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142 comments

The same Michael Sims from /.? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38892663)

Is this the same mod-bombing and domain hijacking [sethf.com] Michael Sims who used to be a slashdot editor some years back?

Re:The same Michael Sims from /.? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38892957)

Considering they spell their name differently, and the fact that it would somewhat strange for someone to simultaneously hold the positions of CEO of a gaming company and editor for Slashdot, I'm going to say no, they're probably not the same person.

Re:The same Michael Sims from /.? (5, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893293)


somewhat strange for someone to simultaneously hold the positions of CEO of a gaming company and editor for Slashdot, I'm going to say no, they're probably not the same person.

I always thought the /. editors were doing the work during their break from greeting people at WalMart.

Company site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38892677)

The site needs to be updated and they need a properly designed logo.

That would be a start.

Re:Company site (5, Insightful)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38892685)

A good start would be to actually have a game from the past 10 years in their catalog...

Re:Company site (5, Interesting)

Svartalf (2997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893011)

Got a quarter of a mil burning a hole in your pocket?

Unless you can get a sweetheart deal, that's going to very likely be the price of admission unless you're dealing with Indies like I've been doing. Seriously.

You have to put up a royalty payment, as often as not, ranging from $20k-500k to get the rights to get a glimpse of the code.

You have to pay someone either a wage or offer them a decent chunk of the proceeds as a percentage.

You then have to do the porting work. Sometimes this is easy. Sometimes it's brutal for varying reasons. Some of it's poor code. Some of it is just simply...complex.

Then you've got to push it off to the duplicators. This is another somewhat complex aspect of things. You need to gauge the demand of the title and do at least a first production run of the gold master that will be enough to make your production and packaging costs reasonable. You owe that up-front. Depending on your royalty structure, you'll either owe the royalties per copy (and there's one there...) up front, or you'll owe it later on. This is how Loki ended up owing iD a quarter million on that disastrous rollout of Q3:A. (Loki did something iffy from what I'd been told at the time from people on the inside- they cranked out more than 10k units, which is where the $250k iD was owed came from...). If you produce more than about 2-6k units of the title, you can be out a LOT of money. Produce less than 5k units, though, and you have to raise your prices a bit to offset costs that're there on the low end for production, etc.

Once you've got your units, you've got to SELL them.

Re:Company site (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893067)

No one said starting a game distribution company was easy. I'm speaking from the standpoint of the consumer. There is nothing on that list they have, that I would buy. However many indie devs have been creating a lot of good games for Linux the past few years. Someone who was on top of things, probably could have worked out a few good deals here lately, and came out on top for everyone involved. Instead the Indie Bundle guys took matters in to their own hands.

Re:Company site (2)

Svartalf (2997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893481)

Heh... That they did. In fact, I helped there. (I did mention I was working in the Indie space, right? :-D)

Re:Company site (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893719)

Why bother? You put up all that money, just to get it pirated? Why would anyone do that when it's just going to get stolen?

A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (4, Interesting)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38892731)

Has there ever been a Linux-exclusive game company that *didn't* either go bankrupt, face massive layoffs/resignations, or never deliver on their promised games?

I don't mean that sarcastically, I'm seriously asking the question. Seems like every time I hear about a Linux game company, it's something negative. There must be at least one or two success stories out there.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38892763)

Well for a company to be successful they actually have to have a market for their products.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (4, Interesting)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38892797)

It also helps to have products. Look at their list of games... The Indie Bundles have proven there is a market.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (4, Informative)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893139)

Lets just back this up with numbers [imageshack.us] , so you actually have some, well, backing :P

Note that Linux users are about a quarter of the purchasers, and pay more than the other fractions. Being generous and assuming they all payed equal (remember this is NOT true, and this assumption HURTS my point) that means they have taken in around $100k - and lets not forget that I got my email introducing this bundle a mere 19 hours ago. The total amount has gone up by about $80k during the last 9 hours or so.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893329)

Very nice. Kinda hard to argue there is no market when you look at the performance of those bundles.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Svartalf (2997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893499)

There's a reason I've been working with the Indie community, working on helping them get Linux versions out.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (4, Insightful)

torchdragon (816357) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893721)

Except that those numbers are incredibly weak when compared with the "mainstream" game channels.

