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Do You Like Online Privacy? You May Be a Terrorist

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the check-your-washroom-for-bolsheviks dept.

Privacy 720

schwit1 passes on this snippet from Public Intelligence: "A flyer designed by the FBI and the Department of Justice to promote suspicious activity reporting in internet cafes lists basic tools used for online privacy as potential signs of terrorist activity. The document, part of a program called 'Communities Against Terrorism,' lists the use of 'anonymizers, portals, or other means to shield IP address' as a sign that a person could be engaged in or supporting terrorist activity. The use of encryption is also listed as a suspicious activity along with steganography, the practice of using 'software to hide encrypted data in digital photos' or other media. In fact, the flyer recommends that anyone 'overly concerned about privacy' or attempting to 'shield the screen from view of others' should be considered suspicious and potentially engaged in terrorist activities. ... The use of PGP, VPNs, Tor or any of the many other technologies for anonymity and privacy online are directly targeted by the flyer, which is distributed to businesses in an effort to promote the reporting of these activities."

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The power of privacy (5, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904631)

"If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place." - Eric Schmidt, Google CEO

"[There's an] error in logic that leads to short-sighted conceptions of privacy like Schmidt's. ... Google, governments, and technologists need to understand more broadly that ignoring privacy protections in the innovations we incorporate into our lives not only invites invasions of our personal space and comfort, but opens the door to future abuses of power." - EFF

Can you believe that the Internet was once considered a place to escape identity? Where anonymity reigned? It's pretty amazing in retrospect how quickly that changed, and the way people are now trained to reveal everything on Facebook and Twitter is creating a society that doesn't understand the value and the power of their personal information. They're willing to reveal all, to act as better products for advertisers and to avoid suspicion from overbearing governments.

Re:The power of privacy (5, Insightful)

repapetilto (1219852) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904661)

Even if you don't care if the government knows everything about you... do you trust them to keep your info safe from hackers? Do you want ME to know everything you do?

Re:The power of privacy (4, Insightful)

sconeu (64226) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904915)

Do you want ME to know everything you do?

Apparently most people on Facebook and Twitter do want that.

Re:The power of privacy (5, Insightful)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904955)

Even if you don't care if the government knows everything about you...

I do care. The government has powers it should not have. The less they know about me the better. And everyone else for that matter.

If you want to know something about me, ask, if I want to tell you, I will.

Re:The power of privacy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904675)

Can you believe that the Internet was once considered a place to escape identity? Where anonymity reigned? It's pretty amazing in retrospect how quickly that changed, and the way people are now trained to reveal everything on Facebook and Twitter is creating a society that doesn't understand the value and the power of their personal information. They're willing to reveal all, to act as better products for advertisers and to avoid suspicion from overbearing governments

So says the guy with a registered account.

Re:The power of privacy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904727)

I second that. Oh wait, I have a registered account too. (I just don't log into it on this computer.)

Re:The power of privacy (3, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904773)

Pseudonymity is one form of anonymity.

Re:The power of privacy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904897)

You have a subscriber star. Your money is extremely trackable with the right subpoenas.

Additionally, even if you weren't a subscriber, the time and dates of your postings along with your user ID can be used as inputs to track you down (even with an anonymizer like Tor).

Re:The power of privacy (1)

what2123 (1116571) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905029)

Yes, but good look trying to figure out who is really behind "Barrett Williams."

Re:The power of privacy (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905005)

There's an email address assigend to your account with an IP address associated with that - even if is assigned raondomly; just look at logs.

And then there's the IP address associated with your (and my) posts.

So, now there are two ways of finding you if I were some sort of secret police. With a couple of letter with a certain letter head, it wouldn't be too hard to find out what ISP account these posts came from and the billing address and who you are - or at least find your parents and tell them what you've been doing in your basement.

Secondly, as someone with such a low Slashdot account number (with a star too!), I'm really disappionted in you for having such an attitude regarding internet accounts. I expected better from you and everyone who modded you up.

I am a disappoint.

