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72 comments

Very reasonable (5, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997475)

I never grasped how copyright changes could be considered legally urgent. This doesn't mean the treaty will be blocked(it won't be), but at least Germany is taking their time.

Re:Very reasonable (4, Interesting)

mseeger (40923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997655)

Don't put your hopes to high. They are just waiting till the public's attention is elsewhere, e.g. occupied by a soccer cup.

Re:Very reasonable (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997669)

Pretty much. Further meetings just means "How can we sneak this past the public."

Re:Very reasonable (5, Insightful)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998003)

And if you identify everyone who attends these meetings and concentrate on getting rid of them you will have struck a very big blow for clearing up politics generally. There are very few issues which as clearly come out as big corporation vs. people. Even better is that in this case it isn't because there are no big corporations on our side, just because they are new corporations which haven't yet worked out how to do corruption (that's why Microsoft is on the other side). This is a really really worthwhile cause and making a list of everyone who ever collaborated with the RIAA, MPAA and big media over this and following up on it to the end could set back the corporate control of government by decades.

Re:Very reasonable (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39002473)

Microsoft is on "their" side because Microsoft has long had an official stance against software piracy, not because they're somehow being suckered into it by the *AA.

Much as I hate the *AA, Microsoft is in this one for their OWN benefit, not someone else's.

Re:Very reasonable (2)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | more than 2 years ago | (#39003491)

You aren't getting this entirely. Have a look at GoDaddy; they have a long involvement in DNS, which is one of the areas where corruption and politics meets technology. They aren't particularly big and powerful, but they knew enough to find out about the legislation and to know who to talk to to get their own name in there early. They were explicitly listed by name in the legislation so that only they could benefit from exclusions.

The list of people who support ACTA is invitation only. From their own point of view MS is in there because they benefit. From the general point of view they benefit because the *AA thought that without them the legislation might get blocked and that with them it would be more powerful. The next time this type of legislation comes around you may find something like a new copyright on search engine results being offered to Google in order to drag them in and get their support.

Re:Very reasonable (4, Interesting)

geogob (569250) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998353)

Don't expect the public attention to drop so soon in Germany. People there are very careful about protection of private data and information. They have a somewhat bad historical background about state lurking into private lives and filtering/accumulating information... and they are not about to forget it. Anything that goes into that direction gets strong opposition - and the stage generally weights in favor of the private life protection.

Now, in Germany, is happening exactly what the copyright lobby feared : people are looking into it. They is a reason why they tried to push it under the table and they failed. Now there is a good chance ACTA never goes through in Germany. And if it doesn't pass in Germany, it loses a lot of interest within the EU.

Re:Very reasonable (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39000131)

ACTA is treated as a "mixed treaty" in the EU, which means that according to the rules of procedure it has to be ratified by the European parliament _and_ all of the national parliaments in order to be valid anywhere. If it doesn't pass in Germany (or some other member state) it doesn't pass anywhere in the EU. At all.

Re:Very reasonable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39005917)

Nonsense. I’m German, and Germany is a country of followers The only thing that matters is, how full of yourself and loud you are as a leader, and the mass dynamics.
Back then it was the Nazis, now it's left-extremism that's seen as just as much OK and justified the exact same way.

With ACTA, the only reason Germans protest, is because it's starting to look like it's expected to oppose ACTA to show you follow the pack. So it means, we're just lucky that it's something good for a change.

It's "doing something right, but for the wrong reasons". Or for no reasons to be exact, since most people don't think for themselves.

Yep, we have learned nothing from the FAIL of Naziism. We're still blindly following the loudest few.
And we're very lucky the loudest few aren't evil for a change.

What I want to say: It can flip over very quickly, if the pro-ACTA criminals do enough propaganda.

Re:Very reasonable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39000235)

Nahhhhh..... the EU? Sneaking anything about ACTA past the public [techdirt.com] ? Never! Totally unfounded accusations!

Besides, ACTA is only there to ahhhh BENEFIT the public!

There's a reason the Rapporteur Kader Arif resigned, and his unprecedented open clarification as to the why.

Re:Very reasonable (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38997841)

Not so sceptical please.