When I checked, there were $488k in 82k sales. That's for 4 titles and a charity. Assuming a 100% revenue push from customer to developer (an impossibility), that means their average of $5.95 per sale gets split into 4 companies equating to almost $1.50 per sale, per company.

So we've got $122,000 total possible revenue without any removal of revenue hitting the developer. If you're a one or a two man independent development team, Congrats, you get to (possibly) pay your bills. If you're a 3 or a 4 man team, you're still working a second job. If you're at all bigger, you'll be shutting down unless you have another source of revenue for your game.

Out of those 82,000 sales, less than 25% are linux sales, but even going with 25%, that means 20,500 people specifically bought the Linux version.
Now, not all of the users on Steam have paid $5.95, but I'm willing to be a vast majority have. As I type this there are 4.1 million users on Steam and the vast majority of them are going to be Windows.

So honestly it really isn't hard to argue that there's no market. 20,500 people is great for an interest group, not for a global market.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893895)

The key thing here is that many of these indie guys are getting rich on this model. They don't need to compete with global multi-national corporations. They are doing just fine.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

higuita (129722) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895347)

i have also a steam account... but the lack of linux support made me migrate to desura [desura.com]

in desura i already paid for many linux games and the fact they choose to build a client first to linux instead of Mac shows that they believe there is market and that it open to grow faster than the Mac one

not all games manage to get the "mainstream" sells, even in windows... not even many mainstream games

ignoring 20,000 potential linux gamers, that are more hungry for good games, that can even pay more looks like "shooting the foot"
and those 20,000 might be 100,000 instead by looking the previous humble bundle numbers in wikipedia

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893771)

Right, because a game bundle that pulls in $480,000 total proves there is a market for lots of games? You're kidding me right? That's less than the cost to develop even one game. For comparison, WoW pulls in $1 billion per year [ocregister.com]

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893865)

Hint: These games are turning a huge profit, and they don't cost 480 million to make. You're comparing the number 1 MMO in the world, to "two dudes working out of an apartment".

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893889)

If you're largest more successful example is two guys working out of an apartment, then you're example is proof there is no market.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893939)

You seem to be entirely missing the point.

The point is that if small teams can do it, then large companies (like EA) could, if they tried. They don't, so we don't have actual data for them - we have to make educated guesses based on the performance of said small teams.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893975)

No you seem to be entirely missing the point.

If there is a market for Linux games, where are the wildly successful examples? Where are the billion dollar blockbusters? The games everyone wants to play? They don't exist. Windows games pull in billions and billions every year in sales, and Linux games -- well there are these two guys in an apartment ...

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894449)

How are we supposed to have such examples when nobody who can has bothered to create them?

The ones who HAVE bothered to create games for Linux have either done so in companion to the windows release (and usually later, for example ID's Quakes) or are not large corporations . You don't make a game with a small team and suddenly you're in the club with EA, Ubi, etc. That's not how it works.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894529)

Linux wasn't just started yesterday. It's been around for almost 20 years. Everyone who has tried to create a business out of selling Linux games has failed or had such low success that they can only develop simple/cheap games.

You say you need some large company to come in and develop Linux games, but if there was a market and those large companies refused to serve them, then there would be a lot of successful small Linux game companies. Yet, those small companies don't exist.

20 years... plenty of time for a Linux game company to become a billion dollar company -- if there was a market.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895123)

Yet, those small companies don't exist.

And so we come back to the original point. They do. - where do you think these Indy games are coming from? Thin air? Someone is creating them, and they are doing well for themselves. Linux has been around for a long time, yes... but if you think Linux was ready for anything approaching mainstream entertainment in the early 1990s, you're delusional.

It's only recently started to be ready enough, and it's starting to attract the attention. If things keep up the way they are, then either we'll see some of these small companies/teams grow, or some of the existing Big Boys to start paying attention.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894511)

You are missing the point. The part of the game developer market that is actually close to a "free market" (the indie developers, of which there are many) has identified that there is money to be made in Linux games. The oligopoly part of the market (the big developers) have not. This is a typical case of the market failure when you get away from the idealization (free market).