Lastly, you have lousy taste in porn.

Re:The power of privacy (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904687)

It's not an error in logic. Eric Schmidt knows exactly what he's arguing for.

Re:The power of privacy (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904689)

This is just another example of just how far out of touch the US Government is in technology.

I swear...armed uprising might soon be the only way to restore the country to some semblance of normalcy, where the government works FOR the people, not against us all.

AC to prevent an anonymous black van from showing up at my door.

Re:The power of privacy (5, Insightful)

mrclisdue (1321513) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905097)

...AC to prevent an anonymous black van from showing up at my door...

I could do the old ftfy crap, but posting AC perhaps adds a weak layer of obscurity, but it won't necessarily prevent our rulers from showing up: your anonymity depends hugely on what other steps you may have taken to shield your id....

But the old "only terrorists have something to hide" ideology has become so ingrained in our society that it's sickening. In these parts there was a campaign to swab all the men in town for dna (they were looking for a serial rapist, or something along those lines.) At the press conference, the spokesman for the police said exactly that, "If someone doesn't want to be swabbed, they're obviously hiding something." And pretty well everyone I mentioned this to over the next few weeks absolutely agreed. I didn't get swabbed. Two detectives showed up at my door. I *think* I convinced them that I was refusing, on principle, but I really can't be sure now, can I?

cheers,

Re:The power of privacy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904787)

What's your Facebook username, citizen?

Re:The power of privacy (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904883)

What's your Facebook username, citizen?

You have to ask?

Re:The power of privacy (1)

Ragun (1885816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904885)

Its all tradeoffs. When you go to the store to buy something, people have an opportunity to notice your activities. If you use Google, its absurd to demand they forget what you tell them to of the encounter. The government should have certain limits, because we cannot chose to not do business with them, but to pretend that perfect anonymity will exist just seems silly.

That being said, this flyer is hilarious.

Re:The power of privacy (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904983)

FBI. OPEN the door, you filthy terroriste....

Re:The power of privacy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905053)

Schmidt is correct in his phrasing.
Not wanting anyone to know is very different from not wanting everyone to know.

Re:The power of privacy (2)

tqk (413719) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905087)

It's pretty amazing in retrospect how quickly that changed, and the way people are now trained to reveal everything on Facebook and Twitter is creating a society that doesn't understand the value and the power of their personal information.

Someone in the halls of power has finally got around to reading both 1984 and Brave New World. "Don't forget to take your Soma, citizen, and remember we'll be doing drug testing later to assure you did. It's for your safety, for the children, and to stop terrorists."

Don't worry, DHS, people like me will soon be dead so you needn't worry further about people like me. "Land of the free, home of the brave", my ass.

Re:The power of privacy (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905091)

There are some people who are simply intensly private. Nothing to hide, no borderline paranoia, no affairs, no extreme opinions political, religious or any other kind. You know. Average. Introverts.

I remember once I found a website translating strings into binary code. Used to chat with my brother like that for weeks. We both have laptops, and travel, not frequently, but enough to encrypt the hard drives. I might buy another laptop if I lose it, and lose forever the data on it, but nobody else gets to access my mail or other websites accounts, and other things, like work or personal projects.

There's this thing called identity theft in case you haven't heard of it. Dumbass cops. Suits or uniforms, they're the same damn stock.

Re:The power of privacy (4, Insightful)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905145)

The funny thing is that if everyone felt the way Eric Schmidt did, or for that matter, the TSA, we wouldn't have the iPhone. You want to talk about things developed in secret by people taking borderline insane measures to keep other people from reading their screens.... So is he saying that such products should not have been created in the first place?

In fact, what's interesting is that the people most strongly in favor of privacy are the ones most likely to change things—for better or worse—because they're the ones who see things differently. They look at a piece of wood and see a table, or look at an old car bumper and see a sculpture. They see things not for what they are, but for what they could be. But they know that their ideas must be fully baked before they are unleashed into the wild, or else the public will not understand them—will not accept them—will not appreciate them.

