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Sanctions Or Not, Iranian Competition Yields Successful UAVs

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the force-breeds-resistance dept.

Robotics 147

garymortimer writes with word of the result from a high-tech student competition that doesn't come with sponsorship from DARPA or Mobil — far from it. Instead, the sponsors include "military and non-military organizations" within Iran. "In this competition, participants must provide a UAV equipped with a camera to search a 10 square kilometer area for at least 40 minutes to find 3 square meter marks on the ground with different English letters on them. Finding ground targets and reporting the geo location are criterion for choosing the contest winner." (This article updates another from last year, which gives some more details about the competition.)

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if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954769)

you'd have time to hack together UAV's from cellphones too.

(I wonder, does Iran have any motorsports?)

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (5, Informative)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954831)

From everything I've heard, Iran is a modern, very prosperous country. It's hard to cut through all the bullshit and propaganda on both sides anytime you're dealing with a country that's at odds with the U.S., but I've known two people who went there who said they were welcomed very warmly as Americans and that quality of life there was pretty much the same as any European country.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (5, Funny)

Dexter Herbivore (1322345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954851)

Yup, it's a modern, prosperous country that spouts bullshit and propaganda about its enemies. It does have a dubious government which oppresses the rights of the people as well. Oh, and so does Iran.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38954913)

Oh, poor us - so oppressed... :(

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (2, Informative)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955055)

Yup, it's a modern, prosperous country that spouts bullshit and propaganda about its enemies. It does have a dubious government which oppresses the rights of the people as well. Oh, and so does Iran.

While what you say is more or less true, comparing the "oppression" from the US government to the oppression from the Iranian leadership is not really accurate. For example, I don't see a whole lot of homosexuals being hung from cranes in the US.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955203)

Iran hasn't invaded any nations causing a doubling of overall mortality and the deaths of a million people.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (3, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955383)

Iran hasn't invaded any nations causing a doubling of overall mortality and the deaths of a million people.

There is a HUGE difference. First of all, when I served in the military, I was greeted with open arms by the people in the country I was "invading". No matter how hard I tried, I was not allowed to pay for anything. Even if I could convince the vendor to take my money, someone would always step up and pay for whatever I was trying to pay for. I didn't buy a whole lot, not wanting to take advantage of my hosts' hospitality and gratitude.

Next, any civilian casualties resulting from our "invasion" was purely accidental. The US and her allies went to great lengths to avoid civilian casualties, even if it sometimes meant letting the target go. You'll also notice that the US military does not hide behind human shields made of women and children.

So, again, if you think it's the same thing, you are manipulating the facts in your own head to fit what already believe to be true.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955775)

Next, any civilian casualties resulting from our "invasion" was purely accidental.

So the 100,000+ civilians killed in Iraq was accidental. I'm sure that makes them feel much better.

I was greeted with open arms by the people in the country I was "invading".

Is that also representative of the family members of some of those accidental deaths?

You'll also notice that the US military does not hide behind human shields made of women and children.

You have that in common with the 9/11 terrorists.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (3)

debiangruven (576982) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956695)

Next, any civilian casualties resulting from our "invasion" was purely accidental.

So the 100,000+ civilians killed in Iraq was accidental. I'm sure that makes them feel much better.

I was greeted with open arms by the people in the country I was "invading".

Is that also representative of the family members of some of those accidental deaths?

You'll also notice that the US military does not hide behind human shields made of women and children.

You have that in common with the 9/11 terrorists.

You do realize that civilians are still dying in Iraq and our armed forces are not there. Fact of the matter is insurgents hate the idea of freedom and will kill anyone to try and crush freedom. You are very ignorant when it comes to talking about what our armed forces do in battle. I am an Iraq veteran and I can tell you that in 2005, 99% of all civilian deaths came from terrorists. Maybe you should enlist so that you can see what really happens in a war, or better yet move to Iran because it is such a free democracy and one that values human rights so much.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956829)

Fact of the matter is insurgents hate the idea of freedom and will kill anyone to try and crush freedom

Fuck, did this come straight from dubya? Are you even capable of critical thinking?

They hate our FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEDOM!!!

Jesus, you're a fucking idiot.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957055)

I'm just going to point out that while you attacked his statement, you did nothing to prove it incorrect.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957351)

Because it's idiotic and obviously wrong. The very nature of an 'insurgent' is fighting for freedom from some authority they view as invalid. They're fighting for their version of freedom, dumbass, not your version.

At least dubya was smart enough to say 'they hate OUR freedom', possibly understanding the idiocy of saying someone fighting for their freedom 'hates the idea of freedom'.

