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Journalist Arrested By Interpol For Tweet

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the religious-practice-makes-perfect-slavery dept.

Censorship 915

New submitter StarWreck writes "Police in Kuala Lumpur detained Hamza Kashgari, 23, 'following a request made to us by Interpol' on behalf of the Saudi authorities. Kashgari, a newspaper columnist, fled Saudi Arabia after posting a tweet which read: 'I have loved things about you and I have hated things about you and there is a lot I don't understand about you I will not pray for you.' Said tweet sparked outrage in Saudi Arabia and resulted in multiple death threats. Kashgari faces the death penalty in Saudi Arabia."

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915 comments

and where is exactly the problem? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006503)

Can someone enlighten me, please?

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (5, Informative)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006531)

The tweet was made on Muhammad's birthday. He was accused of apostasy as a result, an offense punishable by death in the muslim tradition.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006559)

I had a hunch that knowing who "you" referred to would shed some light. I thought he was just addressing his twitter followers.

Still despicable though

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006609)

Just to clarify, are you saying his tweet was despicable, or that arresting him over it was?

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006793)

The arrest, definitely. He should be able to tweet whatever the hell he wants.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (3, Insightful)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006877)

Actually he should be able to tweet everything whichdoes not violate twitter's TOS.
But of course, the worst thing which should happen when violating those is having the twitter account cancelled.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006895)

Since he decided to leave Saudi Arabia, I thought that it's implied he refers to the country, not to to religion. By saying that he will not pray for you, it even furthers affirms some kind of religious faith (whatever it might be) and that might be the greater insult: praying for other causes/reasons but not praying for someone/some place.

I say that because I sometimes pray for good things to happen to those I love. I should better say I ask things, which is not very religious.

I wonder what those people have in their hearts to be so quick to condemn. Also, I'm not Muslim, but certainly one cannot be executed for leaving their religion; I often hear/read Muslim people have shown in more than enough examples to have understanding for those of other faiths.

I cannot help but suspect that religion is again being used for evil political aims.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Interesting)

tonywong (96839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006575)

Apparently the Saudis put out the warrant and the Malaysian authorities detained at the airport and are shipping him back. Apparently the Malaysians are really amenable to the foreign governments about extraditing and returning people, so even if this guy faces the death penalty the Malaysians just don't want to get in the middle of things.

I guess the moral of the story is that if you are going to flee to another country, try some place like Canada or Sweden first.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (5, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006615)

Apparently the Saudis put out the warrant and the Malaysian authorities detained at the airport and are shipping him back. Apparently the Malaysians are really amenable to the foreign governments about extraditing and returning people, so even if this guy faces the death penalty the Malaysians just don't want to get in the middle of things.

I guess the moral of the story is that if you are going to flee to another country, try some place like Canada or Sweden first.

But if you choose Sweden, keep away from the women.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006779)

Why keep away tom the women?

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006825)

Keep Tom away from the women?

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Insightful)

eht (8912) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006623)

Malaysia is a Sharia law country, if you are fleeing from Muslim authorities this is the last kind of place you go.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Interesting)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006701)

Maybe the true reason why he fled is a completely different one, and the Saudis just used that twitter message because they couldn't use the real reason, and because they expected Malaysia to accept that one.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (1)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006743)

Malaysia is a Sharia law country, if you are fleeing from Muslim authorities this is the last kind of place you go.

What a sad choice that the guy made... :( I would hope that an extradition hearing would establish a clear case for asylum, but yeah. If you're fleeing a claim of apostasy, don't flee to a country that would equally dislike the heresy that you committed. :(

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Insightful)

Stormthirst (66538) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006887)

Seems to me the moral of the story is don't use Twitter. Wasn't there a recent case of some girls getting sent back to England from LA because they'd Tweeted that they were going to "destroy America". I seem to remember rather a lot of people on Slashdot not being very sympathetic. But suddenly it's freedom of speech?

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006579)

What an excellent display of tolerance and peaceful behavior.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (3, Insightful)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006723)

It's important to understand that peace [wikipedia.org] doesn't mean the same thing to everybody.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006781)

No, what's important to understand is that the Muslim religion is a plague on the world no matter what their own justification of barbarism is.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (3, Insightful)

DrXym (126579) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006823)

Every religion is a plague on the world. Irrational beliefs spawn irrational behaviour.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006833)

No, what's important to understand is that religion is a plague on the world no matter what their own justification of barbarism is.

