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Stealing Laptops For Class Credit

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the for-bonus-points-assassinate-the-prof dept.

Crime 138

First time accepted submitter core_tripper writes "Students at the University of Twente have stolen thirty laptops from various members of the university's staff. They were not prosecuted for this, so they could just get on with their studies. Indeed, these students even received ECTS credits for these thefts. UT researcher Trajce Dimkov asked the students to steal the machines as part of a scientific experiment. Stealing these laptops turned out to be a pretty simple matter."

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138 comments

Looks like a familiar contest. (4, Interesting)

sethstorm (512897) | more than 2 years ago | (#39081233)

This sounds like Pwn2Own taken to the next (and otherwise illegal) level. In this case, it looks like they were auditing physical security amongst other things.

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (5, Interesting)

daedae (1089329) | more than 2 years ago | (#39081279)

Two relevant anecdotes from when I was in college:

1) In an artificial life course we got to propose our own semester project. One guy wanted to write a worm, but the professor was afraid that his tenure would not be enough to protect his job if the worm got out of hand.

2) One faculty member that taught a computer security course used to make the offer that anybody who could successfully access his gradebook and change their grade could have the higher grade. He stopped doing this after students switched from trying to electronically break in to just casing his house.

Why stop? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081357)

Just specify some boundaries. Where was the imagination that birthed the idea in that decision?

And what do you mean casing the house, like attempting to break in or simply gathering information like the names of his children, their birthdays, he wife's name, etc.

Shoot, all anyone would need to get into my dad's laptop is his current dog's name. (Useful for my mom, but not exactly top notch security.)

Re:Why stop? (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 2 years ago | (#39081671)

Shoot, all anyone would need to get into my dad's laptop is his current dog's name. (Useful for my mom, but not exactly top notch security.)

One of the many reasons I prefer dogs over cats.
Dogs can learn their name.

Re:Why stop? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081805)

Cat's are perfectly capable of learning their own names. They simply don't give a fuck when you use it.

Re:Why stop? (1)

SydShamino (547793) | about 2 years ago | (#39082125)

Several of our cats have recognized their names (as distinct from the names of our other cats) and come when called.

Re:Why stop? (3, Funny)

tchuladdiass (174342) | about 2 years ago | (#39082909)

Our dog doesn't call when called, but knows the cat's name. Every time the cat is called for dinner, dog comes running.

Re:Why stop? (4, Funny)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | about 2 years ago | (#39083267)

...speaking of food, I still think that as long as there are hungry people in the world, there is no such thing as an unwanted pet.

Re:Why stop? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083145)

"Cat's are perfectly capable of learning their own names."

Now if you only would be able to comprehend the use of apostrophes, then you would be almost as clever as a cat.

Re:Why stop? (1)

aztracker1 (702135) | about 2 years ago | (#39081817)

My girlfriend's cat plays fetch... doesn't so much respond to his name though...

Re:Why stop? (1)

Anarchduke (1551707) | about 2 years ago | (#39082947)

Try using a name that doesn't involve a curse word.

Re:Why stop? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083583)

I just call them all "allergy antagonist".

Re:Why stop? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083857)

My cat understands her name although she only cares enough to respond about half the time and mostly she just looks at me. Maybe 10% of the time she comes when called.

She understands dammit and goddammit too although it just may be my tone of voice when I say those words.

Re:Why stop? (1)

daedae (1089329) | about 2 years ago | (#39082001)

My understanding was he meant casing in the sense of wanting to break in while he was gone, since to some extent once you give up physical security all bets are off.

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (5, Informative)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#39081711)

This sounds like Pwn2Own taken to the next (and otherwise illegal) level .

They did not do anything illegal. They technically didn't trespass, they had prior permission from the University Security office. And they technically didn't steal anything but loaner laptops that had been loaned out to staff for the express purpose of this experiment.

The only reason you think they might have done something illegal is because of this phrase in the summary: "They were not prosecuted for this, so they could just get on with their studies." And the fact is, this sentence is just poorly worded (by the original non-native English author), and they were not prosecuted for this, not because of some weird altruist reason given by the University. The real reason they were not prosecuted is because they were given prior permission to do this experiment by the University Security office itself (and furthermore, the laptops they were stealing had been supplied by the grad student who wanted them stolen in the first place).

