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Filesonic Removes Ability To Share Files

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the closing-shop dept.

Your Rights Online 412

Ihmhi writes "In the wake of the Megaupload takedown, Filesonic has elected to take preventative measures against a similar fate. The front page and all files now carry the following message: 'All sharing functionality on FileSonic is now disabled. Our service can only be used to upload and retrieve files that you have uploaded personally.' Whether or not this will actually deter the U.S. government from taking action remains to be seen."

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Correction for the title. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788255)

Filesonic becomes useless.

Re:Correction for the title. (0)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788515)

lol so filesonic kills themselves.

Re:Correction for the title. (5, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788565)

More or less. Just canceled my account. Whole point was to be able to send people files too large for email.

Re:Correction for the title. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788653)

>Filesonic becomes useless.

Internet within US jurisdiction becomes a little more useless.

FTFY

You know that piracy isn't bothered by what the US does to it's own Internet businesses, right?

Re:Correction for the title. (5, Informative)

Moru74 (1376087) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788821)

This hunting file-sharers is meaningless, they will just switch over to encryption and other distributed forms of transfer like i2p2.de for example. Encrypted anonymizer written in Java so it runs on all platforms.

The side-effect is that real criminals will also benefit from this development and use the same means to communicate. Great, the pirate hunt will make it impossible to catch real terrorists. Is this really worth it?

Next (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788257)

US government requires written permission for moving files on your desktop.

Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (5, Insightful)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788291)

The sharing scene for the music I listen to mainly transitioned from P2P networks or Bittorrent sites to indexes of Megaupload/Rapidshare/whatever uploads. The advantages cited were the inability to track IPs and more dependability since one didn't have to wait around for seeders. These recent developments might be enough to send people back to Bittorrent, especially as legal challenges have not sufficed to bring down The Pirate Bay, let alone some of the (IMHO more useful) lesser known torrent communities.

If things go back to Bittorrent, remember that the community depends to a degree on you, so please seed.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (3)

Barbariandude (2558467) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788319)

I do believe this sounds about right. I'll seed what I can :)

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788349)

Huh?

When did things ever go away from torrents? Demonoid is still alive. Despite prior threats, TPB is still going strong. And the private tracker community has absolutely exploded over the past few years (though they'll leave your ass in the dust if you drop below a certain sharing ratio).

So what am I missing? Was there some global Megaupload revolution I wasn't aware of? Because all I've ever seen from lame ass websites like that was "OMG you exceeded your daily quota, give us money to continue! We promise we won't hand over your CC information to the FBI, we swear!"...

-AC

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788369)

When did things ever go away from torrents?

Three years ago or more.

Demonoid is still alive.

If you're looking for classical music and jazz, as well as .iso files (full DVDs) of films instead of low-quality transcoded files, Demonoid's selection is extremely poor compared to certain websites that link to Rapidshare et al.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (2)

rsmith-mac (639075) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788447)

When did things ever go away from torrents?

Three years ago or more.

Now the interesting thing with that timeline is that it was directly influenced by the MPAA/RIAA's lawsuits - services such as MegaUpload effectively masked the identities of copyright infringers, shielding them from such suits. If this does swing back to BitTorrent, those infringers are going to once again become visible. Does this mean we'll see the RIAA/MPAA step up their civil lawsuits once more, since they'll be able to catch more people in the act now?

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (1)

Pubstar (2525396) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788597)

Well it seems as if it would be your problem for using public trackers. I've been on private trackers almost exclusively for 2 years now, and I haven't looked back.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (3, Interesting)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788449)

What if someone combined TOR with P2P? People who owned the file could not be identified because they'd be obfuscated through like X nodes. People who were generous could mark themselves as portals where people could send data through. Sure it isn't impossible for ISPs to get records across short hops of a few people, but if it got complex and multinational, it might be impossible to track. I think especially if you forced hops across the world so ISP records couldn't be lifted, it'd make it very difficult for RIAA to sue your grandmother for downloading music.

I personally try and not even consume that which comes from Hollywood, Television or music I can't get off the radio anymore. The Internet just is so great without main stream media that I don't need it. I actually kinda dislike mainstream media because they try and change policy with government to destroy the Internet.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (1)

Zemran (3101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788523)

If you look at the settings on Vuze you will find that this is already a normal thing to do.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788601)

Some P2P networks work through Tor (more or less) but suffer from a very narrow bandwidth bottleneck. BitTorrent inherently can't work properly with Tor. It uses UDP.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (3, Informative)

aaron552 (1621603) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788817)

Wrong [wikipedia.org]

BitTorrent makes many small data requests over different TCP connections to different machines

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (5, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788843)

"What if someone combined TOR with P2P?"

