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Ask Slashdot: Does Europe Have Better Magazines Than the US?

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the german-stereo-magazines-are-spitzenklasse dept.

The Media 562

An anonymous reader writes "Now that all the large chain book stores have disappeared from the landscape, I visited my local independent book store. In the basement I found a dazzling array of amazing magazines from the UK and Germany. Not only were the magazines impressive, they included CDs and DVDs of material. Nearly every subject was there: Knitting, Photography, Music, Linux, and Fitness. I snapped up a magazine called 'Computer Music,' which had a whole issue dedicated to making house music, including a disc of extra content. I subscribe to U.S. magazines like Wired, 2600, & Make, but their quality seems to ebb and flow from issue to issue and I don't ever recall a bonus disc. Are the UK magazines really better? If yes, why and which of them do you subscribe to? The other interesting thing about them is they weren't filled with tons of those annoying subscription cards. What is the best way to subscribe?"

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562 comments

EU Linux Mags Rock (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855035)

EU Linux mags rock, especially the UK versions.

I don't read dead tree magazines. (-1, Offtopic)

mrmeval (662166) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855051)

I read everything I need online. The only dead tree items I buy are hardcover books or special edition ebooks and printed comic compilations. I buy both direct from the author if at all possible to support them.

I mostly despise magazines and have for a very long time the last I recall reading was Nuts and Volts http://www.nutsvolts.com/ [nutsvolts.com] and Shotgun news http://www.shotgunnews.com/ [shotgunnews.com]

Online is more timely and up to date, there's more content and I can participate.

Not everything is online (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855377)

What about the official My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic magazine?

"All"? (2, Interesting)

Endo13 (1000782) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855055)

Now that all the large chain book stores have disappeared from the landscape

You live in the US, don't you? Aren't you forgetting something?

Re:"All"? (4, Funny)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855131)

Ah, I'm glad that we could get the redundant "what? the US isn't the ENTIRE WORLD, YOU KNOW" post out of the way. I bet you're eagerly awaiting your first "yeah but slashdot is a US-centric site" so you can counter with your well-planned "sure, but the internet spans the WHOLE WORLD so we deserve equal treatment" comment.
 
-Eleventy Billion, Redundant

Re:"All"? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855177)

Oh god, it's like you're inside our heads!

No really, that's so dead-on it's creepy.

Re:"All"? (0)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855399)

"the US isn't the ENTIRE WORLD, YOU KNOW"

No, but the US used to be one third of the world economy, i.e. before China came along.

Re:"All"? (3, Funny)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855473)

You must really enjoy the pleasant wooshing noises as humor flies over your head

Re:"All"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855495)

"Used to be" is a past tense.

Re:"All"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855577)

And Roman Empire once counted for 1/2 of the word`s economy before barabrians came. And British empire was controlling most of interational trade for some time. And the US is not the exception. Just another empire ti fall.

Re:"All"? (3, Interesting)

rhook (943951) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855339)

Barnes & Noble is still alive and well here in the US. I think subby doesn't get out of the basement too often.

Re:"All"? (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855513)

Barnes & Noble is still alive and well here in the US. I think subby doesn't get out of the basement too often.

I live in the city of San Francisco and the closest Barnes & Noble is a 15 minute drive from my house.

Re:"All"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855633)

"Barnes & Noble is still alive and well here in the US"

Got a dividend lately? They're as good as dead.

Re:"All"? (2)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855521)

I've never seen magazines sold in book stores, such as Waterstones in the UK. Most people in the UK buy from news agents, as the name suggests, they are shops that mainly sell newspapers and magazines (plus milk, perhaps stationary and sweets (candy)).

UK mags rock (5, Insightful)

lyran74 (685550) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855067)

Twenty years ago I was amazed at the quality of the UK magazines, in my case, Amiga computing & gaming rags, that came with floppy disks chocked full of stuff--barely a sector free. The value was far greater than what's available this side of the pond, and nothing has changed.

