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$6 Trillion In Fake US Treasury Bonds Seized In Switzerland

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the that's-ok-the-official-ones-are-fake-too dept.

The Almighty Buck 199

ackthpt writes "If you're going to steal, steal big, right? Italian anti-mafia prosecutors have announced the seizure of $6 trillion of allegedly fake U.S. Treasury bonds, an amount that's almost half of the U.S.'s public debt. The probe focusing upon money laundering has also include financial dealings alleged to direct money to Nigerian sources to buy plutonium. Sound like a movie plot, yet? $6 Trillion, that's a lot of lettuce."

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Please clue me in. (4, Interesting)

grub (11606) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083121)


The U.S. embassy in Rome has examined the securities dated 1934, which had a nominal value of $1 billion apiece, they said in the statement.

I'm admittedly not a financial/bonds guy, but wouldn't $1 billion securities raise some eyebrows? In the same way that trying to pay for a Slurpee with a $1000 bill would.

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083137)

If they were smart criminals, they wouldn't be caught. If anything,m they'd be committing legal acts in political office.

  That's the sad thing, these aren't dangerous criminals, they can only cheat the dishonest.

Nobody ever said crooks were that smart (4, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083151)

Crooks come up with stupid plans all the time, and often let their own greed blind their judgement. Hell look at some of the people who scam the 419 scammers. The 419 scammers are counting on people's greed to overwhelm their good sense, and then fall victim to the same thing.

Indeed such a thing would almost certainly raise eyebrows but the crooks likely didn't think it through.

Re:Nobody ever said crooks were that smart (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084575)

A plot for the next Tom Clancy novel.

  Middle eastern dictator purchases intaglio presses and begins printing 100 dollar bills, T-bills, and stock certificates.The presses run night and day for a decade. Filling caves and warehouses with an impossible amount of phony "value".

  It doesn't go unnoticed another dictator accepts gold for oil. Discounting the price 5% for silver or platinum too. With 200 tons of gold she plans to release a new metal based currency. Prices of valuable metals rise. Industries around the globe absorb the increases.as prices rise. New mines are opened in politically unstable Africa to keep apace. Prices for metal continue to rise. ..a decade passes.

Time for the coup de grace. Terrorists launch an attack on the financial services market and their computers to erase the records....

  Rainbow Six is hired to capture both terrorists and dictators and bring them to trial for human rights abuses. Thus neatly avoiding panic in the currency market.

Great reading i can't wait!

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

Shavano (2541114) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083171)

I'm sure they were thinking they'd only have to sell one at a steep discount to be fabulously rich the rest of their lives.

Re:Please clue me in. (5, Informative)

superwiz (655733) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083231)

Generally, no. Bonds are issued in fairly large denominations. But in this case, it would raise eyebrows because of the date. $1billion dollar bond would not be issued in 1934. No financial institution would have lent money in such one large chunk against 1 financial paper. Today bonds are issued in at least 100 million issues, but as someone pointed out, today they are registered, so it doesn't matter what the original issue is.

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083365)

However, just 10 years earlier in 1924 the Germans, who live next door to Switzerland, experienced hyperinflation [wikipedia.org] . This got so bad that they had to change currencies and literally remove 12 zeros from the old one. Maybe the counterfeiter got his 2's and 3's mixed up?

Re:Please clue me in. (2)

the_other_chewey (1119125) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084521)

And a hyperinflation in Germany would affect the face value of US Treasury bonds exactly how?

Bearer bonds (2)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084509)

Can anyone comment on the infamous "bearer bonds" which Hollywood and movie bank robbers are so fond of?

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083235)

yeah, $1 billion is a ridiculously high denomination - they'd probably make denominations of a thousand or a few thousand for the high rollers.

Re:Please clue me in. (1, Troll)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084567)

Maybe they were thinking of the old Italian Lira [wikipedia.org] . At the time of the Euro changeover a 500,000 lire note was worth € 258.23.