Then you get Freenet. It's anonyminity is as good as it gets - it's designed for use by dissidents living under oppressive regimes, so tracing either source or destination is all but impossible even if someone could compromise many nodes. The cost of this is performance: You can download whole TV episodes and movies, but at a fraction of the speed of a less paranoid network.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (4, Insightful)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788477)

This sort of comment is part of the problem, not the solution. Breaking the law simply because one isn't going go through the effort to pay for something optional like music is not helpful. It isn't noble. And it is exactly the sort of thing that makes nasty things like SOPA and the like get momentum. And as a result now, websites like Filesonic, which has perfectly legal and legitimate uses are now running into trouble. By all means, help those of us who care about civil liberties fight against draconian laws that would damage the Internet, and by all means join us in our attempts to make copyright laws marginally sane. But don't think that you are doing anything helpful when you make posts like the above.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788593)

And it is exactly the sort of thing that makes nasty things like SOPA and the like get momentum.

SOPA gets momentum from those who corporate groups who lobby the government for it. Putting the blame on /. opinions is misdirection at best.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (5, Insightful)

Brett Buck (811747) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788845)

It's not a slashdot opinion - it's the idea that you can take something from someone else who spent some money producing it for sale, and instead get it for free. And then claiming it's somehow your right, or somehow noble to do it.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (5, Insightful)

SchMoops (2019810) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788875)

It's no less arbitrary that those of us who create content (and I'm one of them) claim it's somehow our right to profit from it.

Take a look at this blog post by Jonathan Coulton. I can't think of any way I could agree more:
http://www.jonathancoulton.com/2012/01/21/megaupload/ [jonathancoulton.com]

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788617)

But what you have said essentially equates to "Burn the printing press!"

http://www.frontline.org.za/articles/thereformation_lectures.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Gutenberg

http://www.flowofhistory.com/units/west/11/FC74

http://communication.ucsd.edu/bjones/Books/luther.html

I am quite sure that Moses's copyright claims had expired before Gutenberg got his gritty hands on his words or the damned Germans transcribed Bach's works...but are pirates really gonna buy the Bible, or Bach, or Gaga?

Artists should be remunerated...and shared...and historic. Bill Maher whined about Religiousosityatrocity being pirated the other day...dude, 90% of the dipshits that dl'ed never heard of Bill, 90% of those that did...did not watch it...those that dis said "New Rule: Don't talk about your Mother and Sister more than the Playboy whores. Incestuous Jewish faggot."

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788579)

It's a fairly inevitable back and forth development, as the increasing popularity of BitTorrent gives investigators an incentive to track and drives up the risk, after which streaming sites become more popular, leading to take-down efforts targeted at those, making people go back to BitTorrent again.

It's a question of risk evaluation. BitTorrent almost always works, but leaves you personally open for legal attacks. Streaming sites can be used with relative anonymity but go down easily.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (2)

psiclops (1011105) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788765)

VPN/Private trackers

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788847)

Why seed when there is usenet? It's far superior to torrents. With most providers your files remain up for over three years and you'll be able to download so fast 24/7 that you'll fill up your whole pipe. No need to worry about people who stop seeding, or worrying about the **AA sending DMCA notices to your ISP since you download and upload files completely anonymously since the usenet providers don't keep logs.

I'd avoid giganews though as they are the most expensive and not worth the cost.

I stopped using torrents two months ago and haven't looked back.

Re:Thigs swinging back to Bittorrent and P2P? (3, Insightful)

Kalriath (849904) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788881)

Seeding is becoming incredibly dangerous in countries where the US has too much influence - take a look, for example, at New Zealand's Copyright (Infringing File Sharing) Amendment Act 2008. A law pretty much written by the US Government (read MPAA and RIAA) which essentially makes it so that once the relevant sections kick in, Warner Music or Disney can get you banned from the internet for six months because they claim to have detected you uploading files over Bittorrent - and the burden of proof is on you, the defendant, not them the accuser. And we both know that the reason the US government pushes laws like this overseas is so that they can weaken the domestic opposition. So while you say "please seed", some people are simply not in a position to.