So in all regards, this seems like this was a well executed experiment. And it goes without saying that you should get prior permission before doing any kind of penetration testing or security audit. And ideally, such a permission should be clearly spelled out and obtained in writing, since executives have been known to go back on their word with security auditors once they find out how bad their security really is.

Also note that sometimes, con artists will recruit people to steal things for them under the guise of having them doing a security audit, so if you're going to participate in such an audit yourself, you better be damn sure that the person who's asking you to do such an audit is really the person they're claiming to be (and even if they are, that they're not setting you up for a theft that they've already committed themselves).

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081913)

Does the word "otherwise" mean nothing to you?

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081983)

Since Pwn2Own [wikipedia.org] is already perfectly legal, "otherwise illegal" in this case would mean illegal (the double-negative notwithstanding).

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (1)

LocalH (28506) | about 2 years ago | (#39081991)

The person you responded to said "otherwise illegal". Not that it was illegal as done here, but that it would otherwise be illegal without collusion with those being "stolen" from.

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082043)

Since Pwn2Own [wikipedia.org] is already perfectly legal, saying that "This sounds like Pwn2Own taken to the next (and otherwise illegal) level." would mean in this case that this new experiment is not just taken to the next step, but it's also illegal.

Also, you've got to admit that mentioning the illegality of this wouldn't make much sense, when both activities are already perfectly legal.

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (1)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#39082093)

Ah ok, now I see what you're saying! Yes, it could be interpreted that way too. Please ignore my previous anonymous reply.

The original parent will have to clarify what he meant, because in my personal opinion, it could still be interpreted either way.

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082437)

Could the staff that borrowed the laptops that were taken from them have a case that this experiment caused them extreme anxiety?

what happens if the things go wrong? (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#39082519)

Like Someone picks up the wrong item?

Other laws are broken in the course of doing the test.

Some harass cop busts some one and let's say try to hit them with raising arrest or other charges like braking and entering or some other law.

Let's say you miss a test or class sitting in lock up waiting for it to be cleared up?

some chains the laptop to a weak point and the person trying to take it end ups makes a big mess by pulling on it.

What if some posing a technicians give fake advice ends and that turns in to a big mess or end's giving a fake name that ends' up with some taking the heat just as some named there name.

Re:Looks like a familiar contest. (1)

1u3hr (530656) | about 2 years ago | (#39082873)

In this case, it looks like they were auditing physical security amongst other things. "Looks like"?

If you'd bothered to read the fucking article instead of racing to make a first post, you'd know that was exactly what it was about.

Um, English fail (1)

tautog (46259) | more than 2 years ago | (#39081243)

Even if the submitter speaks another language, couldn't Timmy at least READ the summary before posting it??

Re:Um, English fail (0)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#39081323)

Even if the submitter speaks another language, couldn't Timmy at least READ the summary before posting it??

Could you elucidate?

In the other news (2)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#39081255)

In the other news, 30 new government positions have been allocated as part of a "job program" to 30 soon to be graduates out of University of Twente. Seems like all of them will be IRS related jobs.

"Human behavior" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39081263)

It doesn't mention whether the cleaners or caretakers knew the people they were letting in or not.

Re:"Human behavior" (3, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | more than 2 years ago | (#39081297)

It doesn't mention whether the cleaners or caretakers knew the people they were letting in or not.

Does it matter? A lot of thefts are inside jobs.

outsourced cleaners with poor English don't know a (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#39081307)

outsourced cleaners with poor English don't know any better and a good story is all it takes to get past them.

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (2)

EdIII (1114411) | about 2 years ago | (#39081423)

outsourced cleaners with poor English don't know any better and a good story is all it takes to get past them.

Being a janitor does not mean you can use social engineering to get past them. Even with a good story. It depends on the janitors.

I have used social engineering to get past people that can speak the English real good, get paid many times more than a janitor, and have college degrees.

Social engineering works on people that are not always considering security around them, and to a large extent, those that are not cynical and suspicious of others by nature. It's much harder to get past assholes with the best stories and a lot easier to get past a cute secretary that is outgoing and bubbly.

