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Australian Police Spying On Web, Phone Usage With No Warrants

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the can-we-get-paul-hogan-to-fix-this dept.

Australia 78

New submitter i-reek writes "Australian police, along with government agencies, are accessing phone and internet account information, outward and inward call details, phone and internet access location data, and details of IP addresses visited of Australian citizens, all without judicial warrants . In the last two years, some states have shown an increase of more than 50 per cent in these surveillance authorizations, which can be granted by senior police officers and officials instead of a magistrate or judge."

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78 comments

Vic Toews (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085549)

Does anyone know if Canadian Minister Vic Toews (of #TellVicEverything fame) has been on vacation to Australia recently? It's the DREAMLAND of every politician that's "firmly on board' with the US IPR agenda:

- draconian copyright law, drafted by US special interest groups
- strict enforcement with all options on the table
- and now warrantless spying on all citizens, including "government agencies"!

Re:Vic Toews (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39086495)

"- draconian copyright law, drafted by US special interest groups" ...by US SELF interest groups

FTFY

Ahhh.. the land of the free... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085559)

Oh wait... Where am I?

Re:Ahhh.. the land of the free... (3)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085735)

Oh wait... Where am I?

I don't know, but when you find one (land of the free) let me know!

Re:Ahhh.. the land of the free... (1)

qbast (1265706) | more than 2 years ago | (#39087513)

Your grave. That's where you are finally free.

Not exactly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39090565)

Death is only the beginning of your eternal service to Jesus.
Only North Koreans get to escape their masters when they leave earth.

ok enough humor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39091531)

the institutions of control in society have perfected the modern "international terrorism" approach of controlling people through abnormally high (eventually low) cortisol levels, and calcifying the brain and blocking crucial pathways without which it can seem nearly hopeless to attempt to correct the abnormal stress response. but there are some very very powerful antioxidants that we cannot function without which aid immeasurably. specifically glutathione, vitamin C, and co enzyme Q10.

snort the coQ10 before sleep, its great for assisting the genesis and migration of brain cells, you can smell noticeably better after a few nights. eat at least 10grams of glutathione (perhaps first thing in the morning still developing the regime ), at a rate of 1tsp every hr or more if you feel you need it, acidic fruit has plenty of C.

3) profit

Explains the cost of your Internet service. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085567)

Like trying to run twenty sprinklers off of one garden hose.

Video games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085569)

It must be revenge for the humiliating thrashing they got over the 18+ video game issue. But all joking aside this is some serious shit.

So what now? (5, Insightful)

Sasayaki (1096761) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085597)

So, as an Australian I know complaining about this is going to do jack. So how can we protect ourselves?

As far as I can see, getting an Ipredator account (an encrypted VPN straight to Sweden) allows you to bypass the Australian system completely. All they know is "You have an Ipredator account." You can use Skype to do your telephony through the VPN and it, too, becomes obsficated and encrypted as well.

Now, doing this will basically protect you from most things. If you're looking at 4Chan, or weird arse but legal porn (mmm, mechophilia), or prank calling Christian Weston Chandler or whatever, yeah, you're basically safe.

Don't think that you can DDOS whitehouse.gov, though, or make bomb/assassination threats, or look up kiddy porn or whatever. If you piss off the FBI there's really not a lot, in the long term, you can do to avoid pound-me-in-the-arse prison.

I wonder how long Ipredator/etc will be legal for Australians, or if it remains legal but simply using it will get the attention of ASIO.

Years? Months? Maybe it already does...

Re:So what now? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085647)

So, as an Australian I know complaining about this is going to do jack. So how can we protect ourselves?

Become a member of the [pirateparty.org.au] for free!

Re:So what now? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085705)

Or become a member of the party mentioned in the article [greens.org.au]. You know, the one actually calling this out. Not the "I want to be able to infringe copyright" party.

