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Journalist Arrested For Tweet Deported to Saudi Arabia

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the welcome-to-most-of-history dept.

Censorship 604

New submitter cosmicaug writes with an update to yesterday's report that journalist Hamza Kashgari had been arrested by Malaysian police acting on a request conveyed from the Saudi government via Interpol. Now, says the BBC, "Police confirmed to the BBC that Hamza Kashgari was sent back to Saudi Arabia on Sunday despite protests from human rights groups. Mr Kashgari's controversial tweet last week sparked more than 30,000 responses and several death threats. Insulting the prophet is considered blasphemous in Islam and is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia. Mr Kashgari, 23, fled Saudi Arabia last week and was detained upon his arrival in the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur on Thursday." Writes cosmicaug: "Sadly, the most likely outcome is that they are going to execute this man for three tweets."

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604 comments

Stop buying oil from these dipshits (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012195)

nt

Yeah, mod him down (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012285)

If it was "George Hotz gets slapped by Kaz Hirai and cries" and the comment "That's it I'm never buying Sony again" you'd have modded him to +5 Insightful.

A second just Justice.... Please (5, Interesting)

del_diablo (1747634) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012209)

As far as I know, most western countries have a policy that states "If a man will be executed upon being sent to a country, you are not allowed to send this man to the country, nor are you allowed to deport him to a country that may deport him to the country in question", or something similar. Disregard the lack of Lawyer shargon, but instead: Why was this rule not followed?

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012227)

Malaysia isn't a western country and probably doesn't have that rule.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012399)

Malaysia isn't a western country and probably doesn't have that rule.

Malaysia probably has just the opposite rule, considering The Malaysian constitution states that Islam is the state religion.

One has to wonder why this guy would flee to any Muslim Majority nation, let alone one with an official "state religion" of Islam.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (0, Offtopic)

Skapare (16644) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012441)

Nevertheless, Malaysia will be one of the targets for the coming "occupy" protests over this.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (2)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012545)

That's the part I'm wondering. Either this guy was really dumb, didn't have much choice (maybe he couldn't get a visa to a better country for some odd reason), or maybe he was intercepted while his escape plan was still in motion (maybe he had to go to Malaysia first because they're so friendly with SA, and step 2 was to jump from there to someplace better, and he was caught before that point, faster than he thought he'd be).

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012599)

Considering the volume of air traffic between Saudi Arabia and Malaysia, it is entirely possible that this was simply the first step in his travel plans.

I am an expert on fleeing countries, having watched most of the Bourne and Mission Impossible franchises (except for the hour long car chases - I fast forward through those), and can unequivocally state that your first mission (should you choose to accept it) is to clear datum. Take the first plane, submarine, camel or rickshaw out of the immediate jurisdiction of the people whom you have irritated. Then, it is just an exercise in staying ahead of inter-jurisdictional cooperation.

Thankfully we have Interpol available to efficiently process detain-for-extradition requests for international terrorists such as individuals who voice their opinion.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Informative)

Ogi_UnixNut (916982) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012229)

Probably because he wasn't deported from a western country? He was deported from one Muslim country (Malaysia) to another (Saudi Arabia). AFAIK Malaysia is very friendly with Saudi Arabia, so it's no surprise they deported the guy back as soon as they could.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (1)

joocemann (1273720) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012371)

Something tells me that this expression of religious fundamentalist violence will not be noticed by the war on aforementioned....

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012249)

That only applies to countries that themselves don't have the death penalty. Malaysia does have the death penalty. Besides that, this is still probably even a crime in Malaysia, since they have Shariah law. I think he was only deported to Saudi Arabia for his trial because he is a citizen of Saudi Arabia.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Insightful)

rabbit994 (686936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012255)

Because Malaysia is mostly Muslim and they think it's totally cool that Saudi Arabia wants to execute this guy over bashing "the prophet".