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894793)

What are you talking about? The "game developer market" has started multiple companies that have gone bankrupt. The premier example at the moment is the indie bundle, which has pulled in about $500k, or about what WoW earns in 4.5 hours.

How many $100,000,000 games can you develop with $500,000?

There is no proof there is any significant amount of money to be made in Linux games.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893941)

Never said that was my largest more successful example. Look at the Minecraft team. Mojang went from "one guy working out of an apartment", to now being a full fledged studio with a bunch of employees, and a multi-million dollar company. Part of their success is that you can play Minecraft on anything, including Linux.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893995)

That's awesome. Now show me a Linux game started by one person that grew into a full fledged studio with lots of employees.

I won't hold my breath waiting the answer.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894131)

Minecraft IS a Linux game. You don't get to call something not a Linux game just because it is multi-platform. Even the company this story was about was set up to port games from other platforms to Linux. The only computer system that has exclusive games for it is Windows, as even Mac games are multi-platform.

So yes, you can move the goalposts and declare there to be no market for Linux games, by saying that multi-platform games don't count. Congratulations, you win the internet.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

rgbrenner (317308) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894283)

Minecraft is a multiplatform game written in Java. In other words, they did no Linux work.. they just wrote it in a language that will work on Linux. Second, we have no idea what % of Minecrafts sales are from Linux.. I'm guessing it virtually nil compared to their Windows numbers.

We have numbers for Linux Game Publishing.. they are terrible. We have numbers for the Indie Bundle... they are terrible. Your example, does not have numbers for Linux, yet you want us to believe that it would be fantastic. Show me the Linux numbers and you would have a point.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894913)

Actually a shitload of people are running minecraft on linux servers. You have people buying (or renting/coloc/whatever) entire linux systems for Minecraft. But I admit you have a nice troll going on.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894975)

Isn't that the whole point though? They specifically targetted Java so they they WOULDN'T have to do any heavy lifting to port to other systems. Maybe a little bit of bug fixes and a tweak to the UI...

That's what Flash / Air and Java are all about, yes?

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

HAKdragon (193605) | more than 2 years ago | (#38896049)

Minecraft is a multiplatform game written in Java. In other words, they did no Linux work..
 
When you run Minecraft in Linux and do an update, it mentions that it's pulling down the Linux specific updates.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894777)

Sure, but it's also hard to say that the company's success was due to Linux when 90% of users are on different platforms. Just making that number up but It's probably not far off. Anyone have actual numbers?

To show that Linux is a market worth tapping by game developers, you basically have to show that the revenues from sales to Linux users will be larger than the costs associated with marketing and developing the game for Linux. The case usually starts with Linux's miniscule consumer install base and gets worse from there ending with "If they really want the game they'll just boot into windows or play it on xbox, so why bother?"

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895877)

Minecraft is a java game written to be cross platform. You might as well laud WoW for being a Linux game because it works well under OpenGL and Wine, even though the vast majority of its userbase is Windows.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894065)

I think you misread. it's not 480 million. it's 480 thousand.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894667)

These games are turning a huge profit

In large part due to people buying them and playing them on the Windows platform. So remind me again exactly where developers lose out by targeting only Windows?

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894903)

But it's still just a port. What would be the development costs building it from the ground up? I'm not saying there isn't a market, I'm just wondering if 100% linux games are worth the time and investment.
 
(I'm not the OP or GP, just for the record)

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38896333)

100% Linux games are absolutely not worth the time and investment.