Re:So what now? (0)

sjwt (161428) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085831)

And this is why the democrats have failed and lost so much support, even the Greens are doing a better job of "Keeping the bastards honest"

Re:So what now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39088563)

Uh... you do realize that if that's the pirate party's goal, and they actually manage to change the laws, then it would no longer be copyright infringement, right?

Re:So what now? (2)

Travelsonic (870859) | more than 2 years ago | (#39088893)

It's only the "I want to be able to infringe copyright" party to a moron who slanders instead of looking up facts.

Re:So what now? (1, Informative)

CanEHdian (1098955) | more than 2 years ago | (#39090805)

I'd stay away from the Australian Greens if I were you, they're not at all like the European Greens.

Australian Greens (source: http://greens.org.au/policies/media-arts-science/arts- [greens.org.au] )
"introduce legislation to protect intellectual and artistic property rights."

European Greens (source: http://www.greens-efa.eu/fileadmin/dam/Documents/Policy_papers/Creation_and_copyright_in_the_digital_era_EN.pdf [greens-efa.eu] )
"We want to shorten the protection time to something that is reasonable from both society’s and an investor’s point of view, and propose 20 years from publication."

What?

Not convinced yet?

OK. Let me put the final nail in the Australian Green's 1880s era coffin:
The pre-decision draft (PDF) of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) has drawn praise from the Greens, [zdnet.com.au] but the party says the devil may be in the fine print.

Pirate Party Australia has decried the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA). [pirateparty.org.au]

Australians. You decide what future you want... but at least DO something!

Re:So what now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39096891)

orly? This Austrlian greens guy doesn;t seem to support ACTA...
http://scott-ludlam.greensmps.org.au/content/transcript/anti-counterfeiting-trade-agreement-acta-0

Re:So what now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39095337)

Problem with the greens is that unless you are voting very very carefully your vote ends up on the 'bastards' anyway... even bob katters funny farm would be a better vote than a labor one of late, except he is preferencing labor also.

Re:So what now? (1)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 2 years ago | (#39090751)

Obfuscate your access. Use tools like trackmenot http://cs.nyu.edu/trackmenot/ [nyu.edu] to obfuscate your searches. Now you just need additional tools to randomly access web sites to obfuscate web access. Same can be done to background send email to mutual member's of a random email network (random addresses with random content content purposefully tongue in cheek).

Floor some privacy invasive freaks desk with ten thousand times as much stuff as you actually access.

I found a simple fun site http://www.randomwebsite.com/ [randomwebsite.com] for when you are bored.

Re:So what now? (1)

bejiitas_wrath (825021) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085665)

The government can just claim that the Ipredator system is being used to access child exploitation material and/or assist in terrorism. The people who watch the television news believe everything they see and if they spin that story they could get this system shut down. I wonder if the TOR bundle will really keep you safe... But Australia is following the lead of America at every turn, and any restriction in free speech on the Internet is only for our own good right?

Re:So what now? (2)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085755)

But Australia is following the lead of America at every turn, and any restriction in free speech on the Internet is only for our own good right?

Well, at least we are still a leader in something. It will not be the Internet much longer, if it still even is... http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/02/18/1237243/is-the-government-scaring-web-businesses-out-of-the-us [slashdot.org]

Note that that was sarcasm, for the humour impaired.

Re:So what now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085793)

The name doesn't help. Was, "IAmAChildSexualPredator" too long or something?

Re:So what now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085807)

It's a reference to the IPRED law, one of many similar censorship laws sweeping the world (in this case, the EU). IPREDator as in, they are hunting you and this service protects you.

But yes, it does seem to be easier to spin than perhaps was intended:-)

Re:So what now? (1)

freman (843586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39095361)

I'd almost rather have to deal with terrorism first hand (in the off chance it ever actually happens) than deal with the government every waking hour that is immediately effecting our lives

Re:So what now? (1)

jpapon (1877296) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085771)

Fight to get laws put in place which prevent it.

In the meantime, don't do anything (or talk about anything on the phone) which could get you sent to jail.