This scares those who have vested interests in the status quo. They call them names like terrorist, radical, or crazy to diminish their standing, further isolating them from society. Eventually this actually drives them inevitably to take some extreme action that changes things anyway, in spite of the establishment's desire to avoid that.

What that action is depends on the person. It might be blowing up an airplane, or it might be releasing the most amazing new piece of technology the world has ever seen. It's the same fundamental way of operating, but with vastly different goals. The problem is that there is no good way to tell the difference as an outsider. The only real option is to accept that there will always be a few people who will try to change the world for the worse—blow stuff up, kill people, etc.—and accept that we can't feasibly stop them all without also stopping those who would change the world for the better.

Food for thought.

Organized trolling campaign by GreatBunzinni (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904655)

GreatBunzinni [slashdot.org] has been posting anonymous accusations [slashdot.org] listing a whole bunch of Slashdot accounts as being part of a marketing campaign for Microsoft, without any evidence.

GreatBunzinni has accidentally outed himself [slashdot.org] as this anonymous poster. Here, he writes the same post almost verbatim, first using his logged-in account [slashdot.org] and then in an anonymous post [slashdot.org] submitted days later. Note the use of the exact same terminology and phrasing in both posts.

Half the accounts he attacks don't even post pro-Microsoft rhetoric. The one thing they appear to have in common is that they have been critical of Google in the past. GreatBunzinni has been using multiple accounts to post these "shill" accusations, such as Galestar [slashdot.org] , NicknameOne [slashdot.org] , and flurp [slashdot.org] .

That's not the problem. The problem is that moderators gave him +5 Informative and are now modding down the accused, even for legitimate posts. Metamoderation is supposed to address this by filtering out the bad moderators, but clearly it's not working.

This "shill" crap that has been flying around lately has to stop. It's restricting a variety of viewpoints from participating on the site and creating an echo chamber.

They aren't wrong (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904667)

These might be signs of someone being a terrorist. It's just that 99.9% aren't and you're basically taking away privacy from everyone by treating the use of such tools as being suspicious. It's exactly what terrorists want to achieve.

Re:They aren't wrong (3, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904723)

They're not even signs of being a terrorist. To call them signs of being a terrorist is like saying breathing is a sign of being a terrorist, because terrorists breathe.

Re:They aren't wrong (4, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904863)

They're not even signs of being a terrorist. To call them signs of being a terrorist is like saying breathing is a sign of being a terrorist, because terrorists breathe.

Have you seen any anaerobic terrorists? Well, have you?

Your pitiful libertarian Taliban-loving communist leaning socialist inspired arguments pale in the face of cold, hard logic.

Re:They aren't wrong (4, Funny)

sconeu (64226) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904971)

Has anyone ever seen ColdWetDog and whoever is the current head of AlQaeda in the same room?

Re:They aren't wrong (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904729)

You seem to have knowledge of what terrorists want to achieve, therefore you must be a terrorist!

Re:They aren't wrong (3, Insightful)

Hope Thelps (322083) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904757)

These might be signs of someone being a terrorist. It's just that 99.9% aren't and you're basically taking away privacy from everyone by treating the use of such tools as being suspicious. It's exactly what terrorists want to achieve.

So in the same sense that being right handed is a sign of someone being a terrorist - not all terrorists are right handed but a lot of them are (and maybe some other people too).

Re:They aren't wrong (2)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905057)

So it seems that all the terrorists are also, GOD NO, human beings. So if you are human being......

Chicken or egg? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904677)

"Like privacy? You may be a terrorist!"

It's thinking like that which risks turning me into a terrorist.

OMGWTFBBQ (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904679)

I used encryption (well atleast my browser did) to do a bank transaction, I guess I am a terrorist.
I also work at a local sheriff's office and we use vpn to access a state/federal system. I guess the state and feds are terrorists too

Sounds like the Drug Wars (5, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904697)

I remember the loathsome brochures passed around in the Government during the Reagan / G.H.W. Bush drug wars years. They basically boiled down to

- anyone acting strangely might be on drugs, and
- anyone not acting strangely might be on drugs, and covering it up.