See, Linux is a small part of the market -- I'm gonna say 2% (have no specific recollection of the last batch of numbers, but I this is high). Now if you have a Windows game, getting maybe 88%, is it worth X effort porting it to Mac to open another 10% of the market? Possibly. X effort _again_ for that last 2%? No way, if everyone did it, but since Linux fans are starved for games, you'll realize a greater portion of that 2%, so it just might work out (sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't),

But if you write a Linux-only game, X porting effort suddenly opens up a market 45x the size -- definitely worth it. And realizing that, there's no reason anyone (aiming for profits) would make a "Linux game"; the smart move is to make it a cross-platform game from the get-go.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895321)

Hint, the majority of the humble bundle games were released years ago, and are being re-released to get additional profit. The sunk costs were already paid and recouped, this is just icing and a way of getting money to charities.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

higuita (129722) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895327)

$480,000? that number is not the final number!! ... look at the real data, LIVE:

http://www.humblebundle.com/ [humblebundle.com]

its already at $505,000 and this in just one day... you still have 13 days left of sales

now look that the previous bundles: in wikipedia .. the last one sold almost $2.4 Million

yes, WoW is a lot more... but many games can get that much? WoW is not just a game, its a monthly service and its the TOP seller... of all the MMORPG, not yet came close to it and most of them just closed after losing money for months

Not all games have success, even in windows... the humble bundle proves that if a game is good, porting it to linux will pay it self and will generate profit... the numbers of of linux a little behind of the Mac... and you cant deny that is a game market in the Mac people

of course, if the game is bad, its not the porting to linux that will make it profit... nor developing a game JUST for linux... but using certain technologies, apps and frameworks make possible porting a game to windows, mac and linux without increasing much the cost

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38892915)

Welcome to the Linux Game Publishing Key Server website.

LGP games are now protected by a CD key to protect them from unauthorised copying.

For me at least, that reduces their market further.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893101)

If you won't even accept the most non-intrusive form of DRM (cd-keys) then you should basically forget about ever having big budget games on Linux.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893199)

I already have big budget Linux games that don't have any of this DRM nonsense. It's quite nice actually. It makes it a lot easier to actually use the game if it is something you haven't played in awhile.

Linux ports can be strangely more convenient in this respect.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (1)

pijokela (462279) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893259)

Does Humble Indie Bundle count? They seem to port all the bundle games to Linux and if the number of bundles is any indication they are successful...

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (2)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894341)

Yes, Wolfire Software [wikipedia.org] seems to be the best success story on the Linux front right now. They're not Linux exclusive, but all their games include Linux versions. And they seem to be doing pretty good.

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893517)

ID Software did quite well

Re:A Linux game company that wasn't troubled? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893545)

Game companies are a risky lot...

You can sell 20,000k copies and not break even (15-20 years ago you could). These days you are talking 3-20 people minimum to create a product, put it on shelf. Then the ad network stuff, etc etc etc.

It costs money to make games.

Sure there are *some* indie guys that are doing very good. But for every one that is raking it in there are dozens more who are going under. Even having a successful/good game may not mean much (depending on your publisher and how much of your game they own).

You also most of the time are making one off software. Buying bits and parts from guys who make these things (and sometimes they want a cut too).

It is a neato industry but many times the money ROI is just not there.

The linux ones even had a *WORSE* problem. They were usually releasing games that were 2-3 years out of date. Meaning if they had same day release sometimes they would do 'ok'. But many times they were behind the curve. A game usually has a 6-12 month shelf life. After that the fickle game market has moved on.

Most of the linux companies reinvented themselves as ios/android/windows companies. As that is where you can move some volume. And manufacturing cost is low after the up front cost of making the game. So you are going to want to move volume.

There is a Linux game company? (0)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 2 years ago | (#38892759)

There is a Linux game company?

Re:There is a Linux game company? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38892865)

Was, by the sounds of it.

Re:There is a Linux game company? (-1, Flamebait)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893275)

I was going to ask the same question. Basically there will never be games on Linux because of this hippie / commie 'everythings gotta b e open source and free!' attitude. Can't make any money if your products are all copied and stolen.

Re:There is a Linux game company? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893669)

stolen

*given away (fixed that for ya)

The actual truth is a little more complicated. Consider the following:

For eons, Linux was a very difficult operating system for non-technical computer users. Basically it was impossible to use, even under Knoppix unless you had a firm understanding of all of the underlying parts of Linux, how to call the commands, what switches to include, and how to navigate and manipulate file systems, permissions and user accounts.

In other words, Linux was never intuitive. You needed at least a little bit of a background in programming (ie: shell scripts/batch files), to gain any traction.