Note, when you are fleeing a country for religious reasons, don't flee to another country that is same religion as one you are fleeing from. Double if it's the same state religion. Pick a place that doesn't care like Netherlands or Belgium.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012389)

Who knows, maybe the news will spread, there will be a global response, and Saudi Arabia will cave to diplomatic pressure and simply jail him for life instead of execute him. It happens every so often for women sentenced senselessly in Arab nations.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (4, Informative)

ilguido (1704434) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012443)

It seems he was fleeing to New Zealand, he stopped in Malaysia because it is an airline hub.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012527)

Isn't that (airport) international territory then? That makes the arrest similar to stopping a plane mid air forcing it to land because someone aboard has committed a crime.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (4, Informative)

ilguido (1704434) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012555)

Well the original report (from the Guardian [guardian.co.uk]) reads:

Police in Kuala Lumpur said Hamza Kashgari, 23, was detained at the airport "following a request made to us by Interpol" the international police cooperation agency, on behalf of the Saudi authorities.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (4, Insightful)

tragedy (27079) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012583)

It's only ever treated as "international territory" when it's a convenient fiction for the host nation. No nation that I'm aware of has a problem arresting people that it wants to arrest off planes that are just passing through. The US and other western nations certainly don't.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012525)

Pick a place that doesn't care like Netherlands or Belgium.

Maybe you meant this as a joke, but both the Netherlands and Belgium arrest people for insulting religious figures, expressing particularly unpopular opinions, and (for Belgium) going out in public wearing clothing associated with unpopular religions. If you want references, just google for either country plus "hate speech", "holocaust denial", or "veil ban". These are hardly countries that "don't care" about thought control.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012569)

The question isn't whether the country has total freedom of speech and religion, it's whether the target country will deport this guy for this offense.

If a country doesn't like Islam too much, and bans people wearing Islamic veils in public, then it's quite likely that someone showing up there from an Islamic country, on the run because he insulted the Islamic religion, probably isn't going to be deported.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012265)

Because Malaysia is not a western country but a corrupt 3rd world nation?

Thing is Malaysia does not have an extradition treaty with Saudi Arabia. It does have such treaties with other countries including the USA: http://www.kln.gov.my/web/guest/bd-bilateral_treaties [kln.gov.my]
So it is technically strange for him to be extradited so easily.

But whatever it is, it's a majority muslim country, so not a good destination/stopover choice for him.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (0)

znrt (2424692) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012491)

Because Malaysia is not a corrupt western country but a corrupt 3rd world nation?

ftfy

Thing is Malaysia does not have an extradition treaty with Saudi Arabia. It does have such treaties with other countries including the USA: http://www.kln.gov.my/web/guest/bd-bilateral_treaties [kln.gov.my]

it's just natural for corrupt western countries to have agreements with corrupt 3d world nations. corruption is the coincidence.

So it is technically strange for him to be extradited so easily.

not the least, see above.

But whatever it is, it's a majority muslim country, so not a good destination/stopover choice for him.

with this i can fully agree. poor thing should have fled further away. after all it was just muslim fundamentalism chasing him, it's not like it was american imperialism who was afer him and there would be no safe place in the world to hide anyway.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Interesting)

sosume (680416) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012549)

Malaysia was responding to an Interpol warrant. The real question is why Interpol cooperates in prosecuting thought crimes. Some heads are going to roll, and not just that of the arrested journalist..

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (4, Informative)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012469)

Because Malaysia has the death penalty, outside of wartime treason, themselves (unlike most western countries, the USA being the only exception) so why wouldn't they extradite somewhere else that also does?

Of course Malaysia isn't a Western country no matter how hard you squint either.

On a side note, Saudi Arabia executed someone for witchcraft last year, so one can only assume the burden of proof isn't exactly high. Or they actually have real live witches casting spells of course...

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (1, Interesting)

Paracelcus (151056) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012509)

I would rail and rant about the savage, barbaric, murderous monsters, but upon reflection, the USofA kills dozens of people of questionable guilt primarily to make local prosecutors and police officials look good! So aside from the fact that (here) the condemned get a drug cocktail that presumably does not hurt (much), the Saudis use a sword to saw your head off (it's slow & bloody)! Anybody who would travel to this medieval shitpile is asking for it.

