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DVDs On The International Space Station

michael posted more than 13 years ago | from the write-stuff dept.

Space 220

DrGoon writes: "The BBC has reported that "After docking, the shuttle crew of five astronauts delivered supplies and gifts to the Alpha crew, including a computer, cables for the laboratory, food, water, clothes and about 20 DVD movies. " in this story, which raises the interesting question: what DVD region is the International Space Station?" So, either they have a region-free DVD player - which is theoretically illegal according to Hollywood - or only the U.S. crew gets to watch movies.

cancel ×

220 comments

A very serious question (4)

evil_one (142582) | more than 13 years ago | (#440544)

I am aware that CDs and DVDs have very little mass compared with the rest of the station, but what effect would these discs have on the station when they start and stop spinning? Could the usage of discs onboard the station require thrusters to compensate for them?
---

Re:Abiding by laws... (1)

eudas (192703) | more than 13 years ago | (#440546)

that applies to any organization. whenever they need a new laptop installed for the ceo's assistant or whatever, "just go ahead and install the warez copy of win98", but when the software piracy police come in and find 328 identical copies of win98 and office installed, it's "the actions of a few rogue individuals". all too convenient...

eudas

Region 8 (2)

svirre (39068) | more than 13 years ago | (#440548)

The 'correct' region for the ISS is actually region 8 which is reserved for 'international venues' like cruiseliners and aircraft (And now also the ISS technically).

Remember there are 8 regions in the system, but the world is divided in just 6. Region 8 is for aircraft and such. Region 7 is reserved for future expansion.

Re:Oxygen (1)

kochsr (144988) | more than 13 years ago | (#440553)

oh... you'd have to be french to use unlicensed words!

No "Aliens"??? (1)

JoeMac (102847) | more than 13 years ago | (#440555)

They should definitely watch that up there because after all, in space, no one can hear the girlie screams they'll make when Aliens come out of the walls.

Re:Launch Cost. (1)

dachshund (300733) | more than 13 years ago | (#440556)

but wouldn't it be cheaper to just point one of the multitude of scientific antennas at a DirectTV satellite.

Unless the ISS is in a geosynchronous orbit, you'd be outaluck when the station left the western hemisphere. I'm sure Europe and Asia have some pretty good satellite channels, just don't plan on watching 'The Real World/Road Rules Marathon' all the way through.

Just like the high seas (2)

Gorimek (61128) | more than 13 years ago | (#440557)

I don't think any laws apply in space, just like they don't on international waters. At least not for private vessels. Navy ships have to be bound by international law through their government.

Re:thrilled (1)

disc-chord (232893) | more than 13 years ago | (#440563)

I tried to post an article on the Genome scientists mapping out the code for 98% of the diseases affecting humans earlier and it got bumped for this? Holy shit what has /. come to?

I've been asking myself the same thing. I've submited an article from CNN.com about how increadibly inaccurate most high school science textbooks in circulation are, and a really serious "Your Rights On-Line" about some poor sods that are facing legal action against them from Apogee/3dRealms over a non-profit open source project. Both rejected, but this goofy bit about ISS region encoding gets posted.

Any chance of a spin-off site. Like slashgoof.org for this goofy shit, and slashdot.org for stuff of interest and insight.

disc-chord

Orbit (1)

Silvers (196372) | more than 13 years ago | (#440564)

Offhand I'm not sure what orbit the ISS is in, but if it's GeoSynchronous it will always stay in the same place relative to the ground, so a region code respective of that location would make sense and seem legal. Although if it's not - another funny example of how much the MPAA/RIAA/DMCA sucks.

Re:Who would sue who? (1)

eudas (192703) | more than 13 years ago | (#440566)

it's starting to sound like "Celebrity Deathmatch", only with lawsuits and alphabet soup org's.

eudas

Re:Who Says Space is Under a Particular Set of Law (1)

neoptik (130091) | more than 13 years ago | (#440568)

Wouldn't that be really locally, Planck's, Feynman's, ect... quantum physics laws, Newtons somewhat locally, and Einstein's on the global scale?

Which movies? (1)

lildogie (54998) | more than 13 years ago | (#440571)

20. Dumb & Dumber
19. Forbidden Planet
18. Lost in Space
17. Greater Tuna
16. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
15. Apollo 13
14. Flight of the Phoenix
13. Quest for Fire
12. The Abyss
11. Invasion of the Body Snatchers
10. Night of the Living Dead
9. The Day the Earth Stood Still
8. This Island Earth
7. The Man who Fell to Earth
6. Young Frankenstein
5. 2001, A Space Odyssy
4. Twilight's Last Gleaming
3. Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan
2. Debbie Does Dallas
1. Amazon Women on the Moon

Never mind the region encoding... (1)

mickwd (196449) | more than 13 years ago | (#440572)

...has the player got the right sort of mains plug ?