You are now completely protected. No need to do something silly like route all your calls through Sweden. Just fight to get laws changed. Routing your calls through Sweden doesn't actually help the situation (unless of course you actually ARE doing something illegal).

Fighting to change the law... (1)

Sasayaki (1096761) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085875)

... Can get you put in prison. And imagine the spin put on this: Technical Slashdot User Enables Child Pedophiles To Avoid Prosecution!

It's like saying driving lessons cause vehicular manslaughter. Or Viagra causes rape.

My question to the people who allow this kind of searching, without warrants or oversight, is... if it's so easy and cheap to bypass and avoid, and even modestly technical people can google for "How Do I Shot Anonymous Internet?", then whyare you really doing it?

Re:So what now? (1)

G4Cube (863788) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086375)

This really proves that Australia is like the United States 50 years ago. The government and corporations do whatever they want the people are mostly happy so they let them do it. So what if we scrape a couple dozen square miles of the countryside down to the last coal seam and ship it to China. The government gets a lot of money, corporations get a lot of money, the people get a little money, oh what the heck so we poison a few rivers.

Re:So what now? (4, Insightful)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#39087001)

why 50 years ago?

I see little diff between ANY country in the modern world, today; when it comes to snooping an spying.

its human nature. the sooner we realize this is NOT a 'what language do you speak at home' thing and everyone is going to be spied on by their local and national govs.

not american problem, not a UK problem, not an aussie problem, not a euro problem. its a HUMAN problem.

humans do a bad job of being fair (by nature). we have laws to try to help our bad side be good. ...but its not working and the bad side of humanity is winning.

world wide!

Re:So what now? (1)

davidbofinger (703269) | more than 2 years ago | (#39095491)

I see little diff between ANY country in the modern world, today; when it comes to snooping an spying.

Then, alas, you're blind. Sure, what happens in Australia and other western countries might be sub-optimal. But to say it's as bad as what happens in China or Iran is to embrace the fallacy of the excluded middle: "A is not perfect, B is not perfect, therefore A is as bad as B." The differences include the size of the security apparatus (affecting how many people they can spy on), the existence of mechanisms for bringing the security apparatus to account (including, for instance, a free press), the process by which security people are selected and trained (affecting whether they will happily spy for bad reasons) and many others.

Re:So what now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39086785)

No, all they know is "You have an Ipredator account. You must be doing something wrong, therefore wiretap, pull all information on this suspected terrorist, install a trojan on your computer so we can see the unencrypted information -- you know, the usual."

Re:So what now? (1)

AbRASiON (589899) | more than 2 years ago | (#39088335)

Why is ipredator apparently so good? I thought any encrypted VPN would achieve the same results?

Re:So what now? (1)

Dracophile (140936) | more than 2 years ago | (#39088637)

If enough of us use encrypted communications it'll stop being remarkable. Won't happen, though: there's too much what-have-you-got-to-hide "thinking" going on in the community here.

Re:So what now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39090849)

i agree. people are so brainwashed, instead of having an expectation of freedom, rights, privacy, etc. and pursuing/demanding it they turn on their fellow man like they're going to get an extra scoop of ice cream with their prison meal. this is why they call you dumb beasts and believe they have the right and duty (as the "enlightened ones") to enslave you. you are not a vile creature. you have innate potential to achieve great things, but you have to wake up and open your eyes. there's a reason it's so dark and stanky in there!

Re:So what now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39091221)

I wonder how long Ipredator/etc will be legal for Australians, or if it remains legal but simply using it will get the attention of ASIC

I have a private unpublished recording of the Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Stephen Conroy, explicitly stating that neither himself or his government would ban such services or their use. This same recording also has lots of other juicy things as well, and being a party to the conversation, I'd be perfectly happy to give it to media organisations if this Labour government or the Minister does anything like this.

Re:So what now? (1)

freman (843586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39095387)

Ummm, pretty sure that statement was released as part of a press release because I've heard/read it before

Is it necessary? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085689)

I mean what threat is or has Australia ever faced???

