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Lake Vostok Reached

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the say-hello-to-the-elder-things dept.

Science 156

First time accepted submitter Cyberax writes "After 30 years of drilling and weeks of media attention the Antarctic underground lake Vostok has been reached by Russian scientists (translated article). Deep drilling in the vicinity of Vostok Station in Antarctica began in the 1970s, when the existence of the reservoir was not yet known. Scientists are beginning paleoclimatic studies and further exploration of the lake will continue in 2013-2014."

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We all know what will happen (5, Funny)

Trilkk (2007802) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941465)

Expecting a lone husky to be seen escaping the facility in 2 days time.

Re:We all know what will happen (3, Interesting)

Dave Whiteside (2055370) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941535)

except we're more like to infect and kill anything down there :(

Re:We all know what will happen (4, Funny)

Heed00 (1473203) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941551)

"I know you gentlemen have been through a lot. But when you find the time...I'd rather not spend the rest of the winter TIED TO THIS FUCKING COUCH!!"

Re:We all know what will happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943523)

You do realize that February is the middle of the summer in Antarctica ?

Re:We all know what will happen (1, Interesting)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943577)

You have clearly never watched one of the finest movies ever made.

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943897)

I think we just broke Netflix. Hadn't seen that movie in ages, so I tried to put it in my queue - "An Error Occurred".

Either that or....

Shit. Maybe the Russians....

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944147)

Maybe I haven't, but since you figured that I knew the title just magically then I guess I won't know if I've seen it or not.

Re:We all know what will happen (3, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944275)

The 1982 classic John Carpenter movie The Thing [imdb.com] .

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

ScytheLegion (1274902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943947)

Best use of a movie quote in a long time! Didn't connect the reference until the CAPS

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

IceNinjaNine (2026774) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941563)

Oh, I thought they'd finally found another source [youtube.com] of the voices from hell [wikipedia.org] .

Re:We all know what will happen (2)

ledow (319597) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941741)

Or we could just teach the Norwegians to shoot straight, and maybe take some helicopter flying lessons.

Re:We all know what will happen (4, Insightful)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941821)

You'd need to sober them up first. Good luck with that.

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942793)

You'd need to sober them up first. Good luck with that.

They are waiting for global warming you insensitive clod.

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943367)

There's just two things you can sensibly do up there in the Winter: Drink and code.

And not everyone's cut out to be a programmer.

Re:We all know what will happen (2)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943475)

Spoken like a true programmer. Evidently you've never had drunken sex.

Re:We all know what will happen (0)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943831)

As a disinterested observer, I'd say you win.

Re:We all know what will happen (3, Interesting)

Captain Hook (923766) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942161)

Or we could just teach the Norwegians to shoot straight, and maybe take some helicopter flying lessons.

Bullets would have had no effect anyway. It was a lifeform based on completely separate cells which work together and could be assigned to any role needed.

Bullets would have torn a hole in the macro shape, maybe killed a few hundred cells at the impact point, but the remaining cells would have just knitted the hole back together. The only effect bullets would have had on what was shaped like a dog would have been the momentum of the bullet causing the dog to get knocked around.

It's why they had to resort to fire because you needed to kill the each cell individually. Poison might have worked as well.

Re:We all know what will happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943003)

Or teach the "Norwegians" to speak norwegian. The man who suposedly is speaking norwegian is clearly not Norwegian.

Re:We all know what will happen (3, Insightful)

semi-extrinsic (1997002) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943533)

I'm assuming you are referring to Ulrich Thomsen [imdb.com] ? There is one scene where he is speaking danish rather than norwegian, but we Scandinavians tend to understand each other pretty well, so this is not a goof per se. It might very well happen in real life as well that a Danish person speaks danish to a Norwegian; in fact it happened to me less than two weeks ago, and I had no problem understanding her. The rest of the Norwegians are well-known Norwegian actors, who speak norwegian correctly.

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941841)

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941859)

nevermind, TFA is newer than the one I found.

Re:We all know what will happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941959)

I'd rather deal with a lone husky instead of lava slimes and fire imps!

Re:We all know what will happen (1)

f0nZi3 (2501904) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943245)

Love it! But with a Helicopter chasing after it and the passenger shooting a high-powered rifle at it. bomp-bomp (tick, tick, tick) bomp-bomp (tick, tick, tick) bomp-bomp ;-)

Re:We all know what will happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943459)

Husky? Nah, a penguin. Now, that would actually be funny.