You know what it's like when travelling outside your country.

Re:Isn't the ISS a US-only matter by now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440574)

pppffft Japan, Canada, Russia etc have each contributed either money, or have built a part of the station and their own astronauts go up on the missions and they get their own experiments conducted too. the space shutttle crew is multi-national, its not say 7 americans and 1 russian

DVD MoVies? (1)

Living In The Nexus (314774) | more than 13 years ago | (#440576)

That's not too bad. At least the astronauts are probably watching movies instead of Michael Jackson videos teaching them how to "Moonwalk".

I traded my ambition for a warmer place to sleep.

Wow! (1)

beaubell (208049) | more than 13 years ago | (#440582)

That Kicks Ass!

Too Bad they dont have those here in Alaska!

Re:UserFriendly Comic (1)

dbolger (161340) | more than 13 years ago | (#440585)

I don't see how it can be illegal if its outside any terrestrial jurisdiction...

So, is it theoretically possible... (4)

TDScott (260197) | more than 13 years ago | (#440590)

...to circumvent the DVD region restrictions by playing the DVDs on an orbiting satellite, and beaming down the picture?

(I said theoretically possible, not cheap...)

Herez a little history (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440594)

HISTORY OF THE WORLD

2.5 million B.C.: OOG the Open Source Caveman develops the axe and releases it under the GPL. The axe quickly gains popularity as a means of crushing moderators' heads.

100,000 B.C.: Man domesticates the AIBO.

10,000 B.C.: Civilization begins when early farmers first learn to cultivate hot grits.

3000 B.C.: Sumerians develop a primitive cuneiform perl script.

2920 B.C.: A legendary flood sweeps Slashdot, filling up a Borland / Inprise story with hundreds of offtopic posts.

1750 B.C.: Hammurabi, a Mesopotamian king, codifies the first EULA.

490 B.C.: Greek city-states unite to defeat the Persians. ESR triumphantly proclaims that the Greeks "get it".

399 B.C.: Socrates is convicted of impiety. Despite the efforts of freesocrates.com, he is forced to kill himself by drinking hemlock.

336 B.C.: Fat-Time Charlie becomes King of Macedonia and conquers Persia.

4 B.C.: Following the Star (as in hot young actress) of Bethelem, wise men travel from far away to troll for baby Jesus.

A.D. 476: The Roman Empire BSODs.

A.D. 610: The Glorious MEEPT!! founds Islam after receiving a revelation from God. Following his disappearance from Slashdot in 632, a succession dispute results in the emergence of two troll factions: the Pythonni and the Perliites.

A.D. 800: Charlemagne conquers nearly all of Germany, only to be acquired by andover.net.

A.D. 874: Linus the Red discovers Iceland.

A.D. 1000: The epic of the Beowulf Cluster is written down. It is the first English epic poem.

A.D. 1095: Pope Bruce II calls for a crusade against the Turks when it is revealed they are violating the GPL. Later investigation reveals that Pope Bruce II had not yet contacted the Turks before calling for the crusade.

A.D. 1215: Bowing to pressure to open-source the British government, King John signs the Magna Carta, limiting the British monarchy's power. ESR triumphantly proclaims that the British monarchy "gets it".

A.D. 1348: The ILOVEYOU virus kills over half the population of Europe. (The other half was not using Outlook.)

A.D. 1420: Johann Gutenberg invents the printing press. He is immediately sued by monks claiming that the technology will promote the copying of hand-transcribed books, thus violating the church's intellectual property.

A.D. 1429: Natalie Portman of Arc gathers an army of Slashdot trolls to do battle with the moderators. She is eventually tried as a heretic and stoned (as in petrified).

A.D. 1478: The Catholic Church partners with doubleclick.net to launch the Spanish Inquisition. A.D. 1492: Christopher Columbus arrives in what he believes to be "India", but which RMS informs him is actually "GNU/India".

A.D. 1508-12: Michaelengelo attempts to paint the Sistine Chapel ceiling with ASCII art, only to have his plan thwarted by the "Lameness Filter."

A.D. 1517: Martin Luther nails his 95 Theses to the church door and is promptly moderated down to (-1, Flamebait).

A.D. 1553: "Bloody" Mary ascends the throne of England and begins an infamous crusade against Protestants. ESR eats his words.

A.D. 1588: The "IF I EVER MEET YOU, I WILL KICK YOUR ASS" guy meets the Spanish Armada.

A.D. 1603: Tokugawa Ieyasu unites the feuding pancake-eating ninjas of Japan.

