run the forum don't really get a say in any of this. However, as a software developer, I can imagine a third option for files that are user generated (and for the most part legal).

Now XDA-Developers is going to have tens of thousands of once helpful posts that now lead to a broken link. How could they have avoided this? Well, I'd imagine that someone could have written an internal bot for their forums that would harvest links to the external megaupload. They then could have subscribed to megaupload, downloaded said linked files and created a local cache of their files purely for their own use on a small RAID. Now the last thing the bot would need to do is take the megaupload URL and develop some unique URI ... perhaps a hash of the date, checksum and filename? It would then maintain a key-value pair of these megaupload links to your internal URIs and also a directory structure of these URIs as the files. Now, say megaupload is a very unreliable/questionable service or goes down and now your forum is worthless. Well, you can always re-spider your site and replace all the megaupload links with links to your cloud hosting of these new files or work out a deal with another third party similar to megaupload where they would accept the file and URI and return to you the URI paired with their new URL. Then it's a matter of spidering your site and replacing the megaupload links with your new service's URLs.

It's a pain in the ass but let's face it, some forums could perish when their codependence on megaupload is fully realized in a very painful manner. And I don't think that's a fair risk to the users who have created hundreds of thousands of posts.

Counter party risk (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764828)

Oh my goodness. Who could possibly have forseen that might be a problem.
 

Cloud was stupid from the start in the first place (5, Insightful)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764450)

The foolishness that is millions of users trusting a single giant computing grid owned by a single private corporation was stupid in the first place.

it is everyone putting their eggs in the same giant basket

ranging from policy changes to mergers/takeovers/acquisitions to bankruptcies to government intervention - whatever you can imagine. its a single point of failure and your important stuff is gone.

moreover, these cloud stuff are utilized for making collaboration tools work. so if cloud is gone, there goes your entire communication in between your team, company, clients, workgroup, whatever.

its strategically stupid. run your own cloud if you want. dont put your stuff on another company's turf. its dangerous.

All their eggs in the same basket (5, Insightful)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764554)

But once the SOPA-esque laws and treaties become The Way That Things Are (tm) - and unless things change drastically, they eventually will - and once the Great Consolidation has run its course - what choice will there be?

Re:All their eggs in the same basket (5, Insightful)

fusiongyro (55524) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764762)

How is SOPA going to stop you from hosting your files yourself?

Re:All their eggs in the same basket (4, Insightful)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764960)

It wouldn't.

It would, however, prevent you from using any sort of cloud hosting if you want to keep your data private. Because in order to be SOPA compliant, a cloud would have to scan your data to ensure that you didn't have any sort of "illicit" files.

So - why use the cloud at all? Well, for better or worse, services like AWS make it possible for certain businesses to grow and thrive - and in some cases, exist at all.

Which brings us back to my original point. Given the constant push by the seriously monied interests in SOPA-esque laws and treaties worldwide, and given the trend towards consolidation of the various corporations and services out there, eventually, it's going to be hard for a certain class of business and user not to have all their eggs in one basket - a basket that has both corporate and government eyes peeking at pretty much every bit that's out there.

If this scenario does not appeal, then perhaps a way to change the underlying trends of corporate and government Big Brotherhood needs be found.

Re:All their eggs in the same basket (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38765022)

You are running your own server ?? That is even more suspect..
Don't you trust your cloud provider?
Have anything to hide ??

Re:Cloud was stupid from the start in the first pl (2)

Myopic (18616) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764824)

No it's not, you luddite. If I upload a file into the cloud, the file now exists in two places. I have it, and the cloud has it, and now maybe other people have it too. It is exactly the opposite of everything putting their eggs in one basket. It is more like magically multiplying your single egg among many baskets, so that any basket which disappears still leaves you with a bunch of eggs in a bunch of baskets, with plenty of eggs for everyone.