Re:We all know what will happen (4, Funny)

Xaoswolf (524554) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943845)

I'm waiting for the albino penguins and shoggoths myself...

By extraordinary coincidence... (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941473)

It turns out that the microbiological conditions of ancient lake Vostok are strikingly similar to those of early 21st century drilling mud.

The timeline altering implications of this discovery will keep scientists busy for decades!

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941605)

As far as I know they have gone to extreme lengths to avoid contamination of the water. I know they stopped just before reaching the water to let the hole freeze behind them for one thing.

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941635)

How is that extreme? Did they fill the hole with Mountain Dew?

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (3, Interesting)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941737)

Was there ever any compromise on their drilling procedure?

My understanding was that the Russians were using a method that was likely to cause contamination, despite pleas by western agencies for them to either a) hold off until better tech was developed or b) funding was established to allow them to use (donated) already-developed tech from the west that would be less contaminating?

I'd guess since this is happening roughly according to their original schedule, the answer is "no" which would be tragic.

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (5, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941815)

Nope. The lake had almost been reached in 1998 but drilling was stopped to ensure that there would be no contamination. Several years were spent to devise a good solution for the problem of contamination. So the drilling has been resumed only in 2005 when the international community decided that it's safe enough.

They're using a well filled with kerosene and freon to keep bacterial contamination away. Also, they're using sterilized parts without grease to minimize places where bacteria could hide.

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943993)

They're using a well filled with kerosene and freon to keep bacterial contamination away. Also, they're using sterilized parts without grease to minimize places where bacteria could hide.

OK, so some diesel fuel and refrigerant is supposed to stop some million year old monster?

Don't those people have script writers?

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (3, Funny)

wiedzmin (1269816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944197)

I'm not worried, Bruce Willis will save us.

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941837)

Was there ever any compromise on their drilling procedure?

My understanding was that the Russians were using a method that was likely to cause contamination, despite pleas by western agencies for them to either a) hold off until better tech was developed or b) funding was established to allow them to use (donated) already-developed tech from the west that would be less contaminating?

I'd guess since this is happening roughly according to their original schedule, the answer is "no" which would be tragic.

According to the Google translation of the article the drilling was put on hold while the technology was developed at the St. Petersburg Institute. Western nations approved the Russian proposals after that at a 2003 meeting.

So to answer you, the answer is "yes" which is not tragic.

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (1)

AverageWindowsUser (2537474) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941995)

So we're talking about compromises and holes in the ground. Do compromises happen first, then holes are made in the ground? Help me out here.

Re:By extraordinary coincidence... (1)

wiedzmin (1269816) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944179)

RTFA, they stopped the drilling for a dozen years, with 130 meters left, just to develop technologies to prevent such contamination.

I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (1)

youn (1516637) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941475)

or whatever monster is lurking down there... well at least according to the movies I have seen :p

Re:I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941513)

There was an episode of Northern Exposure [wikipedia.org] where they tapped an ancient glacial lake and found that the water made women extremely horny. So there could be an upside here.

Re:I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (5, Funny)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941555)

Huh. I can see the "I Tapped That at Vostok" T-Shirts and Bumper Stickers now...

Re:I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (1)

bytesex (112972) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944391)

Yeah I have movies that start like that.

Re:I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (5, Funny)

Abreu (173023) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941671)

"In his house at R'lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming..."

Until some pesky humans drill into his cool jacuzzi...

Re:I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941749)

That is not dead which can eternal lie.
And with strange aeons even death may die.

We are doomed. Refreshed, by those crisp, clean, cool, sparkling, mineral waters. But very, very doomed.

Re:I am not sure the yeti will like that :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38942255)

Don't worry Cthulhu doesn't hang out in Antarctica (doesn't like the neiborhood). Though I hear the Elder Things can last a pretty long time on ice...

Now, the Predators come (2)

newsman220 (1928648) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941481)

According to the Daily Mail (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2095193/Lake-Vostok-Russian-scientists-drilling-alien-Antarctic-lake-buried-20m-years.html) this morning, the Russian team has been out of contact for a week. An American scientist says they're probably just busy. Busy incubating aliens, more likely.

Re:Now, the Predators come (4, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941829)

That was a result of mis-translation. The team is in constant communication but there were no official news releases.

Re:Now, the Predators come (5, Funny)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941929)

The team is in constant communication

But all they've been communicating is "Send more ugly-bags-of-mostly-water".