Your democratic checks and balances might be absolutely fucked beyond all hope, to the extent that you live under a corporatocracy, but that isn't the case here.
Besides, the element of surprise is gone. All further attempts are going to be highly scrutinised, and there are countries that will never sign.

Re:Very reasonable (5, Informative)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998363)

The European Parliament (at the top of the food chain) is already deeply suspicious of what the Commision is doing with ACTA and asked them to clean their act up in March of last year.

Some quotes from the report [europa.eu] :

2. Expresses its concern over the lack of a transparent process in the conduct of the ACTA negotiations, a state of affairs at odds with the letter and spirit of the TFEU; is deeply concerned that no legal base was established before the start of the ACTA negotiations and that parliamentary approval for the negotiating mandate was not sought;

3. Calls on the Commission and the Council to grant public and parliamentary access to ACTA negotiation texts and summaries, in accordance with the Treaty and with Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 of 30 May 2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents;

4. Calls on the Commission and the Council to engage proactively with ACTA negotiation partners to rule out any further negotiations which are confidential as a matter of course and to inform Parliament fully and in a timely manner about its initiatives in this regard; expects the Commission to make proposals prior to the next negotiation round in New Zealand in April 2010, to demand that the issue of transparency is put on the agenda of that meeting and to refer the outcome of the negotiation round to Parliament immediately following its conclusion;

5. Stresses that, unless Parliament is immediately and fully informed at all stages of the negotiations, it reserves its right to take suitable action, including bringing a case before the Court of Justice in order to safeguard its prerogatives;

6. Deplores the calculated choice of the parties not to negotiate through well-established international bodies, such as WIPO and WTO, which have established frameworks for public information and consultation;

7. Calls on the Commission to conduct an impact assessment of the implementation of ACTA with regard to fundamental rights and data protection, ongoing EU efforts to harmonise IPR enforcement measures, and e-commerce, prior to any EU agreement on a consolidated ACTA treaty text, and to consult with Parliament in a timely manner about the results of the assessment;

I'm pretty sure the Commission hasn't done any of that, so if the Parliament gets involved again it's doomed. Hopefully this weekend's protests will help get that done.

Re:Very reasonable (2)

nzac (1822298) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997891)

Don't put your hopes to high. They are just waiting till the public's attention is elsewhere, e.g. occupied by a soccer cup.

Your open pessimism helps to make it acceptable for politicians to do this.

Re:Very reasonable (1)

mseeger (40923) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998355)

Your open pessimism helps to make it acceptable for politicians to do this.

I am afraid, they would do the same, should they catch me jubilating ;-).

Re:Very reasonable (1)

slyrat (1143997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998585)

I am afraid, they would do the same, should they catch me jubilating ;-).

Gah, the comma splicing. Be more careful when you use those pointy things!

Re:Very reasonable (1)

mseeger (40923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39004087)

My comma density is right for the German i grew up with. This means it is too high when i get in contact with the English language. Locations of my commas are pretty erratic even in my native tongue ;-).

Re:Very reasonable (1)

nzac (1822298) | more than 2 years ago | (#39000435)

I am afraid, they would do the same, should they catch me jubilating ;-).

Yes but you are implying that you will accept the legislation as the way politics are.
You are saying that even though you don't like it if they do pass it you will do nothing meaningful about it. Knowing that (some) people have stated they will not protest against the legislation gives politicians more confidence to pass the bill.

Re:Very reasonable (1)

mseeger (40923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39004097)

No, my original sentence just intended to say: If we don't replace the current crop of politicians, they will pass ACTA sooner or later. We got a stay for ACTA and not a "nay" ;-).

Re:Very reasonable (4, Interesting)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998039)

It may be a long time until the attention is elsewhere. Right now the German Pirate Party is the one with most popular support, far more than in Sweden. They scored a huge number of seats in Berlin and if it was national election today [wahlrecht.de] they would get anywhere from 4-8% of the votes, there's a 5% threshold but they'd pas it today. Unfortunately it's not election for another year and a half but a long drawn out fight over ACTA is just the thing they need...

Re:Very reasonable (4, Informative)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998237)

If you are in Germany, don't forget to join the demonstrations [stoppacta-protest.info] tomorrow.

Re:Very reasonable (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998725)

Hey, thanks! I was just wondering about exactly that.

Re:Very reasonable (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998809)

Perhaps they feel it needs to be made stricter...

