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Halliburton To Dump Blackberry For iOS

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the death-spiral-in-motion dept.

Blackberry 188

grub writes "Halliburton has decided to drop Research In Motion's Blackberry platform in favor of Apple's iOS for its workforce. 'An internal newsletter outlined the plan for the nearly 70,000 employees who work for Halliburton in more than 70 countries. "Over the next year, we will begin expanding the use of our mobile technology by transitioning from the BlackBerry (RIM) platform that we currently use to smartphone technology via the iPhone."'"

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188 comments

Seems fitting (3, Funny)

gottspeed (2060872) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952347)

Lets all join hands in making the world a better place for investors!

Re:Seems fitting (5, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952865)

A company like Halliburton, is a big company. Most of you the only reason to hate it was because of its connection with a former Vice President who was a War Hawk Republican. Like all Large companies they do a lot of things. And the IT decision to move from Blackberry to iOS, probably isn't part of some evil plot. Just probably more innocently trying to give customers a better tool for their job.
Blackberry had some really large problems in the past few years. Network outages, lack of interests in developing 3rd party apps. Most likely a lot of employees wanted iOS devices more then ones who liked their blackberry. So they made an IT decision to switch... No big deal.

If Apple messes up or something that is far superior pops up then you will see the market switch again.

This isn't some Evil attracted to Evil, liberal hippy crap. To big companies often thing that are ethically wrong... Yes. Are all their decisions based on Evil... No.
Sometimes an IT Decision is just that.

Re:Seems fitting (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952945)

A company like Halliburton, is a big company. Most of you the only reason to hate it was because of its connection with a former Vice President who was a War Hawk Republican. Like all Large companies they do a lot of things. And the IT decision to move from Blackberry to iOS, probably isn't part of some evil plot. Just probably more innocently trying to give customers a better tool for their job.
Blackberry had some really large problems in the past few years. Network outages, lack of interests in developing 3rd party apps. Most likely a lot of employees wanted iOS devices more then ones who liked their blackberry. So they made an IT decision to switch... No big deal.

If Apple messes up or something that is far superior pops up then you will see the market switch again.

This isn't some Evil attracted to Evil, liberal hippy crap. To big companies often thing that are ethically wrong... Yes. Are all their decisions based on Evil... No.
Sometimes an IT Decision is just that.

No, I am pretty sure it was because they were shameless war profiteers who won no-bid contracts and earned billions in profits while ONLY BY COINCIDENCE were they hugely invested in and advised by several officials in the white house... And then they blew up an oil well in the gulf that shit all over the coastline of 5 states. All liberal hippy crap, no doubt.

Re:Seems fitting (1, Troll)

postbigbang (761081) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953203)

It's only statistically significant as another anecdotal sign that RIM needs to change its tune. Haliburton gouged the people of the US, moved their assets base offshore, and generally fucked the USA. During the Mideast wars, they repeatedly gouged, profiteered, and were poster boys and girls for how to bone your country.

So now they're changing to iOS. Who.Fucking. Cares.

Re:Seems fitting (4, Insightful)

P-niiice (1703362) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953265)

A company like Halliburton, is a big company. Most of you the only reason to hate it was because of its connection with a former Vice President who was a War Hawk Republican.

Yeah, that's why we should hate them. It couldn't also be it's support and coverup of a gang rape committed by employees, or it's opposition to anti-human trafficing among other things.

Before the fandroids post this (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952359)

Am evil corporation adopts a product from another evil corporation

Physical keyboard? (2, Insightful)

PT_1 (2425848) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952373)

I'm not saying that the iPhone isn't a good phone, but it has no physical keyboard. Many employees use their phone for answering email; to me the iPhone seems like it would really inconvenient for use in this manner. Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?

Re:Physical keyboard? (5, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952391)

I'm not saying that the iPhone isn't a good phone, but it has no physical keyboard. Many employees use their phone for answering email; to me the iPhone seems like it would really inconvenient for use in this manner. Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?

