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237 comments

Airplanes? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939777)

I think you mean "Aeroplanes".

Re:Airplanes? (1)

Tubal-Cain (1289912) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940103)

Why did this particular spelling die out?

Re:Airplanes? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940121)

It didn't.

Just in the USA.

Re:Airplanes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940395)

Australia uses airplane too...

Re:Airplanes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940737)

Australia always follows what the US does, good or bad.

I think the rest of the British English speaking world uses aeroplane, and my spelling checker agrees with me (NZ English).

Re:Airplanes? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940413)

nobody uses aero in everyday language nowadays, that's the reason.
the reason is that Aero ltd. changed it's name to Finnair in '68.

(Aero-filters? Aeroships? full of hot aero?)

Re:Airplanes? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940615)

Aeroengineering? Aerospace?

Re:Airplanes? (3, Funny)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940693)

nobody uses aero in everyday language nowadays

Once again I'm declared a nobody by slashdot. Should I just get it over with a book a flight to Switzerland now?!

Re:Airplanes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940809)

nobody uses aero in everyday language nowadays

Once again I'm declared a nobody by slashdot. Should I just get it over with a book a flight to Switzerland now?!

Well, nobody is perfect. So what are you complaining about? :-)

And yet somehow (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939791)

a low-tier banking executive makes more money than this man.

Re:And yet somehow (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939805)

doesn't sound like he's really into it for the money

that man is lucky -- he has a very long engineering career with a meaningful benefit to society

Re:And yet somehow (0, Troll)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939825)

yep he will engineer till about age 40 then be replaced by a work visa from India or China, and wont even get a gold watch as he is booted out of the door

sorry? whats the incentive? save lives? phht, only the planes that never hit mountains will be able to afford this crap once the suits get hold of it, meanwhile crop dusters will still be left out, sort of like how my cousins father (not my uncle ... one of those stories) died a couple years back

Re:And yet somehow (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939855)

Sheesh... Would you like some salsa to go with that chip on your shoulder? You make me look like a ray of sunshine by comparison, which is remarkable btw.

Re:And yet somehow (2)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939875)

A man with such an accomplishment on his CV will always find a job.

Re:And yet somehow (4, Insightful)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940163)

A man with such an accomplishment on his CV will always find a job.

You must be a youngling.

I have an impressive CV. Each job or client they allow me to do more difficult and complex things.

In your carreer, if you give your maximum you won't come into a comfortable zone: each other job I need to give maximum (to maintain what I have on my record) PLUS the extra edge expected "for someone with such a CV".

There are moments you cannot keep it up though, and your energy levels and determination can't keep up with your CV. After 10 years carreer in misc fields (advertizing, finance, mobile, retail, ...) I burned out. I haven't cashed in my CV and will need to perform at the same level to embody my CV.

If you want to take a step back (my exgf worked 10 years in finance, wanting to get out) you'll hear "You are overqualified for this job".

Re:And yet somehow (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940499)

Stop exaggerationg on your CV and you will get jobs that you are comfortable with.
They will not be as well paying but at least you will not work with things outside your comfort zone.

Re:And yet somehow (1)

jholyhead (2505574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939883)

Only bad engineers get offshored. The good ones get kept on to manage the offshored employees.

Re:And yet somehow (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939935)

Only bad engineers get offshored. The good ones get kept on to die a slow, painful death by managing the offshored employees.

FTFY.

Re:And yet somehow (-1, Troll)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939983)

Yes, you're probably right. Just like, only bad carpenters ever got replaced by illegal alien invaders from Mexico. Unfortunately, ALL American citizens who were carpenters were bad carpenters!!

(hint for the stupid: any professional or craftsman who expects to make a good living wage is "bad" by definition)

Oh - should I also point out the inherent racism in your ASSumption? You ASSume that all those offshore employees are stupid, substandard, uneducated or worse, and that they can't do the job of a good engineer. Bigot - while I am prejudiced against those illegal alien invaders who stole my job, I'm not stupid enough, or bigoted enough, to claim that those invaders are stupid, or whatever.