You're obviously an American. PROTIP: this is why the rest of the world hates you - you prattle on about liberty and freedom but don't have a fucking clue what either word means.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957793)

Fact of the matter is insurgents hate the idea of freedom and will kill anyone to try and crush freedom

Fuck, did this come straight from dubya? Are you even capable of critical thinking?

They hate our FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEDOM!!!

Jesus, you're a fucking idiot.

You are right. The these guys love freedom and feel that the general public should be free to choose. However, if a citizen makes a choice that these guys disagree with, they kill that citizen and his family, hopefully in that order, but probably not.

And don't call Jesus an idiot.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957033)

You idiot - read your own post.

Insurgents.

Were they there during the time of Saddam?

Fact is, Saddam may have been a bad-ass, but, I would much prefer living under his rule than have been liberated by the US. Cheers buddy, you help destroy the country and helped it descend into anarchy.

And who were these terrorists you speak of?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basra_prison_incident [wikipedia.org]

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957533)

Fact is, Saddam may have been a bad-ass, I would much prefer living under his rule than have been liberated by the US.

You say that only because you're very ignorant or very stupid.

The number of deaths and terror put upon the people, even during a fucking war, is LESS than when Sadam was in power.

Plently, things suck but things can get better for them. The fact is, for most of Iraq, things are better now than they were under Sadam. The major exception is for those who are in the Baath party. Interestingly enough, those are the majority of the people who really hate the new Iraq and complain the most about the changes. After all, not being able to go rape and murder anyone you want for just about any reason, while stealing from families and markets, must really suck for them.

So many Americans are so fucking ignorant when it comes to reality in Iraq. Again, I'm not saying things are really fucking great, but one thing for sure, in many ways, things are far, far better than they've ever been for a whole lot of people in Iraq right now, and that's 100% thanks to America and NATO.

Now I'm sure some moron will some and talk about x, y, and z with an extremely ignorant and/or myoptic view, but that does change reality. Which world would you rather live in? Blown up city and hope? Or a so-so house and fear for your life everyday, whereby your extorted, children raped and murdered, and your friends and family are commonly arrested and/or tortured. Oh that's right, you're one of those stupid fucking Americans which like to pretend the world was all roses for Iraq before the war. The fact is, life sucked for the majority of Iraqies before the war started. And the word, "sucked", by far, is an understatement.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38958955)

Dude, again, your an idiot. Sorry to have to use a personal remark, but really.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (3, Informative)

chrb (1083577) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957575)

You do realize that civilians are still dying in Iraq and our armed forces are not there.

Far [tumblr.com] far fewer [coincidenceithinknot.com] now.

. I am an Iraq veteran and I can tell you that in 2005, 99% of all civilian deaths came from terrorists.

Anecdotal claims from a soldier in the conflict are not evidence. Please provide a citation for this "99%" figure. Back in 2004 the Iraqi Health Ministry stated that coalition forces were killing twice as many civilians than the insurgents were: More Iraqi Civilians Killed by US Forces Than By Insurgents, Data Shows. [commondreams.org]

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956741)

So the 100,000+ civilians killed in Iraq was accidental. I'm sure that makes them feel much better.

No, but it made the families of the MILLIONS killed feel better to know that something was finally being done about it. Also, that 100,000 number is bullshit.

Is that also representative of the family members of some of those accidental deaths?

No. It's representative of the people whose families were tortured and killed by the previous government ON PURPOSE! You know, like when they would kidnap a mother, rape and kill her and then send the video tape to the family kinda thing. But yeah, it's the same thing as a civilian who dies because the bridge he was driving on was blown up at 3:00 am to avoid civilian casualties.

You have that in common with the 9/11 terrorists.

Actually, hijackers, by their very nature are hiding behind the civilians on the plane. Notice that no one hijacks a FedEx transport, for example. The passengers on the plane are their human shields.

Anything else I can answer for you, jackhole? Do you stand idly buy as that drunk beats the shit out of his girlfriend at the bar? Do you still do nothing when moves onto her children? If you hear a woman being raped outside your window, do you just watch and say, "That's unfortunate. She should do something about that"?

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957043)

No, but it made the families of the MILLIONS killed feel better to know that something was finally being done about it. Also, that 100,000 number is bullshit.

Actually, according to the polls, the overwhelming majority of Iraqi's (and the rest of the world) thought it was a complete fucking mistake. Also, the 100,000 number is way too low - how many sources would you like?

Congratulations, you're a brainwashed moron who kills for other people's profit.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957253)

So long as we're into analogies...

U.S. going into Iraq is the equivalent of ignoring the woman being raped outside your window (half a dozen oppressive countries sponsoring terrorism that U.S. is best friends with, like Saudi Arabia), and going after a guy who slapped his girlfriend.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (2)

chrb (1083577) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957663)

Also, that 100,000 number is bullshit.