Re:UK mags rock (3, Interesting)

jools33 (252092) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855533)

I used to be an overseas subscriber to PCZONE (RIP) [wikipedia.org] back when I lived in the US just because there was no US pc gaming mag that I could find with anything like a similar sense of humour. I always found that the CD / DVD was an almost complete waste of space - serving only for the publisher to ask an extra few $ on the price - as all material could be downloaded from the web - with the exception perhaps of some of the PCZONEs team videos (some of which were worth the asking price). The US based equivalent publications always seemed to be more about advertisements than the articles.
I bought the mag for the article writing not for the bunf.

Re:UK mags rock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855547)

I think this is the case generally in Europe. From when I was buying magazines regularily (and I stopped doing so now, just occasionaly as of late), every magazine I bought in Poland, Czech Republic or Germany was rathere centered on one topic, nearly every single one had a disc with additional content and there always was something interesting.

Re:UK mags rock (1)

Bitsy Boffin (110334) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855569)

Brings back happy memories of going into the bookshop every month to get the latest issue of Zzap! 64 with the cassette, and later Amiga Shopper with disk(s).

I can almost smell the newsprint if I close my eyes. Sigh.

About twice as good, and twice as expensive. (4, Informative)

Dutchmaan (442553) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855071)

I do design work and find that most magazines especially if they pertain to computers are very nice. The paper is usually a very heavy stock glossy with a larger format. Also, there are a lot of detailed 'how to' articles with examples. The only real downside is that they seem at least 2 to 3 times as expensive and US counterparts, always on par price wise with a good paperback novel. I used to sit in the bookstore and drink coffee while reading those magazines but never buying. They were a good source of information, but they were IMHO too expensive to buy.

Subscription price? (3, Informative)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855307)

What about if you have a subscription?

Most US magazines are 1/4 of the price if you subscribe. Is it any cheaper to read these expensive UK magazines if you subscribe?

Re:About twice as good, and twice as expensive. (2)

evanism (600676) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855407)

If its just for a read, then they might by expensive, but I like to keep mine. I read them to shreds and refer to them constantly.

Perhaps this is the difference with the US mags? They are short term entertainment, whereas the other come close to a book (light version) or knowledge transfer system (I like woodworking)

Wow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855073)

All I can say is wow, http://www.earthsquotes.com

Troll Submission? (3, Interesting)

tagno25 (1518033) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855075)

Now that all the large chain book stores have disappeared from the landscape

What did Barnes & Noble close?

If you go to a Tech store that sells books, like MicroCenter, there are plenty of magazines covering a wide variety of subjects. Some of them have disks and others may have downloads.

Re:Troll Submission? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855125)

The us is loosing ground fast

Re:Troll Submission? (1)

Forever Wondering (2506940) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855167)

The us is loosing ground fast

s/us is loosing/US is losing/

Re:Troll Submission? (4, Insightful)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855417)

Well, that just shows you how much the USA has 'loosed' already... 'No child left behind' simply meant that all children got left behind.

Re:Troll Submission? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855599)

It actually meant that no child got ahead.

Re:Troll Submission? (1)

Morty (32057) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855363)

At least where I live, in MD, larger supermarkets have a nice selection of magazines. To include Linux magazines.

[posting to undo a bad moderation.]

Re:Troll Submission? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855587)

What did Barnes & Noble close?

Not yet, but give them some time [wsj.com] . They're working on it, what with putting all their money towards the Nook, an e-reader which is only noteworthy in discussion of why Barnes and Noble is going to be going out of business in a few years.

Give them a year or two, then the answer to that question will be a definitive "yes." B&N are doomed.

Total speculation on why (5, Insightful)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855077)

Europeans live on an infrastructure that supports pedestrian life. So, there's more likelihood for walking past magazine stands and making those impulse buys. The only time I ever see magazines is if I happen to pass by that aisle in the grocery store. And, some mags I admit I *would* buy on an impulse if I were exposed to them more often even though they're not topical enough for me to google for. For example, tonight was was in the grocery store and passed an aisle while waiting for my GF. I was thumbing through the guns and hunting mags and given a few more minutes I might have picked one up.