FTFY

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006871)

Whoa, that's a pretty broad brush you are painting with there. Let's not forget the millions of Muslim people who do not support terrorism and are as peaceful and law-abiding as most of the Christians in the world. And even Christians had their crusades.

About the only two groups who haven't waged wars for their religion (or lack of one) are atheists and Buddhists, but the rest of the world's religions have all had their fringe elements, and those fringe elements are by definition not representative of the whole.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006915)

About the only two groups who haven't waged wars for their religion (or lack of one) are atheists and Buddhists

Citation needed

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006919)

"About the only two groups who haven't waged wars for their religion (or lack of one) are atheists and Buddhists"

Buddhists I agree. Communism is atheistic and killed millions in it wars against those that opposed them.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006921)

He's not talking about terrorism, he's talking about the religious law that active Muslims hold dear.

And Atheists haven't waged war? No communist country has ever waged war?

You are an idiot, shrink back into your hole.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (5, Insightful)

NIN1385 (760712) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006601)

This is exactly the type of extremism that turns me away from religion, and that applies to all forms of it. To threaten death, or other forms of punishment for saying something... I just have the feeling if God or Allah or whatever deity were to reveal them-self, or return to us or whatever they would probably be like: "WTF are you people doing?"

Just my opinion though.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (5, Interesting)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006683)

One of my favorite readings about religion is Dostoevsky's The Grand Inquisitor, which is featured in The Brothers Karamazov. Basically, Jesus returns to earth in the midst of the Spanish Inquisition. He goes around and does his Jesus thing, giving sight to the blind and healing the sick. The church gets word of this and arrests Jesus, putting him in a holding cell and sentencing him to death.

The Grand Inquisitor, knowing it's really Jesus, goes to Jesus' cell and asks him what the hell he's doing. Jesus wants to know why the church is treating him this way and the inquisitor says, "You're bad for business. Now that you're here, what the hell are we gonna do? Sorry man, it is in our best interests to make you disappear."

Jesus, somewhat homoerotically, kisses the inquisitor on the cheek and says, "I love you, brother." The Inquisitor, very moved by the gesture, opens the cell and releases Jesus, saying, "Get the hell out of here, and don't come back." Jesus walked off into the darkness and was never heard from again.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006867)

I prefer the director's cut ending, where Jesus lays waste to the inquisition and church. Lightning and searing blasts of holy fire melting the faces off the heretical priests as they scream in agony. Plus a whole lot of kung-fu ass kicking. Oh yeah, and Jesus is played by Jean-Claude Van Damme.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006725)

Such extremism isn't the sole domain of the religious, and I say that as an atheist. The assholes will always find some way to legitimize their assholeness, if not religion then some other idealogy like nationalism, racism, economics, etc.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Interesting)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006829)

The Bible describes this as idolatry. Basically, if you can take a concept and put it into a box, you can gain authority over the idea in people's minds and substitute your own voice for the idea. The Bible is actually a good example of this itself. Even though the Bible never actually claims to be the word of God (in fact, it never claims to be true or accurate either) pastors have an easy time holding it up as a physical manifestation of such ideas. Form there it's a fairly simple matter to pick and choose through it, adding their own words here and there, and presto! Suddenly they've got their own words accepted by people as being from God.

The principle is easily applied elsewhere, and you see it all the time.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Insightful)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006741)

This is exactly the type of extremism that turns me away from religion, and that applies to all forms of it.

That's not specific to religion. If in the former Soviet Union you had said that you don't think communism is a good idea, your life wouldn't exactly have been safe either.

Depends... (4, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006837)

A former colleague once spent six months in the Soviet Union as part of a technology project. One of the staff at the engineering company at which he worked was always pestering him about life in the West, asking questions and saying "isn't it true that such and such is much better than here in Russia". So he formulated the idea that this was some sort of KGB plant trying to get him into trouble so they could detain him.

When the time came for him to leave they had a big party and he asked someone if this guy really worked for the KGB, only to get the reply "No, no, so-and-so is the KGB rep, he's OK, that other guy just thinks everything is better in the West and keeps trying to prove it to us."

As my colleague remarked, imagine an American engineering company where one of the engineers kept trying to tell everybody that life was better in the Soviet Union. All right, he would be massively wrong, but he would also get fired very quick.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006691)

He was accused of apostasy as a result,

In my country, apostasy from Islam is punishable by free beer!

