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Canadian Govt To Introduce Massive Internet Surveillance Law

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the what-are-you-looking-at? dept.

Canada 215

An anonymous reader writes "The Canadian government will introduce new Internet surveillance legislation tomorrow that will mandate a massive new surveillance infrastructure at all Canadian ISPs and remove the need for court oversight of the disclosure of customer information. Michael Geist has a detailed FAQ on the history of the bill, the likely contents, the lack of government evidence supporting the need for the invasive legislation, and what Canadians can do about it."

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To stop child pornographers and organized crime? (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020431)

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews said the law will give the tools to police to adequately deal with 21st-century technology, and said anyone opposing the laws favours "the rights of child pornographers and organized crime ahead of the rights of lawabiding citizens."

If that's true, why do you need to avoid court oversight? If you're going after real criminals, what exactly is stopping you from getting a *warrant* to track them and get their information? Are Canadian judges uniquely reluctant to sign warrants when actual criminal activity is involved, so much so that you need to bypass them?

Or are you REALLY looking to go after someone else, someone that a judge is NOT going to sign a warrant for?

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020509)

What they want:
Step 1: assume all citizens are involved in organized crime
Step 2: observe until you can find a case
Step 3: issue fines
Step 4: revel in revenue increases due to above fines

It gets a lot harder when someone is asking "what probable cause do you have to watch this one?"

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (5, Insightful)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020599)

I guess all Canadians are presumed Guilty, until you can afford to provide your innocence.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (4, Insightful)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020705)

Yeah, Canada is getting more like the US every day. Sorry to hear that, guys. You had a helluva nice civilised country up there.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

kdawson (3715) (1344097) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021957)

Yeah, Canada is getting more like the US every day. Sorry to hear that, guys. You had a helluva nice civilised country up there.

Yeah, hear's an idea for the administration-

1. The US. creates incentive / law to force much of American traffic through Canada.
2. Canada does wiretapping of Us. citizens.
3. US. asks Canadia "nicely" for transcripts of wiretapping.
4. ???
5. Instant US warantless wiretapping.

Surprised this hasn't happened before...oh wait, lol, who am I kidding?

-KD

(ps, vote for Obama or Newt Gangrene cuz he's gonna stop all of this LOL)

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020951)

We did this to ourselves, you know. Canada had three chances to toss the Harper government out, and the third time, we handed them a majority despite their myriad offences that would have toppled prior governments (butchering Statistics Canada, running endless attack ads, blowing a billion dollars turning Toronto into a police state for the G20, proroguing parliament to avoid answering difficult questions, complicity in torture of Afghan detainees, being found in contempt of parliament... And these are just the ones I can remember off the top of my head). As a nation, we deserve exactly what we're getting for not turfing that clown Harper at the first opportunity.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (4, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021381)

You can't vote a government out, you can only vote another government in... and they would probably be doing pretty much the same as this one.

And Canada was doing OK with a minority government until the left decided to commit suicide by forcing yet another election that no-one wanted. That has to be one of the worst 'shot myself in the ass' moments in political history.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021713)

That's not true. The Liberals lost their government for far less with the sponsorship scandal. By comparison, the Conservatives have done far, far worse in their favouritism, their contempt for evidence-based policy, and utter lack of transparency which they were elected to improve in the first place, and to suggest the Liberals would have done the same if they were in power is disingenuous at best.

Also, the election really came down to a last minute NDP surge, an anomaly in the campaign. If the left's power hadn't diluted at the last possible minute, then the Conservatives would have gotten a minority, which would have resulted in a joint Liberal/NDP government rule, given that the two parties had expressed no intention in working with the Conservatives should another Conservative minority come to pass. It was a political gamble that the left lost, but a failed gambit is far from 'committing suicide' or 'shooting themselves in the ass'.