Re:A second just Justice.... Please (5, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012601)

It's a different problem in the USA. At least the people being killed are supposedly guilty of a real crime, mainly murder (I don't think you can be executed for anything less). Everyone in the world agrees that murder is a heinous crime and that people shouldn't be allowed to just murder others and not be punished for it somehow. The problem is that the judicial process used to try and convict these people is severely flawed, so that occasionally non-guilty people are executed for a crime they did not commit, like Troy Davis.

This, while certainly bad, is still a far cry from a country where people are routinely executed for things which should not be crimes (and even more, shouldn't be capital crimes, rather than slap-on-the-wrist crimes), such as leaving the Islamic religion, saying bad things about it, having sex outside of marriage, and many other petty things that here in the West simply aren't crimes at all for the most part (except for some silly European countries where for some dumb reason, they do prosecute people for "insulting a religion", but the penalty is usually a small fine like $100, i.e. slap-on-the-wrist).

He's dead (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012213)

LOL GNAA

Remember kids (5, Insightful)

NiceGeek (126629) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012219)

Separation of State and Church = good.

Re:Remember kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012257)

States of Religion of Peace do their utmost in order to separate Church from their state. Any excuse to attack the Church is good, if you ask them.

Re:Remember kids (-1, Troll)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012327)

Yup, certainly seems to be working in the USA...

Re:Remember kids (4, Interesting)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012477)

Snark if you must, but it's been a long time since anyone in the US faced execution for stating that Jesus was a good, inspirational man, but not God. In fact, I'm not even sure that such a thing has ever happened. People have been killed by lynch mobs, but that's not a question of separating church and state, it's a question of people not being barbarous murderers.

In fact, according to Wikipedia, even as far back as the late 17th century, the British colonists' laws only punished blasphemers with some months in prison and a couple hundred dollars in fines. It's not nothing, but it's certainly not death.

Re:Remember kids (2)

halivar (535827) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012523)

The whole point of moving to America back then for most folks was to get away from religious persecution. The idea that no one should die because they have a different faith was ingrained in America from the most enlightened deist to the the most devout puritan.

Re:Remember kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012565)

Unless of course you were a witch.... then!!! by golly it was 10x worse.

Re:Remember kids (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012429)

More like separate Witchcraft and State. All religion is Witchcraft in my eyes.

Re:Remember kids (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012511)

However, Islam is actually both a religion and a government rolled into one. That is why Islam has so much conflict with western views of duality (government and religion fulfill separate functions).

Thank you /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012575)

To follow up on my post above, I would like to thank /. for keeping anonymous option for posting. I have working relationship with many people of Islamic faith in Asia, I consider them all decent good people but my views may hit a nerve since it's about their religion and I rather not that happen over a simple post.

Malaysia is Muslim (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012231)

If you commit a crime, don't go to another country that also considers it a crime. If he had made it to Australia, he would have been ok. If he'd been spreading child porn in the US, a similar thing would have happened (although not executed, and who knows what kind of fair trial people get in SA).

Unless you have a way to show that one moral system is better than another, you can't say one country's laws and preferences are better than another.

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012263)

True. However, do not try to link one's opinion to an ideal the same to one that is a physical act. Further more, I fail to see how you would try to say the two are even more similar.
 
Humans have done some of the most horrendous acts to one another in the name of a 'God'. I don't think they understand the gravity of the situation, and how it is perceived beyond this rock by others (gods or otherwise).

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (4, Interesting)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012407)

However, do not try to link one's opinion to an ideal the same to one that is a physical act. Further more, I fail to see how you would try to say the two are even more similar.

OK, I'll try to explain it.

Spreading child porn and blaspheming against god are both speech. That is it, there isn't any serious argument on this point.