Sounds like the DOJ is falling down the same rathole once again.

Re:Sounds like the Drug Wars (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904931)

It's an easy hole to fall into:

Everybody is suspicious.

Then you can run around being all up tight and paranoid. Much easier than thinking, planning or following that pesky Constitutional framework called The Law.

posted as anonymous coward (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904701)

Sorry guys, I may not be able to post here much longer.

Welcome privacy advocates... (5, Insightful)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904709)

Welcome privacy advocates to the Accused of Being A Terrorist While Doing Nothing Wrong Club. Take a seat over there next to the Photographers (because terrorists will really cart around a DSLR and tripod in their terrifying terroristic travels).

Re:Welcome privacy advocates... (2)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904901)

Privacy advocates are charter members of that club. Photographers were relative latecomers.

(Remember the Clipper chip?)

Nothing to hide? Really? (1)

Zharr (879496) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904719)

Sounds like a lot of businesses are goin to be on the 'suspicious' list.

Porn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904731)

Just have it running with speakers full blast in the middle of the cafe if they REALLY wanna know what you're up to.

People are clueless (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904751)

The sad thing is, people still believe the US government has their best interests at heart and is not trying to oppress them.
They seem to think a tyranny is impossible in the USA.

News at 10 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904753)

In other breaking news, buying a ticket on a commercial airline, driving a car, buying a penknife, wearing a shirt and breathing are all signs of possible terrorist activity.

a home based ISP? (2, Interesting)

jaymz666 (34050) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904759)

If you login to you comcast webmail you may be a terrorist?

Code? (5, Interesting)

Bucky24 (1943328) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904761)

"Suspicious or coded writings, use of code word sheets, cryptic ledgers, etc"

To the average citizen, most programming languages would fit this.

Re:Code? (5, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904979)

"Suspicious or coded writings, use of code word sheets, cryptic ledgers, etc"

To the average citizen, most programming languages would fit this.

To the average (US) citizen, simple declarative English sentences would fit this.

Re:Code? (5, Interesting)

idontgno (624372) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905063)

According to Esperantist legend, when Zamenhof (the initial creator of the Esperanto language) went to medical school, his father found his initial work notes on the language and burned it all, fearing that it was evidence that young Zamenhof was a spy.

This was in 1881, according to the sources I could find. So the "OMG SEECRET CODEZ" panic is well over a century old, at least.

Re:Code? (4, Funny)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905113)

The question is who is the biggest terrorist:
1. Java terrorist
2. C++ terrorist
1. C terrorist
1. Oracle terrorist
1. Perl terrorist
1. LUA terrorist

(i bet the Oracle terrorist are the most dangerous)

Re:Code? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905123)

The one-time pad of codes I use to log into my bank account online fits that description perfectly too. I guess online banking is a sign of being a terrorist, then.

I'll Become One (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904781)

If you keep stripping my rights, I'll become a Terrorist

Re:I'll Become One (5, Insightful)

JobyOne (1578377) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905059)

Rights become crimes, making more criminals out of thin air. Suddenly there's a lot of crime going on, so we strip more rights, to deal with all the crimes. It's pretty damn circular.

Similar to McArthur anti-communist propaganda... (4, Interesting)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904785)

My grand parents knew friends who were arrested as they were suspected communists during the witch hunt years McArthur was going after people who simply had an opinion about the government...

Re:Similar to McArthur anti-communist propaganda.. (4, Informative)

iceaxe (18903) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904961)

I think you are referring to Senator Joseph McCarthy [wikipedia.org] and not General Douglas MacArthur [wikipedia.org] . Right?

Re:Similar to McArthur anti-communist propaganda.. (0)

gregg (42218) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904975)

My grand parents knew friends who were arrested as they were suspected communists during the witch hunt years McArthur was going after people who simply had an opinion about the government...