In a few years, when your own job is off shored, and you have to accept some shit paying job just to keep food on the table, we'll all listen attentively to your sorry assed explanations for what happened.

Re:And yet somehow (3, Insightful)

jholyhead (2505574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940053)

No, you've made those assumptions on my behalf (thanks). No reasonable person could make those inferences from my comment.

If someone else can do my job cheaper than I can, to the same standard or better than I can - I deserve to lose my job - that's the free market people are always raving about, isn't it.

Fortunately, the Chinese haven't worked out how to transfer years of specialist domain experience into the heads of their worker drones yet. I'm good for another decade or so, in which time I'll have moved on.

Re:And yet somehow (4, Insightful)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940087)

Just to be clear - what we have today is not "free trade" by any definition. NAFTA was a weapon, which was designed to pit Mexican workmen against United States workers. CAFTA is more of the same. And, China's "most favored trade partner" status was too.

The corporate world is using us, all of us, as tools to destroy each other's livelihoods. Corporations in Mexico, South America, China, Africa, and the rest of the world are pushing family farmers out of business, so that those families have no choice but to emigrate, or turn to a life of crime to survive.

All that cheap labor becomes available to undermine the economies of the first world nations.

What we have today amounts to class warfare, with that infamous 1% stealing everything that belonged to the middle classes, lower classes, and even the subsistence level dirt poor of the world.

Free trade, my ass. Who was it that made all these "free trade" agreements? Damned near no one in the 99% voted for any of it. Al Gore's constituents made it quite clear to him that they did NOT want anything to do with NAFTA, and his reply amounted to, "I'm sorry, but I know better, so I'm overriding your wishes."

If this is "free trade", then I'm ready to try some socialism.

Re:And yet somehow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940427)

Yes, it it "free trade". "Free", doesn't means free for everyone, or equal for everyone. "Free trade" just means "no rules trade" or "self-regulating trade".

I look forward to the day (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940477)

When you retards stop complaining about the system and start campaigning for Ron Paul to get it fixed.

Re:I look forward to the day (2, Funny)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940645)

When you retards stop complaining about the system and start campaigning for Ron Paul to get it fixed.

Help us O. B. Gyn Kenobie; you're our only hope.

Re:I look forward to the day (3, Insightful)

jpapon (1877296) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940769)

hahaha, Ron Paul would just make it so much worse. He truly believes that free trade is the solution to all our problems. Deregulation won't solve anything; you still won't have a job, you just also won't have potable ground water.

Different does not necessarily mean better.

Re:And yet somehow (2, Interesting)

Twinbee (767046) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940731)

And that's why we all need a "basic income" [wikipedia.org] which is basically an unconditional amount given to everyone (with their only requirement being their citizenship).

The rich will still keep rich and people will still have a massive incentive to work (we can set the basic income perhaps quarter to half the amount of a normal job).

It's inevitable anyway once automation comes into force more strongly, and frees our time up. Tons of people will simply not be 'needed' (i.e. not needed to be slaves to the 9-5) any more, and I'm talking about even very skilled workers here, as well as those more menial jobs. We can start the basic income at a low amount and gradually increase it over time.

Re:And yet somehow (4, Insightful)

garrettg84 (1826802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940591)

If someone else can do my job cheaper than I can, to the same standard or better than I can - I deserve to lose my job - that's the free market people are always raving about, isn't it.

You have entirely failed to recognize the stupidity of our MBAs that are often in control of these jobs. The qualification for offshoring jobs is not 'cheaper, same/better standard or faster'. It is simply CHEAPER. These MBA types run companies into the ground regularly going for the cheapest alternative with no quality control or time requirements.

Now don't get me wrong, I don't assume those jobs offshore are always terrible either. They very well may be able to deliver on time, above/on spec, and much cheaper than American labor. From what I have seen - it is a crap shoot. Similar things can be said about American contractors as well though, but in America - you have the legal system and can sue the contractor out of existence if they screw you!

Re:And yet somehow (4, Interesting)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939951)

Everyone talks about age discrimination as if it were real. I've had problems with a slow job market, but not with age discrimination. If anything, I've found more companies willing to do interviews in the past years than less.