In America, we oppose spreading child porn, in part because sometimes it hurts kids, but also because we tend to view sex-offenders as scum, and label them as scum for the rest of their lives. We prevent them from living close to schools, we create websites to easily look up where they live. It doesn't matter if no kids were harmed in the making of the porn, we still label them as such. Note, I am not a supporter of child porn, just trying to show how morally, these two things are similar.

In Saudi Arabia, blaspheming against god can ruin the lives of others, if you manage to convince them to be bad, etc. It also labels you as scum, undesirable, someone to be avoided. Their punishments for the particular crime are harsher, but in many ways it is similar to our child porn laws.

Now, I am personally opposed to condemning people for blasphemy, and I think anything that hurts little kids is horrible, but this is based on my own personal beliefs. I can understand the beliefs that the Saudis have that would make them come to different conclusions.

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012557)

Humans have done some of the most horrendous acts to one another in the name of a 'God'.

And your point? Humans have done horrible acts in the name of other stuff too.

Lots of atheists are fond of the delusion that religion is the source of most evils. Fact is out of the top 10 genocides of last century only a minority were done in the name of religion. The rest were done by atheists, or tribal people trying to kill the other tribes.

So even if you get rid of religion, groups of people will still kill each other on a per group basis. Much of it boils down to tribe vs tribe. Doesn't take much to get supporters of hockey/football/soccer teams to kill/bash each other. Not sure about emacs vs vi but who knows ;)...

Anyway, I guess this is one of those things members of the Atheist tribe (and many other tribes) do to feel superior to the other tribes: The other tribes are inferior and do terrible stuff, we are not like them, we are superior, so I can now feel good about myself. Wake up, you're behaving just like them.

Lastly, you can try to get rid of religion, but people being people will just find another one. Most people have a need to belong to some group. I know a number of atheists who are fanatical members of the Cult of Apple. Which so far is relatively innocuous but I don't see much in terms of good deeds and altruism from them. So the "net positive contribution" of their new religion is unproven. If you hate the existing religions so much, maybe you bunch can go work out a new belief system that is a better substitute (more positives than negatives), so that people can "belong to it" and the belief system can "self-reproduce" (otherwise it's pointless). You better be careful to ensure that it really is better in practice. You might find it's not such an easy task.

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012311)

It's very simple indeed. Freedom of though, discuss or manifest its simple better system than one without this. The Sharia is a violation of human rights and all the very basic freedoms.

Unfortunately, almost every other moral system is better than this.

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (3, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012347)

Unless you have a way to show that one moral system is better than another, you can't say one country's laws and preferences are better than another.

Luckily, it's actually very easy to compare laws and judicial systems, and find one - as informed by specific philosphical/moral tenets, and codified in a constitution - to be, in fact, plainly superior. That is, if rationality plays any role in the mechanisms by which you evaluate such things. I don't fee any urge to use crazy magical thinking as a standard by which to compare systems, so I have none of the trouble that some people - strangely, toxically - have with the need for moral relativism in order to remain politically correct and not hurt anyone's feelings.

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (2, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012449)

Everyone's morals are based on something. I don't know what yours are based on, but clearly they don't include "not hurting anyone's feelings," (although somehow they do include "not disappointing your bird dog").

Other people have morals based on other things, including not hurting people's feelings. How can you judge yours to be better, except to claim that your beliefs are better?

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (5, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012605)

How can you judge yours to be better,

Really? You can't summon the perspective to see that a moral system that stones women to death for teaching their daughters to read is fundamentally, objectively inferior to a system that doesn't do so?

Who cares if moral systems are based on different things? When they're based on death worship, for example, they are inherently, irrationally self destructive. When a moral code is based on lies (say, about the nature of the world around you) it is a code that embraces untruth as its foundation. Do you really find no means, in your own reckoning, to separate such a value system from one that seeks and acknowledges reality?

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012517)

Unless you have a way to show that one moral system is better than another, you can't say one country's laws and preferences are better than another.

Sorry, but I do say that dictatorships are worse than democracies, and Saudi Arabia is a ferocious dictatorship.