I think you mean McCarthy [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Similar to... who? (0)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905077)

Did you by chance mean "McCarthy"? Gen. Douglas McArthur was no fan of Communists, but it was Sen. Joe McCarthy who is know for anti-Commie witch hunts.

Darnit! Now I get it... (0)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904791)

attempting to 'shield the screen from view of others' should be considered suspicious and potentially engaged in terrorist activities. ...

Darnit! So thats why I failed the FBI test! I checked "C: is a Masturbator" on that one!

Working = Terrorism? (5, Interesting)

Wamoc (1263324) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904809)

So this means that anytime I am at a public place and fire up a VPN to access work materials I am engaged in terrorist activities? Hopefully tech companies will shed some light over how absurd the FBI and DoJ are being on this.

Re:Working = Terrorism? (5, Informative)

kdekorte (8768) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904981)

This was my first thought. I use VPNs and my corporate security policy discourages allowing people to view your screen. Plus we use PGP and other technologies to secure the company data. So basically if you are a remote worker you must be involved in terrorism based on the summary.

Re:Working = Terrorism? (1)

oracleofbargth (16602) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905017)

By their own definition, all the secrecy, encryption, etc, everyone working for the FBI/DoJ may be considered a terrorist.

If you like candy... (1)

MisterMidi (1119653) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904813)

If you like candy, you may be a terrorist, if you can ride a bike you may be a terrorist, if you keep your food in the fridge you may be a terrorist... Hell, we may all be terrorists!

I knew the "Hellscream's Raiders" were suspicioous (0)

Ragun (1885816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904817)

Suspicious communications using VOIP or communicating through a PC game

MMO Guilds, consider yourselves warned...

Every child in America a potential Terrorist (5, Insightful)

Ragnarok89 (1066010) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904823)

"Suspicious communications using VOIP or communicating through a PC game" Seriously!? Communicating through a videogame? By that definition every single child who plays online computer games that allow them to talk to others is a potential threat. I wonder what that means for all those who play Modern Warfare and the like? Maybe they're TRAINING to be terrorists! The US lawmakers sicken me.

Or simply wanking to porn (2)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904853)

"Do You Like Online Privacy? You May Be a Terrorist"

Or simply wanking to porn. Who wants to be disturbed by CIA/FBI when touching one's genitals?

Re:Or simply wanking to porn (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904871)

Users of Chatroulette?

Re:Or simply wanking to porn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904899)

Perhaps some are -hoping- to get the help of the CIA and/or FBI in such endeavors. They just can't get rough enough with themselves otherwise...

Terrorist tools for everybody (0)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904869)

When l33t tools are outlawed, only outlaws will have them.

Governments are evil by definition [slashdot.org] and the real terrorists are in government and people need protection from government, which is what Constitution is supposed to be in at least in US.

Function Repeat (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904875)

This all sounds very familiar doesn't it...

"Are you know or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?"

Make it universal (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904893)

This is why everyone should use such tools and practices, all the time.

Well..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904895)

I guess I'm a terrorist...

Just because you like protecting your identity does not mean you are a terrorist.

Remind me again why we have 1000 year old politicians, using Windows XP and IE6, making Tech laws for future generations?

Hey----Why not just LOGIN to the internet. So if you pirate something or say something stupid it is ON YOUR ACCOUNT. It DOES NOT punish the rest of us.
 

Nakedness (1)

U8MyData (1281010) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904905)

So in the effort to prevent bad things from happening we will take x and if that doesn't work we'll take y. We will keep taking to protect women, children, and the nation until we are all stripped of everything. The only problem with that is so will the bad thing. I am avoiding the obvious use of the term of this topic, but get my drift? What will prevent the bad thing is unity and dilligence of the community, not stipping the community of what makes them unique. This has become sport in some circles.

Utoh (3)

bartoku (922448) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904909)

I guess I am a terrorist, where do I turn myself in?

I am a terrorist then, I guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904911)

Since I am now classified as a terrorist, where can I pick up my free AK-47?