Re:Now, the Predators come (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942337)

And "you can cut the flamethrower fuel out of the next shipment."

Re:Now, the Predators come (2)

jfengel (409917) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944273)

In an ordinary news source, I'd call it "mis-translation". For the Daily Fail, it's more likely a deliberate misreading for the purpose of sensationalism. The line between that and an outright lie would is unclear, and both are the Daily Fail's daily bread and butter.

Any Elder Things found yet? (1)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941505)

Awaiting the first youtube videos...

Obligatory. (2, Funny)

IronHalik (1568993) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941547)

Suddenly, deadly bacteria/frozen alien/frozen robotic alien/frozen goo-like mind control alien.

Re:Obligatory. (2, Funny)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941701)

Or worse, sheeple [xkcd.com] !

Re:Obligatory. (1)

alreaud (2529304) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941885)

Thanks! Nothing like an early morning roll on the floor with tears in the eyes...

Re:Obligatory. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943975)

From what? The painfully un-funny cartoon?

Considering climate change... (5, Funny)

larys (2559815) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941559)

and how so few people/countries seem to be taking lifestyle-changing action against it, they wasted 30 years when in a few years or so, they might have the ice melt enough for them to reach the lake by just tapping on a thin sheet of it with the back of a pencil...

Re:Can't wait for it to hit the shelves.. (1)

sempir (1916194) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941617)

PaleoVodka !

Stargate? (5, Funny)

HiChris! (999553) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941609)

Did they find the Stargate yet? or the weapons platform?

Re:Stargate? (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941711)

which would explain the lake. the heat from the ZPM's would be keeping the ice melted around the facility.

Re:Stargate? (2)

Lanforod (1344011) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942689)

ZPM's don't produce heat unless powering a heat source. Thought that'd be obvious from the way they can be handled with bare hands.
No reason to believe it/they would be powering anything right now.

Re:Stargate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38944161)

They need to make more Stargate shows!

Melt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941625)

Why were they drilling for so long instead of melting the ice most of the way, then drill for the last feet?

Re:Melt (2)

ledow (319597) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941703)

13,100 feet to the lake.

Been digging since 1974. That's 344 feet a year, or a foot per day. Hell, *I* could have dug quicker than that!

Or maybe they just had lots of problems, costs, setbacks, etc. associated with a 13,000 foot-long drill through a substance that nobody has ever drilled 13,000 down through?

Re:Melt (5, Funny)

Mente (219525) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941721)

Bruce Willis could have drilled it in a matter of hours.

Re:Melt (4, Funny)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941795)

Only to find Chuck Norris waiting for him at the bottom.

Re:Melt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38942653)

And Clint Eastwood growling at both of them, "get off my lawn!"

Re:Melt (1)

blindseer (891256) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943353)

Why would he move to Antarctica? Is it warmer there than Dearborn, Michigan?

Re:Melt (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944011)

It's February, so... maybe?

Re:Melt (1)

loneDreamer (1502073) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942931)

The difference is that this time, for once, they don't want to nuke it!

Re:Melt (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941739)

Making sure they don't contaminate the lake when they break through is a big big one.
Also conditions to drill in are variable, and when you're not actively drilling it will freeze back up.

This ain't no latrine 6 feet down 30 feet from camp they're making.

Re:Melt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941777)

I don't think the Soviets were all that concerned about contaminating the lake.

Re:Melt (1)

SpacePirate20X6 (935718) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941809)

Actually, drilling in earnest was suspended until 2005, when it finally resumed. RTFA.

Re:Melt (4, Informative)

stjobe (78285) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941881)

13,100 feet to the lake.

Been digging since 1974. That's 344 feet a year, or a foot per day. Hell, *I* could have dug quicker than that!

Or maybe they just had lots of problems, costs, setbacks, etc. associated with a 13,000 foot-long drill through a substance that nobody has ever drilled 13,000 down through?

It's also in the middle of the Antarctic, just about, and almost 900 miles from the Scott-Amundsen base at the South Pole. It's where the coldest temperature on earth has been measured, a whopping -128F (-89C). I'd love to see anyone dig a foot *that* day! :)

Re:Melt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38942073)

More like LOSE a foot! Zing!

Re:Melt (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942049)

>> 13,100 feet to the lake. Been digging since 1974. That's
344 feet a year, or a foot per day.

Wow, I didn't think there were any iceholes bigger than my brother-in-law.

Re:Melt (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942157)

13,100 feet to the lake.