Brevity of reply = feature not bug

Re:Physical keyboard? (5, Informative)

twofishy (1658233) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952575)

Yup. Used BlackBerry for about 5 years before switching to iPhone when the 4 came out. It took a day or to to get used to it, but these days I'm just as fast typing on the screen as I ever was on the BlackBerry phone. And the phone a whole is a lot better than the last BlackBerry I owned.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

Tolleman (606762) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953197)

I find it harder to type on touchscreen keyboards then on physical phone keyboards when I'm shitfaced.

Re:Physical keyboard? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953345)

I find it harder to type on touchscreen keyboards then on physical phone keyboards when I'm shitfaced.

But the touchscreen is easier to clean the puke off of.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953411)

Do you also find it harder to differentiate homonyms when you're sober?

Re:Physical keyboard? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952407)

"Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?"

Only while driving.

Re:Physical keyboard? (4, Funny)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952409)

Oh, don't say that. With autocorrect, an on-screen touch keyboard is just as fast and arrogant as a maniacal keyboard.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952727)

>arrogant
Can we assume that's from your iPhone auto correct?

Re:Physical keyboard? (3, Funny)

cc1984_ (1096355) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952829)

>arrogant
Can we assume that's from your iPhone auto correct?

Choose

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953037)

Layers of funny.

Re:Physical keyboard? (3, Insightful)

EMR (13768) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952421)

I use it all the time, and don't really have issues writing emails on it.. With any compact device it takes practice. I personally have a harder time on those mini physical keyboards than on the virtual iPhone keyboard.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952441)

All I can say is, "Thank Jebus."

Blackberry replies (actually any smartphone replies) are usually useless and poorly thought out. The useful ones are stuff like, "We'll talk tomorrow at 3," which can still be hacked out on a virtual keyboard.

That said, I can understand the desire for an actual keyboard, but then I don't work for Halliburton.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

ewanm89 (1052822) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952781)

Right, which is why I prefer Android myself. And yes I'm typing this on i touchscreen keyboard on my Android phone.

Re:Physical keyboard? (4, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952889)

typing this on i touchscreen keyboard

Comedy gold!

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

ewanm89 (1052822) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953089)

Yeah, that right there is the usual problem with onscreen keyboard, the automatic completion and correction can go screwy at times. Although it is getting better, currently building a have Java dictionary into this one.

Re:Physical keyboard? (3, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953263)

LOL, a have Java dictionary?

One pro tip: never type curse words into your phone. It will learn the curse words and then auto-correct at the worst possible times.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952445)

I'm not saying that the iPhone isn't a good phone, but it has no physical keyboard. Many employees use their phone for answering email; to me the iPhone seems like it would really inconvenient for use in this manner. Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?

Millions!

SMS is the single most used "app" (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952589)

With email second.
Web third.
and apps are a fairly distant fourth.

No keyboard does indeed suck.
 

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

Troke (1612099) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952629)

Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?

Short answer, no. On the road my Droid 2 becomes my primary device. I purchased it because of the physical keyboard, but haven't slid the keyboard out in months. I'm just as fast with the on screen keyboard and have no problem responding to e-mails without a physical keyboard.

That being said, my responses from a mobile device tend to be less eloquent and shorter, so for anything requiring long responses I will grab my laptop or sit down at the desktop and hammer it out.

Re:Physical keyboard? (2)

JonathanF (532591) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952677)

Think the "I can't write unless I have a hardware keyboard" trope died once people actually bothered to learn to type on touchscreen keyboards. I know I can type faster on an iPhone (or Galaxy Nexus) than I can on the multiple recent BlackBerrys I've used. Not having to use awkward function key combos and using autocorrection to your advantage can go a long way.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952681)

Depends on the person. As a large guy, I find onscreen keyboards horribly inconvenient, especially when switching between case or letters/numbers/symbols (my passwords kill me on onscreen keyboards). My girlfriend is the opposite, after a half hour she could type nearly as fast as on a physical keyboard and didn't mind it at all. Of course, I'm usually much more into grammar and capitalization than most people on mobile device. From the companies I've supported using iPhones for their mobile salesforce, most of them find it to be a good balance between perceived coolness, functionality and simplicity of use.