Now, on the other hand, take the gaming community. This is a huge community filled with all different kinds of people, but the vast VAST majority of gamers, while VERY computer literate, and generally technologicaly savvy, are not technical. Almost everyone attracted to video games is used to having a reliable intuitive GUI. One that is so easily accessible that, you need no greater technical skills that to simply press the CD-ROM drives eject button, insert a disc, close it, and pick up a controller and wait for the prompt to PRESS START.

Honestly, this wasn't truly available until Ubuntu came along, and Ubuntu didn't really pick up steam until 2007, amidst the throes of Microsoft's infamous Windows Vista debacle.

Now that Ubuntu has brought a groundswell of non-technical users, I predict a market will emerge, indeed even a closed-source DRM imprisoned market will work with Ubuntu/Mint freely available. It just needs time to grow, and maybe some investment.

Theres games on linux? (0)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#38892837)

ok tux racer is kind of fun, and occasionally if a game was made in open GL companies might release a linux client (ie ID there for a little bit) but wow games on linux, that didnt run like garbage with wine???

mind blown

Re:Theres games on linux? (2)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#38892897)

Some games work well, others don't.

WoW works well. So well, in fact, that you get more FPS than on Windows.

--
BMO

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893007)

That's wasn't true in my case. It ran worse, and hardware acceleration on the mouse was totally broken.

Re:Theres games on linux? (2)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893051)

If you get more FPS on Linux than Windows, that's usually because some cycle eating feature in the Windows driver is not present in the Linux driver. Whether "feature incomplete but faster" is the same as "better" is a subjective question.

Re:Theres games on linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893149)

I bet Minesweeper would also probably run pretty well but it's not exactly a benchmark of games. WoW isn't even close to a benchmark for 2004 game tech.

Re:Theres games on linux? (2)

RazzleFrog (537054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893169)

Why would I want an FPS higher than my refresh rate? I never understood those people who brag of 120 FPS when your screen is only going to show 60 of those.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

vinehair (1937606) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893341)

This wasn't a valid point even back when CRTs were the norm because it is far easier to run a CRT at a high refresh rate than an LCD, although flat-panels are now catching up (for 3D and such things.) But it's a valid point you make - it does my head in when people worry about increasing FPS at that level on a cheap-ass 60hz monitor.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893365)

I find that with most people it's pointless to argue this with facts. They fell better with 120fps, and by god, that's what their sticking with facts be damned. Definitely don't try to talk them into using vsync. That limits the fps to the refresh rate, and get's rid of horizontal screen tearing. Without that screen tearing, how do you know you're driving a Ferrari of the PC world? ;)

Re:Theres games on linux? (3, Interesting)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893459)

Well, 60fps, where every second had 60 frames, and they were evenly spaced, would be incredible performance.

Unfortunately, even when I get 150-200fps in games, I still notice rather sizeable jitters. Sure, there may lots of frames that are 2-3 ms each, and they outnumber the one 600ms frame by enough of a margin to keep the average low, but that one 600ms frame is a killer. Usually this is due to a simulation task that takes too long, and rendering the scene over and over without an update in the simulation is pointless. So, the rendering hangs also.

There's a bit of a movement to start measuring performance in a more accurate way, but no one has come up with a real solution yet. So, we still use fps. If you play a game one day and get 120fps, and then your system launches a background task and your performance goes down to 80fps, the change will be rather noticeable.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893631)

Why would I want an FPS higher than my refresh rate?

For one thing, uigrad_2000 pointed out that what you really want is a high minimum frame rate. 600 FPS is all well and good until loading all the geometry and textures associated with a new area causes you render one frame in 100 ms, at which point you're running 10 instantaneous FPS. For another, higher FPS allows the use of an accumulation buffer to motion-blur the video, providing more subtle realism cues for e.g. the fast rotations of the camera seen in twitch first-person shooters.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893743)

120 Hz monitors, for starters. Also, the extra frames lend smoothness to the rendered video, well above 60 Hz. In the past, the more FPS you had, the faster you would move through the game space (Quake 3). Add in 3D effects and triple monitors and you start to see why you would want a card that can do above 60 Hz

Re:Theres games on linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894751)

Because some game engines (q3) have bugs that do silly stuff like give you extra speed in game

Re:Theres games on linux? (2)

Ogi_UnixNut (916982) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893035)

I quite like Warzone2100 [wz2100.net] as a RTS
and Wormux [wormux.org] (Worms 2 clone).