If I'm wrong, then you will kindly point out how now nobody can pirate movies anymore, because the only copy (the only egg) of those movies existed on Megaupload (the only basket).

Re:Cloud was stupid from the start in the first pl (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765108)

The foolishness that is millions of users trusting a single giant computing grid owned by a single private corporation was stupid in the first place.

it is everyone putting their eggs in the same giant basket

Generally speaking, that isn't a bad idea. When you put money in your bank, you're putting your eggs in that same giant basket.

What is a bad idea is putting your eggs in a basket with a switchblade, kilo of coke, a couple grenades, a packet of anthrax and a VHS tape of kiddie porn. At that point, you really need to blame yourself when that basket gets taken from you.

No surprise (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764462)

This is exactly the reason a lot of companies keep things in-house. That way, as long as you're running, you have control of your own data. This has always been one of the dangers of The Cloud .

PIPA/SOPA Backlash (0)

mitcheli (894743) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764464)

I would not be in the least bit surprised if a class action suit against the government (or something of that nature) was launched from all those who had legitimate files on Megaupload. Imagine if the USG shut down Youtube when it was first starting up. But truthfully, we are as a society held to the laws we make. To quote a lawyer once while I was in court, "If people don't like the laws, they should change them."

Re:PIPA/SOPA Backlash (3, Informative)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764684)

I would not be in the least bit surprised if a class action suit against the government (or something of that nature) was launched from all those who had legitimate files on Megaupload. Imagine if the USG shut down Youtube when it was first starting up. But truthfully, we are as a society held to the laws we make. To quote a lawyer once while I was in court, "If people don't like the laws, they should change them."

What are you smoking? First, you can't sue the government (easily). Second, the ones to sue are the people running Megaupload. If you had a valid contract with them to give them money so they store your data, then it was _their_ duty to ensure your data is safe. One part of their duty is to not commit illegal activities that gets them closed down.

Re:PIPA/SOPA Backlash (4, Insightful)

Marc Madness (2205586) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764998)

One part of their duty is to not commit illegal activities that gets them closed down.

At this point, it has not been demonstrated whether Megaupload has committed any illegal activities (remember the presumption of innocence and all that). The problem is that it's not unfathomable for an entity to be taken down in this fashion regardless of whether they actually commited any crime; especially if SOPA/PIPA or any similar legislation ever gets passed.

Re:PIPA/SOPA Backlash (1)

fusiongyro (55524) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765034)

First, you can't sue the government (easily)

Isn't that exactly what is meant by "The People" in the name of the suit?

Re:PIPA/SOPA Backlash (1)

Aryden (1872756) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764720)

Depends on whether the government concedes that it committed a tortious act or not. If not, they have to give permission for the suit to go forward. I am certain that there are many precedents already on the table that will show that the government withholding property of a 3rd party for the purpose of evidence in a criminal case is not considered a tortious act.

Files = Pokemon (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764468)

I've always wondered what happens to Pokemon in a trainers' computer when the trainer dies/quits/etc. I imagine the same would happen to megaupload files. Like the pokemon lost in a nonphysical oblivion for all eternity, these files will endure an endless torture of nothingness.

Re:Files = Pokemon (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764654)

nobody knows what the hell you're talking about

Re:Files = Pokemon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764782)

They're happy that at least they won't be forced into cockfights any more.

Re:Files = Pokemon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764994)

why couldn't somebody else find the computer and use it? Seems you have a logic fallacy.

Question (5, Insightful)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764470)

Has Megaupload been found guilty of anything? If not, why has their site been shut down? If copyright laws apply to the internet, then why doesn't due process?

Re:Question (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764506)

Because due process is applied, and yes, you can be arrested and put in jail before being found guilty.

I don't know what the specific procedure used in this case involved, but presumably they presented evidence to a judge that was persuasive enough to warrant this action.

That you are asking, without even expecting this to be the case, either means you are ignorant or deeply cynical.