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006815)

I think he made a mistake by fleeing to a Muslim country that would take such bullshit seriously. More justice from the Religion of Love.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Stormthirst (66538) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006863)

Just about everything is punishable by death in the Muslim tradition. I'm surprised breathing isn't punishable by death.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006909)

This muslim problem is going to continue to grow until some country with an army steps up to take care of it. Hopefully it won't go on long enough to land the whole world in a war when it comes to a head.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (3, Funny)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006551)

Lol, yeah what's wrong with putting this guy to death for tweeting that? I mean frankly he deserves it.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (2, Funny)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006621)

Yeah, it's not like he was talking down AFTA or SOPA...

NO CARRIER...

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006591)

Verily I say untu you the prophet, peace be upon him, now I kill you !!!

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (5, Insightful)

SaXisT4LiF (120908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006617)

According to the article, the tweet in question was a reference to the Prophet Muhammud. In some parts of the word, disavowing the religion of the majority (apostasy [wikipedia.org] ) can be punishable by death. Interpol's compliance in this act violates the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [un.org] , which Interpol itself is tasked with upholding by its constitution [interpol.int] .

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (4, Informative)

bloodhawk (813939) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006811)

Interpol isn't involved, Interpol merely forwards warrants to the relevant people, whether the warrant is valid or not is not something for interpol to judge.

Re:and where is exactly the problem? (1)

mikael (484) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006835)

Interpol's only supposed to investigate crimes like fraud, murder, kidnapping, conspiracy, terrorism, not take sides in hurt religious feelings.

Much of the world has "illegal speech" (5, Insightful)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006505)

And it's not just those backwards fools everyone in the middle east talks about. There are upstanding, progressive regimes in Europe where there are literally things you can say that don't involve a threat of violence or which won't cause immediate danger to those around you ("I'm going to kill you!" or "Fire!") which are still considered illegal.

It's cute because these same nations are held up by many as paragons of virtue in terms of human rights, health care, standard of living, etc... Just don't voice an illegal opinion and you'll be fine, that's all.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (1, Troll)

airdweller (1816958) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006569)

I can't decide whether you're trolling or just plain stupid. I'll go with trolling. Good job!

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (4, Interesting)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006731)

Wow, that's a compelling argument. I'd put it a step above "You are a doody head" and a step below "Nuh uh".

I suggest you go to Sweden and preach how you find homosexuality to be abhorrent and against "God's" will. Or maybe go to Germany and say really love Hitler. Or that you think Arabs in poor neighborhoods are dangerous thieves.

I don't agree with any of that, but it's a fundamental right to be an idiot and to express that idiocy as you will. But I'm just preaching to the choir, as you clearly already know that.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (1, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006783)

I can't tell if you're being ironic, or moronic. The GP is dead on. There are Warm and Fuzzy Progressive countries in Europe that make saying certain opinion-related words a crime. We're not talking about fraud, or inciting a riot, or anything like that. That's lefties for you! Peace, harmony, equal rights and free stuff for everyone, as long as they don't say certain naughty and un-Progressive things, or paint Incorrect Pictures, etc. In which case it's off to jail.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (2)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006845)

Holocaust denial is punished in some European countries. I don't know where are you going with that "Incorrect Picture" thing.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (1)

Oswald (235719) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006791)

Assuming you're serious, and not some sort of meta-troll, I suggest you spend some time reading up [wikipedia.org] on the many ways free speech is curtailed in the West. Everything from denying the Holocaust to "hate speech" to "blasphemous, seditious, or indecent matter" can get you in trouble with the law in a lot of places that pride themselves on their freedom.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (0)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006571)

Haha, modded "troll". I can only guess the irony of this is lost on whoever did that, but I like their style.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (2)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006603)

Yeah, but allowing those might force people to think for themselves and actually attempt to determine whether what someone is saying is true or not. Who wants to face a penalty for trampling over someone in a theater while trying to escape (assuming such a thing would ever take place to begin with)? It's so much easier to claim that someone's voice took control of your body and forced you to panic like a brainless animal and injure someone.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (3, Informative)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006605)

Musta been the 'I won't pray for you' bit that got him in hot water. Can't go wrong when you pay lip service to the local gods, ya know.

Prob is, figuring out which are the local gods. Course, the Saudis are a bunch of nutjobs. They produced a shitpile of mujihadeem in Afghanistan back when they 'were on our side' fighting the Soviets. If they didn't have oil, we'dve dropped the Saudis like a hot rock.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006607)

there is a huge difference between threatening to kill someone and saying you wont pray for them. Fire is illegal because it gets people hurt in a panic. As far as I'm concerned Mohammed can suck me. He is probably too busy licking the balls of the camel he rode in on anyway.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (1)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006747)

You and others missing something. I agree it should be illegal to say things which are a threat or which create an immediate danger. The problem is that simply expressing an often stupid opinion is illegal in many places around the world, and not just the third world.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (2)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006785)

Fire is illegal because it gets people hurt in a panic.