Re:Very reasonable (5, Funny)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997751)

If they don't act quickly, it's conceivable that Steamboat Willie might be legally distributed to people within the United States. The horror!

Re:Very reasonable (1)

Zoxed (676559) | more than 2 years ago | (#39003871)

The "C" in ACTA is for "Counterfeiting". If new laws can help reduce the inflow of conterfeit, and often substandard, say car brake parts, or medicines, arriving in Europe then I am for it.
On the other hand if other, more contraversial, measures are piggybacked in on it then that is a different matter.

USA (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38997505)

So with the USA's propensity to blackmail other countries into passing legislation they want, what are they going to do when an entire continent rejects this treaty?

Re:USA (5, Funny)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997531)

I heard they have some oil in the North Sea ... ;)

Re:USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38998023)

I heard they have some oil in the North Sea ... ;)

Well, you know how oil is: they're colored, they hide around, and they sometimes blow up and hurt innocent people. All the traits of TERRORISTS

For the North Sea to harbor such dangerous elements just shows how they're enemies of freedom!

Re:USA (1)

VikingOfNorth (2570199) | more than 2 years ago | (#38999163)

I heard they have some oil in the North Sea ... ;)

Not to mention that France and Britain are confirmed to have weapons of mass destruction... :P

Re:USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38999567)

I heard they have some oil in the North Sea ... ;)

Not to mention that France and Britain are confirmed to have weapons of mass destruction... :P

And if everything else fails, they can invoke the The Hague Invasion act [wikipedia.org] .

Re:USA (2)

Issarlk (1429361) | more than 2 years ago | (#39001595)

Sadly they really have them and so the US would never attack. See: North Korea.

Re:USA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39001965)

Sadly they really have them and so the US would never attack. See: North Korea.

Sadly is not the adjective I would use.

China (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38997651)

Think vectors NOT scalars. With the power to stand up to American imperialism, the land of the free will be China this century.

It's a really cool place to live, and nothing I do in my day-to-day life is going to get me into legal trouble. I define this as freedom.

Re:China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38997927)

But do many things explode there... Sewers, space heaters, computers, toilets, office chairs, money... how do you manage to avoid being blown up?

Re:China (4, Insightful)

willodotcom (608854) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997967)

It's a really cool place to live, and nothing I do in my day-to-day life is going to get me into legal trouble. I define this as freedom.

I prefer this definition by John Dalberg-Acton: "The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities."

Re:China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39001509)

"The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities."

Hmm, I always thought it was quote from somebody else that amounted to noting the conditions of their prisons.

Re:China (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 2 years ago | (#39002495)

Dostoevsky

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Fyodor_Dostoevsky [wikiquote.org]

The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.

But the Acton quote is also correct

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Lord_Acton [wikiquote.org]

The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities.

Re:China (0)

LaRainette (1739938) | more than 2 years ago | (#38999847)

You're an ignorant selfish asshole to suggest China is a land of freedom. Just because you happen to be OK making 10 times the average salary there and bribing policemen easily doesn't mean it's the land of freedom.
It's one of the most repressive government on earth, it's in the top 10 of the most corrupt countries, and it is not far from the worst in terms of personnal freedom, tolerance and racism. And the freedom of speech is so great too...
You can get 20 years in jail for 10g of pot in China. So either you never stepped foot in China, or you live in a freaking parallel universe dude.

Re:China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39001867)

Hmmm... he says:

nothing I do in my day-to-day life is going to get me into legal trouble

And you say:

Just because you happen to be OK making 10 times the average salary there and bribing policemen easily doesn't mean it's the land of freedom.

and

You can get 20 years in jail for 10g of pot in China. So either you never stepped foot in China, or you live in a freaking parallel universe dude.

Why the assumption that he's doing pot and bribing police men? Both of those things can get you into trouble in China, so that would mean he's not doing them. China'a citizens may have more restrictions, but at least their government has enough respect for them to be honest about it.