Re:Question (0)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764698)

That you are asking, without even expecting this to be the case, either means you are ignorant or deeply cynical.

Actually, both. I didn't know, that's why I asked.

I understand that the owners of the site can be arrested before being found guilty, but should the site also be shutdown before a verdict has been reached?

Re:Question (1)

bruce_the_loon (856617) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764938)

Yes, same as shutting down a suspected drug den until the case is decided.

Re:Question (2)

AJH16 (940784) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765006)

The servers can be seized as evidence and the service shut down to prevent additional harm being done while the case is decided. It's effectively very similar to a restraining order. It's a civil thing, so innocent until proven guilty doesn't apply, but rather until the issue is determined, the justice department moves to ensure more harm is not done. The idea is that to do so it should be pretty damn clear that policies are not being followed and the indictment does a pretty good job of documenting how they were not.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/78786408/Mega-Indictment [scribd.com] - around page 30 is the most damning part.

ACTA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764738)

Except, in the case of Megaupload, no judge was involved in any 'warrant'. The FBI worked directly with the law enforcement agencies in New Zealand to arrest the people involved. Since New Zealand has signed on to ACTA, this is entirely possible: due process is skipped, as is the responsibility of the copyright holder to enforce said copyright.

The FBI accused MegaUpload of a crime, and have not yet presented any evidence to support that claim. Additionally, no copyright holders have filed specific complaints against MegaUpload for infringement, so what crime have they commited? Accusation of guilt is not evidence of guilt, and we all should do well to remember this. But, thanks to ACTA, none of that actually matters.

Re:Question (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764608)

The same reason you don't get to keep murdering people while the trial is going on.

Re:Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764704)

The same reason you don't get to keep murdering people while the trial is going on.

Funny, that's never stopped me before.

Re:Question (5, Informative)

Caerdwyn (829058) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764706)

For the same reason that some suspects are kept in jail pending their trial: it is considered highly likely by the judge presiding over the case that the criminal activity would continue, or evidence be destroyed. "Due process" includes that decision, and the prosecution and defendant both state their position before the judge makes that decision. That stage has passed.

BTW, I read the complaint. The core of the accusations are twofold: first that the Megaupload folks willfully hosted infringing content (thus losing the safe harbor protections that shield other hosting services); they knew and did nothing. Second, that through other businesses and websites they controlled, the Megaupload folks deliberately solicited infringing content and directed it to Megaupload (hence the "conspiracy" charges, which mean something very specific and not necessarily the tinfoil hats and black helicopters so popular among bloggers who think they know the meaning of a word). If those complaints are true (and none of us here knows that or will decide that; we are not the jury, and we are not seeing the evidence), then yeah, they're gonna go to jail and be stripped of every penny they own. That's reality, regardless of whether Anonymous, Slashdot, or anyone else likes it or not.

Re:Question (4, Insightful)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764830)

Here's the problem with the "willful" argument in general.

Either you can have a cloud in which your data is private, or the owners of the cloud can actively prevent the use of the cloud for hosting "infringing content".

You can't have both.

Re:Question (1)

Aryden (1872756) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764796)

Due process does apply, in theory. Also, the government has the right to shut down any business that is charged with the commission of a crime and confiscate any and all evidence pertaining to said crimes. This is why the site is down and the servers were confiscated.

Re:Question (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764860)

A judge signed it, THATS due process.

Re:Question (1)

Myopic (18616) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764932)

I hope you phrased that comment in the form of a question because you are prepared to accept the large number of factually correct responses you have received and will continue to receive.

I hope you didn't phrase that comment in the form of a question in order to employ the all-too-common crank tactic of using rhetorical question with the implication that there can't possibly be an answer to this ever-so-clever question.

It's called the arrogance of ignorance: I don't know how this could possibly be, therefore it can't possibly be. Sometimes this tactic is used to support magic (I don't know how the universe came to be, therefore it must have been supernatural/God/magic) or political nonsense (I don't know how due process works, therefor fascism/totalitarianism/unlawfulness).