Re:Total speculation on why (5, Insightful)

MartinSGill (704185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855135)

I suspect you are correct at last in part. The more pedestrian lifestyle also extends to commutes. If you don't drive everywhere in your car but instead use public transport your hands and mind are free and magazines are a great way to keep yourself occupied and learn stuff. Also includes, books, audio books, education, newspapers etc.

I did most of an Open University course while commuting to work by train, and also read my monthly Linux Format subscription. When I changed jobs and had to drive I never had time to read the magazine any more (or indeed do courses) and cancelled the subscription.

Re:Total speculation on why (1)

margeman2k3 (1933034) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855251)

I wish I was so lucky.
Here in Canada, the only time I can find a magazine worth reading (ie: not the celebrity gossip crap) is when I go a bookstore with the intention of buying a specific magazine. And, needless to say, it's not usually worth the effort (~20 minutes each way plus ~10 minutes to find it, considering I can find the same content online instantly for free).

Not all mags are online, let alone for free. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855273)

A.) Not all magazines are also available online in any form at all, as this recent article points out. http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-newspaper-that-said-up-yours-to-the-internet-2012-01-20

B.) Even the ones that are sometimes have different content in dead tree and online editions.

C.) Speaking as a print publisher who's sick of your kind of parasitism, bugger off.

Re:Not all mags are online, let alone for free. (3, Insightful)

moronoxyd (1000371) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855381)

Speaking as a print publisher who's sick of your kind of parasitism, bugger off.

How is it parasitism if he uses online sources that are made available for everyone?

Print publishers need to accept the online world as a reality and stop seeing it as unfair competition.
Basically the same lesson that the music and film industries had/have to learn.

Re:Total speculation on why (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855517)

"Europeans live on an infrastructure that supports pedestrian life."

And you don't even get mugged on it.
They have also highways and bridges that don't crumble to dust, cars that people actually buy throughout the world, high-speed trains, a couple of thousand different cheeses, and also science fiction stuff like global health insurance and powerful unions that actually help people.

Re:Total speculation on why (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855553)

>a couple of thousand different cheeses

I hate to stop your wonderful support of my country, but cheeses wise we have about 3, and feck the rest from France :o)

Re:Total speculation on why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855555)

Plus we don't get ear-shattering advertisements every 5 minutes when we watch TV, and then a recap when the ads have finished- just in case we've forgotten what we were watching. Lol.

Competition in print, too (2)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855637)

Magazine printing (not publishing) is an extremely competitive business in Europe and costs have been driven right down. There is lots of high speed web offset capacity available even for short runs. We also have other factors like advertisers who aren't run by dysfunctional billionaires who expect to dictate the science and politics of magazines in which they advertise.

The result is that you can still make good money running magazines. This is perhaps a factor in why Scientific American and National Geographic are now, in fact, British owned.

Hadn't noticed before, but yes. (4, Informative)

kale77in (703316) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855079)

Here in Australia, we get American and English magazines equally. I hardly ever burn ISO's for Linux, but rather buy a magazine every few months and so have good-quality boot/install/recover disks around all the time. The articles aren't bad -- I've learned about some cool apps there -- but I buy the mags for the disks mainly. And they're all UK magazines, now that I think about it. This presumably goes back to when Amigas and C64s were hip; there were always gaming magazines with playable demo disks.

Re:Hadn't noticed before, but yes. (1)

Tim99 (984437) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855325)

I hardly ever burn ISO's for Linux, but rather buy a magazine every few months and so have good-quality boot/install/recover disks around all the time.

They are certainly useful, but, as they are shipped by sea/economy air, I find that the 4-6 week delay on top of the publishers delay means that many tools (and even distributions) are several versions behind.

I agree that imported UK publications are usually better than those from the US. About the only local computer magazine that seems to be reasonably current, and of fair quality, is Macworld Australia.

Yes (4, Insightful)

gangien (151940) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855085)

Everything is better in europe.

Their healthcare, their food, their government, their women, their cars, their tv, their bathrooms, their internet.

I heard they all have supercomputers for their desktops but aren't allowed to tell us americans cus we'll be too embarrassed.