Re:Physical keyboard? (4, Informative)

swalve (1980968) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952899)

I'm not even that large of a person, no sausage fingers for me, and I find that I am unable to use onscreen keyboards with any kind of accuracy either. Four years ago when I was buying my first smartphone, I honestly wanted an iPhone. But when I tried to type on it, nothing but gibberish. Picked up the Blackberry and it fit like a glove. And it still works. Maybe onscreen keyboard prediction technology has gotten better, but I doubt it based on what I see in various forums.

Part of the problem, I think, is that the keyboards include predictive word choosing, and people don't really normally look at the spelling of a word when they are reading. They just see a word that starts and ends with the right letters and is roughly the same size.

Disambiguation (1)

srussia (884021) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952707)

Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?

Did you mean "primary device for work" or "primary device at work"?

Re:Disambiguation (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953171)

Does anybody else use an iPhone as their primary work device?

Did you mean "primary device for work" or
"primary device at work"?

What? Playing Tiny Tower is *like* work... Is that close enough?

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952721)

I had a lot of questions about going to a virtual keyboard after owning a Motorola Droid for about 2 years. I went to iPhone 4 and it took me all of about 3 days to get use to it. I text and write mails with no serious issues. YMMV, obviously.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

digitalsolo (1175321) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952779)

They are replacing Blackberry phones with iPhones. I've used both keyboards extensively, and I find the iPhone keyboard no more difficult to use than the Blackberry, and with practice, I'm nominally faster on the iPhone.

Now, versus a REAL keyboard, sure, it's a PITA. That isn't what they're changing from however.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952801)

(Posting AC from work...)

Given how poorly most people write using BB's physical keyboard, I'm quite fine with people using a virtual keyboard and having auto-correct fix their mistakes. Odds are their messages will better resemble actual English....

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

garatheus (993376) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952941)

Other than with the auto correct fails that often occur with the iPhone (and BlackBerry) completely getting it wrong sometimes... Heck, there are whole web sites dedicated to this very thing (well, at least I think there are, right?)

Or perhaps it's just that our particular style of English (South African) has so many different mixtures in it - where we often will have an Afrikaans or other language based word included in our sentences...

That's just going to go down well when you're sending out corporate emails!

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

Etdashou (1400737) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952833)

I'm not sure to understand this post, is this sarcasm? I have an iPhone for some years now and I don't see why I would need a physical keyboard at all. I type really fast on the iPhone keyboard. Same thing for my friends who has both option (physical + virtual keyboard). They don't use the physical keyboard anymore. Perhaps I live somewhere strange.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953289)

You have better screen real estate when half of it isn't being consumed by a keyboard. I've seen some rather schizophrenic emails composed on small screens because the author literally had forgotten what they had mentioned a paragraph ago. I personally find I compose much more coherently on a large screen where I can see what I said more than two sentences ago.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952847)

I'm not saying that the iPhone isn't a good phone, but it has no physical keyboard. Many employees use their phone for answering email; to me the iPhone seems like it would really inconvenient for use in this manner.

Hello 2007,

I'm glad to see you are still around complaining about the lack of physical keyboards. It seems the market has spoken and is in disagreement with your assessment. Now if you would kindly return to complaining about the lack or right mouse buttons on Macs or claims of "security through obscurity", the slashdot world will all be right again.

Sincerely,

Humanity

Re:Physical keyboard? (2)

rockmuelle (575982) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952875)

I'm an iPhone user and generally like the platform, but the lack of a physical keyboard is problematic when it's cold out. I suspect many employees oil services company will be using their phones outside while gloves, which will be an challenge on the iPhone's touchscreen.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952959)

They make gloves with contact patches for smart phones. If you aren't completely retarded and have 20 extra minutes you can make any gloves smartphone friendly with conductive thread.

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

jezwel (2451108) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952939)

I've used an iPhone 3G to write an entire resume plus cover letter for a job application, which was painful in that I had to save and close those docs to open the PDF of the job application from an email. I'd imagine that would be much easier now with the advanced hardware and multi-tasking in the 4 /4S.
Add to that the ~$800 in roaming charges I incurred by doing this while overseas (Japan yay) and it was a bit frustrating. Got an interview out of it - plus a job offer - so wasn't too bad.

tl,dr: yes it would work for many situations.

