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Text Message Brands Quebec Man a Terror Suspect

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the rooting-for-the-habs-will-do-that dept.

Canada 451

An anonymous reader writes "Saad Allami likely never expected that a simple text message of encouragement would have turned his life upside down. But as seen in a similar case of absurd overreaction by authorities, a simple text message is all it takes to have yourself branded as a terrorist. From the article: 'The Quebec man says he was arrested by provincial police while picking up his seven-year-old son at school. A team of police officers stormed into his home, telling his wife she was married to a terrorist. And his work colleagues were detained for hours at the U.S. border because of their connection to him.'"

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What was it? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930755)

What were the contents of the text message? That seems like sort of a key point.

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

guabah (968691) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930781)

He just wanted to "blow away" the competition

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930861)

A Connecticut Casino [mohegansun.com] has a set of 4 "core values" that its employees are supposed to emulate:

Blowing Away the Customer
Developing Passionate and Dedicated Employees
Continuously Striving for Perfection
Bottom Line Performance


Is this out of a terrorist handbook?

Re:What was it? (5, Funny)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931081)

Connecticut Casino has a set of 4 "core values" that its employees are supposed to emulate:

Blowing Away the Customer

I think that must have been done by a non-native English speaker. It's just a mistaken idiom; the correct "core value" is "Cleaning Out the Customer".

Re:What was it? (4, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931229)

Blowing the customer. That's got to be a Nevada casino? No?

Re:What was it? (2)

jasno (124830) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931261)

I think it's a reference to the complementary buffet...

Re:What was it? (4, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931249)

Ya know, we all make fun of them when they do obvious dumbshit like this, but how much of this is typical corporate CYA that always happens when somebody fucks up? I mean they ignored the guys learning to fly a plane and not land it which now looks pretty fucking stupid but at that time, when the only thing any terrorist had ever done with a plane was demand it take him to Cuba? Compared to what they had on their plates it probably wasn't seen as a big whoop.

Well now here we are, and after millions spent in investigation on how they could have missed 9/11 i have no problem thinking they may go completely overboard in the other direction in a classic case of CYA. Again while not condoning this obvious dumbshit maneuver given the circumstances you can see why it happens, nobody wants to be labeled the next guy that "ZOMFG you fucked up and let them attack us you monster!" so here we go.

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

Squiddie (1942230) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930783)

The article says that he told his colleagues to "blow away" the competition, so most likely it read as, "Blow them away." And it was misinterpreted.

Re:What was it? (5, Interesting)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930813)

The article says that he told his colleagues to "blow away" the competition, so most likely it read as, "Blow them away." And it was misinterpreted.

Indeed -- but misinterpreted by whom? His colleagues, or by someone who was spying on his text messages? And if it was the latter, did they have a search warrant, or is this another case of the government conducting warrantless wiretaps?

Re:What was it? (2)

Squiddie (1942230) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930835)

The article doesn't say, but it was more likely that they were spying on him.

Re:What was it? (4, Interesting)

Isaac Remuant (1891806) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931003)

how sure are you that you're not being spied on as well? and I mean you and everyone else who uses cell phones.

Re:What was it? (4, Funny)

murdocj (543661) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931057)

I'm not, I have my tinfoil hat on

Re:What was it? (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931133)

Is it on your cellphone?

Re:What was it? (5, Insightful)

meerling (1487879) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931205)

more likely? Considering they went ballistic on one misinterpreted word in a text message, I'd say they it's 100% positive they were spying on him.

Re:What was it? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930841)

And if it is the former, that is even scarier. We can trust no one!

Re:What was it? (2)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930929)

The NSA dictionary search was run by very smart people and the different federal actions never really got too public over many years.
Now every federal, state and telco related agency is trying for the same easy telco feeds on cheap "super" computers after renting or buying dictionary search software.

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

Seq (653613) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930967)

Allami says he sent the text message in French and used the word ''exploser,'' a term he claims is commonly used in finance to mean grow or succeed.