A.D. 1611: Mattel adds Galileo Galilei to its CyberPatrol block list for proposing that the Earth revolves around the sun.

A.D. 1688: In the so-called "Glorious Revolution", King James II is bloodlessly forced out of power and flees to France. ESR again triumphantly proclaims that the British monarchy "gets it".

A.D. 1692: Anti-GIF hysteria in the New World comes to a head in the infamous "Salem GIF Trials", in which 20 alleged GIFs are burned at the stake. Later investigation reveals that mayn of the supposed GIFs were actually PNGs.

A.D. 1769: James Watt patents the one-click steam engine.

A.D. 1776: Trolls, angered by CmdrTaco's passage of the Moderation Act, rebel. After a several-year flame war, the trolls succeed in seceding from Slashdot and forming the United Coalition of Trolls.

A.D. 1789: The French Revolution begins with a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the Bastille.

A.D. 1799: Attempts at discovering Egyptian hieroglyphs receive a major boost when Napoleon's troops discover the Rosetta stone. Sadly, the stone is quickly outlawed under the DMCA as an illegal means of circumventing encryption.

A.D. 1844: Samuel Morse invents Morse code. Cryptography export restrictions prevent the telegraph's use outside the U.S. and Canada.

A.D. 1853: United States Commodore Matthew C. Perry arrives in Japan and forces the xenophobic nation to open its doors to foreign trade. ESR triumphantly proclaims that Japan finally "gets it".

A.D. 1865: President Lincoln is 'bitchslapped.' The nation mourns.

A.D. 1901: Italian inventor Guglielmo Marcoli first demonstrates the radio. Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich immediately delivers to Marcoli a list of 335,435 suspected radio users.

A.D. 1911: Facing a break-up by the United States Supreme Court, Standard Oil Co. defends its "freedom to innovate" and proposes numerous rejected settlements. Slashbots mock the company as "Standa~1" and depict John D. Rockefeller as a member of the Borg.

A.D. 1929: V.A. Linux's stock drops over 200 dollars on "Black Tuesday", October 29th.

A.D. 1945: In the secret Manhattan Project, scientists working in Los Alamos, New Mexico, construct a nuclear bomb from Star Wars Legos.

A.D. 1948: Slashdot runs the infamous headline "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN." Shamefaced, the site quickly retracts the story when numerous readers point out that it is not news for nerds, stuff that matters.

A.D. 1965: Jon Katz delivers his famous "I Have A Post-Hellmouth Dream" speech, which stated: "I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the geeks of former slaves and the geeks of former slave geeks will be able to sit down together at the table of geeks... I have a dream that my geek little geeks will one geek live in a nation where they will not be geeked by the geek of their geek but by the geek of their geek."

A.D. 1969: Neil Armstrong becomes the first man to set foot on the moon. His immortal words: "FIRST MOONWALK!!!"

A.D. 1970: Ohio National Guardsmen shoot four students at Kent State University for "Internet theft".

A.D. 1989: The United States invades Panama to capture renowned "hacker" Manual Noriega, who is suspected of writing the DeCSS utility.

A.D. 1990: West Germany and East Germany reunite after 45 years of separation. ESR triumphantly proclaims that Germany "gets it".

A.D. 1994: As years of apartheid rule finally end, Nelson Mandela is elected president of South Africa. ESR is sick, and sadly misses his chance to triumphantly proclaim that South Africa "gets it".

A.D. 1997: Slashdot reports that Scottish scientists have succeeded in cloning a female sheep named Dolly. Numerous readers complain that if they had wanted information on the latest sheep releases, they would have just gone to freshsheep.net

A.D. 1999: Miramax announces Don Knotts to play hacker Emmanuel Goldstein in upcoming movie "Takedown"

Theoretically Illegal? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440596)

Perhaps, but I'm not sure which jurisdiction space falls under.

Isn't the ISS a US-only matter by now? (1)

trantu (314829) | more than 13 years ago | (#440598)

I was under the impression that all other nations have come to realize how useless the whole effort is.

Re:A very serious question (1)

haggar (72771) | more than 13 years ago | (#440600)

The space station is a mechanically insulated (autonomous) system, so the spinning or deceleration/acceleration of the spinning of some object in this system, will not affect the system itself, UNLESS YOU TURN THE AXIS OF ROTATION OF THE SPINNING OBJECT! This is called giroscopic effect, and there is a force that's related to it, but I forgot the name of this force.