Re:Au Contraire (2)

Phrogman (80473) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021857)

Yes, the election gave our Supreme Leader Stephen Harper license to build his police state (practiced during the G20), once he has legislation like this in place - and all the new prisons have been completed, and that might be seen as a "shot myself in the ass" moment I admit. Harper now has free reign to remake the country according to his own plan - and its all Right-Wing, all the time for him. I am ashamed of my fellow Canadians for electing this charlatan to office repeatedly.
However, from the point of view of the political Left (i.e. the New Democratic part, since even our old Liberals were very conservative much of the time, and sliding more so), it raised them from an also-ran with only a few seats in the house to being the official opposition for the first time in history. It also exploded the Liberal party which is all but dead at the moment.
The election polarized Canada politically. Now what remains to be seen is if Canadians can find the wits to throw Harper out on his fucking ass in the next election and elect an NDP prime minister. Sadly, Jack Layton died after the election and I think only he might have pulled that off.
Personally I think its probably too late for Canada now. Harper is in and he is going to stay in, using/abusing all the powers of his office to stay in power. I am quite prepared to believe that the Conservatives will find some manner to abuse this legislation once it passes to help stiffle the opposition or find dirt to spew out in attack ads.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021013)

I guess all Canadians are presumed Guilty, until you can afford to provide your innocence.

You wouldn't want to negatively impact the ability of law enforcement to violate your rights would you?

You can always plead guilty if you don't want to pay the exorbitant cost of going to court. It would probably be cheaper. I did it once, saved thousands.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021649)

In your case were you actually guilty? Or were you innocent. If talking something that is minor and will not stay on your record yeah it may be worth it. If not then why take the easy road out?

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022019)

In your case were you actually guilty? Or were you innocent. If talking something that is minor and will not stay on your record yeah it may be worth it. If not then why take the easy road out?

I don't know if I was guilty or not. It was over a threat I apparently made when I was drunk, and it was 18 months in the past. I have no recollection, and since there were no other witnesses, there was no proof. It would have been thrown out, but I would have had to hire a lawyer and travel back and fourth to the court (300 miles). I pleaded guilty and got a $200 fine instead. The feminists got their statistic, I didn't have to suffer through a trial and associated court costs.

It doesn't bother me, what it does is lessen my already miniscule respect for our justice system. The judge did not like me pleading guilty, but he couldn't throw it out at that stage.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1, Offtopic)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020685)

Finding new ways to raise cash is critical once you've stepped down the socialism/welfare state path.

When the balance between those who contribute to the system more than they drain and those who drain more than they contribute starts to tip, the citizenry feels it in their wallets.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020939)

This is not off topic. The parent post astutely sees that these machines of law are being installed to give the government a new way to levy fines.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020537)

...someone that a judge is NOT going to sign a warrant for?

Public figures and officials?

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (5, Insightful)

The Askylist (2488908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020543)

Won't somebody think of the children?

Typical slimeball politician - he'll probably come out with "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" next.

Don't forget - Canada doesn't have freedom of speech, so the police will be able to use this to harass thought criminals and other doubleplusungood types.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020701)

Actually we do. It's 'freedom of expression' in our Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Then one of the Jewish backed lobby groups got some 'hate speech' mechanism added - which is used to crush reporting of Israel's warcrimes, and patently ignored when peddling war propaganda about any of Israel's enemies.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

The Askylist (2488908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021739)

It was the "hate speech" to which I was indirectly referring.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (4, Insightful)

adonoman (624929) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020731)

Oddly enough, he seems to be going with the line that opposing this bill is questioning the integrity of front-line police forces. Of course, I'm questioning the integrity of front-line police forces. The entire system is built around the fact that we can't expect to trust all individuals to behave.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (-1, Flamebait)

rmstar (114746) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020747)

Typical conservative politician - he'll probably come out with "nothing to hide, nothing to fear" next.

FTFY

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021173)

Only a moron would think that conservative or liberal has anything to do with it. You need to open your eyes to the fact that ALL politicians the world over are in it for their own benefit. Chances are, in this case, that these laws are motivated by the intellectual property lobby.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

Jawnn (445279) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021665)

Only a moron would think that conservative or liberal has anything to do with it. You need to open your eyes to the fact that ALL politicians the world over are in it for their own benefit. Chances are, in this case, that these laws are motivated by the intellectual property lobby.