Re:Question (1)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765084)

The former.

I was hoping for, and got, some pretty good answers with this comment [slashdot.org] , and this comment [slashdot.org] .

Due Process (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765138)

They will stand trial, and if the trial concludes with them being acquitted they can get their domains, servers, etc. back. The fact that they will lose so much business that they will wind up bankrupt is irrelevant to due process.

Simple... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764472)

Your files will glow in golden sunlight when the cloud dissipates... =)

Fortunately, we've already discussed this problem. (4, Insightful)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764482)

It sounds hauntingly familiar to what happens when a DRM licensing server goes down. (And also due to a company folding/retiring the service.)

Clearly, we need a magical, distributed, self-healing data storage system. I think I've heard of one or two of these (can anyone provide links, if they exist?) but I guess they haven't been popular enough to be remembered. (And I'm not talking about mere P2P; I'm thinking something more like distributed, redundant storage with the structural resilience of BitCoin.)

Re:Fortunately, we've already discussed this probl (1)

amorsen (7485) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764766)

FreeNet is one. It is better for storing files than /dev/zero.

Re:Fortunately, we've already discussed this probl (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764988)

Storage@home [wikipedia.org] was a distributed storage infrastructure designed to store massive amounts of scientific data across a large host of volunteer machines. The project was developed by some of the Folding@home team at Stanford University, and is currently inactive.

Your Screwed (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764502)

Just like Jackson Games in Austin (Google It) back in the 90's. Feds seized hardware and all data in a raid that were later proved to be innocent of. It took 7 years to gain access to the companies data and accounting records. By that time - it made no difference. Interestingly, the IRS got involved in the middle of this and they didn't care why the company could not access their records - huge tax fine, penalties and liability followed.

That have been a number of cases already that prove that there is NO privacy or even search warrant required for seizure of data outside of your own physical control... Even items stored on your cell phone are not protected in many states.

I wouldn't trust the cloud or any virtual storage any further than I can physically throw it.

Don't put all your eggs in one basket (4, Insightful)

Tony Isaac (1301187) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764516)

I don't even trust GMail to keep my e-mail store forever, but download them to my own copy of Thunderbird each day. GMail is probably not going away any time soon, but what would I do if for some reason they shut down my account? Customer service for issues like this at Google isn't exactly stellar. If you don't have your own backups of what you have in the cloud, you are asking for trouble.

Re:Don't put all your eggs in one basket (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764864)

It's not just GMail disappearing that you have to worry about. I once lost all of my e-mail that I had stored on GMail when a Chinese hacker got my password and downloaded it all, deleting my e-mail in the process. I eventually got my e-mail back and all of my account passwords changed, but it was a real hassle. About the only thing I didn't recover (besides my e-mails) was my Haunted Memento in World of Warcraft. I'm still mad about losing that.

Is you had an account on Megaupload (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764530)

If you had an account on Megaupload, especially if you are not American, write to your representative and complain about the US unilaterally stealing your investment. There seems to be no hope of America reforming from within, but maybe some international pushback could make a difference.

Re:Is you had an account on Megaupload (1)

P-niiice (1703362) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764840)

I agree. The US has a history of listening to what other countries say, and a little pressuraaaaaahahaahahahaha

There is nothing magic about the "Cloud" ... (4, Insightful)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764532)

There is nothing magic about the "Cloud". From a practical perspective it is little more than a remote hard drive. A cloud provider going away is very much like a hard drive failing.

Re:There is nothing magic about the "Cloud" ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764788)

A shared remote hard drive. That, in some cases, was the nexus for collaboration/communications. The people using these services, even if they had full backups, now need a way to restore their setup and data elsewhere, and update all their links. I don't know of anyone who has a good solution for that last, if they have full backups, their backup utilities should cover the first. Depending on the Cloud Service's provision for backup/restore.