Screw Paying Customers (3, Interesting)

kyrio (1091003) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788293)

This is the new thing. Make a shit ton of money from customers (advertisers, publishers), and after you've hit your goal, close down and never pay anyone or refund any of the advertising money. Etology (of etology.com) did the same thing about 5 months ago - stole advertisers money and essentially stole money that publishers were owed (for displaying their ads). Megaupload cut off their affiliate program and didn't pay anyone out some time ago. Rapidshare.com went through 5 different version of billing and affiliate methods a couple of years ago - in the end, screwing everyone in the same way rapidshare.de did a year or two earlier. The only company that I've dealt with that has actually paid out what they owed, after cutting off their affiliate program, was Wupload.

MediaFire (2)

KingAlanI (1270538) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788513)

MediaFire doesn't have such a paid affiliate program AFAIK; they seem less guilty of obnoxious behavior in general.

Re:MediaFire (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788627)

MU's affilate programs was very hard to actually garner any payouts from. The minimum payout was $100 for 100000 points IIRC, and the definiton of what downloads counted towards points was quite narrow. One had to be a semi-professional uploader to get money from MU in my opinion... posting on multiple forums, using bots for downloading/posting, etc.

This is is in contrast to other sites like FileSonic, where the bar for getting payouts was far more moderate and could be reached by a large number of users.

Re:MediaFire (1)

kyrio (1091003) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788719)

Due to MediaFire's system of unlimited simultaneous downloads, they are becoming the choice place to host your files. If you go to reddit's r/jailbaitarchive (I only know about them because someone linked to my site in one of their posts), you'll see how the child molesters prefer using MediaFire. Sharing music albums and other "illegal" files with MediaFire has also been common practice due to the lack of delays and high download limits.

"illegal" files being the crap the USA pumps out and tries to sue people over.

Re:MediaFire (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788777)

you'll see how the child molesters

Who is a child molester? If you meant the people on that website, in order for that to be true, they'd have to actually molest someone.

Re:MediaFire (3, Insightful)

aaron552 (1621603) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788829)

I wouldn't really consider the contents of r/jailbaitarchive to be "children", either. Adolescents, for the most part. Legally, yes they are "children", biologically, no.

Obvious (1, Interesting)

mrbcs (737902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788295)

If this type of service was only meant for personal backups and not illegal file sharing, this would have been the standard in the first place.

Why would anyone ever have to "share" backup files with anyone else.

I predict, within a week filestube and the like will be utterly useless and this facade (of legal file sharing)will be completely stopped just like Napster was.

If these sites can be shut down with lawsuits now, why do we need SOPA and PIPA?

Re:Obvious (4, Informative)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788337)

Why would anyone ever have to "share" backup files with anyone else.

Because it was really useful for collaborative projects.

Not only that... (3, Insightful)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788377)

Why would anyone ever have to "share" backup files with anyone else.

Because it was really useful for collaborative projects.

Because it is my freedom to do what the hell I want with *my* files, including backup files.

Re:Not only that... (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788409)

That argument is so 1990s.

Re:Not only that... (1)

mtm_king (99722) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788557)

That argument is so 1990s.

And your point is????

Re:Not only that... (4, Interesting)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788581)

The concept of liberty is so 1790s.

Re:Not only that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788657)

Utopian! That argument is so 1450's!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johannes_Gutenberg

Research: Kunst und Aventur (art and enterprise).

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788347)

You are naive.

Many of those sites were used by businesses. I have personalyl seen legitimate bussinesses have used this way of communication to exchange really big files that cant be transferred over email, like CAD files for exmaple, or some markting videos or smth.

Re:Obvious (5, Informative)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788389)

Which is exactly why things like DropBox are so useful. But the key is to only support sharing with specific users. And, of course, to not have a business model (like MU) built around pirated material.

Github (3, Insightful)

r6144 (544027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788631)

Github's public repositories can of course be used for illegal file sharing, and some infringing material probably exists right now, because it is impractical for the site operator to monitor all uploaded data. However, without such functionality, participating in (or even just forking) an open source project will be much more cumbersome.

Well, an hour spent writing open-source (or other) software is an hour not consuming MAFIAA's stuff, so maybe this is what they actually want...

Re:Obvious (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788351)

Why would anyone ever have to "share" backup files with anyone else.

If its too big to fit in email attachment.

Re:Obvious (0, Troll)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788359)

If these sites can be shut down with lawsuits now, why do we need SOPA and PIPA?

We don't need SOPA and PIPA as currently written, but we need something. Because not all of these piracy-for-cash operations work out of places where reciprocity (as in New Zealand) is workable.