Like a Founding Father, count me in.... (3, Insightful)

realsilly (186931) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904921)

.... for I relish in my privacy rights. I always try to hide what I do from others. I refuse to have an account on Facebook, or other social media tools. I guess this makes me suspect.

Forget that my Civil Liberties are being stripped away one chip at a time, and my right to privacy is a pursuit to my life, liberty and happiness, which is in the Declaration of Independence.

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,[75] that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security."

So I guess our founding fathers were Terrorists then....

How long until... (1)

mrjatsun (543322) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904923)

How long until it's, 'if your not actively posting a log of your daily life to Facebook, you might be a terrorist.'?

Atleast we have a little progress (2)

Ragun (1885816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904925)

It is important to remember that just because someone’s speech,
actions, beliefs, appearance, or way of life is different; it does not
mean that he or s he is suspicious.

Alright, they at least have the arbitrary discrimination disclaimer. Lets take this one step at a time. Slow but sure...

This isn't so bad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904927)

After all if you aren't doing anything wrong then you should have nothing to hide. The government is merely trying to keep our communities safe from terrorism. The fact that there hasn't been another 9/11 type of event on US soil is proof that the DHS is doing an outstanding job.

Well, duh! (1)

IronHalik (1568993) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904929)

You wouldn't mind getting your email monitored if you didn't have anything evil to hide!

Oh, and that encrypted partition pretty much makes you a pedophile.

Problem solves self in DC (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904933)

Are overly concerned about privacy, attempts to shield the screen from view of others
That's every government worker or contractor in Washington. Privacy filters are ubiquitous here, often mandated for anything requiring a clearance above window washer.

  Are observed switching SIM cards in cell phone or use of multiple cell phones
Again, this is pretty much every professional in Washington with a department/company phone and a personal phone.

  Suspicious or coded writings, use of code word sheets, cryptic ledgers, etc.
Multi-factor logins are pretty common here, though one-time pads are usually of the key-fob/credit-card variety.

  Encryption or use of software to hide encrypted data in digital photos, etc.
This is required by pretty much everyone here.

Enjoy your self-inflicted DDoS attack if people in DC actually follow these instructions.

Do you use a pay phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904937)

TERRORISM!

Welcome to the Fourth Reich (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38904939)

I, for one, will be among the first to welcome our heavily-armed, privacy-invading Overlords. >.>

Bend Over. (1)

headkase (533448) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904965)

"Bend Over"

"No"

"By refusing to bend over that is probable cause for not bending over. Here's a warrant, bend over"

I may work for a terrorist organization (4, Funny)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904989)

Apparently my employer could be a terrorist organization, because we use PGP and VPN technology routinely. Sure, the boss says it's for HIPAA compliance, but that's what you'd expect a terrorist to say, isn't it?

Interesting... (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 2 years ago | (#38904997)

I'm pretty sure the FBI and DOJ both use encryption and VPN connections for many, many activities and are pretty diligent to 'shield the screen from view of others' in their day-to-day computer usage. Just say'in. So, who's watching the watchers?

Fake (4, Interesting)

Reservoir Penguin (611789) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905009)

This is obviously a fake flyer, where is your sense of humour people? Mention "Tripwire", seriously?

Just Like the Stasi in East Germany (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905011)

Turn every neighbor against neighbor, one reporting the other to the police, so the other can be subjected to surveillance and snooping until they DO find something illegal...which might take years!

We're moving, exorably and completely, to a Police State, and the police are now over-armed, and using all the intelligence methods developed against our enemies in the past 50 years...so, it turns common citizens with something to protect (their livelihoods, their wealth, their families) into criminals-without-trial.

Hammer and Nail (1)

trolman (648780) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905019)

When all you know how to use is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

Cash (1)

d'baba (1134261) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905021)

I skimmed thru 6 or so of the local specific pdfs and each one listed 'insists on paying with cash' or 'pays cash for large purchases'. My favorite Threat Area? - The Tattoo Parlor!
--
Gagbrae In - Gragabe Out

Terrorist Activitie Related to Internet Cafe? (1)

quax (19371) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905023)

Seriously? Internet Cafe? That's so quaint how Homeland Security is stuck in the lingo of 1999.