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

Rytis (907427) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931179)

It is indeed used very often in colloquial French. You can explode your budget, some limit/quota (overspend or overdo) and yes, you can explode your competition as the title of this article [premiere.fr] says.

Re:What was it? (4, Insightful)

meerling (1487879) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931195)

"Allami says he sent the text message in French and used the word ''exploser,'' a term he claims is commonly used in finance to mean grow or succeed."

Bet it was picked up by english keyword software or 'examined' by an english speaker that obviously doesn't understand french idioms/slang, so he googled it, and found the wrong definition.
Basic moron level knee-jerking.

Re:What was it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930919)

Actually, it seems "blow away" is a translation, FTA:

"""Allami says he sent the text message in French and used the word ''exploser,'' a term he claims is commonly used in finance to mean grow or succeed."""

Re:What was it? (4, Funny)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931033)

I understand a guy who does not have english as his first language using the phrase and not meaning it literally.

BUT - what excuse is there for north american 'authorities' to misunderstand this very common expresssion ?

there is no excuse. anyone in charge connected to this should be fired.

or, blown away....

Re:What was it? (2)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931215)

This guy was from Quebec, whose official language is technically French, so it seems entirely possible that whichever law enforcement agent (the provincial police arrested him) heard about it was not, in fact, a native English speaker as such.

Most Canadians do speak English, but Quebec is the primarily French section of Canada. Haven't been there, but from what I've heard about it from my Canadian friends, this seems possible. Still an over-reaction, obviously.

Re:What was it? (0)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931263)

Whoops, looks like the message was actually sent in French. It used the word "exploser", which literally means "explode". I don't speak French, so if I saw that I would think he meant it literally, but it is entirely possible it is common slang for, well, "blow away" in the innocent sense.

Re:What was it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931069)

Allami says he sent the text message in French and used the word ''exploser,'' a term he claims is commonly used in finance to mean grow or succeed

RTFA

Re:What was it? (-1, Flamebait)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930809)

Well...if you'd read the article in your mad dash for first post you'd know what it was.

You don't even need to read the whole thing, the first line would have done the trick.

Moron.

Yes, *you*. You're a moron.

Re:What was it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930833)

Yes, I read the "blown away" part about his NYC competitors, but that's not the entire text message, is it? I don't see why we should condemn the authorities for this when we don't actually know what he said.

Also, thanks for making it clear that *I'm* a moron. I totally thought you were addressing that comment to someone else.

Re:What was it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930825)

They really should provide a link to some related arti... oh. Wait.

Hey look.

On Jan. 21, 2011, Allami sent a text message to colleagues urging them to "blow away" the competition at a trade show in New York City.

Re:What was it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930911)

Gosh, thanks. I definitely didn't see the link. As I said earlier, the story doesn't include the entire text message which seems pretty important here. I know I'm supposed to just condemn this but I'd rather actually know what happened before freaking out. My apologies for wanting some context.

Re:What was it? (1)

murdocj (543661) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931065)

Gosh, thanks. I definitely didn't see the link. As I said earlier, the story doesn't include the entire text message which seems pretty important here. I know I'm supposed to just condemn this but I'd rather actually know what happened before freaking out. My apologies for wanting some context.

This is slashdot. Amerika is the center of all evil. Get with the program.

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931027)

"Salem, je serai à New York le 25 janvier, on va exploser ACN, si vous avez des contacts référez-les moi"

http://www.aufaitmaroc.com/maroc/societe/2012/2/3/canada-un-entrepreneur-dorigine-marocaine-souhaitant-exploser-la-concurrence-ecroue

Re:What was it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931095)

"Salem, je serai à New York le 25 janvier, on va exploser ACN, si vous avez des contacts référez-les moi"

http://www.aufaitmaroc.com/maroc/societe/2012/2/3/canada-un-entrepreneur-dorigine-marocaine-souhaitant-exploser-la-concurrence-ecroue

Thanks for this. While it doesn't really justify what happened to him, I can definitely see why saying this would be deemed suspicious:

"Salem, I will be in New York on January 25, ACN is going to explode, if you have contacts refer them to me"

Re:What was it? (5, Informative)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931139)

Salem, je serai à New York le 25 janvier, on va exploser ACN, si vous avez des contacts référez-les moi.