Re:Please clue me in. (5, Informative)

VinylRecords (1292374) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083297)

The plan allegedly was to sell them to developing nations and dupe their governments. The mafia would create a circus theater filled with distractions to make them look like a legitimate outfit. Office space, limousines, fancy suits, lots of showmanship. They'd use foreign diplomats and politicians on their payroll to get presidents or warlords of a foreign country into a face to face meeting.

They get a leader of some inexperienced government, possibly even a wealthy warlord, of a developing nation, and try to get them to transfer $1 billion worth of wealth in exchange for a $1 billion U.S. treasury bond. It is actually very creative. Had they not been caught they might have been able to pull this off. Though I don't see how any bank would have not raised a million red flags for this transaction and the reports are that the criminals wanted to move the money through Swiss banks.

This isn't the first treasury bond scam nor will it be the last. Organized crime loves this scam. Every year a few individuals are arrested with fake bonds on them that are valued at billions of dollars. The Italian police found a bunch of fake $1 billion bonds during a routine car stop a few years ago.

Re:Please clue me in. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083733)

Banks are greedy motherfuckers, too. I worked for one (big one) doing due diligence. I personally delivered files on unsavory corporate raiders who gutted many companies and left behind ecological disasters that had to be then cleaned up by the EPA on taxpayer dime. But since none of them were ever convicted of anything, the bank smiled politely and opened their accounts.

Re:Please clue me in. (2)

repapetilto (1219852) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084343)

What is stopping them from being held responsible?

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084321)

And they would've gotten away with it too, if it hadn't been for you meddling kids!

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

pz (113803) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084409)

and try to get them to transfer $1 billion worth of wealth in exchange for a $1 billion U.S. treasury bond

My guess is that they'd try to get them to transfer some lesser amount to make the deal more attractive, say $500 million worth of assets. What despot isn't desparate for more cash?

Re:Please clue me in. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084541)

very insightful, and I was with you until:
"off. Though I don't see how any bank would have not raised a million red flags for this transaction "

hahahahahaha. Everything you said about suits and diplomats -- this is what makes banks know that everything is above the table, ethics and technical legalities aside ;-)

Re:Please clue me in. (5, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083423)

Here is a story with a picture of the bonds. [bloomberg.com] Kind of cool to look at, even if not real. You are right though, here is a quote from the story:

Creating fake Treasuries is a “common scam, especially in Italy,” he said. The tipoff was the “astronomical” face value of each bond, he said. Fake bonds in high denominations are more common in Europe, where people are less familiar with the face value of U.S. Treasury bonds than in the U.S., he said.

Re:Please clue me in. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083661)

Looking at the bond at your given link, it looks like they added 4 zeroes to the $100,000 note (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_denominations_of_United_States_currency#.24100.2C000_bill).

So be on the lookout for $10,000 Washington notes.

I know why the government is mad (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083127)

They get pissed off easily when they have competition printing out worthless currency. RON PAUL 2012

Re:I know why the government is mad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083497)

He's never going to be president. He won't win this election and will be dead of old age before the next one. You morons will have to find another god to fixate on.

Wow (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083133)

The sheer scale of this counterfeiting, $6 trillion dollars worth, and the truly baffling thing is how little coverage its receiving in the mainstream media.

Re:Wow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083143)


the truly baffling thing is how little coverage its receiving in the mainstream media.

Didn't you hear? Whitney Houston died! A very important player in the Bread & Circuses of the 1980s!

Re:Wow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083455)

She was a hot piece of ass back in the day. You know, before the crack habit.

Re:Wow (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083189)

Why would it? If you photo copy some bonds, why is that news? Here, I can print up some while type this comment... where is my 15 minutes?

Bonds are registered. It is nice having a piece of paper, but the paper is not important. Only bearer bonds are unregistered, and the US gov't hasn't use them for years. There are some old bearer bonds that were never redeemed, but the the total amount is less than $100M.

Re:Wow (1)

einhverfr (238914) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083445)

Presumably the bonds would be sold to third parties....

Then eventually banks would own them but when it would be time to collect.... oops, not valid.....

Re:Wow (1)

mikelieman (35628) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083729)

cue "Sad Trombone"!