I don't think such levels of monitoring can be justified.

Re:Is it necessary? (4, Funny)

Teun (17872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086027)

I mean what threat is or has Australia ever faced???

Rabbits!

Re:Is it necessary? (1)

Antarell (930241) | more than 2 years ago | (#39088721)

I mean what threat is or has Australia ever faced???

Rabbits!

That and Japan dropped more bombs on Darwin than on Pearl Harbour, and then had another 100 goes at attacks on Australian soil. (They didn't kill as many people though).

Re:Is it necessary? (1)

davidbofinger (703269) | more than 2 years ago | (#39095537)

Rabbits!

If the rabbits had been spying on each other they'd have know which ones were carrying myxomatosis. Instead, anti-surveillance laws passed by pinko owslas led to lupine catastrophe. Humans should learn from their example.

Remember - (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39085739)

Phone all your friends, and remind them, "Don't say the word BOMB! Remember, don't say the word BOMB! Whatever you do, never, ever say the word BOMB. And don't say ALLAH AKABAR Never, ever say ALLAH AKABAR. And expeciall don't say BOMB and ALLAH AKABAR in the same sentence. The whole thing will BLOW UP in your face. And really never mention the KORAN either. And never put them all in the same sentence, like KORAN blah blah BOMB blah blah ALLAH AKABAR! Now quick, call everyone and warn them, at least once a day, NOT to say KORAN BOMB ALLAH AKABAR!"

Re:Remember - (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39096019)

Great. Now by simply loading this page thousands of people will be placed on watch lists for terrorism.

No warrant - No oversight (5, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | more than 2 years ago | (#39085893)

Police being able to do this things by themselves without having to ask for permission is the hallmark of a Police-State. Rather obviously not body can really want that. The judicial oversight is exactly there to prevent such things from happening.

Note that I do not blame the police. They are just trying to do their job well. But exactly because of that, they are unsuitable to define in which cases this is appropriate and in which case it is not. They have the wrong incentives and the wrong perspective. Which, again, is not really avoidable and not their fault. And therefore somebody else, namely a judge, that has no stake in the actual outcome, needs to decide on this.

Re:No warrant - No oversight (2)

dargaud (518470) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086653)

What I don't understand, is why aren't juges fighting back this kind of thing to force to police to go through them first. They never say a word on the matter !

Re:No warrant - No oversight (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 2 years ago | (#39087023)

law 'enforcement' is one happy family.

they don't shit on their own kind.

pretty much everywhere. in the US its called the blue line of silence and you NEVER step over that if you are a cop and you saw another cop doing wrong.

same with the rest of the 'justice' system.

google 'testilying'. officials lie in court on a regular basis; so often there is a term for it.

Re:No warrant - No oversight (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39089159)

Its legal now. Australia had its early hacking cases and its was no fun for the police.
They had to understand what a phone line was, a modem was and how to record a modem for later play back in full.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_(computer_hacker) [wikipedia.org]
They then had to present a case with very old trespass laws and invite the legal system to think digital with old laws about walking onto gov (~mil) land.
Australia also makes movies, music and produces some form of scientific products of some value every few years.
Australia also likes getting quality military equipment at low cost from the USA.
So Australia made sure it was covered for the next hacking cases, music/movie law and anti terror laws to play nice with its friends around the world and ensure we are seen as a team player.
A judge will be asked to sign off on the final raid, until then your just a person of interest.
http://www.zdnet.com.au/inside-australia-s-data-retention-proposal-339303862.htm [zdnet.com.au] has some info on how logs will be collected and how little legal input will be needed to get your isp details in full and begin long term tracking.
"automate the process of requesting and obtaining access to telecommunications data"

The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (4, Interesting)

Phoenix666 (184391) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086173)

If the government begins to act outside the rule of law, it becomes a tyranny and loses all claim to legitimacy. Citizens of that country might not feel ready to take up arms to correct the situation, but they are certainly justified in slipping the constraints of law in likewise fashion. In other words, if police and government officials think it's mete to surveille private citizens without the sanction of law, then citizens are justified in surveilling those police and government officals, and their families, and their neighbors, etc. without the sanction of law. The tools and technical means are within nearly everyone's reach these days.