Isn't it obvious? (5, Informative)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764572)

It goes away. Hope you had a backup.

If you're lucky, the cloud provider may provide you with a one-time access to your account, but isn't it far safer to assume that if your cloud provider goes down, you've lost everything you put in? Not just data, either - if you've prepaid your account, you probably lost all that stored value as well.

Cloud storage providers especially. What happens if your hard drive dies? You lose the data. What happens if your backup tapes fail - you've lost the backup. What happens if your dropbox/skydrive/etc. disappear? You've lost your files.

All those XDA Developer links? Gone. hope the original authors are still around to upload them elsewhere or that someone downloaded it and can upload it.

Cloud providers make us lazy - we think "it'll always be around and I can grab it later". Turns out later can disappear - perhaps temporary (e.g., your or their internet connection dies), or permanently. But it's really just the same as storing files locally - there's a chance the storage may fail.

As usual, always have your data in 2 places. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764574)

Never put yourself in a position to suffer from a single point of failure.

This is why you can't rely on cloud services (3, Informative)

SirGarlon (845873) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764604)

The possibility that a cloud service can go offline quite suddenly should be a major factor in your decision whether to use the service at all, and the extent to which you'll rely on it. The customer agreement for Amazon Web Services [amazon.com] is better than I might expect because it says they will notify you if the service goes dark, but that might be small comfort if you are not prepared for a sudden migration.

Surprise surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764606)

Seriously. Is anyone really surprised that the junk they stuffed into the cloud could, would, and has disappeared?

And people ask me why I don't use the cloud (storage) and why I run my own e-mail and web servers, etc.

You cannot trust anything left in anyone else's hands. Simple.

Tangerine Dream & Kate Bush (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764630)

The cloud has burst.

Re:Tangerine Dream & Kate Bush (1)

itsdapead (734413) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764768)

The cloud has burst.

I'm sure the T&Cs for most cloud services include a Force Majeure clause. Hopefully someone will have to dig through metamorphic rock to get at your backup.

They end up on eBay. (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764632)

All your files end up on drives being sold on eBay.

There's still on-premises... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764682)

1) Build your favorite Linux server
2) Install an FTP server that ships with web and mobile interfaces (e.g., Serv-U [serv-u.com] )
3) Make it as cloudy as you want (extra redundancy, pipes from the Internet, replicate the back-end, etc.)

Re:There's still on-premises... (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764746)

... 5) Profit!

What will happen to me? Not a thing. (1)

winkydink (650484) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764718)

People who fail to keep backups deserve everything they have coming to them.

One story down (4, Interesting)

IWantMoreSpamPlease (571972) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764722)

Is a case against some Dell folks for massive insider trading scam.

Wanna take a whild guess as to who gets more jail time?

Re:One story down (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765030)

So, they'll be shutting down Dell. Right?

While I'll gladly build a cloud based system... (3, Insightful)

darkharlequin (1923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764740)

...for a client, I'm not going to fool them into believing its any more secure than offsite copies in C level officer's homes or other safe location with physical access. In fact, given what happened with Megaupload, I'm not sure I could, in good conscience, convince a customer that cloud computing is secure for them.

What happens to all the files? (1)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764752)

What happens to all the files that were stored on the servers? If you don't have a backup yourself, then you're SOL.

That's one reason why I refused to depend on cloud storage and keep a NAS. I keep telling friends who use their smartphones as their main PC, digital camera, etc to back the stuff up and not just to the cloud. If you don't, you might find yourself F'ed one day. But do they listen? Nope.

SOPA breaks the notion of the Cloud (4, Insightful)

RichMan (8097) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764786)

Prime example evidence #1 of how SOPA breaks the cloud.

A single complaint that a cloud service has a copyright file can result in a takedown of the entire cloud. Stranding all clients of that cloud.