But you're right about the facade coming down. The whole it's-just-for-Linux-distros bit of Kabuki Theater was getting really ridiculous.

Re:Obvious (5, Interesting)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788407)

We don't need SOPA and PIPA as currently written, but we need something.

Do we? [forbes.com]

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788413)

piracy for cash operations only work when the people you're selling the pirated goods to don't know how you got them.

I admit that some of those places still exist, but even my grandparents know how to use bittorrent now. That argument won't last much longer.

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788471)

It's becoming increasingly clear that we can't 'stop' piracy more than we already do (which is very little) without violating civil rights.

It's just not worth it. If it results in more draconian laws, it's just not worth it. What the fuck are we doing? We're talking about some people maybe losing potential sales here! And yet so much effort is being put into this. It's ridiculous. Don't we have better things to do than this?

But no. Piracy might as well be a national security emergency with how many worthless, draconian laws and bills that they keep trying to pass. Thankfully, not many of them have been successful... yet.

Re:Obvious (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788721)

We don't need SOPA and PIPA as currently written, but we need something.

Do we, really? It's impossible to stop 100% of all piracy and all the current methods are already too far-reaching in my opinion. Besides, one of the things that drives piracy is the entertainment industry's own fault; like e.g. bringing DVD/BluRay movies out in the US only to deliberately wait 3 months before bringing them out in the rest of the world. They need to bring out better service instead of just trying to limit and restrict people more and more and more. Steam is a perfectly good example of this, they've managed to turn plenty of former pirates to legitimate customers simply by offering superior service.

Re:Obvious (2)

Zemran (3101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788807)

The best thing about SOPA and PIPA is that now people all over the world are seeing how dangerous it is to rely on the US for important services. We are switching to DNS servers that cannot be regulated by absurd US law suits. The internet is changing to an US and us internet whereby we can see things you cannot. The Great Firewall of the USA is being built and good luck to those in the US that are letting it happen. The idea is just as idiotic as the Chinese version and less workable.

Re:Obvious (4, Interesting)

rsmith-mac (639075) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788375)

If these sites can be shut down with lawsuits now, why do we need SOPA and PIPA?

Because the owners of these sites are only punishable under US law so long as they're doing business here and they are in a country that extradites to the US. The moment someone sets up an operation like this in a US-unfriendly country (and makes absolutely sure not to conduct any business in the US), there will be no way for the US to shut them down by going after the owners.

Thus SOPA. You can't shut the site down, but if you can prevent them from engaging in transactions with US residents, you've effectively achieved the same thing.

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788641)

Ok, let's go everybody a set up shop in Iran, they might end up making some money from hosting this kind of 'activity' >

Re:Obvious (5, Insightful)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788483)

If this type of service was only meant for personal backups and not illegal file sharing, this would have been the standard in the first place.

This is nonsense. "Personal backups" are by no means the only legitimate use of services such as this. As a freelance developer, I've had several clients use services like this to send me files. Is your imagination really so limited that you can't think of a single reason why you might want to share a file you have the rights to with another person?

File sharing is not intrinsically illegal. File sharing is fundamental to the Internet. Right now, Slashdot is sharing many, many files with people accessing it, including you. Are you a criminal? Copyright infringement is a particular type of file sharing. The two concepts are not synonymous, they are quite distinct.

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788839)

There are also some things you can't legally claim copyright on or maybe you can... but try to bring that to court. Yea- not happening.

Re:Obvious (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788521)

I'm completely lost how this was modded so highly. Legal file sharing isn't a facade. No one is denying that the bulk of file sharing is copyright infringement, but that doesn't take away from legitimate file sharing. I personally have around 700 megabytes of material attached to my mediafire account, and not one bit of it could be considered copyright infringement, and many of the links have seen a lot of use.

If you think file sharing is going down the tube within a week, you've gone completely mental.

Re:Obvious (-1, Flamebait)

mrbcs (737902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788701)

If you think file sharing is going down the tube within a week, you've gone completely mental.

If you had the mental capacity to understand what was originally written, you would not have thrown a fit of verbal diarrhea.

I said that the search site (Filestube), which searches these file upload sites will be useless without the ability to allow anyone to download the files.

The other point that you could not comprehend was that fact that these services advertise their sites as a place to store personal backups.

But I digress, have fun in your mother's basement and let the adults continue to discuss the issue.

It's easy to spew venom as a coward isn't it.