Re:Yes (3, Insightful)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855117)

Well, I live in the EU and I must say that apart from healthcare and government (which are linked), you're pretty much right.

I'll leave women outside the debate for now out of fear that it may degenerate. Flame wars are just so interesting.

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855221)

Well, I live in the EU and I must say that apart from healthcare and government (which are linked), you're pretty much right.

I thought it was ESPECIALLY the healthcare and government that were superior to America.

Re:Yes (5, Insightful)

TheLink (130905) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855313)

The USA has the best healthcare (and government?) money can buy.

But if you don't have enough money...

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855181)

Indeed. I've heard the cellphone service is so amazing that they just implant a chip in your head that gives you a free 10Gigabit wireless link anywhere from the Canary Islands to the back-end of the Urals.

Re:Yes (5, Informative)

war4peace (1628283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855353)

My 15-bucks-a-month Internet subscription comes with a bonus from my ISP: a country-wide*, unlimited traffic, 3.6 Mbit/s 3G USB stick.
For free.

I used it more than once as back-up for my main connection and it rocks.
So yeah, you're not so far-fetched.

*Country-wide means wherever they provide coverage, for now limited to medium-sized and major cities but good enough for what I need.

Re:Yes (5, Funny)

Teun (17872) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855213)

You have to make a decision, either leave food and especially bathrooms out of the comparison or exclude the UK from Europe.

Re:Yes (1)

hb79 (917595) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855335)

Actually ,let's talk about bathrooms for a minute . Why is it that every public toilet stall in the US is designed for exobists? There is at least a foot between the floor and walls, if you're only slightly taller than average you can see over the door without effort , and there's half an inch between the door and frame on both side.

No wonder Americans don't care about privacy. They cannot even take a dump in private .

Re:Yes (1)

spiffmastercow (1001386) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855433)

American here. I prefer my lack of privacy to your lack of toilet seats. I prefer to sit, not hover.

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855441)

exobists

Outside restaurants?

Re:Yes (1)

evanism (600676) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855443)

Maybe the are public dumpers? It's like having a piss in the park while walking home from the pub!

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855573)

Speak for yourself. I love english (british) food. Oh, yes. All of it.
And yes, I am serious.

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855233)

Damn, the secret is out.

-Sent from my BlueGene/Q

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855371)

We also have better investment companies (aka pyramid schemes) than US, but are not allowed to tell more about them to the americans either. Maybe some day in the distant future less than half of earthen population lives in police states which restrict freedom of information.

Re:Yes (4, Funny)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855373)

Everything is better in europe.

Their healthcare, their food, their government, their women, their cars, their tv, their bathrooms, their internet.

Even their fascism! .... what? too early?

Re:Yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855463)

butthurt detected

Re:Yes (1)

rve (4436) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855475)

Does Europe have better foo than us?

Does an article like this serve a purpose other than flame bait?

Ok, I'll bite. Any foo Europe had that was better than foo in another part of the world moved to the (former) colonies long ago, leaving Europe second to last on the human civilization scale, only narrowly beating Antarctica on account of the slightly better food.

Japan (1)

gtada (191158) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855087)

You should see the magazines from Japan (especially the car magazines).

Future Publishing (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855109)

A lot of the UK special interest magazines are by Future Publishing. A company with roots back to 8-bit magazines like Zzap64 and Crash. I think they're partly responsible for raising the game in the UK market.

Re:Future Publishing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855333)

Future publishes my favorite magazine: Guitar Techniques. It is a guitar magazine for people who are actual musicians, or aspire to be such, rather than merely guitar players.

The editorial staffs have lots of overlap. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855123)

Let's remember that in recent years there's a veritable cross-Atlantic shuttle of magazine staffers. After all, Time Out New York is an offshoot of a London company and was first built with staff from the European offices. Tina Brown continues to be a powerhouse on both sides and, of course, the Murdoch people get swapped back and forth like third string baseball players. And within the large production complexes, the editions of magazines like Time for dozens of different markets are mostly repackaged versions of the same pool of content.