Re:Wow (1)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083217)

Yeah. $6 ~trillion~? Lol ... how did that NOT raise eyebrows earlier than this?

Re:Wow (4, Insightful)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083441)

Huh? This story seems to have hit the press the moment it was discovered, and they all sort of ignored the absurdity of it. It's the guy with a printer argument, only expensive printer and organized mafia, but it was absurd. 10 seconds of internet searches reveals US gpd in 1934 as under 100 billion dollars, so a 1 billion dollar bond is just nonsense. That they printed 6000 of them, which is maybe a few thousand dollars in forgery is hardly that significant.

It doesn't seem like anyone important who saw them took them as actually legitimate. They found them and reported them as a result of some bad cheques (that were to the tune of 200k), and that was the end of it.

Not really an interesting story (4, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083669)

Because the scale means it was pretty much automatically ineffective. Also the instruments they counterfeited were never real. There are no billion dollar bonds floating around from 1934, and certainly not $6 trillion worth.

Effective counterfeiting requires that you are cloning an instrument that actually exists and people would accept, and that you pass it off in amounts that doesn't raise suspicion.

It's amusing, but it isn't as though these were some supergenius criminal masterminds who came close to making $6 trillion. They are some idiot criminals who had a scam pretty much doomed to fail.

Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fake (2, Interesting)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083147)

Zerohedge highlights interesting photos: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/why-were-trillions-fake-bonds-held-chicago-fed-crates [zerohedge.com]

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (4, Insightful)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083219)

Why do the photos have a 50 star flag over the "series 1934" label? The box itself isn't even correct... unless there is some good reason it doesn't have the period correct 48 star flag.

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083477)

I applaud your visual acuity if you're able to count the number of stars in any of those grainy photos. But if you're guessing that there's 50 based on their placement, it's worth noting that staggered 48-star layouts--albethey rare--have been known to exist. [shorpy.com]

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (1)

Phat_Tony (661117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083571)

I'm more interested in why it has 25 stripes.

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (3, Informative)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083993)

I only count 13 stripes: http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user5/imageroot/2012/01/Chicago_Bonds_4_0.jpg [zerohedge.com]

But, the staggered stars does not coincide with the common 48 state pattern of that time.

Based on what I've read, there are either lot of counterfeits of a real thing, or this was one incredibly engineered large scale counterfeit. These boxes have been found from all over the world recently, with highest concentrations in the Philippines, with people digging them up in the 1990s. There are quite a few stories to go with them, some more plausible than others. Yet, I cannot find any solid scientific evidence placing the origin of these boxes in history, other than when they were dug up or acquired and the condition they were in.

Given how interesting this could be even if it all the boxes are fraudulent due to its large scale and long history, I think this is worth trying to understand better.

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (4, Informative)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083769)

It's even weirder than that... Here's the highest res shot of the front of the thing that I could find - link [divinecosmos.com] . (Caution -- source website contains industrial grade crazy. Just mousing over the link will get you on at least four watch lists.)

Zoom in on the flag. It's grainy, but I'll be damned if there aren't eight rows, alternating between 6 and 7 stars each. That's 4 x 13 = 52 stars.

Personally, I choose to believe that these are boxes sent back from the future year 1934 AA (after apocalypse), by future Americans who live in a 52 state US (50 + Canada + Mexico + Airstrip One - California [it finally sank]). In the future, the six trillion dollars barely buys a sandwich, but if they invest it several thousand years ago, they'll be rich! Unfortunately, the time traveler who was supposed to invest the money got distracted chasing after a bunch of loonies who were just trying to let all the animals out of the zoo, and the money ended up in the hands of the mob.

Hey, it makes more sense than any theory from those Divine Cosmos people.

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083813)

The stars are hard to make out. Easier to count the stripes -- way too many of them.

Re:Photos cast doubt on whether or not they are fa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083951)

52 stars?! It's from the future! When Mexico and Canada are part of the USA.

Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (5, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083233)

Seriously, that is the dumbest conspiracy theory I've seen. The fact aside all the truther bullshit of "9/11 was an inside job" there's no way the bonds were real on account of the amount. In 1940 the US debt was only about $43 billion dollars (the GDP was only $97 billion). So there weren't $6 trillion of bonds floating around. The debt didn't hit the $6 trillion mark until late 2002 (the GDP was about $10 trillion). However, dates of the bonds aside, the treasury doesn't issue physical notes anymore. They are all just electronic entries in a database. Far more convenient, secure, and trackable.

Might want to lay off the conspiracy sites. Here's a hint: If someone starts going on about 9/11 being an inside job, they are a conspiracy nut.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

KingAlanI (1270538) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083281)

yeah, and conspiracy theorists think you're the crazy one when you don't buy into their wild ideas. It can *drive* you crazy.
though ZeroHedge is nothing compared to some of the stuff I've read.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083311)

The conspiracy theory is not what is interesting. It is the photos of these boxes and their contents that have been on the Internet for years now. The question Zero Hedge raises is why would they go through the trouble of creating counterfeit boxes? You can't cash the boxes, only the bonds.

.
It would be interesting to have independent scientific authentication on the boxes and their contents. Then, if they happen to originate in 1934, try to discover the story around them. Otherwise, if science proves they were created recently, we can quickly dismiss them as fraud. Right now, we have no idea how they determined they are fraudulent. There is also no evidence they were being used in a transaction, only conspiracy theory purported by the Italian authorities who admitted they found them in storage.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083321)

The question Zero Hedge raises is why would they go through the trouble of creating counterfeit boxes?

Maybe because you're trying to convince some idiot that the bonds are genuine? Perhaps they'd fall for the old "if they're in genuine packaging, they must be real" gambit.

Kinda like zerohedge did.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (3, Interesting)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083447)

That's what I thought. But, the more I dig on the boxes, the more historical they appear to be. Here is an interesting thread discussing them: http://www.thunting.com/smf/index.php?action=printpage;topic=2598.0 [thunting.com]

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

Phat_Tony (661117) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083703)

Mod parent up.

No 9/11 truther conspiracies there, but an interesting history predating this incident of other boxes out there exactly like this.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083781)

Hilarious: I love the part about "intentional errors" for future deniability. They even predicted the 50 state flag in 1934 and put that on as an intentional error. And the elaborate justification for the use of Arial font is great. Yes, there were sans-serif fonts in use at the time, but there's a reason they look so out of place here.

It's so amazing when the kooks take ownership of the con.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083819)

Perhaps you could explain why there are so many fucking stripes on a flag that should have 13 stripes.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (2)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084031)

Not sure which image you are looking at, but the photo I see has 13 stripes: http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user5/imageroot/2012/01/Chicago_Bonds_4_0.jpg [zerohedge.com]

Don't forget, these are raised stripes, not alternating colors. And the flag is in a box, so don't count the upper and lower thin lines.

That said, the bigger issue is the stripes are staggered, which is very uncommon for the 48 state period. That alone convinces me that the box in this photo is probably counterfeit.

I just find it interesting that there is a history of these boxes, particularly in the Philippines, dating back to at least the 1990s. In online discussions, there is a consensus that there are a lot of "fakes" out there. But, it is not clear whether or not these were copies of real originals, or just an incredibly elaborate fraud of unprecedented scale. Either way, I'd love to know the truth behind the origin of the boxes.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084035)

correction: the bigger issue is the STARS are staggered

Probably to try and dupe people (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083659)

Remember that's what they are trying to do. However the boxes are fake. How can you tell? Easy: The flag. The stars are staggered, not ordered. From 1912 to 1959 the US flag had 48 stars, which were in 6 rows of 8 stars, all on a nice ordered grid. The staggered flag we see now didn't come until later. Our current 50 star flag was in 1960. There were earlier staggered flags, but not in the same 6-5 configuration.

Then there's the fact that it has like 25 stripes. The flag has always had 13 stripes.

This was a half-assed forgery done by someone who didn't do their homework. When the government stamps the flag on shit, they tend to get it right.

We don't need to try and prove they are fake, there is no way they are real. There weren't bonds issued in that amount, or anywhere near it, in 1934, the boxes feature obvious errors, they are forgeries.