Wow, I never realized just how much ice is down there. Apparently it can reach up to 3 miles [antarcticconnection.com] in thickness.

That's as high as any of the Rocky Mountains in the US and has 200' of global sea level tied up in it.

Re:Melt (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943233)

...and they started drilling at 11,444ft above sea level so the lake is actually 1,656ft below sea level.....

Re:Melt (2)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943179)

They almost reached the lake in 1998 ...stopped to find a way of drilling without contaminating

Try this :

Go to the top of Rees Peak in the Rockies near Flagstaff, Arizona
Arrange the temperature to never get above -10C and go down to -80C
Do not get supplied regularly, and not at all in Winter
Strip all the moisture from the air
Increase the Wind speed so that it always blows at a minimum of 10mph and often goes up to 60mph ...and see how quickly you can drill ...

Re:Melt (4, Informative)

stjobe (78285) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942159)

How do you keep a hole 13,100 ft deep melted when the average temperature in summer is -30C (-22F), and in winter -65C (-85F)?
The warmest it ever gets is about -12C (10F) - that's a record by the way, the warmest ever measured at Vostok station.

It's not exactly a resort, you know:

The warmest recorded temperature at Vostok is -12.2 C (10.0 F), which occurred on 11 January 2002.[10]
The coldest month was August 1987 with a mean temperature of -75.4 C (-103.7 F) and the warmest month was December 1989 with mean of -28 C (-18 F).[9]
In addition to the extremely cold temperatures, other factors make Vostok one of the most difficult places on Earth for human habitation:
* An almost complete lack of moisture in the air.
* An average windspeed of 5 m/s (18 km/h) (11 mph), sometimes rising to as high as 27 m/s (97 km/h)(60 mph).
* An acute lack of oxygen because of its high altitude at 3,488 meters (11,444 ft).
* A higher ionization of the air.
* A polar night that lasts approximately 130 days, from mid April to late August,[13] including 80 continuous days of civil polar night (i.e. too dark to read, during which the Sun is over 6 degrees below the horizon.)

(source wikipedia [wikipedia.org] )

Re:Melt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38942937)

Are you stupid? (Relatively) warm air rises up the hole from the lake, which is obviously warm enough to not be frozen.

Re:Melt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943587)

Not just warm - it's also under high pressure from the weight of the ice above it. The temperature is believed to be about -3 C - still below freezing, but the pressure keeps it liquid.

Re:Melt (3, Informative)

sackbut (1922510) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943667)

They were using kerosene originally to keep it from freezing. I do not believe the ice temperature is as cold as the ambient air either. Snow is a decent insulator. Ice maybe not so much though. The permafrost in the Arctic does not extend down 13000 feet (although it is not pure water). There must be some radiant heat from the earth. Generally temperatures increase 3 degrees C for every 100 meters deep.

Something not mentioned - (4, Interesting)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941813)

How do we know this lake isn't connected to an underground river that could easily wash modern biology in and out?

Re:Something not mentioned - (5, Interesting)

pz (113803) | more than 2 years ago | (#38941903)

Or, just as short-sighted (and more common) is the idea that somehow that bit of matter got stuck in time and has remained impervious to the forces of random genetic mutation and evolution through the intervening years. Same idea comes across when we land on some asteroid, or explore some new bit of Mars, and loudly declare that it is a sample of matter left over from the birth of the solar system, or some such huey, as if it popped through a portal in time. The forces of nature still act on such things, even if they've been isolated from more large-scale interactions.

Lake Vostok might (we think) have been sealed off for a very long time, but that doesn't mean it's a glimpse into the past, but, rather, a glimpse into a different version of the present.

Re:Something not mentioned - (2)

Lashat (1041424) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942507)

I agree with your assesment with one addition if i may.

" a glimpse into a RADICALLY different version of the present."

Re:Something not mentioned - (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944057)

" a glimpse into a RADICALLY different version of the present."

No, that's Las Vegas.

Re:Something not mentioned - (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38942535)

Yup. The same misconception comes from people who think Chimps are our ancestors. They aren't. They're our cousins. It's more likely that our most recent common ancestor was more like a Chimp and a Human of course.