Heh, Russians don't get DVDs at all (3)

hatless (8275) | more than 13 years ago | (#440601)

Don't worry about the Russians. They're probably stuck watching VHS tapes on a dusty old multisystem VCR. There aren't a whole lot of DVDs being made with Russian translations. In Russia, a typical solution is to watch an American or Western European DVD with the sound turned off, and simultaneously play an unofficial MP3 dubbed translation downloaded from the net.

Unfortunately, they don't have fast Internet access in space, so they can't download the MP3s up there. And it seems unlikely an American space shuttle crew would think to burn some CDs of the Russian audio dubs to bring along.

Maybe they have a cheap off-brand DVD player like an Apex, so the Russians can play pirated VideoCDs.. that's one video format for which one can get movies dubbed in Russian that are playable on a DVD player. Either way, they likely have to wait for a Russian crew to fly up to bring them any such pirated stuff. Hollywood would have a fit if illegal VideoCDs and unofficial dubbed soundtracks were being transported on an American spacecraft.

tax (1)

woolite (193398) | more than 13 years ago | (#440602)

I would rather like to know whether I can apply my own tax laws if I dock a personal module to the ISS.

Moderation (2)

dgb2n (85206) | more than 13 years ago | (#440603)

How do you moderate an entire story down to flamebait?

Re:Heh, Russians don't get DVDs at all (1)

trantu (314829) | more than 13 years ago | (#440604)

Why don't they just learn English, like everyone else?

Region 8 (5)

bigdavex (155746) | more than 13 years ago | (#440605)

The appropriate one is region 8, the one used by the airlines. See the faq [dvddemystified.com] :

1: U.S., Canada, U.S. Territories
2: Japan, Europe, South Africa, and Middle East (including Egypt)
3: Southeast Asia and East Asia (including Hong Kong)
4: Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central America, Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean
5: Eastern Europe (Former Soviet Union), Indian subcontinent, Africa, North Korea, and Mongolia
6: China
7: Reserved
8: Special international venues (airplanes, cruise ships, etc.)

They do have a multi region player (5)

Kithran (24643) | more than 13 years ago | (#440606)

According to their website, UK company Techtronics (www.techtronics.com) supplied 2 Sony FX1 players to NASA which had been modified to be multi-region. These players were also delivered by Atlantis.

Kithran

P.S. ..except Russian moies of course (2)

hatless (8275) | more than 13 years ago | (#440607)

Addendum to my own post above: There's always the handful of Russian and Soviet movies available on DVD, but those won't have any English dubbing or subtitles. And do you think the Americans are going to stand for the Russian cosmonauts watching something they can't?

Re:So, is it theoretically possible... (2)

cybercuzco (100904) | more than 13 years ago | (#440627)

no, circumventing region coding or any other encryption means is illegal under the DMCA. The question is, does this apply only when over US airspace? if so, then theyre probably in the right region after all, at least when its legal to rebroadcast. its a conundrum

The story... (1)

haggar (72771) | more than 13 years ago | (#440628)

Ummm.. the link points to a story about the connecting of the sci. lab to the ISS, and the DVDs are indeed mentioned, by the end of the article, in one single sentence: "After docking, the shuttle crew of five astronauts
delivered supplies and gifts to the Alpha crew,
including a computer, cables for the laboratory, food,
water, clothes and about 20 DVD movies."

I don't see any reference to region codes, or titles of the movies?!

Hers the direct link (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440629)

here [techtronics.com]
hmm Illegal under the DMCA but NASA does it? HMmm I hope the MPAA sues them just cuz it will make news and rile some people up =]

Re:Region 0 (1)

kyrre (197103) | more than 13 years ago | (#440630)

Yup, region 0. The only movies i've ever seen with this region is "dances with wolves" and pr0n movies. Gotta love the pr0n industry. Its seems they're not only in it for the money, like certain hollywood companies are. :)

Re:A very serious question (3)

cybercuzco (100904) | more than 13 years ago | (#440631)

The short answer, yes, the long answer, No, not really. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction, according to newton. So as long as the player is firmly fastened to the station, when the motor starts the disk spinning, the station will react in the opposite direction. Angular momentum of the system is conserved. Since the station is huge(about 140 tons) and the disk is tiny, the amount of movement is imperceptible. Technically it does move, but you wouldnt be able to notice it.

Re:Orbit (1)

Roger_Wilco (138600) | more than 13 years ago | (#440632)

Geosynchronous orbits are extremely high. The US space shuttle can't get anywhere near geosynchronous. Carl Sagan said that if you view the world as a peach, the shuttle never leaves the fuzz. That's nowhere near geosynchronous.

The orbit altitude for a very recent flight to the ISS [nasa.gov] was merely 177 nautical miles (328 km). Spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit [nasa.gov] travel at an altitude of 35,785 km.