Translates to:
Salem, I will be in New York on January 25h, we will explode ACN, if you have contacts refer them to me.

So yes, if you only see that sentence alone by itself, it will make you want to go and arrest the man.

The question is, why didn't they dig a bit deeper to get more information such as more details about the supposed bomb and other supposed terrorists *AND* why was his message intercepted in the first place? Welcome to 1984. The real terrorists did win, everyone in North America now lives in a police state.

Re:What was it? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931181)

"Salem, je serai à New York le 25 janvier, on va exploser ACN, si vous avez des contacts référez-les moi"

http://www.aufaitmaroc.com/maroc/societe/2012/2/3/canada-un-entrepreneur-dorigine-marocaine-souhaitant-exploser-la-concurrence-ecroue

Translation:
"Salem, I am in New York on Jan 25, the ACN is going to explode, refer any contacts you have to me."

Don't type this into Google Translate (1)

CuteSteveJobs (1343851) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931203)

I was about to, but this article shows that the police can use the most absurd things to make your life a living hell. Police and other so-called public servants really should be judged the same way employees of companies are: Do something stupid, and you get fired. Lawyers only go after the money since that is after all where the money is, but the cops who did this are also responsible so I hope the victim names them on the law suit or at least lists them as co-defendants to be named after all. That way their incredible dumb is out in the open for all the world to mock and laugh at.

Re:What was it? (4, Insightful)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931165)

With a name like Saad Allami you just know he was being profiled.

Much worse (5, Insightful)

Squiddie (1942230) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930757)

They arrested him because of a simple text message, not because any actions that he took. Just speech. That's a lot worse, if you ask me.

Re:Much worse (2)

timmy.cl (1102617) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930795)

Also, he is Moroccan native, and his seemingly arabic name probably doesn't help him either. So much for racial and origin equity.

Re:Much worse (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931023)

You're all missing the obvious. Forget his religion, origins, looks or name. Look at this, FTA:
"His case has surfaced after another story about an unexpected national-security case, triggered by what appeared to be a meaningless comment."
And that bit about the two Britts a few days ago ...
Doesn't that mean that every bit of data passing through the USA is monitored?

Re:Much worse (0)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931155)

Exactly my first impression too.So, in one sentence, EVERYTHING IS ALREADY MONITORED. Even google, the moment you google: bl%^$&^%$&%^$& the motherfuckers, and you are suspect zero.

Re:Much worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931217)

Exactly my first impression too.So, in one sentence, EVERYTHING IS ALREADY MONITORED. Even google, the moment you google: bl%^$&^%$&%^$& the motherfuckers, and you are suspect zero.

So am I going to guantanamo for saying "Fuck the US president" ?
Damn, I forgot to wear the tinfoil hat.

Re:Much worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930877)

Yeah, it's quite bad -- but this is Canada, where there is no absolute protection of speech analogous to the US's first amendment, so it's possibly legal. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms does protect "freedom of ... expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication", but the whole thing comes with a disclaimer:

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the rights and freedoms set out in it subject only to such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.

So they're basically in the same situation the US has been in ever since SCOTUS Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, scraping for a justification to punish people for speaking against the draft, invented the "clear and present danger" test. (His decision includes the now proverbial "falsely shouting fire in a theatre" example.) If the legislature can make a general law limiting speech in a "justifiable" manner, and occasional ensnares someone like Mr. Allami, that's just fine.

Re:Much worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930955)

BTW, the current SCOTUS test isn't C&PD. It's now referred to as "Strict Scrutiny" as the current court has largely held to that. You have the right to be a ******** in public, like running antigay slurs at a marine's funeral.