Re:Malaysia is Muslim (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012559)

I love good, strong, arguments based in evidence. Not that I disagree with you, but is there a reason that suddenly you start relying on arguments that are about as meaningful as, "Sorry, but I DO say that god exists." Woohoo, good for you.

Why does Interpol even acknowledge this?! (4, Insightful)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012239)

"Sadly, the most likely outcome is that they are going to execute this man for three tweets."

Why does Interpol even acknowledge this?!

What is even worse is that Interpol acknowledges blasphemy as a crime.

This may give the world the impression that religions have substance and may be respected.

Re:Why does Interpol even acknowledge this?! (5, Informative)

wcoenen (1274706) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012309)

What is even worse is that Interpol acknowledges blasphemy as a crime.

According to article 3 of Interpol's own constitution [interpol.int], they are explicitly forbidden to engage in matters of religious character. So either they were deceived about the nature of the "crime" or they ignored their own principles.

Re:Why does Interpol even acknowledge this?! (2)

Shompol (1690084) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012577)

I was thinking the same thing, Interpol was supposed to be a respectable international organisation. I guess the staff located in the Middle East observe Sharia themselves...

Re:Why does Interpol even acknowledge this?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012315)

This goes to show that there is now freedom of speech and one should be very careful what they type on the net. This is a very sad story.

Re:Why does Interpol even acknowledge this?! (5, Informative)

rabbit994 (686936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012353)

Because you obviously don't understand how Interpol works. Interpol is basically a big forum where various police agencies around the world share warrants, police investigations and the like. When one member country says they have warrants for joe smith, Interpol simply distributes the warrant and information to all other members nations. Interpol doesn't check the warrant or see why it's being issued, they just make a note in Joe Smith record and when it's pulled up by another country custom officers, they just see, so and so has warrant against them issued by another country and details of warrant. It's up to individual country to make determination if they are going to follow the warrant or not. 99.99% of the time, warrants are for stuff that all members countries that are consider illegal. Murder, rape, child related charges, drug traffic offenses.

This is what belief in skybeings (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012241)

That grant wishes get you every time.
Wont be long till it happens here in the USA.
Just a matter of time.

Re:This is what belief in skybeings (3, Insightful)

SuperTechnoNerd (964528) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012339)

"Wont be long till it happens here in the USA. Just a matter of time."

MPAA:
You have illegally downloaded Harry Potter Movies.
You shall hereby be sentenced to death by hanging with a CAT-5 ethernet cable.

By order of:
The United Corporations Of America

Why don't they just strip him... (2)

wisebabo (638845) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012247)

... of his citizenship send him to a country where apostasy isn't a crime?

Or would the number of tweets fom like minded citizens hoping to duplicate his fortune crash twitter's servers?

Re:Why don't they just strip him... (0)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012297)

... of his citizenship send him to a country where apostasy isn't a crime?

Because executing him is a much more effective deterrent than, well, anything else they could do to him.

Re:Why don't they just strip him... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012303)

Why don't they just strip him... of his citizenship send him to a country where apostasy isn't a crime?

Why don't we do the same for statuatory-rapists? To them it is something serious that they want to stop, even though it seems silly and barbaric to us. Welcome to inter-cultural studies. People often suffer as a result of the people around them.

Moral High Ground (5, Interesting)

ISoldat53 (977164) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012259)

The US used to have the moral high ground to protest these sort of things. What a difference a decade makes.

Re:Moral High Ground (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012305)

The United States would not have deported him because the crime is not a crime here and carries a death sentence where he would be deported to. He was deported by Malaysia which is a country whose state religion is Islam and has similar issues with religious freedom as Saudi Arabia (being if you're ethnic Malay, you are legally a Muslim). The US had nothing to do with this.

Re:Moral High Ground (2, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012319)

What a difference a decade makes.

What, because the US also now executes people for being insufficiently deferential to the state religion?

Or is this just yet another misdirected, fuzzy-minded Julian Assange fanboy thing?

Re:Moral High Ground (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012465)

Careful, you might be classified as a terrorist and detained indefinitely at a non-disclosed location. That's the new state religion!