It's not illegal everywhere. For instance, it's not illegal in the United States to yell "Fire!" even if it's in a crowded theater, and even if you know it will cause reckless injury to others. The standard in the US has been shifted to a call for "imminent lawless action". Yelling "let's riot!" or "let's go kill people!" to an angry crowd is illegal in the US, while yelling "fire!" is not. (If they actually do go and riot and kill people, all the worse that your speech did cause imminent lawless action. If the didn't, then well, evidence that your words didn't call for imminent lawless action...)

Not illegal but reckless negligence (4, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006873)

If you know shouting "Fire" is likely to cause injury to others, and you do it, you may not be arrested (but you might be taken into custody for your own safety), and you may not be subject to criminal proceedings. But expect civil lawsuits that may well ruin you, and the bar for proof is lower than for criminal activity. Since damages in civil lawsuits in the US tend to be much higher than in the rest of the world, you could argue that, unless like the Westborough Baptists, you investigate the law beforehand, the consequences of anti-social behaviour can be much worse.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (5, Insightful)

Old VMS Junkie (739626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006643)

There's a big difference between threats or statements that might endanger the safety of others and someone stating their feelings towards a religious figure. Just another sign of the Muslim world's complete intolerance, total lack of religious freedom, and complete lack of respect for human life and dignity.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (1)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006761)

I agree those first things should be illegal. That was my point, simply expressing an opinion about certain things that _aren't_ immediately dangerous is illegal in much of the "developed" world.

Re:Much of the world has "illegal speech" (-1, Offtopic)

mapfortu (2567463) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006659)

Did Mohammed make a real pilgrimage [wikispaces.com] ? He isn't alive today, so it's obvious he didn't make 'fast [slashdot.org] ' (to be fair, neither did Jesus Christ--I have).

What's with the descendants of Ishmael and Esau getting all bent out of shape over a few words here and there? I don't see Salmon Rusdie exposing the historical biblical immolation [wikispaces.com] of human babies, or the puppet party system [slashdot.org] , or the antics [slashdot.org] of the world's wealthy, or the mirror within mirror gumby system that turns females into lifelong [slashdot.org] murderers [slashdot.org] .

Characters [wikispaces.com] and content [wikispaces.com] .

http://mapfortu.wikispaces.com/ [wikispaces.com]
http://hairpinblue.wikispaces.com/ [wikispaces.com]

Save it for another thread. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006509)

But, Obama! But, the USA!
See subject.

Bad title. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006521)

Interpol has no "officers" to arrest anyone. It is a multinational organization that facilitates the sharing of info, and arrest warrants, between countries. Here, Saudi Arabia sent out an arrest warrant to Interpol and Interpol transmitted it to police in Kuala Lumpur. The police in Kuala Lumpur arrested. Interpol is just a middle man. We can argue whether it's good or bad (probably both), but Interpol doesn't "arrest" anybody and they didn't force the Lumpurian authorities to arrest. Interpol can't force the police of any State to act. Kuala Lumpur probably doesn't care about this guy and figured better relations with Saudi Arabia is more important.

Re:Bad title. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006567)

Good relations? Or oil money?

Re:Bad title. (2)

Teun (17872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006713)

Malaysia produces it's own oil.

The problem is they have an Islamic majority including extremists of the Saudi kind.

Re:Bad title. (5, Insightful)

Teun (17872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006703)

By their own rules Interpol is not supposed to intervene on the grounds mentioned.

The fact Saudi Arabia has an inhumane legal system is widely known and as long as we want their oil it is not likely to change, but Interpol has done something against the moral values enshrined in their own constitution and the persons responsible should be challenged.

so Interpol (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006529)

is now going to murder journalists?

Seems More Extreme Than Usual (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006535)

This seems more extreme than usual, even for the Saudis.

Yet another example of the so often cited "peaceful" and "understanding" nature of this religion. 'You might suck.' 'KILL HIM!!!!'

Re:Seems More Extreme Than Usual (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006799)

A French-Armenian architect who had worked for years in KSA was once asked what he thought of that country. His response: 'Money can buy anything! Except civilization.'

how is that an insult? (2)

turtledawn (149719) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006549)

Somehow this is an insult to Mohammed? Wha? Makes no sense whatsoever. And Interpol should be saved for big stuff anyway, not doctrinal differences. Whoever authorized the arrest needs some remedial training.