Re:Much worse (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930879)

It doesn't matter. Here is how the average idiot American (the people who end up on JURIES - which is fucking TERRIFYING) perceives something like this:

"He's obviously guilty - otherwise the government wouldn't be looking into him."

Re:Much worse (1, Insightful)

ark1 (873448) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930921)

I doubt it was simply a text message and more likely a chain of events that ended with the text message. Maybe this is a case of mistaken identity but I can bet someone with that name must have been on some sort of watch list for doing questionable activities or associating with questionable people. I doubt we will ever know the full story.

Re:Much worse (2)

SomePgmr (2021234) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930991)

While they obviously botched this one, I suspect you're right.

If they were simply kicking down doors for everyone with a name like his that sent a single, only vaguely suspicous sounding text message to coworkers, without any other pretext, we'd have a hundred articles like this every day.

Though that doesn't excuse what happened here.

Re:Much worse (2)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930997)

why would you doubt it was 'only' a text message?

you don't think we're all hyped up and afraid of any snap or twig that breaks?

we're on a knife-edge here.

oops, I said knife.

they'll come for me, next. if you don't see me post in my usual style, you'll know what happened to me.

(seriously, why would you disbelieve that they pounced down on him for just that? I would assume that it would take very little for the paranoid 'watchers' to freak out.)

Re:Much worse (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931209)

they'll come for me, next. if you don't see me post in my usual style, you'll know what happened to me.

Good news and bad news for ya.

Bad news first. You're joinin us at Gitmo.

Good news is, it's Salisbury steak night! Hurry up, it's goin' fast!

Re:Much worse (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931005)

I doubt it was simply a text message and more likely a chain of events that ended with the text message. Maybe this is a case of mistaken identity but I can bet someone with that name must have been on some sort of watch list for doing questionable activities or associating with questionable people. I doubt we will ever know the full story.

Another fucking just-worlder.

Re:Much worse (0)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931183)

It wasn't speech. Speech is what comes out of your mouth. He used an electronic device, which means it's no longer speech, ergo the authorities were justified in detaining him, destroying his life, plastering his picture all over the newspapers, telling him, his family, and everybody he knew he was a terrorist, making repeated threats against his person, etc.

The favored tactic of the oppressors is to simply redefine things. In the United States, for example, citizenship can now be revoked without a trial and the person deported, even if they were born in this country and never left, because the authorities simply redefined what a citizen is to get around that pesky constitution. In this case, since he didn't actually speak the words, but instead typed them, he is not entitled to any free speech protections. Or any protection. At all. Ever.

Re:Much worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931273)

They arrested him because of a simple text message, not because any actions that he took. Just speech. That's a lot worse, if you ask me.

And this isn't the only western democracy trying it on; ... see also UK; Police slap cuffs on Punk SMSer, 3rd June 2004 [theregister.co.uk] ... see also AU; Police track text message senders, December 23, 2005 [smh.com.au]

Americans are misunderstanding (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930765)

He was actually charged with terrorism for not also send his message in French. This is Quebec after all.

Re:Americans are misunderstanding (2)

POTSandPANS (781918) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930907)

Actually, from the article:

"Allami says he sent the text message in French and used the word ''exploser,'' a term he claims is commonly used in finance to mean grow or succeed."

Re:Americans are misunderstanding (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930927)

If you read TFA, you would find that the message actually was in French. But maybe your English isn't that great.

Re:Americans are misunderstanding (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931159)

Nothing as drastic, but I've heard that the Office québécois de la langue française gave him a "C" because of typos and grammatical errors in his message.

HI! (1)

M0j0_j0j0 (1250800) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930785)

Welcome to the 21st century witch hunt!

It's called a moral panic. (4, Informative)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931163)

The more technical terms is moral panic [wikipedia.org] . It is beyond ridiculous that such a well understood phenomena is completely lost on people who are supposedly "experts" on criminal behavior.

I have nothing to worry about. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930801)

Because I'm not a terrorist.