Re:China (1)

LaRainette (1739938) | more than 2 years ago | (#39019005)

Oh yes the Chinese government's honnesty...
Are you refering to the 150,000 people the Chinese government employs to censor the web and post propaganda on social networks ?
Or maybe you're refering to the cover-up following the accident on the new high speed train that cost the lives of several hundred people ? A train that was burried along with all the cadavers a mere 36 hours after the accident to make sure no investigation would be possible ?
You're talking about a country where you've never lived and of which you apparently know nothing.
And yes I'm saying he is bribing policemen, because to live in China and do half of what you're allowed to do in the USA freely, you will have to bribe policemen, on a weekly basis.
So unless he lives inside his home 24/7 and doesn't use the internet (which seems like an ODD combo) then he's never been to china (or alternatively he has never been outside china)
And I am in no way making the promotion of the US government or the american way of life, I am not american and I am very critical of both, but saying China is a land a freedom is basically like saying Israel is a land of peace. It is insulting to the millions of people who are suffering daily there, and it is insulting to the memory of the millions who died in the name of freedom & peace.

Re:China (1)

MrL0G1C (867445) | more than 2 years ago | (#39003913)

Wow, what drugs are you taking, they must be good.

Re:USA (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39002487)

Continent? So far it's looking like the entire WORLD.

Even the Canadian Senate is still discussing whether to approve the clauses that violate our 40 year + precedent cases, and with any luck, those odious clauses will be struck or the entire batch of legislation rejected.

The US was very quick to brag about how everyone was "signing on." But now that it's up to the countries involved, those nations are realizing that appeasing the US means pissing off their OWN people and losing the next election.

Fortunately, all politicians really care about is their OWN re-election, not what the US wants.

Delaying (4, Insightful)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997627)

Meaning either they're too busy counting how many pitchforks and torches are headed their way..

or...

they are merely waiting for the mafiaa to sweeten their payoffs.

I am not aware of any country involved in the inital back-room negotiations that has announced their unequivocal refusal to sign ACTA, full stop.

Re:Delaying (1)

RogueLeaderX (845092) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997957)

Meaning either they're too busy counting how many pitchforks and torches are headed their way.. or... they are merely waiting for the mafiaa to sweeten their payoffs.

I see that not only is the US exporting bad copyright policy, we're exporting cynicism as well.

OK, so... (5, Insightful)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997701)

They talk about this 'treaty' for months behind closed doors, cross all the i's, dot all the t's, get ready to roll it out, pick up on the groundswell protest against it, and NOW they say they need more discussion on it? Talk about spindoctoring at its finest...

Re:OK, so... (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 2 years ago | (#39002501)

Did the German government as a whole get to discuss the treaty?

That confirms (2, Interesting)

jcreus (2547928) | more than 2 years ago | (#38997781)

Germany as one of the most sensible states in the world.

Re:That confirms (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998035)

Except that Poland beat them to the punch. The timing makes it look like a "me too!" response.

Re:That confirms (4, Informative)

jcreus (2547928) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998081)

Poland is definitely another great country. It once blocked software patents in Europe; now ACTA... Great!

Re:That confirms (2)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998173)

It's more of a "oops people seem to care about that and the Pirate Party got 8,6% in Berlin" response.

Re:That confirms (1)

M. Baranczak (726671) | more than 2 years ago | (#38999117)

Slight clarification: Poland already signed the treaty. What normally happens after that is the treaty gets sent to the parliament for ratification - but the government is now trying to back away from it. So it probably won't get ratified, but it's still possible.

Germany, on the other hand, didn't sign the treaty in the first place. It's a subtle difference, but it means that Poland is a little further on the road to ACTA than Germany.

Makes Me Sick (2)

MoldySpore (1280634) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998123)

I know I shouldn't be surprised, but it really makes me sick how quickly and easily ACTA was pushed and accepted in other countries. MAFIAA must have a silver tongue, equally as silver as the object they use to fuck over everyone else.

Follow Finland's example (2)

Aggrajag (716041) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998203)

EU countries should follow Finland's example and sign every treaty without any delay. Public discussion about government's decisions is done afterwards.

emigrate to where? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38998473)

Ok, enough already! As a U.S. Citizen, who's vote is regularly either not counted, discounted, or otherwise ignored by the ruling money, excuse me I mean by the democratically elected government, where can I legally emigrate to where the government listens to the desires of it's citizens, and acts accordingly? By accordingly I mean in compliance with those wishes, not ignores them or breaks the protested against legislation into smaller parts and puts it into other bills that have good things in them, so that it all gets in under the radar? I don't care, even a tiny island nation someplace, where I'll have to build an igloo out of coconuts, just someplace where the government stands up FOR the peoples' rights, instead of against them. Anywhere? Hello? Guns, Abortion, Gay/marriage rights, and illegal immigration are not the only four issues, they aren't even the most important ones. They're the EMOTIONAL ones, the scare tactics. All I want is a place to hang my hat, respect my neighbors, and have them respect me, raise some kids, and try to have a life that isn't oppressed by Orwellian and Machiavellian mechanations.