You get a 60 year old janitor who has seen it all and heard it all, and believes there are aliens at Area 51, and you have somebody with a finely tuned bullshit detector. Those are the equivalent of landmines in social engineering.

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (4, Funny)

mooingyak (720677) | about 2 years ago | (#39081517)

I have used social engineering to get past people that can speak the English real good,

Have you used it on anyone who could speak English really well?

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#39081843)

William of Ockham had no beard. The most likely explanation is that it was chewed off by squirrels every morning.

Love that sig - is that of your mind?

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (1)

mooingyak (720677) | about 2 years ago | (#39081947)

Yeah that's an original.

Having 3 kids who love Dr. Suess in his many and varied forms, I've always appreciated your sig when I've spotted one of your comments.

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (1)

similar_name (1164087) | about 2 years ago | (#39081685)

So the social engineering aspect made me think of William James Clark [google.com].

From Amarillo Globe News [amarillo.com].

... he impersonated an army officer to take command of the launch site for nearly two days after 14 people were killed when an Interstate 40 bridge fell in eastern Oklahoma...

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (1)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | about 2 years ago | (#39082489)

You get a 60 year old janitor who has seen it all and heard it all, and believes there are aliens at Area 51, and you have somebody with a finely tuned bullshit detector.

A guy that believes there are aliens in a hangar in Nevada has a finely-tuned bullshit detector?

Hell, all you'd have to do is tell him the G-men are coming to destroy the evidence of aliens on the laptop ("You always thought Dr. Smith was a bit off, didn't you?"), and he'll help you get it out of the building.

Actually, I'm pretty sure that happened in The X-Files.

Re:outsourced cleaners with poor English don't kno (1)

MartinSchou (1360093) | about 2 years ago | (#39083771)

Thankfully the cleaners spoke perfect Dutch, which was a good thing, as the University of Twente is in the Netherlands.

Dumbass.

Re:"Human behavior" (3, Interesting)

stephanruby (542433) | about 2 years ago | (#39081929)

It doesn't mention whether the cleaners or caretakers knew the people they were letting in or not.

Given that the University has 9,000 students and 3,300 faculty/staff, and that they were 60 attempts of thefts (only 30 of which succeeded). And given that this experiment was conducted in the context of a security audit, I doubt that the successful cases were all due the cleaners actually knowing the student (may be some of them knew some of the students, but surely not all of them did, and in at least one case, the student got to the laptop just because the door was found unlocked when the door was supposed to be locked).

Besides, "knowing" someone and building rapport can be faked in an extremely short amount of time. For instance, when Steven Spielberg was still a teenager, he got into the Universal Studios through a guided tour, but when he left the Studio that night, he escaped from the guided tour, he dressed himself up in a suit, and he made a point to address the guard on his way out by his first name. After that night, he was able to go back and forth through that security checkpoint as long as that same guard was there, no questions asked. He was wearing the right uniform, a suit, plus the guard "knew" him from the previous day.

Security without security? (1, Insightful)

Dahamma (304068) | about 2 years ago | (#39081315)

"The university’s security staff were informed in advance, to make sure that the students involved did not end up in jail."

Physical security is a lot harder to enforce when you tell the physical security not to do their job...

Re:Security without security? (4, Interesting)

Telvin_3d (855514) | about 2 years ago | (#39081535)

From the description, I suspect the notification was more along the lines of "If you catch a student stealing a laptop, see if they are on this list before you call the cops" and not "sure, they can take whatever they want"

Re:Security without security? (4, Insightful)

KevMar (471257) | about 2 years ago | (#39081589)

I think its just the opposite. They didn't tell them to let the students steal the laptops, they let them know in advance that if they catch someone taking the laptop that it may be legit. Just by mentioning this would have made it harder because laptop theft would be on the security teams mind making it easier to spot.

Re:Security without security? (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about 2 years ago | (#39082239)

Of course, if your theory is true that could skew it the other way, which still affects the outcome ;)

I assume those students had a list of the exact faculty with said laptops, etc. It's a *bit* more than random theft when you have a coordinated effort to take something *knowing* that you would never be punished for it in the end. Still an interesting study and hopefully provided useful data, but it's still fairly contrived...