That being the case, maybe the biggest question becomes what makes these media companies decide to sell Americans such a thin gruel of content out of the rich banquet of editorial that they have to choose from.

You want things to improve? Break Diamond and Ingram distribution, encourage businesses to buy targeted display ads in small magazines that appeal their precise demographics, and help independently owned bookstores to make a profit on magazines and small press creations.

Re:The economics of all this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855235)

For those of you who are curious but impatient, might I recommend this handy little overview of the economics of one of the signature failed magazine ventures of recent years: http://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Media-Critical-Magazine-ebook/dp/product-description/B003PJ7JYS

Better is in the eye of the beholder (2)

oheso (898435) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855157)

I've typically found the CDs/DVDs to be full of trialware -- usually older versions than what's available from the usual download sources. And the editorial content is quite amateurish.

This is for hobbyist magazines (PCs, cars, etc.). Can't vouch for whatever might pass for the equivalent of Atlantic Monthly, etc.

Re:Better is in the eye of the beholder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855263)

I have a subscription to ImagineFX. Their dvd has some demo apps, sure, but they also have tons of video tutorials (hours long), usually some 3d models, textures, and even sometimes reference photos. Really good stuff. The downside is that the magazine isn't in the large format like the old Amiga mags, or the japanese newtype mags.

Re:Better is in the eye of the beholder (1)

m50d (797211) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855623)

As a brit I've taken to reading TIME. The writing seems to be better than our own magazines, and it's nice to have something without the focus on local politics and crime.

Computer Music (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855159)

Funny you should use Computer music as an example. I collected that magazine before I had kids, but by the time it reaches Japan it's 2,600 yen($34)...I love the sample collections but I cannot justify 34 bucks for a magazine. Very little dead tree media for me(space is a premium in Japan).

How to order? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855165)

Easiest way to order is to go the publishers web page. Most of these magazines have different prices for different regions, but it's nothing that credit card cannot handle. I have been ordering Edge by Future Publishing, by far the best gaming magazine I have seen so far.

Europeans can read? (-1, Flamebait)

kawabago (551139) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855199)

Who knew?

Re:Europeans can read? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855375)

Yes, we can.

http://siteselection.com/ssinsider/snapshot/sf011210.htm

Re:Europeans can read? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855419)

don't worry, most north americans wouldn't be able to find it on a map.

Why we care about magazines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855211)

I got Internet, flipboard, zite, and pulse. I don't see why a sane person should spend money on paper. If you really have to, buy an iPad, if you buy lot of magazines you will end up saving both money and trees

The disc is to raise the price (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855229)

I typically read the uk magazine retrogamer, and when they decided to stop
Including the disc, the editorial mentioned that the primary reason for the disk is to raise the cover price. However, downloads over broadband have made such discs increasingly irrelevant, and thus they decided to stop making it

New Scientist (3, Interesting)

gadfium (318941) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855239)

New Scientist is possibly the best popular science magazine available. Scientific American is pretty good too, but doesn't have the same coverage because it's monthly, while NS is weekly.

Re:New Scientist (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855459)

And the funny little cartoons are great too. They should make a book of just those.

The Economist (5, Insightful)

pnot (96038) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855261)

If you have any interest in politics or world affairs: The Economist. Most news these days is like candyfloss; by comparison, the Economist is like a huge, succulent steak. Don't be fooled by its thinness: it's the only magazine I've ever come across where I actually want to read 90% or more of the articles in each and every issue. There's just a lot less of the fluff, filler, and advertising which pads out many thicker magazines.

Re:The Economist (5, Informative)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855409)

+5 Insightful, Informative. I'll add that it is also quite funny, if you enjoy that dry, British, Monty Python style. The English level may be intimidating for non-native speakers at first, but if you want to learn top-notch English, here is your benchmark. After reading this, everything else seems written at a Dr. Suess level.