Re:Moral High Ground (1, Insightful)

wbr1 (2538558) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012355)

Bull Shit. Maybe some citizens would protest but that is about it. Possibly, we would get a 'stern disapproval' from the state department.

As much as I dislike our meddling in other countries directly (Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam, the list goes on), and pushing our own BS morality diplomatically (ACTA, War on drugs, etc), we should as a government stand against things that run counter to freedom of speech, religion and other core aspects of our country.
The problem is our government only gives lip service to those amazing and praiseworthy ideals, and uses them in the worst possible ways.
But unfortunately as a people we have become a trampled, apathetic mass of idiots bemused by bread and circuses, and as long as our politicians feed at the tit of corporations and pander to their interests, and as long as we suck the oil dick of the middle east, we will continue to turn a blind eye to the issues of true importance.

Prophets and prophecies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012269)

Insulting the prophet is considered blasphemous in Islam and is punishable by death in Saudi Arabia.

can not they pardon his life?

JCPM: a blasphemer that didn't commit a blood crime and isn't an authority over peoples, why should he be punished to death?

But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (0)

JDAustin (468180) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012271)

With Islam, there is no such thing as moderate Islam.

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (5, Insightful)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012365)

With Islam, there is no such thing as moderate Islam.

Turn the clock back 600 years or so (the difference in age between Christianity an Islam) and look at the behavior of the Catholic Church.

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition ....

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012427)

You can keep looking back at what happened 600 years ago, I'll keep looking at what is happening now and what will happen in the future.

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012431)

Turn the clock back 600 years or so (the difference in age between Christianity an Islam) and look at the behavior of the Catholic Church.

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition ....

The Spanish were ruled by the Muslims for almost 800 years. Think that in that time they just might have picked up a few unfortunate habits?

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012489)

Sorry. I must have missed the bit about all the torture and burning at the stake done by Muslims during that period. It seems to have fallen through the cracks of a culture that tolerated Christians, Jews and others.

Its much more likely that today's Islam has picked up a few bad habits from Christians' past.

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012543)

Did you also miss them kidnapping young virgin non muslim girls, converting them by force to islam then marrying them during the "golden age" of islam in spain?

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012439)

Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition ....

...or a wholesale child-raping institution...

Re:But Malaysia is moderate muslim.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012473)

And look back 60 years and the Democrats were the party of white racism in the south. Now things are different. What's your point? You aren't making one. Not a coherent one, anyway. Fuck off.

Meanwhile (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012281)

In the UK hate preachers who advocate terrorism get taxpayer's benefits and even get to shop at Morrisons.

Wait. I'm confused... (1, Funny)

TheGreatOrangePeel (618581) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012283)

Journalist Arrested For Tweet Deported to Saudi Arabia

Right. Okay. Uhm. How do you deport a tweet? /smartass

Re:Wait. I'm confused... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012351)

More like /dumbass if you can't parse that sentence.

And these people are our strongest allies? (2)

TellarHK (159748) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012291)

How much clearer does it need to be made to us, that our oil addiction is putting us in bed with some really, really objectionable regimes around the world?

Don't get me wrong, I'm no hippie on a bicycle, and I don't hate Muslims or their faith (at least, no more than I dislike Christians or Christianity) but when you've got nations involved in the whole "execution for apostasy" game, cut them off. Yes, geopolitics is hard, but we should never have let ourselves get put in a position where we'd support any regime like this.

Re:And these people are our strongest allies? (4, Insightful)

ArchieBunker (132337) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012363)

I would have stopped considering them allies the second it was known that 16 out of the 19 9/11 hijackers were from Saudi Arabia.

Interpol (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012293)

Everyone involved in this fiasco should resign immediately if not prosecuted. This is insanity. If this poor man is murdered for this, then I want to see Khoo Boon Hui and Ronald Noble's heads on pikes.

Mohammed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012301)

The pedophile?