In other Developments (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006555)

The US Demanded that Interpol Arrest all the millions of citizens of the world who have at some time or another demanded 'Death to the US'. They even cited a number of people who led the demonstrations against the Vietnam war in the late 1960's.

Ok, so I'm joking but it shows how absurd this is.

I'll be waiting for a knock at the door and my speedy extradition to the USA where no doubt I'll get 999 years in Jail for daring to criticise the USofA.
   

Re:In other Developments (1)

tragedy (27079) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006759)

Don't forget that the US recently killed two of its own citizens in two separate drone strikes: Anwar al Awlaki and his 16 year old son. Aside from allegations that he was involved in terrorist conspiracy, metaphorically (and maybe literally) demading "Death to the US" is his only proven offence.

Re:In other Developments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006841)

i would have done it for free - he was scum

Interpol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006557)

Are they supposed to be used for serious criminal activities? Assange had no charges against him, hurt no one, stole from no one, and yet Interpol put out an arrest for him for his "sex crime", something they've never done in their history. Follow the money, people are embarrassed.

Now we see some ragheads have taken offense to a rubbish tweet, and use their vast wealth to abuse Interpol once again. Strange that making death threats is considered a non-event by these extreme religious nut jobs, yet doing the same in an Interpol office would have you arrested immediately.

Interpol doesn't arrest (4, Informative)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006561)

From what I understand, Interpol does not arrest, they simply forward arrest warrants from member states. They don't even judge the merits of the warrants sent to them, they are assumed to be legitimate (as this probably was under Saudi Law). Regardless of cases such as this, Interpol is a very important agency in that it allows for cooperation between law enforcement agencies across the country, and keep criminals from simply skipping the country and getting off scott free.

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006677)

So they're "just following orders"? I seem to remember that being a bad thing.

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (1)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006705)

So they're "just following orders"? I seem to remember that being a bad thing.

Except Interpol distributing the warrant hasn't caused any harm. The guy will hopefully have an extradition hearing to see if he should be exported. I would hope that the extradition hearing would satisfy any necessary claim for asylum, and they can kill two birds with one stone on that matter.

This is more like the home owner who refuses to hide a family of Jews from the Nazis because it would be against the law. Sure, he's not doing the most moral thing he could, but at the same time, he's not actually complicit in the actions of the third party. (Unlike if he had turned them in.) It's a neutral moral act, rather than a negative one.

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (2)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006805)

So they're "just following orders"? I seem to remember that being a bad thing.

They're just a communications mechanism. That's like saying a FAX machine is a "bad thing" for having been involved in transmitting an Evil Document.

Interpol has nothing whatsoever to do with what really matters: arrest and extradition. That's up to the nations involved.

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006679)

Lets make sure Interpol gets the benefit of the doubt, even when it's used to round up those guilty of speech criminalized by theocracies, or activists [wired.com] that anger great powers. After all, Interpol isn't American. Or something.

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (4, Insightful)

Blue Stone (582566) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006699)

I don't buy it that interpol can get out of it's part of this by saying that they "don't judge the merits of the warrants". They played a part in this and they need to be held to account. Turning a blind eye whilst helping such a cause holds as much water as "I was only following orders".

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006709)

Yeah, is the same organization that can murder people in the US now and not face criminal charges if they make a little boo boo when they do it? Very important indeed!

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006903)

Yeah, is the same organization that can murder people in the US now and not face criminal charges if they make a little boo boo when they do it? Very important indeed!

[citation needed]

"cooperation between law enforcement agencies" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006711)

Cooperation between countries is fine when countries agree completely that something is a crime, and also agree somewhat on the appropriate sentence.

It is an extremely stupid organization if it simply does forward everything they receive to everyone.

Iran for example is party to Interpol too, maybe it is fine, according to your reasoning, if it submitted requests to arrest hostile US politicians to the US, too?

Re:Interpol doesn't arrest (4, Interesting)

Fulminata (999320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006755)

That's not entirely true, Interpol is not supposed to get involved with any cases that are of a "political, military, religious or racial character." This was obviously of a religious character, and is why the agency is being taken to task.

I said the same thing about /. (4, Funny)

wbr1 (2538558) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006589)

The situation is sad, but I could not resist a joke to add some levity to the conversation.