Re:Security without security? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083179)

"It's a *bit* more than random theft when you have a coordinated effort to take something"

Many thieves do coordinate their efforts. They may spend several days observing various routines of people and organizations before making a move based on their observations so that they can choose the right time and approach. That's why one piece of advice for people who don't want to be victims to crime is to avoid routines. If you're an attractive female who regularly walks home at night (from work or wherever) then don't take the same route every night, for example. Be unpredictable, take one street home one night and a different street the next.

Re:Security without security? (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about 2 years ago | (#39083269)

Yes, and you are an expert from all of the cop dramas you watch on TV? Or are you an AC because you are actually a master thief giving us your secrets?

Your example is not really relevant, I doubt any college students *mugged* their teachers. And 30 laptops from one imaginary project stolen in short order? Sure it's all speculation, but the security guys had 2 choices: 1) report the thefts and point out the connection that they already knew 2) ignore it because a teacher specializing in social engineering security told them not to harass his students. How do we have any idea what they would have decided if they weren't given prior knowledge? (which was basically my original point)

Re:Security without security? (4, Funny)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 2 years ago | (#39081807)

Of course, it would be a good scam to tell security that it's a class project anyway. Then after all the laptops are missing and don't show up again, they look up your name and find out you're not a professor and are nowhere to be found.

Re:Security without security? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083671)

As someone who studies at the University of Twente, and walks by the CTIT institute daily, security staff don't really patrol a lot. They get called in if something is stolen, or if someone is defacing any of the artworks spread around the campus, stuff like that. There are no "beat cops" who walk around all day.
 
Likely, what happened is that they were told not to call the cops immediately if they got a report of theft.

Re:Security without security? (1)

Dahamma (304068) | about 2 years ago | (#39083735)

Yeah, that's all I was saying... maybe if they called the cops after the first few the next 25+ would have been a bit harder :)

Very cool research! (1)

gweihir (88907) | about 2 years ago | (#39081317)

Seems there are still scientists out there that know how to do something both spectacular and scientifically valuable. Impressive! I wish there were a lot more that can do things like this.

Laptops are easy. (3, Funny)

MrQuacker (1938262) | about 2 years ago | (#39081337)

At the UofMN people walk out with entire desktops; while the people are still in their office. We had one person who was at her desk talking on the phone, with her back to the door, looking behind her out the window. Someone walked in, unplugged her iMac, and walked out with it.

An iMac doesn't exactly fit under the coat... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081409)

Did they find the person who did it or are you confessing?

Re:An iMac doesn't exactly fit under the coat... (3, Funny)

Anarchduke (1551707) | about 2 years ago | (#39082907)

Of course not. why would anyone confess to a crime? Coincidentally, is anyone looking to purchase a completely legitimate iMac? Only thing wrong with it is that its serial numbers seem to have fallen off.

Re:Laptops are easy. (4, Interesting)

Skyshadow (508) | about 2 years ago | (#39082435)

I work for a large company, large enough that I see people I don't recognize on our campus every single day.

Two years ago this weekend (Presidents Day, which is a holiday at our office) we had an enterprising thief roll a cart around our office around 5 PM on Friday, loading up laptops. Of course, by then most everyone had skipped out for their long weekend, but if someone was in the office he'd tell them it was for the "weekend virus scanner upgrade", promising people that their machines would be back on Tuesday morning.

I don't know this part for a fact -- our security people and management don't talk about this at all -- but I've heard it enough that I believe it: When someone objected to having their laptop taken, he'd act irritated and ask why they "didn't reply to any of the emails about the upgrade" and then make a show of updating his clipboard -- he'd collect the asset tag from the machine, office number and actually get the person to sign on the line.

I have no idea how many machines he made off with, but it was enough that we all had to suffer new BS security procedures for a year afterword. I would imagine that you could do this at pretty much any big office and get away with it.

Re:Laptops are easy. (2)

The Wild Norseman (1404891) | about 2 years ago | (#39082933)

At the UofMN people walk out with entire desktops; while the people are still in their office. We had one person who was at her desk talking on the phone, with her back to the door, looking behind her out the window. Someone walked in, unplugged her iMac, and walked out with it.

Similar thing happened at a uni I had attended. Someone walked in while the prof was in the office, unplugged the laptop and walked out.