Then again, I'm not a hardcore gamer, so I guess it all depends on what you want out of a game. The above have given me hours and hours of fun, despite the low-end graphics (indeed I quite like the low end graphics, allows me to play on my phone, or on other underpowered machines, no need for big gaming rig).

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895185)

I'm about the same as you, I love(d) those games.

Although over the years I've come to the point of leaving gaming to the game systems and computing & internet to the computer. It's a personal preference thing with games, though. World Of Warcraft (I refuse to use WoW as a term for it), Everquest, and whatever other MMORPG there are, really suck you in I guess when your faceplanted against the screen with keyboard and mouse.

Re:Theres games on linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893097)

Actually more and more games are working fine with wine, it has come to the point where I expect a game to be working with wine, often with a little tweaking, though some still don't.
And of course there are the indie bundle games.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893127)

yea I hear that every single year, and I usually get suckered into dicking with it, so spending a shitton of time "tweaking" it and I might get a game that functions but runs slow as snot and has a lot of graphical artifices or anomalies, about the only thing I have gotten to run right on it is the older GTA games (1-SA)

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893573)

Yep I have always been amazed at the disconnect between how Wine really runs and how the linux kool-aid drinkers think it runs.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894191)

I've been using WINE on OS X to play a lot of games that I've got from GOG. Most of them work with no tweaking at all. Given that OS X isn't exactly a tier 1 platform for WINE, I'd be surprised if it works better than on Linux. The main difference is the 3D drives. On Linux they're a complete crapshoot: they may be great, or they may be completely unusable. On OS X, they're usually okay (not great, but consistent).

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

Drinking Bleach (975757) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894895)

Wine tends to work very well, for non-gaming applications. It's constantly getting better on the gaming front, too, but that class of application tends to really put pressure on the parts of the API not so well understood or known.

Re:Theres games on linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893741)

I can't say about speed, I never play any games on windows, and my graphic card is low end (gt240), so I don't expect a lot on that front.
But I've played succefully with (from the top of my head) :
lef4dead 1 and 2
the witcher (with some small graphical glitches)
fallout 3
dragon age origin
team fortress 2
civilization V
plant vs zombies
orcs must die
Torchlight
King's Bounty
Mafia 2
Drakensang
Borderlands
Dungeon defenders
Magicka

Re:Theres games on linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894259)

Stick with games that use OpenGL for rendering and you'll be fine.

Re:Theres games on linux? (1)

Drinking Bleach (975757) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893297)

For all the years I've herad people joke about Tux Racer, I've yet to play it... maybe one of these days.

brb. minecraft is sucking up my slashdot time.

Humble Bundle for Linux/Android (1)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893229)

I got an email yesterday for a new Humble Bundle for Android (and Window/Mac/Linux). Just checked the total sold so far, and it is at over 484,000.00 already. As usual, Linux users pay the most for the bundle.

Seems like Linux/Android/Mac games are viable if you find a niche way to market them.

http://www.humblebundle.com/ [humblebundle.com]

Re:Humble Bundle for Linux/Android (1)

korpenkraxar (1731280) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893395)

I think the Humble Bundle is the really showing the way for how Linux games should be marketed and sold. I hope they inspire others to follow.

Some improvements ideas (2)

devent (1627873) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893401)

  • a) A redesign of the web site would be good. Any modern Wordpress theme looks better than the site.
  • b) a new logo, the LGP looks very old-fashion, it's like a logo for an old book publisher.
  • c) the site is very slow to load;
  • d) they should invest in Wine development, or in the development of Play For Linux [playonlinux.com] ;
  • e) why do I have to log-in first if I want to buy a game? There are lot of sites where I can just buy their stuff without a registration. Make a basket style like in every other shop website.
  • f) there is no FAQ section. There should be questions answered like, what Linux distribution the games can be played, is there DRM protections, can I download the games, how long an order will take, etc;
  • g) the site is sooo slow...