I agree it's likely an overreaction (2, Interesting)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930815)

But I'd really like to see the exact contents of the original text, as opposed to him giving us a vague description about how it mentioned "blowing away" the competition. That is, was it

"Go to this trade show and do such a good sales job that the competition is blown away!"

or a more hyperbolic comment like

"Blow those guys away. Annihilate them. Don't stop until they're lying in a puddle of their own blood, begging for mercy."

Re:I agree it's likely an overreaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930843)

"Blow those guys away. Annihilate them. Don't stop until they're lying in a puddle of their own blood, begging for mercy."

AHHHHHHHH TERRORIST GET HIM!!!!

Re:I agree it's likely an overreaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930863)

BAM!

You've triggered our 'blow away' filter with excessive usage of that phrase.
Watch out! Someone's on their way to 'blow you away' right now.

Re:I agree it's likely an overreaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930873)

93 Escort Wagon, you are clearly a terrorist for using those words.

Authorities: It's a JOKE!

Re:I agree it's likely an overreaction (1)

million_monkeys (2480792) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930881)

But I'd really like to see the exact contents of the original text, as opposed to him giving us a vague description about how it mentioned "blowing away" the competition.

Are you kidding? They're not going to release the actual text. We can't afford to let dangerous information like that fall into the wrong hands. There would be copycat texters all over the place.

Re:I agree it's likely an overreaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930905)

Moroccan living in Quebec... the message was in French.

He said something like "faire exploser la concurrence", the French press isn't that specific either.

Nations of Cowards (5, Insightful)

swbirding (2564493) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930845)

The US and Canada have become such cowardly nations that anything can be made into a threat.

I'm Spartacus! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930857)

This has happened a few times in the UK and the US recently. Why each occasion doesn't cause 100,000 people to post the same message baffles me. Isn't that the whole point of the Twitter groupthink thing?

Yup (2)

RenHoek (101570) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930885)

Knowing the DHS scrapes all of the social sites and sites like Slashdot, I would like to say that the DHS can 'blow me'.

So there...

Re:Yup (2)

million_monkeys (2480792) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930961)

Knowing the DHS scrapes all of the social sites and sites like Slashdot, I would like to say that the DHS can 'blow me'.

So there...

You're doing it wrong. You're not supposed to tell DHS to blow you, you've got to threaten to blow them. But either way, just remember that you're on their watch list now. So if a guy solicits you in a bathroom, you'll have to assume it's a DHS agent.

Re:Yup (5, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931013)

So if a guy solicits you in a bathroom, you'll have to assume it's a DHS agent.

the hell with that: if some guy approaches me in a restroom, I'm assuming he's a republican and I'm running for my life!

Re:Yup (2)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931119)

I'm not sure how much of the following is true. Rumor had it that from the mid-90s on back, the NSA and FBI would monitor a random selection of local telco phone calls (analog POT line for the younger readers). The purpose was seek out certain key words by computer and then flag the call for further review by an agent eavesdropping on it. They say if you heard a "click" after speaking one of these key words or phrases, someone just tapped into your line due to the change in voltage caused by this.

An unfortunate confluence of terms (5, Informative)

dgharmon (2564621) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930891)

"Telecommunications sales manager Saad Allami .. sent a text message to colleagues urging them to "blow away" the competition at a trade show in New York City"

Well there you have it, an obvious prima facie case if there ever were one. An Arab sounding name next to the words 'blow away` and 'New York`. The computers at Fort Meade must have lit up like a Christmas tree ..

Saad Allami? (1)

theNAM666 (179776) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930897)

His name is Saad Allami and he sent your daughter a text message that said "Hello?"

Book him, Danno.

There! Happy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930935)

while True:
        print 'blow away'

war on terror strikes again! (2)

metalmaster (1005171) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930937)

- His name sounds Arabic
- He wants his colleagues to "blow away competition"
- The supposed target is in NYC
- The supposed venue is hosting a trade show

He is a terrorist QED.