Re:Herez a little history (1)

CvD (94050) | more than 13 years ago | (#440633)

That's funny shit... who wrote this??

K H A A A A N (1)

green pizza (159161) | more than 13 years ago | (#440656)

see above

new region (2)

maraist (68387) | more than 13 years ago | (#440657)

Isn't it obvious? Hollywood should be really excited now because they've identified a whole new region that consists of a growing handful of wealthy people.. Just imagine. A handfull of people willing to pay thousands of times above sticker for copies of Apollo 13. Man what a lucrative market. Wish I could have gotten in.

-Michael

You have to be wrong. (3)

Paul Crowley (837) | more than 13 years ago | (#440658)

Imagine for a moment that the disk in the DVD weighed *far more* than the ISS. Imagine it's a huge disk, floating in the vacuum of space on perfect bearings, and the ISS is just a thin shell around it. Now motors attached to the thin shell introduce torsion on the bearings: surely the shell will spin, not the disk?

The earlier answer was correct.
--

Re:UserFriendly Comic (2)

agentZ (210674) | more than 13 years ago | (#440659)

Just because you're in outer space does not put you beyond the reach of lawyers. Same for death.

Seti (1)

SlashGeek (192010) | more than 13 years ago | (#440660)

And here we thought that Seti was the "Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence." Now we all know, it is to detect "Stolen Entertainment and Television Information."


"Everything that can be invented has been invented."

Re:Region 8 (2)

weave (48069) | more than 13 years ago | (#440661)

Region 8 seems to be a waste. Does anything actually get produced that is region 8? It sounds to me that region 8 would only effectively play non-regioned disks...

Re:what a silly question... (1)

Betcour (50623) | more than 13 years ago | (#440662)

It is not illegal for a European, Asian or African to stare at a TV playing a US DVD

Except when this is ID4 or a Chuck Norris movie : torture is not allowed even in the US (execution is, but that's another story).

Re:Region 7 (1)

anichan (205614) | more than 13 years ago | (#440663)

I thought Region 7 was reserved for Atlantis when it's found.

Re:Region 8 (2)

GC (19160) | more than 13 years ago | (#440664)

Hmmm... so the astronauts have to put up with the awful airline cut versions of the films.

Re:Herez a little history (1)

Eagle7 (111475) | more than 13 years ago | (#440665)

The author of this should post it to segfault.net -- unless that's where he found it. ;)

Wow, what a whiny little shit... (4)

luge (4808) | more than 13 years ago | (#440666)

Not to be an arrogant ass or anything, but "what has slashdot come to" from someone with a > 300K user ID is pretty damn funny, since you clearly have no idea what /. once was. So, a little history lesson: Once upon a time /. actually used to be about Malda having fun and posting whatever shit he thought was cool. This article falls pretty damn squarely into the "I think this is cool" category (which, if you ask me, is probably the best category on /.) If you don't think that this is interesting, take your "serious and important news" and go write for CNet. I mean- every other news source on Earth has something about the Human Genome Project this weekend... go read about it there. I'll stay here and continue to read things like this that I wouldn't have noticed anywhere else. In short: you go Rob, michael, etc. keep posting whatever the fuck you want to. Some of us still appreciate the weird and the different, and don't want to see this place become CNN.
~luge

Re:Who Says Space is Under a Particular Set of Law (1)

SlashGeek (192010) | more than 13 years ago | (#440679)

Universally, Murphys.


"Everything that can be invented has been invented."

Re:Region 0 (1)

bwalling (195998) | more than 13 years ago | (#440680)

Its seems they're not only in it for the money

Well, they're in it to get paid to have sex.

DVDs on the ISS (1)

Cesium (181154) | more than 13 years ago | (#440681)

Strictly speaking, space (under an international treaty) belongs to everyone, so there shouldn't be a region of space where it is legal to play one kind of DVD but not others. This sort of thing applies only on the surface of the Earth.

Note "air-space" and "space" are not the same things. The region coding on DVDs is supposed to protect against piracy (yeah, right) and to allow the MPAA and/or studios to control better (ostensibly) what version of the content gets released where, and when.

Until a lot of people get up into space, and stay up there on a regular basis (i.e., in a space, moon, or Mars 'base',) I seriously doubt anyone at the MPAA would really give a rat's ass if a half-dozen or so people out in orbit are watching a region-1 encoded DVD as they fly over, for example, Europe.

And if it does upset them, screw 'em. Maybe this will somehow provide ammo against the MPAA in favor of DeCSS and related technologies! :)

Just my 1/50 dollar.

I browse at +2... am I being too selective?
-Cesium.