Not true. The Ministry of Defence's chief scientific adviser said "The study design is robust and employs methods that are regarded as close to 'best practice' in this area, given the difficulties of data collection and verification in the present circumstances in Iraq." And that is coming from a country that was part of the coalition. Iraqi deaths survey 'was robust' [bbc.co.uk]

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955821)

There is a HUGE difference. First of all, when I served in the military, I was greeted with open arms by the people in the country I was "invading".

So what's with all the people trying to blow up shit in your country?

Next, any civilian casualties resulting from our "invasion" was purely accidental. The US and her allies went to great lengths to avoid civilian casualties, even if it sometimes meant letting the target go.

Easy when you define the term civilian and who is and isn't a belligerent. "Oh my god, they're swarthy! TALIBANALQAEDA!!!"

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956253)

The Nazis were greeted with open arms and treated well by the people in France too. That doesn't mean that they liked them or wanted them to be there.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956883)

I don't even think it's fair to grant that much.

If your nation suffers a coup and starts sourcing support from an outside military - especially if the source military is already more powerful - then you are pretty much out of options, besides national suicide (in which case you can never recover and never live to get the last laugh..

But when nighttime comes, you can strike back anonymously, as the French did.

This is why I totally don't GET France-bashing in the US over WW2, which shows not just a lack of common sense, but a complete ignorance of what happened (and the US role) in the war prior to Japan attacking Pearl Harbor.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957157)

This is why I totally don't GET France-bashing in the US over WW2, which shows not just a lack of common sense, but a complete ignorance of what happened (and the US role) in the war prior to Japan attacking Pearl Harbor.

One of the reasons people bash France's involvement in WW2 is that they built the Maginot Line along the French/German border and got flanked by the Nazis moving through Belgium. What is so ridiculous about this is that the German Army flanked the French Army by moving through Belgium in WW1 as well.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (3, Insightful)

cforciea (1926392) | more than 2 years ago | (#38958035)

What you say is true, but there is always an unfair implication that the two invasions via Belgium happened the same way implicit in the summarized version of the story. War was a much slower moving affair in World War 1. The entire design of the Maginot Line was supposed to take into account invasion from Belgium or Switzerland. Yes, it was supposed to make invasion direct from Germany very difficult, but it was also supposed to make it much easier to hold the line on the German border with less manpower specifically to free up mobilized forces to respond to the presumably slower offensives that could take place from other borders.

Yes, obviously there was a large miscalculation on how quickly the Germans could advance through Belgium (and in hoping that they would respect Belgium's neutral status), but France's was not the only fighting force to be outmaneuvered by the German Blitzkrieg, and France was highly outnumbered to boot. The whole meme of France learning nothing from World War 1 is way overblown. If the Germans had moved the same way that they had in World War 1, France would have been in great shape. The real problem is that they spent too much effort responding to what they learned from World War 1, and war had changed (despite what Ron Perlman would have you believe).

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957361)

While I wouldn't take the harsh tone others take in their reply (and btw, thank you for your service), I have to remark that it is TOTALLY naive to think the US was welcomed as liberators in Iraq.

Yes, there was a public show of gratitude for deposing Saddam Hussein... but part of that is relief, and part of that is just for show, as pretty much -every- nation has done when successfully invaded. Also, at that moment, none of those people expected the US to actually occupy them for almost 10 years.

I actually made this bet with someone who incessantly beat the war drums, and who bet me that the US would be welcomed as liberators. I suggested a different bet, let's see how things are exactly 18 months later. He took the bet, although he couldn't resist making a jibe that as a typical liberal I love Saddam and must hate the US. 18 months later, I dug up the email, and tried to collect on the bet and he was very angry and personally blamed deaths of people he knew on me (he served under Clinton but knew plenty of lifers). But that's exactly how I felt about HIM... his talking points bullshit from Fox is what killed his friends. No one has EVER welcomed occupiers. You get in, you promote a less-brutal general who remembers who promoted him, and you get the fvck out before their problems become your problems. Much of western Europe remained a dictatorship after we drove the Nazis out.

The point is, wanting something to be true does not make it true. History repeats itself not by chance, but when folks willfully ignore history and perspective. It was quite obvious to me America was walking into a second trap. The US lost the moment Rumsfeld chuckled about uncontrolled looting of the Iraqi civil structure and museums.

Worst of all.. instead of keeping the Iraqi military infrastructure intact, Rumsfeld dissolved it and then BANNED all the junior and low level Iraqi solders from any civil job. An unemployed military is pretty reckless, and so there was not just one but two competing insurgencies.