Re:Something not mentioned - (4, Interesting)

thrich81 (1357561) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942913)

On the other hand, the rate of change of some systems is significantly slower than for many other systems. The obvious example is comparing the surface of the moon to the surface of the earth -- the earth had at least the same cratering events as the moon but the moon still displays a surface similar to what it was 2 billion or more years ago. Yes the surface of the moon is the present day surface but unlike the earth it is little changed and so is a good replica of the moon in the past. Geologically the same goes for those asteroids, Mars, etc. and biologically for Lake Vostok and many other isolated biological environments -- there is less competition and influx of new "innovations" from the larger outside world on the organisms there so the biologists say that the living things there have changed less than those in more open environments. The present is not the past but some places in the present are a lot like the past, indistinguishably so.

Re:Something not mentioned - (1)

tokul (682258) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944001)

the moon still displays a surface similar to what it was 2 billion or more years ago

No impacts from meteorites? No erosion from temperature changes? What kind of material Moon is made off?

Re:Something not mentioned - (1)

CarsonChittom (2025388) | more than 2 years ago | (#38944359)

What kind of material Moon is made off?

Green cheese, of course. I thought everyone knew that.

Re:Something not mentioned - (4, Informative)

Verteiron (224042) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943343)

The goal here is not to see any living organisms there as a portal to the past. It is to see any organisms who have manged to survive in an airless, water-filled lake buried under 3 miles of ice for millions of years. It is fairly likely that, if there are any living organisms there, they're going to have evolved in some pretty interesting ways.

Re:Something not mentioned - (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943641)

While I agree with your point about biology - living things strongly couple to each other in remarkably complex ways - asteroids and debris on the rocky planets are (compared to Earth) completely pristine due to the inertness of their environment, and the processes they are subject to are blissfully easy to model and use in interpretation.

Re:Something not mentioned - (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943689)

Lake Vostok might (we think) have been sealed off for a very long time, but that doesn't mean it's a glimpse into the past, but, rather, a glimpse into a different version of the present.

That is very true; however, if the environment of Lake Vostok hasn't changed in x eons (and it likely hasn't under all that ice) then environmental causes for evolution won't have occurred. It is changes in the environment that cause most "directional" evolution. Without that all you have after a while is random genetic drift. Physically cockroaches look the same today as they did millions of years ago because they are a pretty darn good-design that can't be improved upon for any of the environments that have come and gone since.

You look at what is similar between any potential organisms there- and any organisms surface-side- and say that what is similar is "likely" a common historical trait.

Re:Something not mentioned - (1)

jackbird (721605) | more than 2 years ago | (#38942823)

Because McElligot's Pool is near Sneeden's Hotel and State Highway 203, not the middle of Antarctica.

Miss read: Lake of Vodka? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38941819)

I'd would dig for a lake a vodka too.

I wondered where it came from. Vodka lakes, hummm...

Interesting Read (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38942167)

'Cold Plague' by Daniel Kalla.

Decent read about this exact thing. I guess when drilling takes so long you can easily fit a book in before it's done!

http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/Cold-Plague-DANIEL-KALLA/9780765318336-item.html?ikwid=daniel+kalla&ikwsec=Books

K-THULU (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943313)

So when will the CIA start smuggling Heroin through it [infinityplus.co.uk] ?

Fox News Reported Them Lost (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38943493)

Jeremy A Kaplan reported [foxnews.com] these guys lost. Best I can tell, he misunderstood some e-mails and ran with the story. A few other papers quoted his story, but most journalists must have know he was wrong. Funny, this story has not author listed and says,

A brief break in communication with colleagues in the unfrozen world had some asking questions about the scientists, as Antarctica's killing winter draws near. But despite the lack of info and onset of winter, which brings temperatures as low as -80 F or colder, the team was never in danger, Priscu said.

So, some were asking questions? Nice. Don't even mention that the only one asking questions was your own reporter running a story when the fact checking failed to confirm it. Go Fox!

Retail (2)

Thuktun (221615) | more than 2 years ago | (#38943895)

How long until we get Vostok(tm) bottled water in the grocery store?

Re:Retail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38944221)

Dammit, you beat me to that one.

Unless there is a connection somewhere to the ocean or surface water of some sort, i believe the only thing they are going to find at that site is water.

The only energy available for life that deep, would be volcanic and I think that the linked article said that they were drilling along the shoreline of the lake somewhere.

Re:Retail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38944403)

Probably not long. The only question that remains is what should we name it? How about "naive" spelled backwards? The rubes will never figure it out.

So when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38944339)

I can't wait until someone ties this research into an evolution vs. intelligent design debate or man-made global warming spectacle to completely deligitimitize and demean any actual SCIENTIFIC findings made!

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