Anywhere? Anyplace? Do we have to go off planet to get this?

Re:emigrate to where? (4, Informative)

LaRainette (1739938) | more than 2 years ago | (#38999735)

Norway.
They have a small minority of maybe 5% of right wing nutjobs (but as you are american it is really nothing you can't handle) but other than that it's probably the most democratic place on earth right now.
Just to justify this : reaction of the US government after 9/11 => Patriot act and 2 wars
Reaction of the mayor of Oslo after the shootings this year by far-right terrorrist : "We need even more democracy".
Salaries are great, inequalities are pretty low, social tension is almost inexistant, and the welfare state is rock solid and financed for almost ever by Oil money and the $400 billions Strategic investment Fund the Norvegian governement created with it.
Oh and EVERYBODY speaks english. Literally.

Minor Corrections (1)

andersh (229403) | more than 2 years ago | (#39002699)

Reaction of the mayor of Oslo after the shootings this year by far-right terrorrist : "We need even more democracy".

It was actually the Prime Minister of Norway that said that. Also the shootings themselves happened in another county far away from Oslo city.

... welfare state is rock solid and financed for almost ever by Oil money ...

The national budget is financed by income, corporate and sales tax (75%). Sales taxes being the largest contributor. Oil and gas revenue is invested abroad in the SWF, we allow a maximum of 4% of the surplus to go towards the national budget. Oil does represent a solid portion of the revenue (25%), however it is not what funds the budget.

Re:emigrate to where? (1)

HiThere (15173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39007393)

IIRC, you need to speak Norwegian to be considered for immigration. Not the most unreasonable of requirements, but too high a bar for some. You may also need to be under 30 or 35, so don't delay too long. (OTOH, it's been a long time since I last checked, so my memories may be faulty, or things may have changed. Check it out yourself if you're serious.)

Re:emigrate to where? (1)

LaRainette (1739938) | more than 2 years ago | (#39019281)

Hum... fair point, I hadn't thought about it because Norway is in the EEA (sort of broader economic-focused EU) so you can freely go there from anywhere in the EU if you have a passeport, and stay for 3 months. Once there you can apply for an extension as long as you have a job.
For US citizens I don't know, but Norway has a fairly welcoming immigration policy, especially if you have a job there / have qualifications, and I am 100% sure you don't need to speak Bokmal or Nynorsk to emmigrate there (althought that might come in handy if you plan to work there : Bokmal is spoken by 90% of the population)
You do however need to speak one of the two to have citizenship.

1st rule of the war is you don't mention the war (4, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 2 years ago | (#38998621)

Germany has joined Latvia, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia

This has happened before, and it didn't turn out well.

Re:1st rule of the war is you don't mention the wa (0)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#38999055)

Hurrrrr-de-durrrr.

Re:1st rule of the war is you don't mention the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39000379)

Hurrrrr-de-durrrr.

Is there something wrong?

Re:1st rule of the war is you don't mention the wa (1)

Erikderzweite (1146485) | more than 2 years ago | (#39000233)

You, sir, made my day!

Re:1st rule of the war is you don't mention the wa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39001547)

There's a correlation here. These are countries that have had bad experiences with governments controlling private and public communication. They want to make sure it doesn't happen again.

it's not entirely correct about Poland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38999211)

Poland did sign the ACTA but the gov now tells the people "we want to discuss it and make public consultations"
So as somebody said thay are just waiting till it blows over and the protests end or at least are not so powerfull

Not Fair! (1)

Erikderzweite (1146485) | more than 2 years ago | (#39000215)

German country-wide protests are tomorrow. They are backing up too soon!