Anyways... yeah, you may have got a flower in your rifle but it's pretty disingenuous to suggest that was ANYTHING but a blip.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38958257)

Vietnam?

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (2)

MrSteveSD (801820) | more than 2 years ago | (#38958665)

"Next, any civilian casualties resulting from our "invasion" was purely accidental."

I suppose it depends on how you define accidental. For example in the siege, bombardment and assault on Falluja, it was a certainty that civilian casualties would be significant. The siege was largely revenge for the killing of four armed Blackwater mercenaries (the term Private Military Contractor does not feature in the Geneva conventions). When you attack a city the size of Fallujah to avenge the deaths of four men, use 2000lb bombs and howitzers and kill many civilians in the process, can you really call the civilian deaths accidental?

In fact, it was largely footage of civilian casualties in the hospital that stopped the first attempted attack on Falluja in April 2004, which is why the hospital was seized immediately in the second assault in November. The Red Cross reported that refugees had witnessed the use of cluster bombs and white Phosphorus.

"You'll also notice that the US military does not hide behind human shields made of women and children."

This is a charge commonly levelled against enemy forces. It's a good way of demonizing them. Whenever enemy forces are entrenched in a city, you can accused them of hiding behind civilians. If US forces ever have to defend a US city against an invading enemy, you can be sure the same accusations will be made against them.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (2)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955745)

Iran hasn't invaded any nations causing a doubling of overall mortality and the deaths of a million people.

At least not since the Iran-Iraq war though to be fair there, Saddam Hussein was at fault, like the rest of the wars he was involved in.

Since we're obviously comparing Iran to the US here, it's worth noting that the US has done so, but the last time was during the Vietnam War. The Lancet studies [wikipedia.org] which claim otherwise are remarkably flawed (to the point, I consider it pure deception) and overshoot greatly other estimates of casualties from the Iraqi invasion and the subsequent unrest.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

tragedy (27079) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956593)

The question there is, if Saddam Hussein was at fault in the Iran-Iraq war (and I'm not saying he wasn't, he wasn't exactly a very nice guy), why was the US on his side at the time?

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956789)

No they just bankroll every lunatic extremist Islamic group to do their fighting for them. And it's these extremist groups who create the reasons for interference from other countries. Their various actions are more like invitations for others to come over and join in the fighting while they hide behind their women and children and cry foul when people get killed. Iran was a prosperous and modern country until their glorious revolution created an Islamic government whose first act was to kill or imprison anyone who didn't get with their program. The moronic college students fronting the revolution thought it more important to hold US hostages while the Islamic parties actually organized a government. Before the revolution the Islamists were a minority group but all the liberal and progressive morons got so busy expressing their outrage at the US they ended up losing their country.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38958379)

No they just bankroll every lunatic extremist Islamic group to do their fighting for them

Are you talking about the US or its bff Saudi Arabia? Or Pakistan?

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956889)

Iraq.
Weapons to Afghanistan.
Weapons to Hezballah.
Weapons to Lebanon.
Weapons to Syria.

iran is all over the place with continuing loads of warfare. And yes, they have caused a great deal more than a million deaths. Hell, the provide support, money and weapons to AQ.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955263)

Why is it not accurate to compare? For example, I don't see Iran invading multiple foreign countries, killing tens or hundreds of thousands of people, or capturing, imprisoning, and torturing people from many countries without even minimal evidence of wrongdoing. How is hanging several homosexuals worse than this? Maybe the difference is that the US doesn't oppress white people, so it's ok.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955533)

Is it a numbers thing or do you simply don't care what happens to gays?

So the more people you kill and torture (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955773)

the better it is? The numbers of atrocities by the USA is higher than that produced by Iran.

Or do you simply not care what happens to humans, *unless* they're gay?

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956089)

While what you say is more or less true, comparing the "oppression" from the US government to the oppression from the Iranian leadership is not really accurate. For example, I don't see a whole lot of homosexuals being hung from cranes in the US.

The Iranian government opresses its own people, which is definitely bad.

The U.S. government also oppresses its own people, albeit far more covertly than Iran, as well as oppressing the entire fucking world.

So, you're right, it is far from an accurate comparison - Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is a pacifist compared to the masters of our great empire, er, "nation."

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956215)

Oh, and the US is so ahead of everyone with "don't ask, don't tell" repealed not two years ago, herds of religious fanatics bursting with hate toward ways unfamiliar or unknown, wonderful justice system and oh so impeccable record in wrongful [wikipedia.org] executions [wikipedia.org] and where every newborn gets $50k debt as a welcome gift.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

tmarsh86 (896458) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955191)

Do you actually enjoy spouting such BS? Do you wait with bated breath for the moments that you get to throw these rocks of ridiculousness? You have no idea what oppression is, but you are welcome to travel to Iran and experience on a level that is worthy of you.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956201)

"Yup, it's a modern, prosperous country that spouts bullshit and propaganda about its enemies."