I'm starting a business because it's the right thing to do with the efforts I've made in my life and the cards I hold right now, not because I "can't find work." I could get a regular job, and be a wage slave for the rest of my life -- I choose not to.

But then again, I'm still willing to put in as much effort as I can for my employers and customers, even if that's not as much clock time as it was 20 years ago.

Maybe you should ask yourself a pertinent question the next time you think you were discriminated against on basis of age:

Do I still act like a 20-something who thinks the world "owes" them and shoot myself in the foot with my own attitude?

Re:And yet somehow (2)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940367)

I'm starting a business because it's the right thing to do with the efforts I've made in my life and the cards I hold right now, not because I "can't find work." I could get a regular job, and be a wage slave for the rest of my life -- I choose not to.

Why are your options "don't work" or "wage slave"? Is there a reason you couldn't command a higher salary with your experience?

Perhaps "Experience & Salary Demands Discrimination" would be more accurate...

Re:And yet somehow (1)

GuB-42 (2483988) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940313)

Good engineers are precious, and companies that are not total crap are ready to pay good money to get them.
He may be replaced by a work visa from India or China but if he does, the "work visa" will be a highly skilled engineer that will be paid as much as an American citizen in the same league.

Only low skill work is off-shored for cost reasons.

Re:And yet somehow (1)

MacTO (1161105) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939975)

For the most part, I agree with you. Thing is though, he's not going to have as much in the bank should something happen and he can't work any more.

Re:And yet somehow (5, Insightful)

geogob (569250) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939979)

I'm an engineer working in the field of aerospace instrumentation. I'm passionate about my job. For me, it's like playing a game and I can barely wait for the weekend to end to go back to work. In my team here, we're having a lot of fun and everyday gives us new challenges. Solving these challenges is quite exhilarating, probably just as it was for this engineer fight through the challenge of solving CFITs.

But, in the end, we're still all in it for the money. We were just lucky enough to find a career and a job that we really happened to enjoy.

I'm totally biased when I say this, but engineers are one of the profession that's grossly underpaid and under-regarded. Some investment make millions just by moving some virtual values - usually worthless - left and right on a computer screens, while engineers responsible for the success of projects worth in the multi-billion "real dollars" range, or indirectly responsible for countless lives, struggle to get decent salaries and usually don't even come close to 6 digit figures. What's even worse is that engineers carry a true responsibility for the success of their project. A personal responsibility. Bankers, when they fail because of their own greed, carry little responsibility as far as I know. Worse that could happen, is that they lose their job when the company goes down. That's nothing compared to what engineers have to face personally when they fail like that.

Re:And yet somehow (3, Interesting)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940093)

Damn right. And until society learns to value real productivity and demand that its engineers be paid what they're worth to society, nothing will change.

I will also admit to bias - I'm also an engineering researcher (coincidentally, also specialising in aerial systems). And I love my job... but I think that might be part of the problem. If engineering wasn't as fun and creative and fulfilling, nobody would do it for what's being paid. It seems to me that perhaps if we weren't willling to do it for the love of it, maybe we would get paid more... but then someone else would just step right in. Again, I think that unless society is prepared to paid for less-stressed and more productive engineers, we're stuck.

Another perspective (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940653)

Engineers are one of the highest paid professions in our society. Other than actuary you won't find a profession that pays higher with a 4 year. Starting salaries? What profession tops the list everytime? Engineering. If you want to come out of a 4 year program making the most money, it's engineering. And it's been that way for decades.

The trouble is that everyone here is comparing their salaires to Wall Street types - who are outliers when it comes to compensation. I have met a local investment banker here in Atlanta (at Suntrust) who shakes his head about Wall Street bankers - he says they're another "World".