Re:Physical keyboard? (2)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953075)

My touch screen phone is my primary digital device. Period.

My computer has fallen back into niche uses like coding and writing extensively long multi-page articles.

The touch screen keyboard becomes second nature within a week of ownership. This holds true for all touch screen phones, Android, iPhone or WinPhone7.

At the end of the day, if a keyboard is so important, there are a a lot of cases that come with bluetooth keyboard. Just check this link out:
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=bluetooth+keyboard+case+iphone&id=76D36CFA8438B11231CD36CAF645900802FD70E6&FORM=IQFRBA [bing.com]

Re:Physical keyboard? (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953307)

Yes, I use the iPhone for work. I type emails on it. It's fine. In fact, I prefer typing (and type faster) on my iPhone to typing on my Blackberry, but I recognize that it's a personal preference thing.

I have both an iPhone and a Blackberry, and the Blackberry gets no use.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953403)

Yes. Not having a physical keyboard is a trivial issue.

Re:Physical keyboard? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953433)

An Android phone with Swype (e.g. Samsung Galaxy S2 which has it by default) is much faster than both a physical keyboard or a regular touchscreen keyboard. Autocorrect is decent too - though iOS's autocorrect is notoriously terrible - HTC's keyboard is absolutely fantastic.

Remember their coveted corporate user base? (3, Informative)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952395)

Now we know that RIM is dead. You heard it here first.

Re:Remember their coveted corporate user base? (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952433)

On the plus side, RIM should find it much easier to retain customer-service reps, now that the risk of picking up the phone and being on the receiving end of Dick Cheney's rather impressive gravelly snarl is gone...

Feds won't like it (4, Insightful)

gruntled (107194) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952413)

iOS does not have a FIPS 140-2 certified encryption module associated with it, meaning that viewing non-public government data on their e-mail system would be a contract violation at worst and might expose them to criminal liability. Aren't these guys basically government contractors?

Re:Feds won't like it (1)

jonwil (467024) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952435)

There is no reason why Apple in conjunction with the Federal Government and others couldn't come up with a way to make the iPhone meet whatever federal standards are necessary, especially if it means a big sale to a major company.

Re:Feds won't like it (5, Informative)

d00f (242859) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952511)

There is also no reason why the Android couldn't do the same. Lawyers don't care about whether it would have been possible for some company to modify their product to meet the requirements of a contract - they care what was done.

RIM designed their infrastructure and device from the ground up to be secure and there is a reason why nearly all the law firms, government contractors and big business uses their devices. Apple designed their iPhone around the best user experience - 2 different objectives and this explains why they've had great success with the home type users.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952819)

secure and a single point of failure don't really mix that well, nor does government tapping option.

what BB did was spend enormous amounts of time and money to convince people that it's a secure and reliable solution, a lot of that comes from the fact that many companies used it so it was automatically assumed that they used it because it was reliable and secure, but what it was really was just "easy".

Re:Feds won't like it (1)

EvilBudMan (588716) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953425)

From what I've seen Blackberries aren't that secure maybe less secure than an iPhone which seems even more boxed in.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952831)

Major government contractors do not give a ... about laws. Such as having L1 transfers working on DoD projects that require US citizenship and security clearance
inside DoD buildings this being just a random example :)

Re:Feds won't like it (1)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953165)

Reason: When a bunch of high profile senators want to use their one iPhone to handle their email, or the president of the United States himself wants to use his iPad to check his email, they will come up with legal exceptions to allow it.

Sure, can happen with Android, once they forget about CarrierIQ.

Re:Feds won't like it (3, Informative)

gruntled (107194) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952579)

You're right, there's no reason Apple can't...except it hasn't bothered. Until last year, Apple didn't have a FIPS 140-2 certified encryption module for *anything*. And it's not like if Apple developed an iOS encryption module and submitted it for approval that suddenly it's done; FIPS 140-2 is a testing requirement; it can take a long time before your encryption module is certified after being submitted for testing.

Re:Feds won't like it (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952907)

Gee, I wonder where Apple is going to ever find the resources to develop a FIPS 140-2 capable device. Will $40 billion cover it?