I can only speak for the U.S., where the "conservatives" demand the insane abuses of civil rights, and the liberals are to afraid to call "bullshit" for fear of being labeled "soft on terrorism". So yeah. Both groups suck when it comes to defending our rights. And the terrorists win again.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39022073)

You are a moron.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

The Askylist (2488908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021723)

If you saw the damage that the Left have done in the UK to our rights and freedoms, you might not have such a jaded view.

All politicians distrust the people - it is, after all, the people who made them and the people who (theoretically) can break them. It is the State itself that is the greatest threat to our freedoms, and if you think that conservatives are worse in that respect than socialists then I suggest you read some history.

They are all as bad as each other - remember that no matter who you vote for the Government always wins. I'll take a small state libertarian over any of the statists any day.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (0)

MachDelta (704883) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020787)

Canada doesn't have freedom of speech

No, we have something better: freedom of expression. ;)

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

The Askylist (2488908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021837)

Er... no you don't. [wikipedia.org]

Another victory for the forces of evil dressed up as protecting the vulnerable / minority / whatever.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021107)

Address please, time to setup a million cameras watching him at all hours of the day. Live stream that shit and let's see how fast this law dies :D

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (4, Insightful)

justforgetme (1814588) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020739)

It's a thinly veiled excuse.
Just like the misconception that free distribution of independent literature would:
1) turn the peasants into hedonists (Confucianism - moveable type press)
2) put "the beast" into people (Catholic church - Gutenberg printing press)

Well, the governments were "right" back then so they must be "right" now aswell.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (5, Insightful)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020749)

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews said the law will give the tools to police to adequately deal with 21st-century technology, and said anyone opposing the laws favours "the rights of child pornographers and organized crime ahead of the rights of lawabiding citizens."

That's quite right, actually, I do "favor" their rights. They have a right to due process of law. Any government official who says they do not favor the rights of any individual under the law is not fit for office, and should probably be impeached. One of those rights is to privacy from government surveillance without a warrant.

Not that that quote even makes sense, anyways: anyone who opposes the bill favors the rights of everyone.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (5, Informative)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020847)

Back in the 1030s Hitler is reported to have said something along these lines. "If you want to pass a draconian piece of legislation wrap it in 'protecting our most precious resource, our children' such legislation will never be defeated." He went on to use this tactic in regards to several pieces of anti-Jewish anti-Polish legislation.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

Slippery_Hank (2035136) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020973)

How are we going to fill (and justify) all of our fancy new super jails if we can only go after people who are actually commiting crimes?

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021929)

We can fill them up with banksters and politicians.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021651)

That is an excellent point of which I am sure will get overlooked by everyone, except parliament, which they in turn already know this, and want to pass the bill anyways.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022043)

Could somebody change the /. moderation system so that we can take that one above +5, please.

Re:To stop child pornographers and organized crime (4, Interesting)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022231)

The easiest way for them to do this is to adopt another legal fallacy: like corporations are people, encryption is a munition, money is speech, the national "border" is 200 miles thick (100 miles to each side), and DRM is effective protection, declare the Internet as a public space and you can surveil with impunity.

(Acknowledged, those are US official legal fallacies and this is about Canada.)

Inevitability (2)

dittbub (2425592) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020477)

I give up. Just implant the video recorder in my brain already. Its the eventual result anyway.

Re:Inevitability (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020525)

But then they'll only see what you see. They also want to hear what you hear, touch what you touch, taste what you taste and above all else, know what you think. They're still on the fence about smelling what you smell, because that would be taking it too far.

Re:Inevitability (1)

ice3 (1305003) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020609)

replying to cancel an incorrect mod.

Re:Inevitability (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020727)

Santa?

Re:Inevitability (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021515)

Mandatory SQUID's for everyone!

Re:Inevitability (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020611)

Actually when I was younger, I thought the internet, as a disruptive technology was going to fundamentally change political sociology forever.

Guess that I
1. Underestimated the hard-coded weakness of human nature.
2. Haven't lived long enough to experience the cyclical inevitability of it all first hand. (The history book insufficient for this).