Re:Obvious (3, Insightful)

rhysweatherley (193588) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788533)

And where exactly is it going to end? Files can be "shared" via github, savannah, and sourceforge too. In fact, that's the primary purpose of those sites - legal sharing of files containing open source code. Setting up an account on those sites to share things the user doesn't own is just as easy and could go unnoticed for quite a while before some RIAA/MPAA/etc lawyer decides to nuke an open source hub off the net for the actions of a handful of users. First they came for megaupload ...

Re:Obvious (4, Interesting)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788551)

If this type of service was only meant for personal backups and not illegal file sharing, this would have been the standard in the first place.

Why would anyone ever have to "share" backup files with anyone else.

You're making a strawman argument. No where does it say on that site that it's for making backups.

I assume they're only making the files available to the original uploaders (so that no one can come and later claim that they've lost important files because of them). You know how people are. If gmail were to suddenly shut down tomorrow and allow no one to retrieve anything from their account. 100% of all gmail users would claim that they had lost irreplaceable files and data on it (even if they hadn't).

...and this facade (of legal file sharing) will be completely stopped...

Sure, the facade of illegal file sharing may shut down, but at the cost of the legal file sharing as well. I don't know about you, but for me if everyone of those filesharing sites shuts down, that means I'm relegated to using gmail for sharing files (and that usually means a limit of 5 MB to 25 MB depending on who I'm emailing the attachment to). Either that, or I can use meetup.com site which has a limit of 10 MB (plus I think they manually inspects each upload, even for paid customers, so that means there is a delay there as well before anything actually shows up).

If these sites can be shut down with lawsuits now, why do we need SOPA and PIPA?

Like I said, I hope this doesn't shut down all file-sharing web sites, which would make my life difficult, but I think that was the original point of SOPA and PIPA, and that was to eventually shut down without due process any and all user file-sharing web sites that are easy to use (no matter what collateral damage this would create on the legitimate and legal usage that goes on there).

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788871)

Don't worry, sharing files with hard size limits is a solved problem. If this happens, we'll just see new tools that adapt the USENET method and make it transparent and super easy.

Re:Obvious (1)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788615)

we never needed more laws they just what to be the judge and jury aka going around all your rights and just send you straight to jail. file sharing is filesharing its imposable to control what users upload and they should not be expected to. i hope after the dust settles megaupload wins in court they did comply with dcma takedowns all the time its just a bunch of shit because megaupload was going to start competing with the labels and was going to open a media store and many artest where aruldy going around the media company's and releasing directly on megaupload. never believe media hype when stuff like this happens. rapidshare was took to court for the same reasons and won.

Re:Obvious (1)

dissy (172727) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788859)

If this type of service was only meant for personal backups and not illegal file sharing, this would have been the standard in the first place.
Why would anyone ever have to "share" backup files with anyone else.

Well you're in luck, I have a document file here with the full answer to your question, with detailed explanations abound!
It also contains the secret to life, and a pony.

Now if only I had a place to upload that file and share the link with you...
Oh well, as you say no one has or ever would have a need to do such a thing. Guess you'll have to do without.
It was an adorable pony too!

Re:Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788867)

SOPA and PIPA--if eventually revised from their tabled versions and then passed--thankfully have a broader scope of enforcing copyright violations and intellectual property violations than the current laws may offer. Plus, they also specifically have clauses relevant to the Internet.

Think of it as helping to establish a new Internet order, if you will. Shutting down as many of the sites facilitating upload and download of RIAA or MPAA content in violation of copyright laws, bust even those who are responsible for the sites in addition to the users who did the illegal upload and download. Law compliance as the top priority with Internet liberties in compliance with all laws governing the Internet being the next priority.

Then majority of uploads and downloads will only be user created content specifically authorized to be uploaded and download, with the piracy "scene" driven so far underground that they are no longer relevant anymore.

SOPA and PIPA are a good start for taking harsh measures against any site allowing upload or download of illegal content and hosting it. How could I not support that--especially reading other posts that favor piracy or even request seeding pirated content?

Put another way, isn't anyone against SOPA and PIPA essentially de facto saying they are proponents of piracy? If those site owners are so worried about being shut down, why don't they implement faster and more effective measures of finding and removing the illegal content? Why do they even dare act on content removal takedown requests without a court order? Why aren't they already monitoring uploads and download for known "fingerprints" of copyrighted RIAA or MPAA content?