Re:Probably to try and dupe people (1)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084157)

Or some subgroup of the US government actually discreetly made those bonds, in a hush-hush but valid manner, traded them for a shitton of various valuables to some foreign instance. But their ridiculous face value and general invisibility means they can easily claim they are forgeries.

But of course no government would ever do that now would they? Because being government they are per definition on moral highground and would never do something malicious or fraudulent to further the agenda of their own person or special little circle of friends. Sortof how nazi germany totally didn't end up cooking a few million jews due to some whim of their leadership.
Oh wait...

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083389)

In a system like ours, EVERYTHING is a conspiracy, the only possible question is: Which one is winning?

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

quantaman (517394) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083391)

There's also the part where WWI was planned by freemasonry...

Though I do feel reassured that my BS detector was going off even before I noticed all the other conspiracy theories showing up, I guess everything is still in working order.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083695)

Ya zerohedge has always got my antennae twitching but I've never read much of it, despite people's love for linking it here and not been enough of an expert to really judge what he's saying.

However this here shows that as is so often the case it is just another random Internet conspiracy nut that people have latched on to.

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (1)

X.25 (255792) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083763)

Might want to lay off the conspiracy sites. Here's a hint: If someone starts going on about 9/11 being an inside job, they are a conspiracy nut.

What I am actually enjoying is seeing so many 'conspiracy theories' from past 20 years turning out not to be conspiracy theories at all.

But blind mediocre nuts will just keep calling anything they don't like a "conspiracy theory".

Re:Wow, Zero Hedge is going full on truther there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084173)

Name one.

How about two? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084395)

Extraordinary rendition.

Echelon

Duh! (4, Funny)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083159)

Everyone knows the real ones are in China!

Re:Duh! (2)

metlin (258108) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083277)

...and Japan.

Re:Duh! (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083399)

Japan is in worse financial condition than the US. They probably sold off any they had to China or some other country years ago.

Re:Duh! (3, Informative)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083487)

No they didn't, in fact they increased their holdings significnantly (by almost 20%) in 2011 - almost taking back the top holder spot from China (China held 5% more) at the end of the year.

But don't let facts get in the way of your fantasies about the financial condition of Japan. Of course better to pick facts that aren't quite so published.

Re:Duh! (5, Informative)

metlin (258108) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083789)

Slashdot, where people's knowledge of technology is only surpassed by their knowledge and understanding of of economics.

But here you go: major foreign holders of treasury securities [treasury.gov] . Holdings at the end of Dec 2011:

China: 1100.7B USD
Japan: 1042.4B USD

And oh, here's the data on the Japanese GDP since 1960 [google.com] .

FYI, it's grown from 4.6674T USD in 2000 to to 5.4588T USD in 2011. Sure, it fell for a while from the high of 5.2644T USD in 1995, but to state that their economy is not performing well only shows your stupidity.

Re:Duh! (1)

repapetilto (1219852) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084377)

What is your definition of "economy performing well"?

Never intented to be used directly. (4, Interesting)

Kaenneth (82978) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083169)

I would guess the planned scam (Including the Nigerian connection) would be sending spam e-mails, etc. saying "as a nigerian prince, I inherited this billion dollar certificate. I just need a loan of $10,000 to pay for security, transport, etc. to have it redeemed, then you'll get $100,000 back..."

The certificates themselves would never be 'redeemed' just used to bait greedy people into getting scammed.

Re:Never intented to be used directly. (2)

Openstandards.net (614258) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084089)

I'm pretty sure the letter to Nigerians, written from someone trying get their money back, promised trillions of dollars in bonds to be paid as soon as a small deposit of plutonium was deposited to help pay a lawyer who could sign over the bonds.

Movie Plot? (2)

guttentag (313541) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083175)

The probe focusing upon money laundering has also include financial dealings alleged to direct money to Nigerian sources to buy plutonium. Sound like a movie plot, yet? $6 Trillion, that's a lot of lettuce."