Re:Inevitability (1)

dittbub (2425592) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020995)

Yeah I though that too. I thought the internet was unrelenting freedom. its quite the opposite.

Won't somebody think of the children, eh? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020517)

Well I guess you Canucks can climb down off your high horses now, after chiding America for its SOPA and the like. We stopped ours dead in its tracks.

Re:Won't somebody think of the children, eh? (1)

adonoman (624929) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020753)

Except that this bill would still only get us as far as similar laws that already exist in the US and UK. SOPA is a whole other can of worms.

Re:Won't somebody think of the children, eh? (1)

justforgetme (1814588) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020811)

What the?!??!

You didn't stop anything. The only thing that has happened is they legislators have put it on hold for the dust to settle and once everybody is looking somewhere else they will bring it out and sign it again in a blizkriegian move and will be done with it before you have time to wipe your drool.

Fools!

Double speak (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020523)

Government abolishes long-gun registry citing privacy concerns. But I suppose spying without court oversight isnt violating privacy in their eyes.

Re:Double speak (3, Informative)

dittbub (2425592) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021109)

the conservative base is retarded. they will always support surveillance and spying because 'they have nothing to hide'. thats all the excuse they need in their retarded heads.

Is it time? (5, Insightful)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020539)

...for a change? I have another proposition: Lets pass a bill for a full massive surveillance infrastructure at all politicians, and here comes the important part, WITHOUT court order. Who is with me?

Re:Is it time? (5, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020563)

...for a change? I have another proposition: Lets pass a bill for a full massive surveillance infrastructure at all politicians, and here comes the important part, WITHOUT court order. Who is with me?

Why are you worried about getting a court order? I should think that being a politician would, in and of itself, be 'probable cause'.

Re:Is it time? (2)

justforgetme (1814588) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020901)

Well, I happen to be familiar with some democracies and in all of them elected officials are completely above suspicion, something that often is paraphrased as: "when lawmaking always cover your arse first!"

Petition (-1, Troll)

mcavic (2007672) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020549)

Can we start a petition to evict Canada from North America? They're giving us a bad name. Mexico is welcome to stay.

Re:Petition (2, Interesting)

aristotle-dude (626586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020757)

Can we start a petition to evict Canada from North America? They're giving us a bad name. Mexico is welcome to stay.

So you have no problem with that form the DHS now requires all US citizens to fill out when they "leave" the US for any reason be it business trip or vacation? I don't know of any other country in North America that requires its citizens to report to the government when the "leave".

Re:Petition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021085)

So you have no problem with that form the DHS now requires all US citizens to fill out when they "leave" the US for any reason be it business trip or vacation? I don't know of any other country in North America that requires its citizens to report to the government when the "leave".

Actually, Canada. The new regulation that Harper was talking about with Obama few weeks ago. It basically comes down to,

1. when someone from US enters Canada, Canada will send their entire information to US (ie. that person left US to Canada)

2. when someone enters US from Canada, US will send all the information about said individual to Canada.

Canada is US's next state, more or less. So whatever laws US gets, Canada will also have. Whatever laws Canada has, US will most likely have some sort of a program too.

For example, the new copyright laws, they will make it illegal for Canadians to watch videos on places like youtube that are copyright infringements. Together with this law about pervasive surveillance and next thing we know, we get tickets in the mail for watching random videos or listening to some music on internet radio. You know, like traffic cameras for cars.

Re:Petition (2)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021097)

BS. There's a 100% optional form available if you wish to register items you're taking abroad to avoid any hassles about duty on reentry, but it's sort of a waste of time IMHO which is absolutely not legal advise. If you have knowledge of any requisite form that millions of people departing the US each year are apparently not filling out, please let us know.

Re:Petition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021765)

Just going off my own experience, unless you come in carrying a rolex, liquor, cigarettes, or other 'obviously expensive' or 'obviously restricted' items, they could give a flying fuck what you take with you in either direction.