This fit's every single government on the planet except for Sweden and Greenland. Swedes are cool, Greenland is cold.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955713)

Yeah, right.
Very modern country, just like any advanced European country where justice like public: stoning, lashing, mass hanging is practiced left and right. Just Google any one of the above forms of punishment and Iran.

Re:if you were stuck in Iran.. (1)

jopsen (885607) | more than 2 years ago | (#38958061)

but I've known two people who went there who said they were welcomed very warmly as Americans and that quality of life there was pretty much the same as any European country.

I'm pretty sure things have changed in Europe since your ancestors emigrated 200 years ago :)

</flamebait> if by "any European country" you mean the only poor former east block countries, then maybe you're right... Assuming you don't care about human rights.

i have some letters for them (2, Funny)

noh8rz2 (2538714) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954793)

I can lay down some letters for the iranian drones - "f"..."u"..."c"...

Re:i have some letters for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38954953)

You should be more careful, otherwise it will happen to you again.

Re:i have some letters for them (1)

JustNilt (984644) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954997)

I can lay down some letters for the iranian drones - "f"..."u"..."c"...

More like "f"..."u"..."D", I suspect.

Comment Subject: (5, Interesting)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954871)

This is one of the things the Middle East is very good at. The Portuguese have a word for it: Desenrascanco [cracked.com], which basically means the quick and dirty solution that's thrown together at the last minute and/or from what's on hand.

We saw this innovation in Libya, including some humorous military innovations such as the Bread Helmet [perspy.com] and some far less humorous things like technicals, anti-air turrets, etc. Iran saw how effective the US's drones were and they want some of their own. They saw how effective stuff like DARPA is, so they do the same thing. Of course, Iran has the advantage of coming late to market so they can get all of the component parts much, much easier.

Re:Comment Subject: (5, Funny)

Xest (935314) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955333)

"Of course, Iran has the advantage of coming late to market so they can get all of the component parts much, much easier."

Especially when your enemy lands them in your back yard.

Re:Comment Subject: (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956491)

This is one of the things the Middle East is very good at. The Portuguese have a word for it: Desenrascanco [cracked.com], which basically means the quick and dirty solution that's thrown together at the last minute and/or from what's on hand.

And exactly who do think invented Duck Tape?

USA! USA! USA!

People are good at that everywhere (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956705)

this is not just a trait of those in one region of the world, though living in constant threat of your life from your government and those around you does tend to spur innovation. Even Slashdot has been replete with stories of people creating their own drones, shooting off rockets, and the like.

The difference comes down to scale and integration. Anyone can put up a model plane and find things they are supposed to find. Now, having the ability to do so in varied weather conditions, varied terrains, and coordinate the search and response with related elements is there the process bogs down. It bogs down because of dependencies, something this contest did not cover. (Besides there is a good number of small drones out there in the hands of many countries)

The are two messages here. First, smart and innovative exist world wide, and second the pace and spread of technology is outstripping the ability for many people to comprehend.

Well there is a third reason, Iran's government needs to impress. Impress their own people more than others btw.

Re:People are good at that everywhere (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957645)

It's a feature of life in less affluent societies. People learn to make do with what's on hand, and not rely on ready made(expensive) tools and equipment.

Re:Comment Subject: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956733)

The Portuguese have a word for it: Desenrascanco, which basically means the quick and dirty solution that's thrown together at the last minute and/or from what's on hand.

I am portuguese, and there are a couple of incorrections with that cracked article. The first one is that the word is "desenrascanço", with a cedilla in the C. For the english speakers out there, this makes "desenrascanço" sound a bit like desenrascan-sue.
The jab on how portuguese supposedly "value just the opposite" of planning every little thing ahead is simply wrong. The world refers to problems which weren't expected and for which there isn't any contingency plan, but must be solved urgently. For example, the Apollo 13 team did a great job at "desenrascar" a solution to a problem which could easily cost the crew their lives. This doesn't mean that 1960s NASA valued not planning things ahead of time. Think of it as problem solving skills which are based in "out of the box thinking and are adequate for a pragmatic approach to solve urgent problems.

Re:Comment Subject: (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957215)

Keep in mind that Cracked is a humor site and strives for being funny over being accurate.

That said, what's the deal with the letter "ç"? It's basically an S every time I've heard it - why the heck don't you guys just use an "S"? d:

Re:Comment Subject: (2)

painandgreed (692585) | more than 2 years ago | (#38958923)

Keep in mind that Cracked is a humor site and strives for being funny over being accurate.