When the thief found out he had just stolen an Acer though, he just quietly returned to the office and plugged it back in.

Re:Laptops are easy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083081)

One more reason to use a PC, too many connected and separate components to steal. (macs are easy, only power and USB to keyboard/mouse, no ethernet since mac people want the magic of wireless)

its no wonder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081341)

if you can get a phd by getting kids to rob for you, now i understand how obama got that nobel prize.

More details on the marking scheme please! (5, Funny)

martin-boundary (547041) | about 2 years ago | (#39081343)

Suppose one of the students followed his friend around to see how he stole a laptop, and then later copied the method? Would he get credit, or be marked down for plagiarism?

Re:More details on the marking scheme please! (1)

BenihanaX (1405543) | about 2 years ago | (#39081587)

And then suppose that student was not part of the research group (the "thieves"). Hope they had a backup security method.

Re:More details on the marking scheme please! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081623)

Only if he didn't properly cite it.

Who was really at fault? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 2 years ago | (#39081395)

From TFA:

The members of staff who had loaned the laptops were asked to make sure that these machines were always chained to their desks.

So the fault was with the people who loaned the laptops for not keeping them chained up. It's hard to loan someone something if you've chained it to your desk, but that's the best security if you don't trust the people you loan things to, I guess.

Re:Who was really at fault? (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#39081999)

every laptop for decades has a kingston lock on it, which is a little tiny lock with steel rope that loops around anything you feel is too heavy to lift with your laptop

If I loaned you my laptop I would be pretty fucking pissed if it got stolen even after my specific requirements to prevent such an action, and lastly for some odd reasons people often view laptops as valueless tools, which has always baffled me.

  I watched a co-worker one day get seriously irate cause someone stole all the pens off of her desk, and while bitching and moaning about it got up and went to go have a hissfit in the middle of lunch... leaving a brand new macbook behind in a not well known but still public area.

Re:Who was really at fault? (1)

duk242 (1412949) | about 2 years ago | (#39082499)

I've had a few laptops stolen from a computer lab that were chained down with kensington locks.. They managed to get the window off its rails, then reach in and pull 3 laptops out, all 3 of them the locks weren't strong enough to survive them pulling them hard enough. Maybe it was because I used a cheaper brand lock or something, but still kinda annoying :(

Re:Who was really at fault? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#39082603)

yea but (and there is always a but) if you had loaned the laptop and told you specifically to lock it down in a locked room, which would you be more mad about when it was stolen?

"they broke into though the window and used all their might to rip the lock out of the laptop"

or

"I left it in the wide open, only tethered by its power cord"

Clearly their majors were all... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081481)

...African American studies.

trust (1, Insightful)

Walt Dismal (534799) | about 2 years ago | (#39081525)

Seems like a douche move rather than a fair one. A university is a place of somewhat more trust in others than the outside, because in academia you share knowledge with others, the spirit is a bit different, you don't take others' tools.

Taking advantage of that to run a test of whether it's easy to steal laptops is not entirely ethical.

Not to say that people shouldn't be careful, but exploiting them isn't cool either.

When I was in school, someone hacked my student account and framed me for downloading and piracy. I didn't have to go to court, but if I ever found out who did it, I'd gladly have caused them serious injury.

The gateway experiment. (1)

rykin (836525) | about 2 years ago | (#39081677)

Interestingly enough, many of these students may never have attempted to steal a laptop because of the legal consequences. Now that they were given permission to become comfortable with the idea, it is more possible that one of them would be inclined to steal a laptop at a later point. After all, they now know how to get past security (assuming nothing is beefed up after the experiment).

Re:trust (2)

sexconker (1179573) | about 2 years ago | (#39081715)

Seems like a douche move rather than a fair one. A university is a place of somewhat more trust in others than the outside, because in academia you share knowledge with others, the spirit is a bit different, you don't take others' tools.

Taking advantage of that to run a test of whether it's easy to steal laptops is not entirely ethical.

Not to say that people shouldn't be careful, but exploiting them isn't cool either.

When I was in school, someone hacked my student account and framed me for downloading and piracy. I didn't have to go to court, but if I ever found out who did it, I'd gladly have caused them serious injury.