OK, it's the Libyans who want plutonium and used pinball machine parts, and you only need a couple heads of lettuce to generate 1.21 gigawatts of electricity with Mr. Fusion, not 6 exa-heads of lettuce. Get your Back To The Future quotes straight!

Re:Movie Plot? (3, Informative)

Bill Currie (487) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083405)

Discharge a AA nicad batery (~1200mAh) in 4.3 miscroseconds, and you have 1.2GW, so a few lettuce leaves poses no problem. Now, getting a GJ would take a few head of letuce.

DEAR KIND SIR (3, Funny)

Shoten (260439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083239)

(Okay, I originally typed this in all caps...because it's funnier that way...but Slashdot's code doesn't permit it.)

I am the widow of A.Q. Khan from Pakistan. I am contacting you in good faith because I know you are a good person and will help me. I need your help in moving $6 trillion worth of plutonium out of the country. In exchange, you will receive a ten percent commission...

Re:DEAR KIND SIR (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084013)

I am the widow of A.Q. Khan from Pakistan. I am contacting you in good faith because I know you are a good person and will help me. I need your help in moving $6 trillion worth of plutonium out of the country. In exchange, you will receive a ten percent commission...

Shouldn't that be "In exchange, you will receive some polonium."?

Are Dr.Evil or something involved with this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083247)

I mean, what they would do? Crash the economy with the bonds and then use a drill on a vulcan or something to Threat the world?

How Now Brown Cow? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083249)

Don't they have serial numbers and a look-up verification system or something? How can that much fake mulah not stand out like a sore thumb sooner?

It's as the bad proposal similar to evil poker. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083263)

$6 trillion of allegedly fake U.S. Treasury bonds in Switzerland.

LOLOLOLOLOL, how reliable is Switzerland and their swisse banks as to don't accepting fake U.S. Treasury bonds? Didn't they check the validity of the money when accepting them? Then, why did they have them fake inside?. LOLOLOLOL.

In Quantum Mechanics, $100'000 is an infinitesimal measurement value that is 99.9999% statistically undetectable respecting to the current relative totality of the current U.S. debt of >$13'000'000'000'000.00

Obama bought much plutonium under his bribery, and at same time, he did forbid to the Iran's president Ahmadinejad to fabricate its own plutonium. Period.

In the obscurity's underground of Obama, he did prepare many ICBMs with plutonium's warheads for the comming World War III in this Spring 2012 announced precipitatedly by Israel & U.S..

During this coming spring, instead of breaking out flowers, they will sprout nuclear mushrooms. What why is that?.

JCPM: my/our arrow is into GRID of Quantum SAT solvers.

Re:It's as the bad proposal similar to evil poker. (1)

Zibodiz (2160038) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083303)

I want to reply to this, but the only thing that comes to mind is "....huh?"

It's as the bad proposal similar to evil poker.

That, my friend, is the quote of the day.

Re:It's as the bad proposal similar to evil poker. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083557)

Quantitative Easing IV, merging Toxic Assets of Obama, etc. They didn't lose anything under the zero for longer time. Did you forget it?.

With this new data, China should inspect real numbers of money accounting this alledged fake US bonds and the real that they should have in their accountings. To be known that the accounts should be balanced for their strict political economies's rules.

In 1934, the nuclear bomb wasn't discovered yet in U.S. and not detonated firstly. Did U.S. buy this nigerian technology of plutoniums for detonating their 2 nuclear bombs over two Japan's cities with its exchange of U.S. $6 trillion in 1934? You could understand the why of this possible reality. It could possibly explain the relations between french researchers and the country Niger[ia] before of 1934, and later, americans were very interested in sucesses that happened on this african land.

JCPM: there are who did want infinital printing of money for an infinity of richness but they did fail: the gold never is infinite, so that with their planned traps of "With infinital money that we did fabricate, we did buy ALL the gold of the world!!!". In 1934, was a political advantage "not Minting" the U.S. money?. And Fortune 50 Magazine should be fake, not?. Why to seize the surprised treasure?. Period.

Re:It's as the bad proposal similar to evil poker. (1)

flimflammer (956759) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083537)

My poor brain. What did I just read?