Honestly the only purpose of all that anal retentive posturing is usually to ensure people don't just use 'personal entry' as a dodge to normal customs duties by having a bunch of mules haul stuff into/out of the country claiming it's 'personal effects'.

Not to say you'll never get a customs agent fucking you around over it, but if they're corrupt, or you're a dick, they'll be doing it whether or not there's a REAL legal reason for them to be.

Advice for the rest of us (3, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020561)

Travel light to Canada [slashdot.org] .

The Good Old Days Are Gone (3, Funny)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020565)

It brings a tear to my eye to see that our beloved secret police will no longer get to enjoy the local bar, pub or coffee shop while listening in on people's conversations. Instead now they are going to be relegated to dank little cubes in the cellars of mammoth government buildings poring over endless text files of internet data. I can just imagine the deceased members of the East-German Stasi rolling in their graves.

Re:The Good Old Days Are Gone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020779)

Don't worry, they can get an iPad.

Thin Veil (5, Insightful)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020569)

That is an extremely thin veil. The politicans really want to ultimately be able to control dissent. I grow weary of this crap but human ingenuity finds a way around little problems like these. I am waiting for the time when communities come together to build community-owned, decentralized networks nullifying the point of creating such laws as these. If the internet were really owned by the people, a surveillance law would be practically impossible to enforce. It just shows that government is afraid of the people and it should be. People should not fear their government.

Smashing the printing presses (1)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020751)

Tyrants and Kings used to do it all the time. Public opinion mush be controlled.

Meet the new boss....

Re:Thin Veil (3, Interesting)

forkfail (228161) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021065)

The 'net was decentralized at it's start. That only lasted a few years before the corporations bought up all the hubs and trunks. And now, the tool of said corporations is making laws to ensure eternal control.

It seems that there is nothing that can be built that won't get taken away and turned into a tool of control.

Re:Thin Veil (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022103)

Rose Tyler: So, what is it? What's wrong?
The Doctor: Don't know, some kind of signal drawing the TARDIS off course.
Rose Tyler: Where are we?
The Doctor: Earth, Utah, North America. About half a mile underground.
Rose Tyler: And... when are we?
The Doctor: 2012.
Rose Tyler: God, that's so close. So I should be... 26.

Adam Mitchell: This is Mr. van Statten.
Rose Tyler: And who is he when he's not at home?
Adam Mitchell: Mr. van Statten owns the Internet.
Rose Tyler: Don't be stupid, no one owns the Internet.
Henry van Statten: And let's just keep the whole world thinking that way, right kids?

Henry van Statten: So, the next President. What do you think? Republican or Democrat?
Diana Goddard: Democrat, Sir.
Henry van Statten: For what reason?
Diana Goddard: They're... just so funny, Sir?

Re:Thin Veil (1)

na1led (1030470) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021187)

The only way around this, and to preserve your freedom would be to move to Mars. Even then, freedom will only last a short while.

Sad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020573)

I'm saddened that our neighbor to the north is acting like my own country. At least we won't hear the jokes anymore from Canadians. You guys need to fight this.

You were on my short list for places to move when things go to hell here. Now what.

Re:Sad (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020615)

Antarctica. Or even better, north pole.

Why isn't everything encrypted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020585)

Because that's where we're heading: a completely obfuscated Internet.

Speed things up, Cut out the middle man (4, Insightful)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020617)

Make if easier for the government to do its job. At the end of every day email copies of your internet activity to Public Safety Minister Vic Toews.

Already done. Canada participates in Echelon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021067)

Canada is one of the five English-speaking countries (the 'Five Eyes') that participates in Project Echelon, and has for decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echelon_(signals_intelligence) [wikipedia.org]

Part of this system involves collusion between spy agencies to exchange data. E.g. The US National Security Agency is forbidden from spying on US citizens inside the USA, but the Australian military is not, and vice-versa. They get around this by swapping data. Your emails are ALREADY available to the Vic Toews.

Re:Already done. Canada participates in Echelon (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021253)

Sorry, what was that?