That said, what's the deal with the letter "ç"? It's basically an S every time I've heard it - why the heck don't you guys just use an "S"? d:

Because the S in english is a voiceless alveolar fricative and the ç is a voiceless palatal fricative, a sound english doesn't even have. You can substitute the S for the ç but you'll sound like some guy with an accent to a native speaker.

X-Prize (4, Informative)

aero2600-5 (797736) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954895)

Nice, the Iranian version of the Ansari X-Prize.

What people don't realize is that even with all the sanctions, hostility, and generally crazy behavior, Iran IS NOT Iraq or Afghanistan. Right now, American casualties are seen as unacceptable, which is leading our drive towards more drones. If we pick a fight with the Iranians, or let them pick a fight with the US, there will be American casualties. They have the ability to sink U.S. war ships. That have the support of Russia and China. Granted, they probably didn't ground that RQ-170, but that doesn't mean it isn't feasible in the near future.

We all know that quite a large chunk of the young adults in Iran don't like the current regime, but do you know what they like even less? The United States. Whether we start the fight or they do, it will cause Iran to solidify behind that common dislike of the U.S., and we will have a real fight on our hands.

Re:X-Prize (0)

js3 (319268) | more than 2 years ago | (#38954951)

I really could give a shit about who likes what. If someone is a threat, they are gonna have to answer to the rest of us.

Re:X-Prize (3, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955029)

I really could give a shit about who likes what. If someone is a threat, they are gonna have to answer to the rest of us.

Typical government lapdog mentality: If we rattle a saber at someone and they don't flinch, they are a threat and must be cowed.

Re:X-Prize (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955169)

Gee, yes, promoting/funding terrorism (the kind that kills people on a daily basis), and producing materials needed to build terrible weapons, while producing deeply antisemitic rhetoric. Sounds JUST like lacking a flinch reflex. Or... [warning, Godwin ahead]

What country again?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956497)

Wait, are you talking about America, Israel, or Iran? Because the last time I checked, the US and Israel seem to be among the top exporters of terrorism in the world.

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956669)

You seem to forget that Bin Laden and the Taliban were trained and funded by the United States government and Saddam Hussein was once a US ally against Iran.

That's the problem with the US government, they are backstabbing snakes. They try to play all of the sides against each other, then they cry and whine when one of them gets pissed off and strikes back. You can thank the US government for all of the deaths on 9/11.

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955143)

The United States is a serious threat to Iran and several other countries. Who do they have to answer to?

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955187)

Typical emotional guided timebomb nut with a superiority complex. That will lead to war and actually make the world an unsafe place to live.
In reality motivated by the change of petrodollars to other currencies by these countries (Iraq, Libya, Iran..)

Re:X-Prize (1)

X.25 (255792) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955863)

I really could give a shit about who likes what. If someone is a threat, they are gonna have to answer to the rest of us.

So, when will USA answer to the rest of us, eh?

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956011)

THAT'S what Iran said!

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956851)

I really could give a shit about who likes what. If someone is a threat, they are gonna have to answer to the rest of us.

Similar to the "could care less" statement, but even more obviously absurd sounding.

Don't tell anyone... (1)

srussia (884021) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955013)

but the Ansari family is Iranian.

Re:Don't tell anyone... (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955087)

I'm pretty sure Anousheh even migrated from Iran.

Plus, the X-Prize program isn't just funded by her money - there have been lots of other X-Prizes that got funding from other sources.

Re:X-Prize (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955075)

My personal opinion is that wars involving world economic powers are going to become less and less likely over the next 50-100 years. There is too much at stake at home, and I don't just mean troops' lives. The global economy is a reality, and we're quite entangled with the economies of pretty much any other country of economic significance - by that I don't just mean the G8, but well beyond that. With the other large economies, we have a lot to lose on exports/imports of finished goods if we go to war, but with the middle 50%, we lose access to inputs - sometimes critical ones, like oil - if we go to war. Even beyond the idea that killing each other is so 20th century, there's too much to lose economically in a hot war in probably 75% of the cases. With Iran, we're talking a global oil price spike affecting us, while Iran's exports virtually grind to a halt because they can't get out of port. In the coming decade, I think we're going to get smart enough to realize that a hot war is not the solution to an ideological divide, and by we, I mean everyone - not just the US. Even though I personally think the cost of lives is too high a price, our leaders (on both sides) often don't, but the last thing anyone wants is to lose power due to an avoidable economic catastrophe.

Of course, we can look at history and point out many examples of wars that happened despite it being a poor economic decision to do so, so maybe my thinking is just wishful. As an economist (by education at least), I think we tend to think economics can solve anything.