--------

Re:One copy for each region? (1)

Pakaran2 (138209) | more than 13 years ago | (#440682)

This would be very inconvenient - the ISS circles the Earth in, IIRC, 90 minutes.

Thus, they are over any given continent at most maybe fifteen minutes, in the case of Asia.

If you want to get an idea how fast they're going, you can see the ISS move in realtime here [nasa.gov] .

Re:Herez a little history (1)

mickwd (196449) | more than 13 years ago | (#440683)

This is so funny. Please mod up.

Re:Space Law (2)

Fishstick (150821) | more than 13 years ago | (#440684)

>the plane is from USA, even if you are over China, legally, you are in Area 1.

Yeah, except the ISS supposedly isn't from one specific country.

You know, that's an interesting idea, in general. What if an ISS crew member commited some serious crime while in space, like killing someone? Where would he/she be tried and under whose laws? Wonder if they'd go to all the trouble of convening an international tribunal in The Hague for somthing like that, or they'd be extradited to the country of origin of the victim to stand trial?

Re:Region 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440685)

No it isn't, because unless all the studios suddenly start providing Region 8 DVDs for general consumption, the astronauts won't be able to play any of their discs. That's the whole point...

Re:Which movies? (1)

Fishstick (150821) | more than 13 years ago | (#440686)

What, no Resevoir Dogs? The Matrix? Police Academy XII!? those poor slobs!

Re:A very serious question (1)

Gyan (6853) | more than 13 years ago | (#440687)

Coroilis force perhaps ? ...or something like that

Re:P.S. ..except Russian moies of course (1)

kosipov (218202) | more than 13 years ago | (#440688)

First of all, there is only one American on Alpha so he is in minority when the other guys want to watch the Russian DVDs. Second of all, Bill Shepard the American dude speaks and understands Russians well enough to watch Russian movies. As a matter of fact, they watched a classic Russian movie before going to Alpha.

Re:what a silly question... (2)

radja (58949) | more than 13 years ago | (#440689)

>What is illegal is to play a US encoded DVD in a non-US DVD player.

When you're in the US :)

//rdj

DVD (1)

collin.m (207384) | more than 13 years ago | (#440690)

In Germany it is legal to sell and buy region free DVD players...

just my 2 cets

Re:thrilled (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440691)

and slashdot.org for stuff of interest and insight.

That would be kuro5hin [kuro5hin.org] .

Re:Who Says Space is Under a Particular Set of Law (2)

stain ain (151381) | more than 13 years ago | (#440692)

In fact the UN has an Office for Outer Space Affairs and there is a bit of International Space Law.
One of the treaties says that outer space is not subject to national appropation by claims of sovereignity, interesting.
Check http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/SpaceLaw/spacelaw.htm for more info.

Abiding by laws... (4)

BMazurek (137285) | more than 13 years ago | (#440693)

which is theoretically illegal according to Hollywood

Yes, and we all know that U.S. Government agencies never break any laws...

Re:Theoretically Illegal? (3)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440694)

US jurisdiction, of course. Like the rest of the world.

At least that's how th US State Department sees things.

thrilled (1)

stigmatic (310472) | more than 13 years ago | (#440696)


So how is this interesting news?!

First off would it matter what region they're in at this point in time, they're in space for crying out loud and no government can claim juridstiction over that.

Secondly who cares about which cypher of DVD's they're watching, their astronauts in outer space watching a movie. Who do you think they're going to fence a DVD to an alien?

I tried to post an article on the Genome scientists mapping out the code for 98% of the diseases affecting humans earlier and it got bumped for this? Holy shit what has /. come to?

Slashdot 2001 [antioffline.com] could it be true?

Oxygen (1)

local($punk) (211303) | more than 13 years ago | (#440698)

My oxygen bill was high this month...
I hope Bush will lower taxes on the ability to eat...
I hope I didn't mess up again and used unlicensed letters and words...

Fucked up!
--------------

Who would sue who? (2)

uq1 (59540) | more than 13 years ago | (#440701)

Who'd be suing who?

MPAA vs NASA
RIAA vs NAMBLA
FBI vs CIA
NSA vs KGB

TOO many lawsuits from TOO many companies with TOO many acronyms.

Who Says Space is Under a Particular Set of Laws? (2)

ivi (126837) | more than 13 years ago | (#440703)

So, who's laws apply in Space?

Maybe we can let the UN control that chunk of the Universe...

Region 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440705)

Region 8 is for "special international venues" like in-flight films or cruise ships. I suspect it's just a normal NTSC disc with extra license cost built into it. So it's possible. But I doubt that's what they got.

Quick, press play! (sarcasm package) (2)

glebite (206150) | more than 13 years ago | (#440707)

While over North America, they use the regional encoded DVD with the appropriatately sanctioned player.