(Same sig since 1998)

Re:Already done. Canada participates in Echelon (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021261)

But they are not in his inbox :-)

what Canadians can do about it ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020693)

Since our government is probably being leaned on by yours ( aka Homeland Security ), and we'ld like to continue to trade with you, effectively nothing :-( .

WAR! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020695)

The War of the Internet is in full swing... yet another front has opened! Call to arms! Keep writing/phoning your representatives! Join Pirate Parties! Go to demonstrations if there is one near you!

Past battles (might flare up again):
#SOPA
#PIPA

Current battles:
#ACTA
#TPP
#C11
#IPRED(2)
#INDECT
#pRECISE
#RWA
#PCIP
#SOPAIreland

Future battles
#C30
#SOPA/PIPA-replacement

Re:WAR! (1)

The Askylist (2488908) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022041)

Add to that RIPA and the Digital Economy Act in the UK - battles we've already lost to the statist scum that inhabit all 3 of our major political parties.

The only thing our current coalition has done for freedom is to scrap the identity card scheme that Labour proposed, but considering the 3,000 new laws passed between 1997 and 2010 that effectively require identity checks for everything, that's small beer.

last chance to be an anonymous coward (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020743)

This may be close to your last chance to be an anonymous coward, so sign the petition at openmedia,
http://openmedia.ca/StopSpying

Re:last chance to be an anonymous coward (1)

1_brown_mouse (160511) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021153)

I find signing an internet petition as useful as praying for a cure.

Sign the petition (4, Insightful)

alexo (9335) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021747)

This may be close to your last chance to be an anonymous coward, so sign the petition at openmedia,
http://openmedia.ca/StopSpying [openmedia.ca]

And don't forget to donate as well

Equal and Opposite... (4, Insightful)

SuperCharlie (1068072) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020759)

Just an observation... it seems that anything with great potential to be good to mankind always seems to come with something equally bad... maybe its some kind of conservation of benefit equality.. but if you think about it.. theres not too many things that come along with benefits that do not come with equal detractors. The Internet, with its promise of global communication and sharing has now become the tool for government control of the global masses. Sounds about right. Sadly.

Save the children... or make their work easier. (4, Insightful)

EmperorOfCanada (1332175) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020783)

I love how they are always trying to protect the children when all they want is to make their jobs easier. Can you imagine if say Coca cola were able to make laws. How many laws would they pass to make selling cola easier?
What this all boils down to is that they have all the tools they already need to nail organized crime as any judge will sign warrants for that. Where the judges are "uncooperative" is when it comes to trolling to see if protesters are planning on embarrassing the government or police.
What Canadians want is more protection of our rights and more exposure of what the police and government are hiding. This law proposes the exact opposite.
I can't imagine the surveillance they will now rain down on someone who say does a freedom of information request on the RCMP. A situation that no judge in a million years would agree to.
A good example of a law that most Canadians would want is that the police can't use a drone without a warrant. I don't want them peeking over my bushes.

Re:Save the children... or make their work easier. (4, Insightful)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021235)

Can you imagine if say Coca cola were able to make laws[?]

They'd classify Pepsi as a Class 1 controlled substance and have the DEA enforce its prohibition. Wait, didn't this happen with the timber industry?

Re:Save the children... or make their work easier. (1)

fightersfury (2206088) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021525)

What are you hiding on the other side of your bushes? A KIDDIE PORN STUDIO?!?! I demand 24/7 surveillance over your yard by a squadron of drones. Those who want privacy are bound to be criminals. If you have nothing to hide, why worry about the government seeing everything you do, knowing everything about you, and keeping a database on you that incorporates all that information? They're just making sure you are not looking at kiddie porn. They need all that information. I mean it's pretty obvious that political dissenters are kiddie porn addicts, because if you disagree with the political norm you obviously have a sexual attraction towards children. That's the only reason they need the information. I applaud their efforts.

The real problem... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020803)

The real problem is that we can't trust the politicians to use our data correctly, not that they are collecting it.

If all my data is used for is discovering that I'm not a criminal, then I'm happy.
If my data is used to arrest me for not-actually-crimes I didn't commit, and then left on a train so someone can steal my possessions, my online and real life identity then do things the government disapproves of in my name - Then I reach for the encryption&anonymity tools.