The same could be said about /. :
'I have loved things about you (great submissions, brilliant posts) and I have hated things about you (useless news, trolls, goatse) and there is a lot I don't understand about you (why your code is still buggy after so many years) I will not pray for you.(But I will still read)'

Rapist Mohammed & his asshole fantatic folllow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006667)

suck!

I am saudi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006671)

This is truly exaggerated... the meaning of what he said got lost into the translation and as I understand he is not a journalist.

That said... what he said which is a lot more than that tweet is punishable by Saudi law... He knew that very well I am sure or he must be an idiot.

I am not saying I agree with the law or not. but all I am saying is he broke a law. what he said a lot of people say but they don't go publishing it for the whole world to point at them and say "THAT'S THE GUY OFFICER! HERE'S THE EVIDENCE".

I agree change should happen, but this is rubbish every time we take a step into the right direction some idiot like this guy comes and rallies up the extremist from both sides the liberals and conservatives take us back 100 steps.

Twitter, facebook and the like have done as much for progressing the freedoms in countries like saudi arabia as they have helped push it back even further.

P.S. Please remember English is my second language

Re:I am saudi (4, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006727)

As unpleasant as it is for both you and him, social change is not made by people who muddle quietly along the mainstream. Progress is only made by people who test the edge of acceptable behavior.

Re:I am saudi (1)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006775)

Just out of curiosity, do they only do that whole "death" thing for Saudi citizens? For instance, if I tweeted "Mohammed fucked camels, and he liked it." would I be on the Saudi "kill 'em when they get here" list?

Seems like Saudi Arabia still has a LONG way to go if it wants to embrace liberty (even a little bit.)

Fuck you all (5, Insightful)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006715)

I'm just gonna say it right out. Fuck Muhammad and Islam, Fuck Jesus and Christianity and Fuck you and all religions where you have to pray to show devotion and destroy your enemies. Got to love this world. One one side you're getting fucked by your government, right next to it you are getting fucked by corporation and right next to that you're a target some some fucking religious freaks that instead of keeping away from you and minding their own business are trying to enslave or kill you.

Re:Fuck you all (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006883)

Amen! ;)

Re:Fuck you all (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006885)

The two greatest causes of oppression and death throughout time are politics and religion, the worst atrocities occuring when they get together. Recognition of this being a major reason that separation of church and state were included by the founding fathers in the USA constitution.

Re:Fuck you all (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006925)

Sounds like we should all start enjoying Ménage à quatre.

Islam is disgusting (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006819)

Muhammad was a pervert who had sex with little girls, boys, and even pigs. Many Muslims are pederasts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacha_bazi) and almost all Muslim men have engaged in bestiality as a result of strict sexual segregation and polygamy in Muslim countries.

A merciful god (3, Informative)

wjcofkc (964165) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006831)

"Kashgari faces the death penalty in Saudi Arabia."

In the name of Allah, the merciful, the compassionate - funny how that works.
If you don't get what I'm saying go thumb through the Quaran.

Ok, so what is a red notice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39006839)

The article says Interpol has many colored notices and that this instance may be a invalid use of a "red notice" but no where does the damn article say what a "red notice" is supposed to be used for.

Hamza Kashgari is a Saudi. (4, Informative)

Animats (122034) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006855)

Hamza Kashgari is a Saudi. The offense was committed in Saudi Arabia, from which he fled to Malaysia. That's a standard fugitive situation. He was in transit to New Zealand where he apparently intended to request political asylum.

Al Jazeera has images of his Twitter feed [aljazeera.com] , with English translations. Here's the full text:

"On your birthday I find you in front of me wherever I go, I love many things about you and hate others, and there are many things about you I don't understand. On your birthday I won't bow in front of you, I won't kiss your hand. Instead, I will shake it as an equal, I will smile at you and you will smile back and I will talk to you as a friend, no more. All the great gods that we worship, all the great fears that we dread, all the desires that we wait for impatiently are but figments of our imagination. No Saudi women will go to hell, because it's impossible to go there twice."

It's amazing how touchy the Islamic theocracies are about this sort of thing. It's as if they're terrified that their whole religious edifice will collapse if there's any criticism. Islam has never had a Martin Luther.

Remember this... (1)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006857)

when next you top off your gas tank.

Re:Remember this... (0)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#39006901)

Actually when I'm topping off my gas tank which is usually 50km away in another city I'm feeling raped as I pay 1.11/l while if I was to fill up in my city I'd be paying $1.28/l Oh and best part is coming up next month while the city 50km away is gonna still be $1.11 my city will be $.02 more per L as a new tax to support a failing corporation (Translink) comes in.

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