Having all sanctioned players on the ISS as well as their DVDs, the ISS will pave the way as a shining example of how the MPAA wishes the whole world to watch.

Thanks! And MPAA: fuck off!! (2)

haggar (72771) | more than 13 years ago | (#440714)

Ha! Thanks, dude, I have found this link [techtronics.com] on techtronics.com, and it looks like they really got Multi-fucking-Region players up there! This made my day, folkz! For one moment I thought it'll be Region 8 or something, but since they needed something that will play Region 5, too, they got themselves tvo nice portable multi region players.

Re:A very serious question (1)

haggar (72771) | more than 13 years ago | (#440715)

Yeah, that sounds like it... I can't remember for the life of mine, but I think you're at least close. Some italian phisicist, anyway.

Re:what a silly question... (1)

martin-k (99343) | more than 13 years ago | (#440716)

Torture not allowed? What about Michael Hasselhoff's acting?

-Martin

Re:A very serious question (1)

haggar (72771) | more than 13 years ago | (#440717)

Ummm... you're wrong. Spinning and stopping of objects inside insulated systems will not affect the movement and position of such systems in any way. What you might have experienced in your rotating chair is caused by the fact that there is air friction, which makes such system not completely insulated.
No, the IIS will not move, not even a little bit, because of the spinning of DVDs (or stopping/decelerating/accelerating thereof), unless you turn the axis of rotation.

Re:Several Players? (1)

perky (106880) | more than 13 years ago | (#440718)

So there are 8 regions and a DVD player weighs about a pound, so that's $80,000 dollars to get them up there as well as the comparatively small cost of buying them. Good use of taxpayers money.

Re:Which movies? (1)

jim68000 (8746) | more than 13 years ago | (#440719)

And Solaris

That would suit the Russians but might do some odd things to anyone working in one of the less used parts of the station...

Re:Region 8 (1)

TecraMan (12354) | more than 13 years ago | (#440720)

No... Regions 1-6 and 8 cover the whole world, so region 7 must be reserved for mankind's imminent push into space... Now that's forward looking!

Or... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440721)

They have 6 DVD players.

So what DVDs did they get? (2)

Masem (1171) | more than 13 years ago | (#440722)

I think that "Armegeddon" is a perfect choice. "Apollo 13" and the "Space 1999" collection sounds good too...

(</humor>)

Re:Wow, what a whiny little shit... (1)

romi (80701) | more than 13 years ago | (#440723)

Well said, man.
Thanks...

Ramesh

Re:A very serious question (3)

gilroy (155262) | more than 13 years ago | (#440724)

Um, something has to exert a torque on the disc to get it moving. Maybe a physical rod, maybe an electromagnetic grapple, maybe telepathy... but it's not gonna move unless something exerts a torque on it. By Newton's III, that will create an oppositely-directed torque on the "something" that will cause it to rotate the other way.

Now, you could prevent the ISS from rotating by not clamping the DVD player to the station hull. In that case, the DVD player will start to rotate -- perhaps noticeably, since the mass ratio is not so severe. Or you can clmap it to the hull and impart that angular momentum to the station (where it would probably be negligible).

I don't know what you mean when you say

The space station is a mechanically insulated (autonomous) system,
but the fact of being isolated causes this linkage. If ISS+DVD starts off non-rotating, and if they form an isolated system, then their angular momentum must remain zero no matter what they do to each other. So if the disc spins (and picks up angular momentum), the station counter-spins (to cancel it out in the system total).

That's just the way it works.

Re:A very serious question (2)

Dr. Evil (3501) | more than 13 years ago | (#440725)

In relation to the axis of rotation, one side of the disk is further away than the other. When you spin up the disk, the angular momentum on the far side of the disk is greater than that of the near side.

If you position the disk perpendicular to the centre of gravity, the station will take on a slight rotation... until the disk is stopped. You could however dampen this by creating a DVD player which spun an equal mass in the opposite direction.

If it weren't for pesky things such as mortality, you could sit on a frictionless chair in a vacuum, and by waving your arms such that you thrust them outward, fling them backward, then bring them back inward you could build up rotational velocity. It has nothing to do with air friction.

Actually moving around however is quite impossible, unless you start flinging clothes away from the direction you intend to move.

I bet the whole station has gyroscopes to deal with this sort of thing. It would be too complex and unreliable to deal with it on a case-by-case basis.

Re:Abiding by laws... (1)

nanoakron (234907) | more than 13 years ago | (#440726)

Well, I reckon someone should hire a smart-ass lawyer to make a good test case out of this and show just how stupid regional coding is in this day and age.