Re:The real problem... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021459)

No, the problem is that they're collecting it.

Not just governments censor the internet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39020827)

Some parents also censor web content.

http://www.wsoctv.com/news/news/local/youtube-dad-who-shot-daughters-laptop-gets-visit-a/nHbcR/

Goes right along with the 2nd Amendment.

Too Late. (5, Insightful)

bedwards (1937210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39020875)

We have a myriad of technical solutions to this problem.

Tor and the .onion domains effectually neutralise the ability of a third party (The state or any other organisation) to perform survailance on internet traffic.

Freenet enables the disemenation of whatever material anybody cares to share, to anybody.

Bitcoin allows unregulated trade.

It should be our goal to spread these existing tools and develop new methods of ensuring information can be transferred between people without fear, censorship, or interferance of any other person.

Re:Too Late. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021375)

Bitcoin allows forex trader wannabes to play a zero sum game with pretend money on casino sites masquerading as currency exchanges.

FTFY

Re:Too Late. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021759)

It should be our goal to spread these existing tools and develop new methods of ensuring information can be transferred between people without fear, censorship, or interferance of any other person.

This is naive. Technology alone cannot win the struggle against info-tyrants. The political and social fronts are much more important at this point. Yes, the technology should be used/spread/developed, but mainly as a threat that informs the political dialog.

Re:Too Late. (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021809)

I'm amazed it hasn't happened yet.. but the eventual step is to criminalize those very tools. Won't even be hard, under the guise that they "enable child pornographers and organized crime" .. because well.. they actually do (create a system for transfering data anonymously and some people are going to use it for bad things, impossible to have selective total privacy, etc..).

Ok, Conservative Party (3, Informative)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021009)

Remind me why I should ever vote for you again? I have voted against you in the previous number of federal elections (even while considering myself conservative) because of this stuff. You're not helping change my mind!

I don't understand (3, Insightful)

Xacid (560407) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021055)

I don't understand what it is with this recent(?) obsession with wanting to bypass warrants? It just outright baffles and frustrates me.

Re:I don't understand (5, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021239)

I don't understand what it is with this recent(?) obsession with wanting to bypass warrants?

How can you build a police state if you need a warrant to spy on everyone?

Re:I don't understand (3, Interesting)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021427)

See, I don't have a problem with the police getting a warrant for surveillance. That's because you've got to have a person check and you can't just go fishing. It's a terrible invasion of privacy to just have to police looking over your shoulders.

What you can do now though is that if anyone comes out against a party or against any idea AT ALL, they can just blackmail you with your Internet history. "Hey Beardo, it looks like you like this and this, would be a shame if this went to the CBC, wouldn't it? I guess you're not all that opposed to this pipeline after all." (In my case I have no shame and no pride so it wouldn't really bother me.)

They also don't have to get probable cause to see if you're downloading stuff. grep everyones_history_Telco mp3 "Here's everyone that downloaded any mp3s in the last month, Sony." It's akin to drugtesting the sewer to see if anyone in a suburb has taken drugs, and then checking every toilet in the neighbourhood.

There's not even a chance that this law will be found Constitutional by the SCC or acceptable by the privacy comissionner.

Or if not, what we can do is get PI licences and publish the web history of every MP and Senator and their familes every single day.

Re:I don't understand (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021749)

So they want the current chinese system for 1. keeping tabs on everyone, 2. 'enforcement' justification. No surprises here.

Re:I don't understand (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021873)

There's not even a chance that this law will be found Constitutional by the SCC or acceptable by the privacy comissionner.

I really hope you are right.

While I don't think our system here in Canada is perfect, it does seem to have an ok track record of squashing these insane laws before they become a reality.

New Fee (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021393)

Perfect, I can't wait to pay the new Internet Surveillance Fee of $7.85 on both my home internet and my cell phone to cover the cost of this ridiculous display of Harper's majority government. I hope you conservatives are happy, way to ruin Canada.