Witchcraft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905025)

Unfortunately, the general public, and more alarmingly, the government are starting to wrap their heads around the power technology provides but they still can't wrap their heads around the technology itself and therefore it is scary and evil to them. All technology that /can/ be used for nefarious deeds is, clearly, /always/ being used for nefarious deeds and has no other purpose. Because who wants to keep company/personal documents private besides a terrorist? Who would ever want to have more than one computer hooked to their ISP without paying for separate connections? That's terror-talk.

LOL (1)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905033)

>Gather information about individuals without drawing attention to yourself

LOL isn't this what that flayer is about? Look for anyone trying to stay private while not drawing attention to themselves BUT you are ok to do it if you are trying to rat out your neighbour as possible terrorist.

It's my fault! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905041)

I guess the Obama administration is sick of my posts, too.

It's pretty much like this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905043)

"If you don't tell me everything about you in intimate detail, I'm going to arrest you and destroy your house in front of you."

Because Internet Cafes Are So Secure? (3, Insightful)

crunchygranola (1954152) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905051)

Anyone accessing any kind of sensitive information (like reading email) at an internet cafe is exposing themselves to the possibility of every type of electronic snooping by criminals, up to and including laptop theft. It would be folly not to employ strong security measures when accessing the net under such circumstances.

This is like claiming people who lock their front doors fit a criminal profile, because they are trying to keep people from seeing what they have or are doing in their houses.

This goes beyond terror (4, Interesting)

Morris Thorpe (762715) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905055)

There's a news story in Ann Arbor in which a pediatrician is accused of peeping involving a minor. Police confiscated his computer based on the investigation. That's great and I'm glad they caught the guy.

But....after analyzing his computer, the cops presented the "evidence" they found.
The detective was (can't find the news story right now, sorry) quoted as listing images, an electronic receipt to a child porn site and....the fact that the doctor deleted cookies and added other privacy measures to his browsing! The quote assumed that he must have been up to no good if he was careful about his privacy.

More telling. Out of the 200-plus comments on the story, none referenced this.

Yes (1)

whrrr (1087271) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905071)

I do like online privacy. I like anonymizers too. I love encryption.

But then, I am actually a terrorist. Checkmate, freedom advocates.

Ask for it by name. (2, Interesting)

utkonos (2104836) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905105)

I see that the FBI still has a rock hard boner because of the Anarchist Cookbook.

Disclaimer at the end (5, Informative)

sloth10k (1298709) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905109)

At the bottom of the flyer: "Each indictor listed above is by itself lawful conduct or behavior and may also constitute the exercise of rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution." Don't let pesky details get in the way, JRIC...

Time to smoke out the watchers (1)

radionerd (916462) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905111)

This is a nice list of things to use as bait to find out if you're being watched. I think it's time to get out my netbook, and head for the local coffee shops. If I'm approached, I'll immediately turn off the netbook, eject the SD chip, and break it with my pocket multi tool...... will one of you please come bail me out?

The terrorists have won (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905119)

That's right. They've won their war by turning this formerly free country into a state of fear and paranoia, where people are being indoctrinated and taught by the State to fear their own shadows and to constantly look over their shoulders. If at all, this FBI flyer is material proof of the terrorists' success, and that's a shame.

Papers please, Comrade. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38905125)

If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.

Oh My God.... (1)

Lithdren (605362) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905131)

This means my bank is a terrorist!

This would actually explain quite a bit about what happened not so long ago, come to think of it.

I bet there will be many false alarms... (1)

sweffymo (1760622) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905133)

Caused by people who are trying to look at pr0n.

With that logic... (1)

GReaToaK_2000 (217386) | more than 2 years ago | (#38905143)

The FBI, CIA, NSA, DOD, etc etc etc are ALL terrorist organizations.

Banks are terrorist organizations too for that matter.

Give me a break...

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