They can do all that, both by manual and automated means, but apparently they won't make the effort. SOPA and PIPA will thankfully force them to comply faster or get busted.

Sooo... (1)

grub (11606) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788301)


Basically, they're now competing with the free services of Dropbox, iCloud, Box, SpiderOak, et al, and are charging money for it.
Great business plan.

Re:Sooo... (3, Informative)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788391)

Actually, even Dropbox and SpiderOak have "sharing" support on their free offerings (at least, assuming they don't follow this lead themselves).

**AA have won another battle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788345)

now that self censoring is in place

Oh the shame!

E-mail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788367)

Why not just e-mail it to yourself then, jeez.

Re:E-mail? (3, Insightful)

green1 (322787) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788417)

Ever emailed yourself a 600+MB file?

Forgot about IRC? (1)

Fysx (1992304) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788385)

Bleh, most people don't know about IRC (internet relay chat), many networks (EFnet and Undernet mostly), have mp3 and download xdcc bots, IRC is harder to take down because it comprises of multiple servers and some in other countries.

Re:Forgot about IRC? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788473)

You have to find the server, mb register, find the file, work out what the trigger is, the download might be very slow ....

Workaround (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788431)

People will create multiple accounts, post their usernames/passwords on the forums.

Go Filesharing!

Re:Workaround (2)

Brucelet (1857158) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788467)

And then some jerkoff will change the password

Re:Workaround (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788699)

But there will be some people downloading and resharing it.

Two down... (4, Informative)

enoz (1181117) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788433)

Megaupload is being taken for a ride in the Party Van and Filesonic has chosen self obliteration, though there is no shortage of competing services. On first glance Wikipedia lists 70+ [wikipedia.org] of the most popular file hosting services.

Re:Two down... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788539)

Megaupload is being taken for a ride in the Party Van and Filesonic has become an hero.

ftfy

Re:Two down... (2)

green1 (322787) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788637)

What is heroic about breaking one of their primary functions?
Admittedly I haven't used filesonic, however I have shared large files on MegaUpload (and no, they weren't files controlled by any media cartels) with the primary purpose of allowing someone other than myself to download them.
ISPs don't like you running your own servers without paying 4 times as much for 1/4 of the speed (I used to go that route...) and you can't email someone a 600MB file, so it's really handy to have services like this.

If they were to "become (a) hero" they would take a stand and block all US IP addresses, ensure their servers, DNS, and staff were outside the USA, and continue business as usual. Enough sites do this and maybe the American public will eventually realize what a mess they've allowed their government to create and do something about it. Until then, no sane business would ever take the risk of doing business over the internet with the USA. The rest of the world awaits, and we don't need the USA

Re:Two down... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788655)

http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/an-hero

Re:Two down... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788671)

"An hero" = Committed Suicide, it's an internet meme.

Local DC++ hubs, magnet and torrent trackers (5, Interesting)

D,Petkow (793457) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788437)

Some curiosity:In Bulgaria and also most other eastern European countries there used to be a funny practice amongst ISP's:Each internet provider used to have a NAS/LAN server, accessible only to subscribers/customers, loaded with warez, pr0n and movies, in a catalog type of way, year by year. This was way back in 1999- 2005. So You basically see what your monthly fee is, now much Mbps you get up/down, and also what kind of "bonus" warez this particular ISP has to offer, lol! I almost canot believe this was the de facto standard for many years! After some time the laws got changed and the ISPs were forced to quit this practice. But then torrents came in place. So what i am thinking is - we have at least a dozen trackers that are registered/hosted in Switzerland, Netherlands and other locations, like offshore islands or that Transnistria in Russia, where our local Bulgarian/EU laws do not apply. The servers/trackers themselves are configured to answer to requests only from Bulgarian peering IP addresses. So basically those servers remain unseen for the rest of the internet, including authorities, unless you use a Bulgarian proxy. My humble guess is that this kind of "localized" trackers will never go away, also i know for a fact that in Russia they have the same private trackers, DC hubs, and other p2p based ways of sharing warez. Just my 2 cents on this subject - i don't really care about the Filesharing hosts like MegaUpload, WUpload, Hotfile, RapidShare and so on, because they want money, because they have their pages bloated with ads and because of the crappy CAPTCHAs. Yeah.

Re:Local DC++ hubs, magnet and torrent trackers (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788547)

Some curiosity:In Bulgaria and also most other eastern European countries there used to be a funny practice amongst ISP's:Each internet provider used to have a NAS/LAN server, accessible only to subscribers/customers, loaded with warez, pr0n and movies, in a catalog type of way, year by year.