Re:And yet somehow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940669)

Teachers should be paid 6 figures, but it is the pro athletes that get the multi-million dollar contracts
Engineers should be paid in the 6-7 figure range, but it is the entertainers who get the multi-million dollar contracts for 6 months of real "work"

Re:And yet somehow (1)

u38cg (607297) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940721)

The job of the financial system is to allocate capital efficiently. If it doesn't do that, none of your multi-million dollar projects would ever see the light of day. Yes, there's plenty wrong with the system, but to misrepresent it as "moving virtual worthless values around" is just complete rubbish.

Re:And yet somehow (4, Insightful)

The Evil Atheist (2484676) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940035)

That's what rich people tell themselves to allow themselves to sleep at night, and tell you to keep you where you belong. Libertarians talk about how the market will solve everything, but the market shows time and time again that it does not value the correct jobs. Don may not be in it for the money, but by all rights he should get more money as a matter of principle.

Re:And yet somehow (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939809)

There are larger rewards in life than money

Re:And yet somehow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939953)

problem is not money being lower reward, problem, without them a lot of other lower rewards ar not there.

You may be a teacher in village school in some third world country, like Russia for example, and become very proud of achievements of your students, but than, you may have problems in personal life. Like marying a woman you may like, since she doesnt want to marry guy whose income is lower than hers(happens everywhere), or even marry one and never being able to travel anywhere for vacation with your family or smth like that.

it makes me sad, guys like him are unappreciated in this society, while greedy corporate bustards live their life and take advantage of everything and everyone without thinking about contributing back something to society they parasite on.

captcha: captured

Re:And yet somehow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939955)

Shhh! Don't tell him.

Re:And yet somehow (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940043)

Those rewards have all been banned by feminists and women over the past 150 years.

There is nothing except money left.

Re:And yet somehow (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940431)

well there's still booze.. ...which isn't that useful if you can't properly booze up due to medical conditions..

Re:And yet somehow (5, Insightful)

X.25 (255792) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939963)

a low-tier banking executive makes more money than this man.

Well, look at the "Forbes 400 list" of richest Americans, and see how many of 20 richest actually produce a physical product.

And that's why system is about to collapse.

Re:And yet somehow (0)

eh2o (471262) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940185)

That's because banking executives prevent ordinary citizens from making controlled descents into financial ruin... oh wait never mind, they don't do that either.

Re:And yet somehow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940671)

Yeah, and he has no plans to retire since his Honeywell retirement plans sucks. Surprising Honeywell has not outsourced him to India. They sure have done well at decimating the engineering jobs at the KS avionics facility.

And the geek shall inherit the earth... (5, Insightful)

jholyhead (2505574) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939795)

It's nice to see real Engineers getting a bit of recognition for a change.

Scary fact of the day from the CFIT wiki article - as of 2007, 5% of commercial airlines still weren't running a Terrain awareness and warning system.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (-1, Flamebait)

stevencbrown (238995) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939811)

surely a more scary fact is that we have people flying planes who can't tell the difference between the land and the sky?

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (4, Informative)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939991)

I was a sailor, not a pilot. And, I've seen many, many times when it was hard to tell the sky from the sea. To almost echo, jholyhead, "Ever heard of storms?"

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (5, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940019)

surely a more scary fact is that we have people flying planes who can't tell the difference between the land and the sky?

If, like Don Bateman, you'd ever lived in the Pacific Northwest - you'd realize there are times you can't tell the land from the sky even when you're standing on the land.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940783)

Bateman? More like Batman in disguise.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (4, Informative)

Alioth (221270) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940285)

Well, unless you only want to fly in day time VFR (visual flight rules) conditions, in which case, getting around by airlines would be incredibly unreliable as it would depend totally on a nice sunny day the length of your route and at the start and destination. In other words, aviation as a means of transport would be more or less impractical.

In the real world we have to fly at night, in the clouds or both. Make a navigational error and you could end up piling into a mountainside instead of making a nice smooth approach into an airport.

In the clouds or at night with no visual reference, you can't even tell which way up you are without reference to instruments.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (5, Funny)

devitto (230479) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939817)

"Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth..." - and some plough into it by accident.

5% of commercial airlines still weren't running a Terrain awareness and warning system.

Don't worry about the 5% - that number is decreasing all the time, one way or another.....