Thanks to the government and their extra-judicial processes, they have broken the notion of internet provided services.

More to the point... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764856)

...how can we lay it all on the feet of Microsoft Fanboys? ;-)

Seriously, scary precedent being set. Next you'll get arrested for knowing someone who knows someone who posted copyrighted material without permission.

Megaupload does have a site up? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764866)

http://109.236.83.66/ This site claims to be megaupload reborn. Can anyone confirm whether this location actually holds files?

Whats any different (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764870)

Whats any different then what happened during the dotcom bust where millions lost whatever they were storing on image storing services? They couldn't get them back theres no money to pay anyone to watch the server farm no money to pay the elect bills and so on. The only thing that has changed is the naming of the server farm its called the cloud.

I just read the full indictment (4, Informative)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764886)

Those emails are pretty damning, especially the ones specifying payments to users for providing illegal content. To paraphrase: "User X has 10 great, DVD ripped copies of some popular movies, let's send him a check for five grand." If anything, though, this is proof that the existing law is working as intended and we really don't need any additional bills to go through to crack down on piracy.

The Folly of the Cloud (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38764898)

Reading some of the above comments, and the article on ExtremeTech, I am left with a very bad feeling.

One point which everyone misses: it is not unlikely (or improbable) that a service such as Megaupload, could utilize resources provided by AWS. Why spin up your own, when other providers already do it, and do it cheaply? In such a case, the feds would be going after Amazon and could possibly request to shut down their services. The ramifications of such a takedown, are of course, dire for many businesses great and small relying on AWS.

It is impossible for a company like Amazon to defend against copyrighted content being stored on their servers (by some 3rd party) without their knowledge. This opens them up for all types of unpleasant "business" with law enforcement. Theoretically, if you read your service agreement with Amazon, you would have found that they forbid illegal use (don't they all?) and also are not liable for any losses incurred due to unavailability of the services. How can one run a business in that type of environment? No liability? So, who in the end is liable for a service you might have spent "x" dollars (where "x" may be a non-trivial number) disappearing? So "best-effort" is worth how much nowadays?

What happens to the Cloud when it rains ? (4, Interesting)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 2 years ago | (#38764900)

Today, millions of people understood why technical staff always had reservation about "cloud-based" solutions.

Treat it like any other evidence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38765000)

When a crime like stealing happens, and that is basically what hollywood said they are doing, the evidence is returned to the rightfull owner once the trial is done with. Once they are done with their bogus trial they should have to sort through it and return any "evidence" back to the owners that uploaded that isn't illegal. Hope the gov. has fun sorting through all that data.

The economics of using multiple hosting providers (2)

DamnStupidElf (649844) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765004)

should work out pretty well. Just upload your content to as many "cloud" services as possible and each one can pay for itself if your content is worth anything. If one provider goes away, the rest will take up the slack. Use magnet links.

Dumb Enough to Store Important Files Online? (1)

kyrio (1091003) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765056)

If you're dumb enough to store important files online, and not have a local copy, why should you get them back when that service goes offline?

Q: What Happens To Your Files When a Cloud Service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38765096)

A: Bastards like me laugh at you for not backing up as soon as you read that "What Happens To Your Files When a Cloud Service Shuts Down?" article on the interwebs

Master copy (1)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#38765116)

Well, when I upload something to the cloud, I still of course keep the master file. So there is no problem.

False Site: 109.236.83.66 (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38765124)

From the site:
WE DON'T HAVE ANY DOMAIN NAME FOR NOW
ONLY THIS IP ADDRESS (http://109.236.83.66) BEWARE TO THE PISHING SITES!
This is the NEW MEGAUPLOAD SITE! we are working to be back full again
Bookmark the site and share the new address in facebook and twitter!

But apparently if you go to the site, you will be used as part of a DDoS attack?
http://gawker.com/5877707/the-evil-new-tactic-behind-anonymous-massive-revenge-attack

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