Same in Romania. We also already enjoyed fiber to the door years ago. Whatever film you wanted to watch some evening, you could download it in just a couple of minutes. It was this experience especially that really made me feel that the US had lost its edge in tech. Before emigrating to Eastern Europe, I was living in a major US metropolitan area but stuck with bad cable or DSL options that throttled the hell out of connections, as well as the fear of P2P lawsuits.

In thousands of basements (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788451)

Voices echo up suburban stairs - "Mommy I will be a little late with your stories tonight"

A mixed bag ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788453)

All of the file sharing websites on the list initially started with a limitation on size of uploads. This meant the file of interest was broken into pieces and encrypted with a password. This "feature" enabled these websites to claim immunity. They got a bit brazen when these file locker models were expanding rapidly all over the world. They decided to "compete" and made uploads with larger file sizes. These larger file sizes did not "require" the use of rar and other "encryption" methods. All files which are on the server can be tagged with a md5 or other checksum. The end result was that these websites are left vulnerable and fall foul of the safe harbor provision. I believe we will see swifter action on take downs and re-uploads will be files with different file-sizes which don't have the same check sums. Welcome to yesterday. The best bet will be a usenet archive web interface "filesharing" empire. All files are uploaded to the usenet archive chosen by the user. Nothing is stored on the servers of the filesharing empire. Download links are links to the files stored on the usenet servers. The links let users download the file and "assemble" them on their computer. Nothing illegal about this. Let them go after usenet then the real fun will begin.

Self-Censorship (1)

bug1 (96678) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788503)

Jacob Appelbaum spoke about self-censorship at his keynote at LCA2012.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMN2360LM_U [youtube.com]

In this case, its a company choosing to censor themselves so the government doesnt have to.

Re:Self-Censorship (1)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788531)

Self-censorship isn't an acceptable alternative to no censorship at all.

Re:Self-Censorship (2)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788743)

Which was Jacob's point; where there is surveillance, there will be censorship, even if it is not explicit. He called it "an emergent phenomenon of surveillance". Hence the importance of resistance to surveillance.

A message from America... (4, Interesting)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788507)

...to the rest of the world: we don't want your business. We don't want any tech companies to set up here. We're going to make this the most hostile nation to internet and technology start ups by bullying anyone who dares defy our notion of imaginary property.

Re:A message from America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788541)

yeah because running a glorified FTP site is what passes for innovation.

Re:A message from America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788857)

Yes, but at Internet scale. It's like calling Slashdot a glorified web page.

If Those hollywood bitches wanted to shut anyone down, it should be AWS. For letting all S3 frontend startups in the first place. Then you can wonder where all the real innovations went.

Re:A message from America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788681)

The vast majority of the rest of the world doesn't give a shit about file sharing sites, especially ones that specifically and openly cater to copyright infringement. As far as the business world goes, people care about contracts and money changing hands. 99.9% of people do not care, and never will care about these crusades. This is bound to be an unpopular view on a site like /. but it's simply the truth. I've seen 15 years of this stuff come and go, and nothing has truly changed. American tech companies are actually doing just fine, thank you. I happen to know this firsthand, as I own one that specializes in managed Linux server solutions.

Re:A message from America... (2)

schnell (163007) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788781)

We don't want your business. We don't want any tech companies to set up here.

I applaud your sentiment since SOPA/PIPA etc. are stupid. But your comment is not reflective of reality. Google is based in the USA. So is Apple. So is Intel. So is Cisco. So is Facebook. So is Microsoft. So is Oracle. So is Red Hat. So is Qualcomm. So is Yahoo!. The list goes on and on.

There are a lot of good arguments against the current US Intellectual Property/patent policies, but "tech companies won't exist in the US" is not one of them.

Re:A message from America... (2)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788853)

Internet and technology startups rely on intellectual property rights. If you just invented a new widget, you'd much rather do business in the US (with all its flaws) than in some anarcho-libertarian utopia with no intellectual property rights, because in that "utopia" some big megacorp would just come along, take your idea, and mass produce it at a lower price than you can afford to compete at. Thanks for all your hard work, now get back in the unemployment line.