ONE LESS SAUDI TERRORIST IN THE WORLD !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012331)

It will be a good day at Hanging Rock when this very bad person has gone to his harrem in the sky !!

behold! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012333)

the face of Mohammed:

(_|_)

Shiite Eaters!

Well that explains a lot (1)

koan (80826) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012403)

No wonder they are all such fervent believers, they get killed if they aren't.

This is a violation of Interpol's constitution. (1)

goodmanj (234846) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012415)

Interpol's constitution states:
"in order to ensure the widest possible cooperation between the police authorities of its member States, it is strictly forbidden for organization to undertake any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character."
http://www.interpol.int/About-INTERPOL/Legal-materials/The-Constitution [interpol.int]

How the hell did this get through Interpol's bureaucracy?

Re:This is a violation of Interpol's constitution. (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012503)

You missed the point. Interpol does not intervene with religious matters. Interpol would be meddling with religious matters if it refused to cooperate with a member nation because it disagreed with its religious laws. So Interpol were being fair, in the fucked up sense of the word.

Interpol Values (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012423)

Values:
With such a diverse group of men and women, the organization's values play a particularly important role in maintaining a harmonious and effective working environment. The INTERPOL General Secretariat defines its values through the following qualities:
Respect for human rights
Integrity
Commitment to quality
Availability
Team spirit
Value for money
Accountability

Source: http://www.interpol.int/Recruitment [interpol.int] [interpol.int]

Action is taken within the limits of existing laws in different countries and in the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Source: http://www.interpol.int/About-INTERPOL/Overview [interpol.int] [interpol.int]

So lemme get this straight (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39012445)

INTERPOL will gladly help radical religious tyrants to enforce their religious intolerance all around the world.

Do I have that right?

The Age Old Art of Making an Example of Someone (1)

dryriver (1010635) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012447)

Ironic that we are in the 2nd Decade of the 21st Century, and anyone with the potential to make waves in any way is instantly charged/extradited/executed/crucified/smeared publicly, no matter where they are. Examples: Man tweets relatively insignificant crap about Mohammed - extradited to KSA and charged with Apostasy/Death Penalty. Man/Peace Activist in 70s reveals Israel has Nkes/WMDs - gets instant life-in-prison in Israel. Man leaks government war/diplomacy documents on the web - Charged with raping 2 women in Sweden/extradition to U.S. and Life Sentence Wanted (some want him executed, too). Socialist/Lefty Man gets ready to challenge Sarkozy presidency in France - charged with sudden nude sex assault on chamber maid in Manhattan Hotel, arrested on way to NY Airport, supposedly prevented from "fleeing" to France. British Man hacks U.S. gov computers looking for "UFO and Free Energy Evidence" - spends 10 years in will-he-be-extradited-to-USA-or-not-? limbo. The cases may be different, but the point of the actions taken against each man is the same. Punish-Him-And-Make-An-Example-Of-Him. Whether the laws should actually work this way is anybody's guess...

fuck you islam (1)

FrozenFood (2515360) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012487)

fuck you islam

fuck you muhammed

and people say islam is a religion of peace.

"then again atheists aren't as likely to burn your house down" - Yhatzee

A religion of peace? (1)

YankDownUnder (872956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012563)

According to the 10 Commandments: "Thou shalt not kill" It's strange that society and religion can re-interpret this to their perspective instead of standing on the reality of the meaning. It also goes to show that, as a "monotheistic" religion, Islam puts Mohammed above all other humans - and even God; wherein lies the inherent problem. This is exactly how Islam creates enemies - of it's own volition - and creates fear throughout the non-muslim world. Very sad, very sad. I'm fairly certain that God would think of this (and all other religious executions) as being an insult to His Creation.

Knock off the Islam-bashing (4, Insightful)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 2 years ago | (#39012585)

Man there's a heck of a lot of trolls commenting here.

Look, this is a problem of dictatorship, not of religion. The majority of the world's Muslims live in democracies and don't have such repressive laws. Muslims in America are aghast at such an unjust situation. Saudi is the backwards exception in the Muslim world. I'm a Muslim and I certainly don't support what's going on here.

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