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939957)

I'm surprised airlines have a choice in the matter, given how regulated the industry is world wide.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (5, Informative)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940081)

That 5% includes Africa and Asia, most of which isn't covered by aviation authorities with the same power as the EASA or FAA - places like Singapore etc are, but you need to start including all the smaller airlines that own Boeing 737-200s or 727s, which have been around for over 4 decades and are available very cheaply. They won't fly to Europe or the US, so they get to operate under very relaxed rules - check out the list of airlines banned from flying to EU airports sometime, it's quite enlightening.

Also, corruption is rife in many African countries, which even by itself is a big blocker to reform.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939921)

Scary fact of the day from the CFIT wiki article - as of 2007, 5% of commercial airlines still weren't running a Terrain awareness and warning system.

You just never know when disgruntled colonel has set the ground level to minus 200 feet. Old habits die hard, too.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939939)

If you want to read something even scarier, have a look at the transcripts from the French flight that stalled and fell into the ocean not long ago.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (4, Informative)

bickerdyke (670000) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940023)

It's nice to see real Engineers getting a bit of recognition for a change.

On Slashdot.

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (0)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940337)

Right, cause slashdot honours real engineers like Steve Jobs all the time...

Re:And the geek shall inherit the earth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940817)

I think you missed the point, but kudos for getting an anti-Apple comment in.

Terrain (2)

Grindalf (1089511) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939833)

I quote "Terrain! BING BING Terrain! BING BING Altitude! Don't Think! BING! BING! Pull Up! BING BING!"

Re:Terrain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940033)

You misquoted. Pretty sure it's "Don't sink!", actually.

Re:Terrain (5, Interesting)

qxcv (2422318) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940051)

"He deliberately force-landed the plane by diving down in a steep manner until the Ground Proximity Warning System gave off a signal 'sink rate, whoop, whoop, pull up'."

He said Komar ignored 15 GPWS warnings as well as his co-pilot's warning and brought the plane into the sharp dive, causing it to drop suddenly by 1,600 feet per minute compared with a normal 1,000 feet per minute and to overshoot the runway.

The plane's front wheel snapped off, causing the aircraft to bounce three times before skidding on the runway, crossing an airport fence and a public road and hitting a dyke before bursting into flames, the prosecutor said.

Source. [sky.com]
 
A few years ago, a friend claimed that a member of the flight crew aboard GA-200 actually said "Stupid American" or something along those lines in an attempt to shut up the GPWS (which wouldn't particularly surprise me knowing Garuda). I'd dearly love to hear the CVR recordings for that flight if anyone knows where I can get them, I'd like to see whether that rumour is fact or fiction.

CFIT vs loss of control (1, Redundant)

evilad (87480) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939849)

CFIT is nowhere near the leading cause of fatal accidents in general aviation.
http://www.faa.gov/news/fact_sheets/news_story.cfm?newsId=13103&omniRss=fact_sheetsAoc&cid=103_F_S [faa.gov]

It's pretty hard to find statistics for combined civil aviation, please post a link if you can find one.

Re:CFIT vs loss of control (5, Informative)

robbak (775424) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939905)

Correction: cfit is no longer the leading cause. Terrain warning systems make then almost impossible, which is the point of this article.

Flight 901 November 1978 (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940015)

Air New Zealand DC10 was equipped with a terrain warning system, on the black box voice recorder you could hear the "woop woop pull up a few seconds before it hit Mt Erebus. So I duess it depends on how steep the mountain is.

The reason the plane flew straight into the mountain was the navigation system had been programmed wrong.
An the visibilty was compromised by the cluds and reflections from the snow and ice.

BTW it was not an 'international' flight, it took off from Aucland and was schedules to land in Christchurch. (And its final resting place was still in New Zealand territory MT Erebus is in the Ross Dependency (the part of Antarctica claimed by NZ)

Re:Flight 901 November 1978 (1)

Miseph (979059) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940173)

I don't think anyone actually claimed that CFIT never happens at all to anyone anywhere. The claim is that it used to be substantially more common, so much more common that it was the leading cause of fatal aviation accidents, and now it is anomalous for a commercial plane to be involved in such an incident. That Air New Zealand crash is notable specifically because the accident is so rare on modern aircraft.