Pretend they are real (4, Funny)

tlambert (566799) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083291)

Pretend they are real and pay down the US debt?

-- Terry

Re:Pretend they are real (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083317)

Pretend they are real and pay down the US debt?

-- Terry

Works for the US Government.

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

gewalker (57809) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083361)

What would you do if you won a million dollars? Apply it to my debts as far as it would go.

Sadly, an extra 6 trillion dollars would only reduce the national debt by about 4 years.

Re:Pretend they are real (5, Informative)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083485)

The US federal debt is only 15 trillion dollars. 6 trillion would make a big difference. Of course these are government bonds, so the US government would be obliged to pay them back, er.. something, there's no one to pay if the government has them, but that's beside the point.

With 6 trillion dollars or even half of that, you could get rid of basically all foreign debt the US has. Then your debt would be borrowed entirely from yourselves (which is mostly is now, but not completely). The reason Japan hasn't imploded, despite having 200+% of GDP in debt (compared to the US ~100%), and they've been like that for a decade, is they owe that money to themselves.

Government debt is odd. Especially because it's in a currency you control. Mild inflation, with economic growth and a close to balanced budget deficit makes even big debts like the US has go away very quickly. That won't work for japan because their population is shrinking, and aging, but it will for the US because the population is at least flat, if not growing. But 6 trillion dollars could do a lot of interesting things for the US. Including just cover the deficit for the next 8 or 9 years. (900 billion this year, and progressively less after that, theoretically).

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

repapetilto (1219852) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084397)

Agreed completely, it is odd. Now that we recognize this oddness, how could you and I benefit?

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083419)

1. Hand them to Goldman Sachs
2. Lend 30x the face value from the Federal Reserve to GS based on them
3. Federal Reserve keeps quiet about the money, can't warn people into the true amount of money till GS has spent it
4. GS buys assets that earn real money with this borrowed money.
5. GS borrows money against these new real assets and pays back money borrowed against fake asset. (i.e. a zero sum).
6. Federal Reserve announces all the money it created with these fake assets has been paid back, so it made a good decision!

Nah, that's movie plot dumb, nobody in their right mind would do such a thing. It would be like handing all the wealth in the world to Goldman Sachs. Not plausible.

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083783)

Bonds are basically IOUs from the government. So you're suggesting that we pay our debts with IOUs.

Trust me, Washington is waaay ahead of you.

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

ikkonoishi (674762) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083945)

If we pretend they are real then they would be PART of the US debt. The US debt IS treasury bonds.

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

janimal (172428) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084163)

Good point. In order for US to redeem these bonds, they would have to use them to pay back some sucker holding the real bonds and convince him/her that he/she doesn't need to redeem the new bona fide 1934 $1B ones, since they're now collector's items and will be worth far more in 30 years.

Re:Pretend they are real (1)

matunos (1587263) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084559)

Pay down the US debt with US debt? That sounds as useful as putting a portable hole inside a bag of holding.

Dear American (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083313)

I am a Nigerian widow who just inherited $6,000,000,000,000.00 from my late husband, and I need help getting it out of my country.

etc.

False flag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083335)

Maybe the U.S. government printed those fake bonds to covertly rob its enemies!

It would have worked, too, if it weren't for those meddling kids!
(*cue laugh track and Scooby Doo music while cops haul disgruntled mastermind to justice*)

it's only 6 bills Mr. Burns used have one now cuba (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083337)

it's only 6 bills Mr. Burns used have one now it's in cuba

How much would that be in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083515)

bitcoin?

Re:How much would that be in... hamburgers? (1)

theNAM666 (179776) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083533)

I have here a $1 billion FRN I will be happy to exchange on Monday, for a bitcoin mine today.

To exchange for Plutonium from Nigeria? (1)

theNAM666 (179776) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083527)

If true, this is the more interesting fact in the news. Unless one assumes, of course, that it is an exchange of fake plutonium for fake bonds. Ah, Nigeria-- a banana peel Republic economy.

What a great idea! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083539)

If we can print twice that many we can pay off the national debt!