Oh, and take a look at Viz as well, a satirical adult comic. Low humor for high brows.

c't (5, Interesting)

NoZart (961808) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855265)

I once read somewhere "c't is a magazine worth learning german for".

c't is a technology magazine somewhere between casual and pro, and deals with gadgets, computers and their peripherals, mobile phones and more. It reviews the quality of service of hardware vendors, ISPs and such, reports on wage situations in the IT-field and the occasional game. Being very broad in content, they still manage to go indepth (?) if questions arise via reader feedback. I have yet to find a publication in that field that matches the quality of research, writing and running this fine line of easy consumable content without being shallow.
Also they used to have the most hilarious April fools articles.

They have a sister magazine called IX, which focuses on linux and security. It's outside my competence field, so i can't say much about it, but it seems it's quite good, regarding to my linux-loving peers.

Re:c't (2)

koinu (472851) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855461)

There is an electronic version called "Heise.de" (in form of a website with forums) that you can use, if you want. It is different from the paper version, because no one would buy it anymore, of course. It's the publishing company that brings c't and iX.

I visit the German version (classic view) [heise.de] quite regularly, because the forum discussions are fun and it is my number 1 bookmark. This is comparable to Slashdot in my opinion and has funny troll threads. ;) There is also an version in English [h-online.com] that is probably not that busy as the German one and does not publish as many articles. I think they would, if they had more visitors. So it's up to you to make it big, because the competence is available there.

Btw, I can see articles quite frequently here on Slashdot that originate from Heise.de.

Boobs in Newspaper Stands (5, Funny)

bit trollent (824666) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855323)

The best thing about European newspaper stands is that they often display magazines which feature topless women on the cover.

It's really nice to be able to look to your right as you walk down the street and see multiple nice pairs of tits on display like tennis shoes.

Of course that's got nothing on the red light district in Amsterdam, but I can see I'm getting off topic...

Re:Boobs in Newspaper Stands (2)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855639)

Of course that's got nothing on the red light district in Amsterdam, but I can see I'm getting off ...

Fixed that for you.

US mags have advantages too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855331)

HI! I live in Europe and I buy US magazines online. For example, I'm a RC helicopter fan and until about 2 years ago, there was no French magazine dedicated to this. RC mags mostly talked about RC planes and only a few pages were about helicopters, while in the US there were mags 100% dedicated to RC helis. Now there are RC heli only french magazines, but that's something quite new.
As for Linux mags, I really found great to have CDs bundled with the mags so I didn't have to download ISOs and burn CDs before ADSL existed. Now I find it better to grab the latest version of the distros online and burn it. I think the bundled CD/DVD are not so useful now.

Eurpope has better *everything*. (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855351)

(Except biscuit flour.)

</discussion>

Reading, riting and rithmetic (4, Funny)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855389)

Well, in Europe, most people can read and write. Consequently books and magazines are more popular and can cater to a more advanced demographic.

Because of the cultural diversity? (3, Informative)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855395)

EU has many more languages with a printing tradition than the US. Essentially USA is English with some influx from the myriad of minorities. EU has more than 30+ languages, each with a long and unique printing tradition. Because of the cultural diversity, and the slower pace with which ideas transfer cross the language barrier there is a greater diversity than in the printed monoculture of the US. Spanish Latin America is somewhat similar, yet more diverse than the US due to the fact that these are sovereign nations.

Still, this doesn't mean that UK magazines more readily borrows from the rest of Europe than American magazines do. So, I believe the number of EU languages has little to do with this, thinking of it again... :) [I didn't want to delete what I had just written, it _sounded_ nice...]

In fact, it has been my impression that American magazines have way more ads (sorry, way way more ads) but more readable content because the larger number of subscribers. Some monthly magazines have like 200+ pages, with perhaps 50% ads, which very few EU magazines have.

The reason is probably that the number of pan-US publishers has gone down, because of market forces. Dog-eat-dog. The headline "Because of the cultural diversity?" probably is misleading in one sense, but the governments in the EU tend to defend the small publishers using e.g. tax reductions, just to retain that headline cultural diversity, after all.

Re:Because of the cultural diversity? (2)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855609)

Living in America, with the internet, I can't think of a reason to buy a magazine anymore. The internet replaces any need I had for print stuff.