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952861)

There is no reason why Apple in conjunction with the Federal Government and others couldn't come up with a way to make the iPhone meet whatever federal standards are necessary,

Except that would require Apple to give up control of the device to the people who bought their phones.

Apple is all about control. When using an iDevice, you are only allowed to do what St. Jobs magnanimously allows you to do. Apple spies on its users. Apple has the ability to restrict what you do with your iDevice. And Apple regularly does both.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952471)

iOS does not have a FIPS 140-2 certified encryption module associated with it, meaning that viewing non-public government data on their e-mail system would be a contract violation at worst and might expose them to criminal liability. Aren't these guys basically government contractors?

Maybe Anonymous can hack them something up to secure their shizzle ...just a thought as they seem to know their networks pretty well

peace.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952483)

I might be reading this wrong, but according to the report from NIST linked below the iPhone/iPad cryptographic module is in the same category as the Blackberry cryptographic library when it comes to FIPS 140-1 and 140-2 status.

http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/STM/cmvp/documents/140-1/140InProcess.pdf

Re:Feds won't like it (4, Informative)

gruntled (107194) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952749)

You can think of FIPS 140-1 as what's commonly referred to as encryption strength (that is, the type of encryption, like AES 256). FIPS 140-2 is a certification that the encryption you're using under 140-1 has been implemented properly and it looks like this chart combines both one and two. To the best of my knowledge there's no 140-2 certification for iOS.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

retech (1228598) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952497)

Well they're a bit higher up the food chain. Since they make the conflicts their contracted to solve they write many of their own policies. No doubt they'll just rewrite this one as well. No sense in upgrading the tech when paper is quicker to upgrade. Now that they've bought the world court system and convinced us all that wikileaks is a terrorist cell they don't have to worry about people reading their email or docs.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952517)

Aren't these guys basically government contractors?

No. KBR, the government contractor, used to be owned by Halliburton but no longer. Halliburon is a oil well services company.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952557)

Halliburton could write their own secure mail app and deploy it, if the built-in stuff isn't secure enough.

And at least this way they're assured the company making their phones will still exist in five years.

Re:Feds won't like it (1)

MrCrassic (994046) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952663)

iOS might not, but good chance the management tool that will be baked into their phones is. I'm also confident that Apple's staunch refusal to accommodate corporate customers got pushed to the side here.

Re:Feds won't like it (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952665)

(Posting AC because I'm at work)

It would appear you're not entirely correct: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/04/prweb3829534.htm

"Mocana Corporation, a company that focuses on securing non-PC connected devices, today announced that it has earned the government's first FIPS 140-2 level one validation for an encryption product running on the Apple iPhone or iPad."

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952947)

Corporate iOS customers use http://www.good.com/ for their email app (or an equivalent) which meets FIPS 140-2. With Good all corporate mail (including calender etc,) is kept in an encrypted database on the device. Other applications on the device are not allowed access to that encrypted data.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953017)

They were.

Re:Feds won't like it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953159)

Aren't these guys basically government contractors?

No, they're a construction company, specializing in petroleum and gas, that happened to get a lot of government contracts when a former executive was elected to the vice presidency and the country went to war in an area of the world that had a lot of petroleum.

Its primary customers are the big oil companies (Chevron, BP, Exxon, Shell) and their partner companies and ventures.

No mention if Droids were considered (1)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952455)

I'm curious as to what were Halliburton's reasons for going Apple.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952527)

Someone misread the spec sheet - thought it said oIL

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (0, Flamebait)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952551)

Halliburton prefers dealing with companies that have an acceptable level of evil. Google pretty much told them they weren't interested in their business with that silly motto of theirs.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952565)

it says "via the iPhone", leaving other smartphone platforms open in the long run. the funny thing in their wording is that they don't consider bb's as smartphones.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (0)

DogDude (805747) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952655)

They probably went to Apple because it was the most expensive. After all, Haliburton is funded through massive no-bid government contracts so hey, it's not their money!

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (3, Interesting)

Dixie_Flatline (5077) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952661)

I suspect that it has something to do with support level. Google doesn't do end-user support, so you're stuck with a raft of manufacturers that have no proven support structure and are notoriously behind schedule when it comes to OS updates. Apple has a good history of keeping their phones up to date with the latest OS revision for at least a couple of years, which is probably pretty enticing.