Re:Some improvements ideas (1)

thereitis (2355426) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894629)

Also, get in on some social networking or some other cheap way to advertise. This is the first I've ever heard of the company.

I hate to ask this, but does the demographic of Linux users encompass a mass of gamers? I use Linux exclusively for work.

Linux games have been having a lot of success... (1)

Dennis Sheil (1706056) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893421)

...on smartphones and tablets, particularly Android and its derivatives.

Cut the Rope [android.com] is 99 cents with at least half a million downloads. There are two unknown factors - how many returns were there (downside) and how many over 500k are they (upside). So they've made around $500,000 on this app.

GTA III on Android - 4.99 and over 100,000 downloads - another $500,000 in revenue. And a lot of the graphics and engine code was already written.

I had a chat with one of the Big Mountain Snowboarding [android.com] developers ($2.99 times 5000+ is $15,000, plus an ad-based Android version with over 500,000 users) who told me that over 85% of the C++ and OpenGL code from their iPhone version could be reused in their Android version. Companies with an existing C++/OpenGL code base don't have to re-invent the wheel to get on Android.

Fruit Ninja : $1.26 * 500,000+ = $630,000. Doodle Jump: $0.99 * 500,000+ = $500,000. Madden NFL 12: $4.99 * 100,000+ = $500,000. And so on. Then there's the money games make on their free, ad-based versions. As I said, many of these games have existing C++/OpenGL code on another platform, so the half million in sales, plus more in ads, that they've made thus far, is money they made just for the port. Which also helps keeping you in the game if some competitors want to take these established games on in this newer platform.

Android is a Linux kernel, with the rest of its code open source. Tim Bird and others recently started an effort [elinux.org] to bring the Android developers and Linux closer together, so hopefully that will bear fruit.

Re:Linux games have been having a lot of success.. (1)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893797)

Cut the Rope [android.com] is 99 cents with at least half a million downloads. There are two unknown factors - how many returns were there (downside) and how many over 500k are they (upside). So they've made around $500,000 on this app.

In revenue, yes. In profit? It's not free to write the game.

Re:Linux games have been having a lot of success.. (1)

ifiwereasculptor (1870574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894139)

Cut the Rope [android.com] is 99 cents with at least half a million downloads.

Shit, for a moment there I thought this [newgrounds.com] (warning: not Goatse) was the current bomb in gaming.

Don't reinvent the wheel (1)

bigbangnet (1108411) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893493)

I don`t know what they try to do at Linux Games but to make it super easy on them and users alike, they could just associate themselves with Steam (Valve). They are already talking about releasing steam on linux. Steam has tons of games. This is just an idea but steam as grown up so big in the last couple of years and its proven to be a successful gaming platform.

;nbsp

;nbsp

Just my 2cents

Tough platform (2)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#38893539)

I still opine that the rapidly changing selection of APIs, libraries, sound daemons, desktop environments, etc. of Linux world are a turndown for commercial developers - be it applications or games. It's hard to figure what you should exactly target and, soon your product is broken anyway unless you keep re-adapting it constantly. Most of your stuff will be from the current distro repository.

Re:Tough platform (1)

shish (588640) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894403)

I still opine that the rapidly changing selection of APIs, libraries, ...

I've had the stand-alone flash player installed in my home directory for a while, moving with me across distros and hardware -- it was installed on 32-bit debian in 2006, and it's still working on my 64-bit ubuntu 11.10 install today.</anecdote>

Re:Tough platform (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#38895317)

Even if it's true that such an ancient binary works on more than a handful of Flash-using sites (which I am skeptical of), it has 1001 security holes and should be replaced by something more recent.

64-bit Flash has worked well enough for quite some time now, no need to run the 32-bit version. Try the Flash-Aid addon if you use Firefox to handle auto-updating the plugin for you.

PulseAudio (1)

phorm (591458) | more than 2 years ago | (#38896489)

My biggest peeve is the movement towards pulseaudio. It introduces a *TON* of performance issues that make Linux very non-game-friendly.
Wine hates it (it lags out)
VOIP apps also hate it (audio lag/sync issues).