The only thing that makes less sense than the RIAA's trillion dollar "losses" is the notion of IP abolition.

next up: pastebin, scribd, youtube, tubestack (2)

decora (1710862) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788545)

and all the other sites that are just massive abuses of the 'good faith' idea.

its one thing to be a neutral admin. but lets compare youtube and wikipedia for a moment.

on wikipedia, if you see copyright violations, you can take them down yourself. or, you can report them to a specialized group on wiki that actually cares about removing copyrighted content that was uploaded without permission of the copyright holder. they also have a system to verify whether or not works have been granted permission, and whether they are in public domain, by a large amount of research done with licensing and legal systems around the world.

now, lets take youtube. its full of people just uploading music albums and putting a still photo as their 'video'. now, the only person who can ever report that as a copyright vio is the artist themselves. nevermind you could probably listen to their music for free on bandcamp or something. . . youtube is not going to provide a link to bandcamp. youtube just does not give a shit.

The sites have different purposes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788715)

Wikipedia editors are essentially co-authors of its articles. The community as a whole feels morally (if not legally) responsible for the content of each article, so anything potentially problematic, whether copyvios, other illegal stuff, or just incorrect or poorly written material will be edited or removed more aggressively. Even though good material are sometimes removed erroneously, this is not a big problem because it is inevitable when there is only one version of the encyclopedia at any given time for the whole world to see.

On the other hand, youtube/pastebin is more like arXiv, where the site simply hosts the uploaded stuff and does not want to take responsibility for them. Policing the contents too much is not necessary and would defeat their purpose, such as to allow the users to share ideas, even wrong ones that are not acceptable on Wikipedia.

Re:next up: pastebin, scribd, youtube, tubestack (3, Interesting)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788751)

Youtube also has checks in place to figure out whether the soundtrack matches a copyrighted one. Of course, it's relatively easy to fool (change tone a bit or alter the soundtrack just a tiny fraction), but unaltered songs get automatically silenced. I know because I tried uploading a World of Tanks Clan Parade video I made which had "Diesel Power" by Prodigy as soundtrack. As soon as the upload finished, I received a notification that the soundtrack was copyrighted and bang, movie with no sound.

Interestingly, the same algorythm they use made me stop uploading Audiosurf captures; Audiosurf is a game allowing you to "race" a track uniquely generated from a song you choose. After ending up with a few nice captures which were muted, I said screw it and stopped.

Re:next up: pastebin, scribd, youtube, tubestack (1)

kcbnac (854015) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788827)

I wish there was a way to know what audio would be filtered and what wouldn't be. "These artists have said you can use their music in YT videos." Then tosses in the 'buy it on amazon/itunes/whatever' links.

Re:next up: pastebin, scribd, youtube, tubestack (1)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788855)

Oh yeah, me too. As it is right now, it's overly simplistic. I wouldn't mind paying royalties for a few songs which are worth it. but you can't.
Oh well...

Lan Parties (1)

EEPROMS (889169) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788591)

I have noticed since the crack down more and more people have been taking NAS boxes to LAN parties and sharing files. The reality is I find it easier now to get stuff now than before (download 20 gig per hour on a decent LAN). People will always share stuff especially if they know someone who cant afford it. When I was in college in the 80's we used create our own mix tapes and share them all the time. I did buy music but only stuff I liked and the rest I got was just filler that I deleted after 6 months.

this_sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788595)

This is going to get worse. Innovation and the internet are dieing fast. Long live sharing.

Boo hoo (2)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788669)

FileSonic was one of the hosts most beloved by for-profit autoposters, who spam links everywhere they can to rack up rewards payouts for lots of downloads, all while ignoring forum rules and drowning out people who actually want to share with other community members.

I'm not sad to see some of the for-profit whores exit the file sharing scene. Good riddance.

Napster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38788695)

How come that Napster guy never did any time?

So it begins (1)

atari2600a (1892574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788775)

The great technocratic war is now upon us my brethren! Join with me, & we shall wipe the imperialist scourge from these lands at last!

good old ftp.. (0, Flamebait)

ardiri (245358) | more than 2 years ago | (#38788825)

want to share files? host your own server - thats how we used to do it back in the day.

i also have projects i work on where i need to share "legal" files (artwork, music et al) for various things - why would i want to upload it to a public service where anyone can access this stuff? with my own ftp server, heck, can even expose it via http with htaccess - my clients can upload/download files as they need.

it is the pirates (stealing music, videos) who use these public services.. maybe we will see a few more of these sites drop, it is where all of our software that we have written ends up for kiddies to pirate. i say this is a step in the right direction. for p2p file sharing, bittorrent is always the way to go.. but, depends on the community as another poster has said.

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