Missed (1)

Pecisk (688001) | more than 2 years ago | (#39001221)

Again have to repeat this - Estonia haven't even signed yet, and they are quite serious have good discussion about ACTA.

I know it's boring to mention countries where government actually work for people, but come on :)

Re:Missed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39003815)

I'm not really sure the Estonian government really works for the people. It's just - for some strange reason, they weren't quick enough to sign it and before they got to that an enormous discussion happened on all media about ACTA.

The PM (Andrus Ansip) said publicly that everyone who were against ACTA had eaten some interesting seeds and should start wearing tinfoil hats - fueling even more harsh reaction and more engaging discussion from the people.

If you think of that as "government working for people" .. then I don't know.

A word of Warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39003193)

I read in the FA that Germany's Justice Ministry is claiming that no amendments to the law have to be made. I read similar statements from the Dutch government. It almost seems like a predetermined strategy to convince parliament. I wonder if they think they do not even need Parliament's agreement for the signature if they claim this (since no legalization will be made), or that it is a way to convince MPs that ACTA is so trivial since our laws already implement it. So why not sign?

Of course, the Minister can later claim he was wrong, or even lying, and nothing will be done to reverse the signature. It is like a policemen telling you "Go ahead, ignore the red light, nothing will happen", and then another one will bust you for it nonetheless. You will have no defence.

Even when they are right and no laws need to be changed. Such a signature would effectively block any new laws that are in disagreement, or the change of laws that are related to this. It is a folly to think such a signature means nothing and my reply, would I be an MP, to "we need no legalization", would be: "then we do not need to sign". IMNSHO, such treaties are subverting the normal democratic process by setting boundaries on what you can do, in a very undemocratic matter. Such a system is not a democracy.

In addition, they seem to stall the process in the hopes the European Parliament votes first. I wonder if they are sure of their victory there and hope that vote will pull in consent from unwilling member-states.....

I am not in Europe ATM, but if you are there; go protest, and try to make people aware of the issues here. Even if you are in favor of ACTA, the process stinks and has no place in a democratic country.

Re:A word of Warning (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 2 years ago | (#39003797)

The minister of justice in Germany is a liberal (I believe the US term for the stance is Libertarian) so I'm not sure whether she's siding with corporate or public interests. She's been a major stumbling stone for various anti-freedom legislation before (e.g. anti-terror laws) so I could realistically see her oppose ACTA out of her own volition if it's really a problem.

Of course I have no idea what prompted that change in stance from the govt, on one hand there was public opposition to ACTA, on the other it's not like the FDP has anything to lose by screwing the population over (their poll scores are at rock bottom, the pirate party took like 75% of their voters away).

Liberal in Germany (1)

krischik (781389) | more than 2 years ago | (#39004059)

The Literals in Germany only stand for the Liberty of Trade. And perhaps the liberty to exploit your workforce. And finally the electorate have understood that. Currently the FDP are at 3 4 % which means they are below the minimum of 5% needed to be admitted into Office.

See: http://www.wahlrecht.de/umfragen/index.htm [wahlrecht.de]

The Party which stands for the liberty of the individual is the Pirate Party which are at 4 8%. Too bad the next election is in 2013 — plenty of time for the FPD to recover and the Pirate Party to loose momentum.

Re:Liberal in Germany (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39005111)

Well except that the minister of justice and other members of the party have proven themselves during the current government coalition. Saying that they are only about "liberty of trade" while being a popular meme is misleading. Especially compared to the last two government coalitions that also had the Green and Social Democrat Party voting for heinous "security" laws the FDP fared much better.

The Pirate Party has a solid platform that I also sympathize but they have yet to prove themselves in any government office. Being an opposition party is certainly easier than actually governing. So maybe we should wait and judge them when they actually get elected into a government coalition.

** IPRED2 ** (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006625)

**** IMPORTANT ****

The worst of the worst from ACTA has been moved from ACTA to IPRED2: http://www.laquadrature.net/en/the-eu-commissions-repressive-plans-beyond-acta

IPRED2 roadmap: http://ec.europa.eu/governance/impact/planned_ia/docs/2011_markt_006_review_enforcement_directive_ipr_en.pdf

Protest in Amsterdam as we speak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39003965)

As we speak there is a ACTA protest going on at Dam Square in Amsterdam. Join us if you're nearby!

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