I'm a sexy mofo (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930939)

http://www.facebook.com/jeremy.wathen1 [facebook.com]

Show me you junk.

Ask The Right Questions... (5, Insightful)

IonOtter (629215) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930957)

We need to be asking the right questions here:

He made the tweet on Jan 21, and he was picked up three days later. That is an incredibly fast turnaround for law enforcement, even for the US or Canada. They were throwing the T-word around like it was a known fact, all while terrorizing his wife and co-workers.

So, let's ask some useful questions.

1. How long have the authorities been monitoring this man?
2. WHY have they been monitoring him?
3. WHY did they go after his co-workers?

The answers are bound to be exceptionally interesting and frightening.

Re:Ask The Right Questions... (2)

quantaman (517394) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931143)

We need to be asking the right questions here:

He made the tweet on Jan 21, and he was picked up three days later. That is an incredibly fast turnaround for law enforcement, even for the US or Canada.

We're talking about suspicion that there's about to be an attack, particularly one involving the T-word, frankly 3 days is a little slow (but who knows when the trade show was).

They were throwing the T-word around like it was a known fact, all while terrorizing his wife and co-workers.

Not the first time unfortunately [thestar.com]

So, let's ask some useful questions.

1. How long have the authorities been monitoring this man?
2. WHY have they been monitoring him?
3. WHY did they go after his co-workers?

The answers are bound to be exceptionally interesting and frightening.

1. He's Arab and presumably Muslim, he and a ton of people like him have probably been monitored to some degree for a while.
2. see 1), particularly if he's part of a mosque you probably don't have to follow that many links to find someone with terrorist ties (you can do the same thing with Christian Churches involving pedophiles and pro-life extremists).
3) Some analyst saw the message, assumed he was a terrorist, saw a couple other things that while innocent, still fit the bill, then freaked out. Once it became clear that he was completely innocent they had to drop charges, but they'd already investigated him and they knew if he ever DID get involved with terrorism in the future, they'd risk having huge egg on the faces, thus they're leaving the marker on his record as a CYA (Cover Your Ass).

It's all in the unAmerican-sounding name (2)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38930959)

...there's no racial profiling going on here at all, no, no...

All forms of communication are tapped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38930981)

See subject.

Assume that everything you do, if it passes through a digital system, is passing through a system that is being monitored, logged, and alerts created by one or more parties.

VPN everywhere. SSL 3rd party trust is 100% broken! private SSL relationships only. Encrypt everything you store, download, and upload.

It is all tapped logged.

How was this detected... (4, Interesting)

rainwalker (174354) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931015)

...is Canada intercepting every single text message sent in their country? TFA doesn't say, but frankly I'm pretty curious. The UK people banned for the Twitter comment actually makes a little sense, as Twitter is public, but AFAIK text messages aren't.

Re:How was this detected... (2)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931043)

Even if Canada was intercepting every text message sent (not unlikely), they wouldn't admit it for this. He's a sales manager, he sent this message to several colleagues. One of them probably figured they could get ahead by turning him in.

Re:How was this detected... (1)

number11 (129686) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931115)

...is Canada intercepting every single text message sent in their country? TFA doesn't say, but frankly I'm pretty curious..

Canada doesn't need to, the US will do it for them.

Watch what you say. (1)

Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931045)

You are guilty until proven innocent. If you dare criticize or say "Fuck the government" You are now a terrorist.

Orwellian (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931077)

1984 here we come.

stories like this blow me away (5, Interesting)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931087)

i am just smashed thermodynamically to pieces by the kind overreaction here

one wonders if a complete shock wave of annihilation of common sense has occurred

what do we do as a society if we utterly and eruptive eviscerate and detonate our sense of proportion?

a violent cataclysm of frothing hysteria is bursting forth and is explosively convulsively disintegrating mental composure here in a frenzied fulminating volcano of bursting boiling meteoric rage and---

[NO CARRIER]

Re:stories like this blow me away (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931237)

Sober up/go to bed then maybe tomorrow you can translate this gibberish post of yours into english.