Putin, Pinochet, Hitler, Harper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39021477)

Draconian governments always find the need for 'extra controls' over others, while removing all oversight with regard to their actions. Hitler burned the Reichstag. Harper has systematically destroyed civil liberties in Canada, (following the lead of the US). He doesn't have any issues with China, because he is adopting the policies of China too! At some point, he will order tanks into the street and start shelling neighborhoods in Canada (just like Bashar al-Assad). Don't want to vote for me? Take that! He hasn't got a problem pissing $1Billion away on a G8 summit (why spend $20 million when you can get bad press for 50 times as much), and while you are at it, prop up the American arms industry with overpriced airplanes, ignore unemployment problems at home, keep telling people everything is rosy (when people clearly see that it isn't), ride on the economic coat tails of the Liberals (Paul Martin knows about fiscal responsibility, Jim Flaherty clearly doesn't), and make people regret that you are in charge. ...Just like Hitler.

Re:Putin, Pinochet, Hitler, Harper (1)

Phrogman (80473) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022183)

To be fair, the high cost of the G8/G20 conferences was due in part to the massive amount of police anti-riot and riot-supression gear that was purchased for police all across the country, plus the expenses of bringing all those police to Toronto then staging the violent parts of the riot (using Police undercover agents to incite the violence) so that they get a chance to try out the new equipment. Really all Harper did was try to hide the cost of equipping and training the enforcers for the Police State using the conference. But then he didn't have the majority then did he?
I suspect now he can afford to be more obvious about things, once the new prisons are up and running. Until then he will just keep putting more legislation in place to aid his corporate owners and make the task of turning the country into more of a police state easier down the road.

Creepy (3, Interesting)

koan (80826) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021541)

"The new system would require the disclosure of customer name, address, phone number, email address, Internet protocol address, and a series of device identification numbers. "

That part about the "series of device identification numbers" will likely be a hardware profile similar to the kind used for DRM'ing software and not just a MAC address, if every access point records this profile then this type of surveillance is extensive, very extensive.
Your Internet fingerprint as it were.

For some reason I never associated Canada with this draconian crap, but there it is, along with Australia's equally intrusive measures soon the Internet will no longer be a forum of open discussion but rather one demoted to "content delivery" system, just like TV.

Past Advice (2)

lazarus (2879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39021919)

Fourteen years ago I was invited to speak to Canadian MPs about "Internet safety." The only MPs that showed up (sober) were Conservative MPs. Other MPs (Liberals, NDP, and Bloc) were in the same building partying with the Lumber Lobby and the strippers they brought with them. A few Bloc MPs showed up a little later but were so drunk they could hardly walk.

To say I'm disappointed with this current turn of events is an understatement given what I have done to avoid it. That said, anybody who thinks that this is because the Conservatives are in power is, frankly, just an ignorant troll. Governments want control. All governments. You're job as the populace is to vocally encourage them to focus their efforts on methods of "protecting the people" (the initial and still principle role of government) that do so in a way that does not infringe on their rights as citizens.

If you're concerned about it (and you should be), be sure to contact your MP and tell them how you feel, what they should be doing differently, and how this is going to effect your vote in the next election.

Harper's recent China trip (1)

Kernel Kurtz (182424) | more than 2 years ago | (#39022115)

must have given him some new ideas to incorporate into this legislation.

Good thing for onion routing and anonymous proxies. They are not just for users in China and Iran any more............

One word: JEWS... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39022153)

... if you haven't worked it out yet, you never will...

The JEWS own your country, and thus own YOU, and your children. The JEWS tell your government what to do, the JEWS print the money (or 'issue' it, if it's digital), the JEWS run your entire media, and your academia, thus ensuring the next generation of children are totally brainwashed and will immediately leap to the defence of their 'masters' whenever somebody (like me) dares to tell the truth about them.

Find out whether the 'holocaust' stories were actually possible, then ask yourself why you aren't allowed to even ASK QUESTIONS about it in many countries in Europe, and ask yourself why Brendan O'Connell is in prison for three years for merely TALKING TO a couple of Jews.... sorry - 'God's chosen people'...

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