About the only thing that it seems to be good for is having multiple outputs under a single target. It used to be useful to allow multiple input streams to mix at once without blocking, but that seems to work just fine with ALSA alone these days.

I have a PXE boot environment at home. In the PXE, I use XFCE and pulseAudio is disabled (by renaming the binary, damn thing comes back like the walking undead otherwise). In the non-PXE (booted from HDD) environment, I use gnome and thus Pulse is enabled because a bunch of gnome'ish stuff depends on it.

In XFCE, audio just *WORKS*. I can chat with friends on mumble while playing music and minecraft. The only weirdness is that my headphone auto-sensing seems off, but that may be an aspect of tweaking the soundcard driver settings.

In Gnome /w Pulseaudio, audio sucks. My headphones work, but audio stutters, lags, or doesn't work at all (especially in wine). Input and output have terrible sync issues, and quality overall sucks.

Pulseaudio needs to *DIE* - or be fixed greatly - for multimedia on linux to have a good future. Perhaps the ALSA devs and Pulse devs could work together to build a nice UI and plugin integration for the ALSA stuff (A2DP audio etc) that is also stable and functional.

No CZ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38893867)

What? No CZ on Linux?

Re:No CZ? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894061)

What? No CZ on Linux?

Ok, I give up, what is CZ?

The closest I could find [wikipedia.org] was Counter-Strike: Condition Zero, but I'm not sure why that particular game (which came out 7 or 8 years ago) is relevant?

Is it just me, (1)

TheFoxMan88 (2528592) | more than 2 years ago | (#38894333)

or is the line up of games pretty sad. On another note... maybe they got their business sense from "Software Tycoon".

Don't worry. I'm on it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38894567)

I'm just starting. With Linux-ONLY games. Yes, that's right. I want them to be killer features. There will never be a Windows or Mac version. Period.
I think the same thing should have happened with OpenOffice, Firefox, etc. People just didn't have the balls. Which is so typical for geeks.
Jobs did. But he was delusional.

The thing is: Women I showed Compiz and all the styling ablities of Linux to, asked me to switch them to Linux. That's all it takes! It's that easy! (They also liked OpenOffice over the MS Office ribbon UI.)
You know what put them off? Not being able to do video chat and have the animated emoticons, flash games and stuff in their instant messengers.
This should be a key priority. Communication is key to women. (And don't dare belittling that.)
Because if you get it to generally work (>90% done), all communication features (>80% done), all file management features (done), all media playback features (done) and all office features (done), that's all that ~90% of the home users need. Add a nice package manager frontend, and good support forums (we have that too), and you're on the same level.

Then it needs another killer feature on top of that, to win.
This is where Gnome and KDE failed. Because all they did was imitating. Which by definition is a guarantee that you always stay behind. Ask any race car driver: As long as you follow, you never take over. Only if you drive your own way can you win. (Again: This is one key part of Jobs' success. [Yeah, I hate him, but a fact is a fact.])

That’s why I decided to go Linux-only. And so should you.
Maybe distribute things as a live-CD/DVD/USB to ease them into it.

And: No, Linux game programming is not at all hard.
OpenGL, SDL, POSIX and the FreeDesktop standards, and you’re already nearly completely there.
Game input was a problem previously. But with generic event/button/key/axis devices and udev, that problem is solved.
The only place that needs improvement is the OpenAL effects (think EAX). But that was deliberate monopolism abuse by Creative.
I can live without it, or write my own.

This is why I proposed a 2-4-yearly standard base platform with a certain set of guaranteed features, like graphics processing power, RAM, APIs etc, that make it easy for game developers to target a stable platform. It would be marketed to end-users the same way as consoles. So when the PS4 and XBox 720 come out, GamePC 4 could also come out. (Yes, it's deliberately named "GamePC" to 1. make it clear that Linux is a PC platform too, and that 2. it is the *only* game pc platform. This is a naming strategy that MS uses all the time [Media Player, Internet Explorer, etc]. So why not kick their asses that way too, for a change. ^^)
It would also guarantee that all new games would work on your nearly 4 year old PC. But not on Windows. Only on a Linux GamePC. :D

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