-Nano

Several Players? (3)

The Wing Lover (106357) | more than 13 years ago | (#440728)

With all the billions of dollars that the International Space Station is costing, I would assume that they could afford one player for each region.

Space Law (1)

stm2 (141831) | more than 13 years ago | (#440730)

I think the law that should be applied is according to the ship. Like in the sea or in the planes. So, the plane is from USA, even if you are over China, legally, you are in Area 1.

what a silly question... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440732)

the DVD might be only US, but that does not mean the rest of the crew (the non-US people) can not watch it. It is not illegal for a European, Asian or African to stare at a TV playing a US DVD! Furthermore, it is not illegal to buy a US TV and US DVD player and operate them in Europe (or vice versa)! What is illegal is to play a US encoded DVD in a non-US DVD player.

Re:Space Law (1)

desideria (140436) | more than 13 years ago | (#440734)

They should use that phat pipe they have up there to download VCDs :) - Desi

Dr. Strangelove: Or how I learned to love DVD (3)

BIGJIMSLATE (314762) | more than 13 years ago | (#440736)

I still want to know what movies they brought up there. Rocky IV perhaps? ;)

watching vidoes 5 minuts at a time? (2)

thogard (43403) | more than 13 years ago | (#440738)

Since ISS uses 110V 60hz power, I expect they have a region one player. On a good orbit they will be over rgion one area for long enough to watch an entire movie.

Region 0 (1)

toneby (27318) | more than 13 years ago | (#440739)

I seem to recall that region 0 is the region that should be possible to play by all players, so if they get region 0 DVDs they should be able to play them on any player, legally.

Re:Herez a little history (PLAGIARIMS again) (4)

gallir (171727) | more than 13 years ago | (#440744)

Yeap, another plagiarist eager for. This document was copied from previous Slashdot articles:

http://slashdot.org/articles/00/05/23/2021213.sh tm l

http://slashdot.org/articles/00/08/12/1528230.sh tm l

--ricardo

Re:Region 8 (1)

Sc00ter (99550) | more than 13 years ago | (#440747)

Perhaps the MPAA made special region 8 DVDs for NASA. That's not something that's totally unbelivable.
--

Re:So, is it theoretically possible... (1)

Sc00ter (99550) | more than 13 years ago | (#440749)

US airspace only reaches X ammount of miles above the earth. I don't remember the exact number but it doesn't go all the way to space.
--

This is just crazy (2)

Sc00ter (99550) | more than 13 years ago | (#440750)

Okay here we go:

#1 - US airspace does not extend into where spaceships orbit to. So US law won't effect them.
#2 - There is a region for international use. It's not toatally unbelivable that the MPAA would make DVDs that fall under that region (either 7 or 8 I belive)
#3 - The DVD player going to the space station is comming from another country so again, it doesn't fall under US law.
#4 - If it is a region 1 DVD player with Region 1 DVDs they'll just put it in the US section of the space station because that should/could be considered US teritory.
--

Re:Heh, Russians don't get DVDs at all (2)

natenate (172771) | more than 13 years ago | (#440751)

They're probably stuck watching VHS tapes on a dusty old multisystem VCR.

How is this VCR going to collect dust in near-zero gravity?

Illegal my ass (3)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440753)

"theoretically illegal under US law"

Right so now these damn Americans are assuming they own space and can push their laws out there too?

Last I heard it was not owned by anyone and was without *any* laws.

Re:Who Says Space is Under a Particular Set of Law (5)

lildogie (54998) | more than 13 years ago | (#440754)

> So, who's laws apply in Space?

Locally, Newton's.

Globally, Einstein's.

Same question here on earth. (1)

2max (198934) | more than 13 years ago | (#440756)

How does this apply to boats or airplanes in or over international waters?

The solution is obvious, once you see it (1)

lildogie (54998) | more than 13 years ago | (#440758)

> I would assume that they could afford one player for each region.

Silly, they got 20 _DVD's_, not 20 Movies.

One for each region.

Re:UserFriendly Comic (1)

stu_coates (156061) | more than 13 years ago | (#440760)

UserFriendly is possibly the worst comic on earth.

That may be true, but on the ISS it rocks! ;-)

a better question (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 13 years ago | (#440763)

instead of the stupid and pointless slashdot MPAA jab(I agree with it, but at some point - like about a year ago - it just became repetative and annoying), what I'm wondering is how much NASA spent to get the player and discs up to the station. doesn't it cost like $10,000/lb? so we're probably talking the price of a nice car just to get it all up there. maybe almost $1000/DVD

I'm not saying it's a waste, but you'd want to choose your movies carefully. some of the ones they brought up were shitty. is Pleastanville really worth $1000?
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