Re:X-Prize (2)

JDG1980 (2438906) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957199)

My personal opinion is that wars involving world economic powers are going to become less and less likely over the next 50-100 years. There is too much at stake at home, and I don't just mean troops' lives. The global economy is a reality, and we're quite entangled with the economies of pretty much any other country of economic significance - by that I don't just mean the G8, but well beyond that. With the other large economies, we have a lot to lose on exports/imports of finished goods if we go to war, but with the middle 50%, we lose access to inputs - sometimes critical ones, like oil - if we go to war. Even beyond the idea that killing each other is so 20th century, there's too much to lose economically in a hot war in probably 75% of the cases.

Norman Angell made the same argument in 1912, in his book The Great Illusion. He noted that any kind of large-scale war among European powers would be economically destructive and futile, and that even the "winners" would lose more than they gained in blood and treasure. He was right, of course, but it didn't stop World War I from happening anyway only a few years later. I think you overestimate the rationality of humans and underestimate the power of tribal ideology.

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955081)

Ironic, given that Ansari was Iranian!

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38956129)

-1, missed the perfect pun

Irany!

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955493)

If the over numbered Americans had so much of problems in Iraq and Afghanistan fighting a bunch of farmers. Now in an economic crisis, wanting to pick a fight with Iran, in reality lead by the nose by Israel which doesn't care what happens to the Americans or America.
For I will be heading to the nearest shelter once this starts waiting for their east coast reaching missiles. In reality most of the world hates us and are not rooting for us; if given a chance, will take us down when we're most vulnerable.

Re:X-Prize (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955557)

We all know that quite a large chunk of the young adults in Iran don't like the current regime, but do you know what they like even less? The United States. Whether we start the fight or they do, it will cause Iran to solidify behind that common dislike of the U.S., and we will have a real fight on our hands.

I'm not worried. We have the Hope and Change president now. There's no way he's going to get us involved in another war in the middle-east. He even won the Nobel Peace Prize.

What could go wrong?

For spotting evac attempts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955095)

Hmm, let's see, don't squads trapped/downed behind enemy lines use similar 'flags' to signal their location to passing friendly aircraft? Could one of these UAVs be 'let loose' in an area known to contain a pinned down squad or downed aircraft, to try and identify the personnel's evac. attempts? Maybe I've been watching too much 24...

Re:For spotting evac attempts? (2)

HeckRuler (1369601) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955457)

I think the more direct use would be for spotting, targeting, and destroying tanks and other vehicles. Most armies stencil on the name of the thing in big bold letters. Slap on a brick of C4 and you have a pretty smart missile that hover around till needed and can choose to come home and not detonate.

What are "English letters"? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955227)

Did the English have an alphabet of its own before the Romans introduced the Latin one?

Re:What are "English letters"? (2, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955365)

I think they meant the American alphabet.

Re:What are "English letters"? (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956149)

Next thing you know, Americans will start labeling things with Arabic numerals!

Re:What are "English letters"? (1)

rmstar (114746) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956345)

Next thing you know, Americans will start labeling things with Arabic numerals!

I'm mystified - why don't we call them Freedom numerals instead?

Re:What are "English letters"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957639)

Maybe they meant that within the zone there are letters in an Old English font style.

Despite sanctions? (1, Informative)

HeckRuler (1369601) | more than 2 years ago | (#38955349)

Despite sanctions? Dude, all the parts come from China. And China isn't part of the embargo. 10^2 km is a little wide for the smaller RC fliers out there, but for the larger ones that have a gas engine, it's completely do-able. That's retail store level technology. That hard part is flying it out of sight. Sensors, cameras, communications, all these little modules are made in china and are hobbyist stuff.

Long story short, it's impossible to embargo technology any more. It used to be that areospace technology was unatainable by anyone outside the industry. Serious engineers with serious companies with serious money. Now it's cheap. Kids are launching their own satellites.

Embargoes work for bulk goods, regulated and controlled substances, and money. And they usually work very badly. UAV technology doesn't fall under those categories.

Re:Despite sanctions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955727)

No.

One word: ITAR.

The Bible warns the US will NOT defend Israel (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955367)

"Russia fears Israel will push the United States into a military conflict with Iran which could retaliate by blocking oil shipments from the Gulf, a confidant of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said. 'There is a likelihood of military escalation of the conflict, towards which Israel is pushing the Americans,' Nikolai Patrushev, who heads the Kremlin’s Security Council, told Interfax news agency."
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/01/12/russia-afraid-israel-will-push-u-s-into-war-with-iran-vladimir-putin-ally-says/

"Any new sanctions or a possible strike against Iran 'will be perceived by international community as an attempt at changing' Tehran’s regime, Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Gennady Gatilov stated on Saturday."
http://english.ruvr.ru/2012/01/14/63852396.html

Those are the expected reactions. But this?