I can't remember... (1)

JackPepper (1603563) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855413)

the last time I used a CD or DVD that I hadn't burned myself.
 
I mainly read magazines while in the loo and I'm too worried about getting my phone full of germs.

More than that (4, Funny)

rossdee (243626) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855421)

They not only have better magazines, they have better weapons in general.
For example the FN P90 has 50 rounds in its magazine, and its out of the way on the stock.

Say is Israel included in this definition of Europe? The Tavor is a very nice assault rifle.

Might be a sign (1)

aaronb1138 (2035478) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855423)

This may be the response to the emergence of web journalism (now about 15 years in). U.S. magazines decided to invest less in good authors and experts as they feared their circulation would drop, and it did because they in fact did not attract the best staff.

Newspapers certainly completely threw in the towel in the U.S. following the advent of the WWW, RSS, portals, etcetera.

Perhaps in Europe, journalistic entities instead maintained standards, kept hiring good writers and experts, and started looking for real methods to retain customers. The CD/DVDs you mention are a great example. In the U.S. we have decided quite clearly to disenfranchise those without high speed, persistent internet access. In Europe, it is much more widely acknowledged that internet access is not ubiquitous among the people due to cost, despite many regions having vastly better coverage, lower cost, and higher speeds than offered in the U.S. Add to this the frequency of metered internet service in Europe, and a DVD of media obtains tangible value added as a replacement for downloads.

Imagine FX (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855427)

I subscribe to a SF&F art and illustration magazine called Imagine FX, and I pay through the nose for it. And to be honest, I might pay even more if I had to, there just isn't anything published in the US that is even close...

Yes! (1)

upuv (1201447) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855429)

Yes!

Who the fuck reads magizines anymore? (0)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855483)

N/T

What the hell are magazines? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855499)

Really.

Who gives a fuck? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855529)

A better question would be: who cares? Magazines are a waste of paper and I haven't seen a good one anyway since 1996. The Internet has made magazines irrelevant more so than any other print medium, with the possible exception of dictionaries and encyclopedias.

You're not looking very hard. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855531)

There are plenty of magazines out there, and not all the bookstores have closed.

Are you living under a rock?

Re:You're not looking very hard. (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855617)

Plenty?

What's the best US Carp fishing magazine? Because we appear to have quite a selection. That's the sort of level of specific enthusiasm British magazines.

Bonus discs (4, Informative)

DarkDust (239124) | more than 2 years ago | (#38855561)

Well, I'm from Germany and can only describe the situation here, but "bonus" discs really are pretty standard for a long time now. Especially with computer and gaming magazines, although some have abandoned them for online content.

For example, Linux magazines often provide a disc with the software that is reported about in the magazine, and often they're also bootable (rescue systems, latest Debian, whatever) which comes in very handy in case you're system broke down and thus can't get online (happened to me once a few years ago). Other computer magazines' discs have demos, free software and drivers but I've also seen them provide movies (I have no idea why). Luckily the notorious AOL discs have vanished ;-) A noteworthy example of a really useful bonus disc is from the popular computer magazine c't: about once a year it provides Knoppicilin, now called Desinfec't which is a Linux Live-CD with content to fix your Windows system: it comes with a few virus scanners (latest version: the commercial scanners Avira, BitDefender, Kaspersky and the free ClamAV) and always support reading and writing NTFS partitions.

Gaming magazines also put these discs to good use as some of them put video reviews of games on their discs and that really is useful additional content as often two or three screenshots printed in a magazine just can't transport the experience of a game. Of course the PC targeted magazines also have game demos.

No, if I could pick just TWO magazines to read (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855579)

they would be The Economist and ... oh, wait.

More to Come (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855581)

Now that all the large chain book stores have disappeared

You think that's good? Wait until the large record labels have disappeared!

Printed magaznes lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855627)

I knew Euros were backwards, but wow! Hey Euros - it's the 21st century. Even my grandmother uses a tablet.

Software with an accent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38855643)

Funny story.

I bought a UK magazine with a lite version of dictation software on its CD (in California), but after installing it I discovered it expected me to speak with a British accent!

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