The REAL question is why they didn't consider Windows phones. Or maybe they did, but couldn't wait for the WP8 update. There's a company that has a long history of enterprise support; they seem like they'd be a natural fit.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953125)

WP7 at this point is a nonstarter for a multinational enterprise use.

  • No globally supported handset model. There is only one WP7 handset in the Japan market, for example, and it's a Japan specific model. With the iPhone (or the BB), carriers around the world support the exact same device, making the IT department's support much easier. This may change in the future when Nokia floods the global market with handsets. We'll see.
  • Lack of handset maker track record. Even in geographies where you do have a decent choice of handsets, handset manufacturers haven't demonstrated (yet) that they are going to be any better at implementing Microsoft's OS updates than with their Android offerings. Again, this may change in a year or two, but given their past transgressions, I'm not holding my breath.
  • Lack of Microsoft track record. "Long history of enterprise support"? Sure, if you're talking about desktop or server OS. In the mobile market, they just managed to throw out a business-oriented OS completely in favor of something that looks vaguely like...yup, an Xbox. Not a good message to send to corporate IT types if you want their business. True, Apple isn't sending that kind of a message either, but they have made enough converts in the consumer market that it no longer matters.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952671)

My guess is that Android is a fractured mess with phones running multiple different os versions and out of box phones are loaded up with bloatware and vendor/manufacturer specific junk.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (1)

JonathanF (532591) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952713)

iOS has a better centralized management system and enterprise app delivery platform. Most of the enterprise-grade stuff you see in Android is bolted on by an OEM, and I doubt Halliburton wants to buy a few thousand RAZRs and hope that Motorola either isn't messed up by Google or headed down the tubes.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (1)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953189)

Some high level exec wanted to use his iPhone 4S for work so he was able to tell Siri to manage his meetings and ordered it to happen.

Re:No mention if Droids were considered (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953435)

Just to piss you off.

data usage (2)

geoffaus (623283) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952573)

Hope they dont have to pay for roaming - the Iphone uses way more data than the BB

Re:data usage (0)

DogDude (805747) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953053)

Hope they dont have to pay for roaming - the Iphone uses way more data than the BB

Well, if they do, it won't be a problem. They'll just buy a member of Congress to attach a rider to a bill for something like money for disabled children that will pay for their roaming charges, and it'll be called something like the "Freedom America Liberty Freedom Flag Act".

Re:data usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953259)

True. Fortunately, capped international roaming plans are becoming more common, and Halliburton is in a better position to negotiate favorable roaming plans than most consumers.

Windows would've been a more natural fit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952597)

That would've been joined together the UAE company with the UAE operating system.

No surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38952599)

Evil attracts evil. No surprise there.

Hey (1)

no-body (127863) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952605)

Lotsa cheap used devices becoming available!
(punched on one of those dinosour "real" thumb keyboards with a click one can feel)

Another Nail in the BB Coffin (2, Interesting)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952699)

By the end of this year, RIM will have lost so many customers it won't have any legs to stand on. I'm not sure if this is a good thing, but I guess it's progress.

Re:Another Nail in the BB Coffin (2)

tom229 (1640685) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952821)

It's definitely not progress. I, for one, am beyond tired of my only choices being coke or pepsi.

Perfect example of not keeping up... (2, Insightful)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 2 years ago | (#38952773)

The latest Blackberry ads proudly claim "we want a tool, not a toy". Um yeah, no.

If your tool actually did anything that the Android and iOS toys don't do, you might have a point. But since the toys do everything your tool does, but even better, your company is on the brink of extinction.

If I worked at Halliburton, I'd be Droid now (0)

cryfreedomlove (929828) | more than 2 years ago | (#38953211)

I pick my phone. I don't let my employer pick it for me but I do make them pay for it. I prefer employers that encourage this degree of adult decision making from their employees. I'm not sure if Halliburton would have me.

Dumping blackberries? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38953241)

So, they got tired of eating blackberries, crapped them out, and now they're moving on to eating apples?
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