Austin Powers (1)

JimboFBX (1097277) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083709)

Didn't Dr. Evil demand that kind of money back in 1960 and it didn't exist yet?

part of this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083745)

http://divinecosmos.com/start-here/davids-blog/1026-financial-tyranny-final

Crooks just didn't know what trillion means in USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083823)

I don't know about Italy, but many countries in the world use long scale, where your trillion has many more zeroes. Maybe the meant billion, but did not correct for the scale.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales

tv eats you ALIVE! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39083885)

Memorable quotes for
Looker (1981)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082677/quotes [imdb.com] [imdb.com]

"John Reston: Television can control public opinion more effectively than armies of secret police, because television is entirely voluntary. The American government forces our children to attend school, but nobody forces them to watch T.V. Americans of all ages *submit* to television. Television is the American ideal. Persuasion without coercion. Nobody makes us watch. Who could have predicted that a *free* people would voluntarily spend one fifth of their lives sitting in front of a *box* with pictures? Fifteen years sitting in prison is punishment. But 15 years sitting in front of a television set is entertainment. And the average American now spends more than one and a half years of his life just watching television commercials. Fifty minutes, every day of his life, watching commercials. Now, that's power. "

"The United States has it's own propaganda, but it's very effective because people don't realize that it's propaganda. And it's subtle, but it's actually a much stronger propaganda machine than the Nazis had but it's funded in a different way. With the Nazis it was funded by the government, but in the United States, it's funded by corporations and corporations they only want things to happen that will make people want to buy stuff. So whatever that is, then that is considered okay and good, but that doesn't necessarily mean it really serves people's thinking - it can stupify and make not very good things happen."
-- Crispin Glover: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000417/bio [imdb.com] [imdb.com]

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, CIA Director

"It's only logical to assume that conspiracies are everywhere, because that's what people do. They conspire. If you can't get the message, get the man.'' -- Mel Gibson

[1967] Jim Garrison Interview "In a very real and terrifying sense, our Government is the CIA and the Pentagon, with Congress reduced to a debating society. Of course, you can't spot this trend to fascism by casually looking around. You can't look for such familiar signs as the swastika, because they won't be there. We won't build Dachaus and Auschwitzes; the clever manipulation of the mass media is creating a concentration camp of the mind that promises to be far more effective in keeping the populace in line. We're not going to wake up one morning and suddenly find ourselves in gray uniforms goose-stepping off to work. But this isn't the test. The test is: What happens to the individual who dissents? In Nazi Germany, he was physically destroyed; here, the process is more subtle, but the end results can be the same. I've learned enough about the machinations of the CIA in the past year to know that this is no longer the dreamworld America I once believed in. The imperatives of the population explosion, which almost inevitably will lessen our belief in the sanctity of the individual human life, combined with the awesome power of the CIA and the defense establishment, seem destined to seal the fate of the America I knew as a child and bring us into a new Orwellian world where the citizen exists for the state and where raw power justifies any and every immoral act. I've always had a kind of knee-jerk trust in my Government's basic integrity, whatever political blunders it may make. But I've come to realize that in Washington, deceiving and manipulating the public are viewed by some as the natural prerogatives of office. Huey Long once said, "Fascism will come to America in the name of anti-fascism." I'm afraid, based on my own experience, that fascism will come to America in the name of national security."

Shame (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | more than 2 years ago | (#39083901)

It's a shame they seized this. It would have been so much more fun to actually have these con guys con other con people with the bonds before arresting them all.

Aimed too high (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084171)

$640 million dollars in negotiable bearer bonds ought to be enough for anybody.

- Hans Gruber

Oh rly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084389)

This is so dumb, everybody knows the US treasury has the monopoly on 'fake' bonds. Bonds backed by taxation, reliant on non-existant growth.

And I thought... (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#39084425)

... that the MAFIAA was against counterfeiting?

The real deal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39084511)

Very interesting.. there appears to more of these “fake” bonds around. I think they are real. If you want to see more photos or read the whole story behind these bonds go to http://www.divinecosmos.com/start-here/davids-blog/1023-financial-tyranny?start=3

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