Re:Flight 901 November 1978 (1)

Ginger Unicorn (952287) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940683)

visibilty was compromised by the cluds.

..and that's when the C.L.U.D.S. came at us. Those insensitive cluds!

Re:CFIT vs loss of control (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939909)

dumbass

Re:CFIT vs loss of control (1)

Sqr(twg) (2126054) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939927)

What TFA says (and what TFS obviously intended to say) is that CFIT was the leading cause of fatal accidents before it was nearly eliminated by Bateman's inventions.

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939915)

Noone has posted a Batecave joke yet...??

How old school. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939925)

Today this would be solved by making flying info mountains illegal.

Re:How old school. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38939999)

Feel free to set laws to put food on your table, but there has to be food out there before you see it happening.

You know, somebody has to be in the backstage to do the magic of your upper-class thinking.

Lies! (4, Funny)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939985)

This summary must be incorrect somehow.

I just opened Flight Simulator and had no trouble controlling my flight right into the side of a mountain. Clearly, the system needs work.

As someone in the mountains I appreciate this (4, Interesting)

taj (32429) | more than 2 years ago | (#38939997)

My family has had a ranch in the mountains for about 100 years within line of sight of a military airport in more recent years.

The B17 and other wreckage there was horrible, uncommon and yet eventual.

You won't see those pictures on the Internet.

Make the technology scale down... (5, Interesting)

MrClever (70766) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940007)

Now all we need is to make the technology down-scale in both size/weight and cost. It would be great to see these systems adapted and installed in smaller, lighter aircraft. There are still far too many CFIT fatalities in the private and small aircraft world. They have synthetic terrain warning (superimposing the aircraft's position from GPS and altimeter over a topographic data to determine horizontal and vertical proximity to terrain) but no active warning systems. GPS is good, so is the altimeter, but neither are perfect all the time - if they were, ground proximity warning systems (GPWS...aka "WHOOP WHOOP, PULL UP!!") still are prohibitive for small aircraft operators. Kudos to the GPWS team though - they saved my ass on at least one occasion in a previous life when I was professional pilot!

Re:Make the technology scale down... (1)

MrClever (70766) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940017)

One sentence got munged...it should've read:

GPS is good, so is the altimeter, but neither are perfect all the time - if they were, ground proximity warning systems (GPWS...aka "WHOOP WHOOP, PULL UP!!") wouldn't be needed. Unfortunately GPWS are prohibitive for small aircraft operators.

Sorry

Re:Make the technology scale down... (1)

eh2o (471262) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940229)

Elevation from GPS alone is accurate to about +/- 15 meters, which isn't great but good enough to save lives.

Meanwhile my phone not only has a GPS that can read position and elevation but also has enough storage to recall a detailed street map of every city in the world, its only a few gigs of information... so why can't they just do this as an app already for small planes?

Re:Make the technology scale down... (1)

icebrain (944107) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940421)

The difference is that we aren't talking about a piece of consumer-grade hardware with no safety-critical application. Aviation-grade hardware has to be hardened against a wider environmental range, has less tolerance for bugs, and (most important from a cost standpoint) has to meet FAA standards. Then you get into regulatory requirements stating that permanent installations need to be certified or otherwise approved for each type of aircraft the equipment is going in.

Re:Make the technology scale down... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940773)

because it's not the elevation of the plane you need, it's the elevation of that radio tower you're about to hit that you need. and streets don't move around much, and when they do, it doesn't kill you.

Re:Make the technology scale down... (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#38940443)

mercedes is doing it for cars. it's scaled already, but I guess retrofitting it is the costly part.

good time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940049)

goof time

flying blind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38940061)

I hope it will make flight safer, but this show makes me uneasy watching what happens to real pilots when confronted with computer warnings...attached to faulty sensors. It doesn't help that they wer're flying at night over water.. what else can you trust?. If you have almost an hour to spare you should watch this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiTd3WVPLyw

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