"The Bible warns Russia, Iran, Turkey, and a coalition of allies (including Libya and Sudan) will go to war, and will attack and will invade Israel. In Ezekiel 38-39 the Bible warns this coming war between Iran (Persia) and Israel will take place sometime after Israel has been re-gathered into Her land as a nation (which was fulfilled on May 14, 1948) ... this prophetic war has never yet taken place ... the only time in history Persia (Iran) has ever gone to war against Israel was to help Israel throw off the yoke of the Byzantine Empire around 614 AD. The Bible warns the US will NOT defend Israel. According to the Bible, Israel must stand alone ... with God."
http://www.alphanewsdaily.com/Warning%206%20Russia%20Iran%20Invasion.html

"Growing up in Kuwait, Asif Balbale thought he wanted to become a chemical engineer. He never imagined enlisting in the U.S. Navy, much less becoming an imam. Balbale got his engineering degree after immigrating to the U.S. at age 21. With jobs hard to come by, he tried to enlist in the Army, but didn't weigh enough. Instead, he met the Navy's minimum requirements. He was sworn in as a U.S. citizen in 2005 while deployed aboard the USS Boxer. Intending to apply for an officer program, Balbale, 31, mistakenly emailed a recruiter for the chaplain corps. 'God, I think, had better plans for me,' Balbale said, looking back."

"Although he grew up nominally Christian, it wasn't until he was 21 that he 'became a Jesus follower.' Wherever his Army deployments took him, he would attend Sunday services and assist the chaplain. He soon realized that the 'gifts God had given me for leadership would allow me to lead spiritually.' In 2005, he enrolled at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, returning to Army duty in 2009. Stationed at Fort Campbell in Kentucky, Odell, 38, said more than half of the soldiers he sees don't share his religion."

"As a student at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., Aaron Kleinman was the "Jew who did Jewish stuff." Although he served two years as president of the academy's Jewish Midshipmen Club, becoming a rabbi had never really entered his mind. If he hadn't experienced deployments on two carrier ships that didn't have onboard Jewish chaplains, it might have remained that way."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/07/chaplains-serve-god-military_n_1258592.html

What The Fuck?!

Are those people for real?

Re:The Bible warns the US will NOT defend Israel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38955785)

I wish I could mod you "+1 Crazy"

Re:The Bible warns the US will NOT defend Israel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957389)

What The Fuck?!

My thoughts exactly.

Repeat (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956191)

I saw this a few weeks ago on an episode of Rocket City Rednecks. Not that I have anything against Iranians, but building a RC plane and fitting it with a camera and transmitter is something not challenging for a teenager, not to mention you can buy them on the internet (unencumbered by any military hardware restrictions) if you aren't even a hobbyist. What is the real story here? That those darn Iranians are "at it again"?

Re:Repeat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38958215)

I saw this a few weeks ago on an episode of Rocket City Rednecks. Not that I have anything against Iranians, but building a RC plane and fitting it with a camera and transmitter is something not challenging for a teenager, not to mention you can buy them on the internet (unencumbered by any military hardware restrictions) if you aren't even a hobbyist. What is the real story here? That those darn Iranians are "at it again"?

Which just makes me wonder why the US Government is so happy to spend millions of dollars to get *its* solution in the air! Oh, wait, maybe the contractors make campaign contributions...

English letters? (1)

jdc18 (1654245) | more than 2 years ago | (#38956267)

Please explain what are english letters, as far as I can remember it is the greco-roman alphabet

I bet they all use american GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38957227)

It is nice to see Iranian students getting into building model Airplanes... They are a lot of fun.

Not UAVs (1)

Corson (746347) | more than 2 years ago | (#38957505)

I looked at the pictures, those are not UAVs but air models. We used to make and pilot such toys in grade 6. They are radio-controlled and require a clear line of sight and proximity for decent maneuvering. In any case, they are pretty expensive even for an amateur.

Re:Not UAVs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38958899)

RC airplanes are easily made into UAVs, and look the same. I have several UAVs in my garage that can go distances far beyond visual sight, and even send back video and telemetry in real time. http://www.diydrones.com

Innovation from crowdsourcing (1)

charliehotel (1883674) | more than 2 years ago | (#38958763)

While people are joking and laughing at the Iranians for making their little toy models of the crashed drone, they are rapidly catching up in the UAS department. A UAV competition means they have realized that the amateurs and students are where the real innovation lies.
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