LOL.
Welcome to the real world. Protip: Academia, as much as it tries not to, does lie within the realm of the real world.
And anyone with a brain would be as untrusting, or more untrusting, of a university student/professor than they would of a random stranger.

Re:trust (2)

Xeno man (1614779) | about 2 years ago | (#39081769)

Where exactly does this sense of trust come from? Because you were a student and you trusted other students? You trust the faculty because they wouldn't risk their jobs?
That's great you have that much faith in your friends and such but that is not everyone that is in a university. Most schools have wide open doors most of the day where anyone can come and go as they please. Strangers are welcomed daily from delivery people, maintenance specialists, tour groups and friends of students and staff. It doesn't take much for someone to walk past an open door with a laptop sitting on the desk. It only take a few seconds for someone to throw it in their bag all because of an opportunity. Some people have the mentality that if something expensive isn't locked down, it means they don't want it so it might as well have a free sign on it.

Re:trust (2)

EvanED (569694) | about 2 years ago | (#39081943)

Know how I can tell you didn't RTFA?

No, it's not because this is slashdot. It's because the profs who were involved all agreed to it, and in fact didn't involve their normal machines. They didn't just go steal laptops and go "ha ha only kidding" after.

Re:trust (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082075)

Actually, from a security perspective, Universities tend to be "hostile environments." You get a lot of bright, young minds all in the same place with relatively little to lose (compared to later adult life), a wide variety of background skills and you have a recipe for mischief.

Re:trust (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082297)

At least at my university, anyone can walk into the building, take the lift and enter any open office.
One professor stepped out of his office to pick up a printout from the printer in the same hallway as his office.
When he returned a minute later his laptop was gone.
This is exactly why I lock my door every single time I step out of the office, even if it's just to get a drink.

Re:trust (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082449)

You would injure someone over that? What good would that do?

Re:trust (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082941)

>A university is a place of somewhat more trust in others than the outside, because in academia you share knowledge with others, the spirit is a bit different, you don't take others' tools.

You are a really, really naive human being.

Re:trust (1)

Walt Dismal (534799) | about 2 years ago | (#39083501)

I went to a science and technology school that had an honor system, and not a ghetto university. We respected each other, whether graduate or undergraduate. Perhaps you should go back to Digg or 4chan where your background and level of intelligence are more appropriate?

as anonymous as possible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39081683)

my school haul : 3 pc's + 24" crt monitor

my grad college haul : 2 macs + 1 pc +1 laserprinter

my postdoc haul : ram chips of dense variety, FPGA cards x 3

no laptops at anytime

no theses or undergrads were harmed nor any professors inconvenienced

Gucci Outlet (-1, Offtopic)

ddss (2576929) | about 2 years ago | (#39081855)

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Re:Gucci Outlet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39082003)

Hey, douche, do you know what a "nofollow" tag is?

hehe... (2)

hitmark (640295) | about 2 years ago | (#39082017)

Reminds me of the early days of computing, where often a student that was found able to break school system security was often given tasks by the IT admin.

Well done (3, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#39082613)

I once gave my undergrad students a similar assignment where they had to each score an ounce of weed for me.

It was also a great success and provided them with an important life lesson about society and individual liberty. Or something.

The Dean of my department at the time was not amused, though he did think the sticky red bud was the bomb.

Twenty (0)

backslashdot (95548) | about 2 years ago | (#39083003)

If they were really students at the Univeristy of Twente, how come they stole Thirty instead of Twenty laptops? Not very good students.

What a crying SHAME!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083067)

There is a bigger picture to consider in this case. What we have here is a perfect example of academia devising experiments in order to get the result that they wish to advance. This was in no way a scientifically established experiment, there were no controls and everyone was in on it. A perfect example of pseudo-science or shall we say the hacking of science. Anyone that uses a conclusion derived from this excercise, is being intellectually dishonest. This case is a perfect metaphor for the world we find ourselves in. It is not something we should embrace.

I had (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39083075)

heard of laptops being stolen from large businesses by people dressed and acting like UPS/delivery/IT personel. These types of people are generally ignored. Act as if you belong there and people will think you do, even though they have never seen you before.

The most sucessful ones that I had heard of had dressed themselves as delivery people and walked in with a 2 wheel cart with empty boxes on it. The boxes were not empty when the walked out again.

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