Re:stories like this blow me away (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931257)

The NSA ignored your "incendiary" post but the BSA had you taken off the Internet because of your .sig

The terrorists have won. (2)

Antarell (930241) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931091)

They have succeeded in turning America and it's northern neighbours (who I thought had more sense) into paranoid lunatics!

WELL, IF NOT A TERRORIST, A VERY BAD GUY !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931099)

Saad Allami

Nuf said. I understand Canada is the prime destination of terrorists targeting the US of A so chaulk this one up to the GOOD GUYS !!

Well done !! Well done !!

And Welcome to the US of A !! Terrorist-free for 4022 days !! Feel safe !! You are in GOOD HANDS !!

Definitely a terrorist (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931111)

With a name like "Saad Allami" he is guilty until proven innocent; ALL muslims are terrorists. May all who worship the child molesting false prophet muhammad (a thousand curses be unto his pig name) be exterminated from this planet like the vermin they are.

Poe's Law (1)

Niscenus (267969) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931235)

Or does posting as an AnonCow count as a pinch of salt?

Vive le Québec libre ! (1)

mevets (322601) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931125)

Guess it wasn't such a long life after all....

The SQ surely knew this was nonsense and harassment, so why do it? Is it because the repercussions are so limited as to be meaningless?

"I was just following orders" should not be accepted. The entire chain in the SQ should face criminal charges, not a wrist-slap and let the taxpayers pick up the tab.

Orwell had it right (1)

calderra (1034658) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931173)

Remember: Unpartyspeak is doubleplusungood. Freedom is slavery. We have always been at war with Eastasia.

The text message is the least of my worries (4, Interesting)

guttentag (313541) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931175)

There are some things you just know better than to do. Don't yell "bomb" on a plane, don't point toy guns at people, don't joke about threatening a head of state, and don't send your buddies a text message about blowing people away as they are on their way to the airport.

Here's the part of TFA that gets me:

Allami says he hasn't been able to get a certificate of good conduct, which he would need in order to get a job working in finance.

His allegations have not been proven in court and the application is to be presented at the Montreal courthouse on March 5.

Provincial police spokesman Guy Lapointe says the force is aware of the case but will not comment as it is before the courts. A Justice Department spokesperson also declined to comment.

Police had in Laval, Que., where he applied for the certificate, found terrorism accusations and public mischief on his file, even though his public file shows no signs of the allegations.

"Without the certificate of good conduct, the plaintiff can no longer work in his profession," the document states.

First of all, you need a "certificate of good conduct" from the police to work in the financial industry in Canada? On Wall Street, you almost need a certificate of unscupulous conduct to work in the financial industry.

Second, Canadians have a "public file?" This sounds like something that was dreamed up to make people feel like they could access the government's information about them. But it implies that there's a private file as well that you will never see, which defeats the purpose of having a public file. In the U.S., you can request your FBI file for a fee [fbi.gov] , but they can tell you they don't have anything on you when they do. And the best part is that one of the requirements for obtaining the file is that you have local law enforcement fingerprint all ten fingers and send that along with your $18 payment. "Mr. Smith, you didn't have a criminal record before we received your request. However, thanks to your voluntary submission of your fingerprints, we discovered you match some prints found at a crime scene that had us stumped 10 years ago. We're going to have to take you in for questioning."

Re:The text message is the least of my worries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931267)

Worse, they assume that because you requested the file you must have something you're worried about, so they go ahead and investigate you and everyone you know.

Where did the text message come from? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931219)

Where did they get the text message from? They just happened to be wiretapping his phone?

Just to Compare (1)

Niscenus (267969) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931225)

you Fail It (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38931233)

you8 own beer

This is Chermany calling... (1)

harvey the nerd (582806) | more than 2 years ago | (#38931269)

...that is, Nazi Germany [see "Lord Haw Haw, WWII].
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