Yes, be careful. Don't get caught. The police have guns and you don't yada yada. But if recorded conversations of the chief of police exchanging sweet nothings with his mistress and video footage of an MP jacking off in a porn shop start surfacing perhaps they'll do a re-think of pissing on the public's rights the way they are. Especially if you used a common tagline like "Free Australia" so they all know it's being done for a reason.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39086307)

Australians cannot take up arms against tyranny. The Australian people have been disarmed by their government.

The last hope against tyranny in Australia is the conscience of the armed forces and police who may refuse orders to support a police state.

If that police state emerges, however, the people are powerless.

Hopefully they can elect some better politicians and avoid going down that road.

If they do, there will be nothing to bring them back. They're nothing like the Yanks, who, despite gun laws which might seem a bit strange in Europe, don't have to worry about a helpless descent into 1984. The problem the Americans have with guns is so many people who have been tossed aside, warehoused for profit, undereducated, and have nothing to lose. The guns aren't doing the shooting, it's the people who have fallen between the cracks.

I wish we could have American style gun laws here in the Netherlands. I know if we cloned their laws we would not clone their violence because Dutch citizens don't fall thought the cracks into hopelessness and criminality. There might be some violence, but it is a small price to pay to protect us against the rise of another Hitler.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086725)

Australians cannot take up arms against tyranny. The Australian people have been disarmed by their government.

Just like you can't get any of those drugs the US government declared illegal in any city across all of America right?

If that police state emerges, however, the people are powerless.

Trust me, if the population decides they want guns in large quantities, the government will be powerless to prevent it. You'll be able to get them on every street corner in even the small towns.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39088497)

And how will that help? Do you think any populace with small arms is ever going to violently defeat a well-equipped modern army on its home ground? Pistols and even assault rifles aren't much use against tanks and bombers.

Name me one violent revolution in recent times that succeeded only with the guns that Americans can buy on the street. You need defecting army units, and probably third-party air cover too.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39088899)

And how will that help? Do you think any populace with small arms is ever going to violently defeat a well-equipped modern army on its home ground? Pistols and even assault rifles aren't much use against tanks and bombers.

That's because you're a fool. Winning an open land battle against a standing army is a ridiculous proposition. Terrorism and similar guerrilla tactics (bombs in mail, bombs in cars, break and enter to plant bombs, small well equipped squads who assault weakly defended facilities, double agents, etc) are the only way that would work.

More simply, you need an economy to sustain the army with supplies, food and bullets. The economy consists entirely of civilians, if enough civilians resist, even passively and not in direct combat, the economy collapses and the army becomes unsustainable. Governments govern because of the consent of the people, even tyrannical ones, if the people refuse to help those in power, that power evaporates and the system collapses on itself. [People die, of course; skirmishes, "examples", etc. But sheer persistence is all you really need over a long enough stretch of time]

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (1)

Cant use a slash wtf (1973166) | more than 2 years ago | (#39089139)

One problem about the gun laws in America is that it is assumed that most people will have access to a gun.

This leads to situations where the police can shoot somebody dead and get away with it because "It looked like he was reaching for a gun". So really, it swings both ways with gun laws. If you don't have them it's harder to fight back, but if you do have them, the police will be more inclined to kill you.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39090891)

this is true, but not a significant percentage of encounters. most encounters with police are actually the other way around. put a couple nra or GOA stickers on your back window where the police can see it when they walk up to your vehicle, keep your hands on the steering wheel and/top of open window and see how you are treated. if they see you watching them from the time they get out the vehicle and you make deliberate actions that are non threatening you will usually be out of there very quickly. everybody wants to go home at night.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (1)

MrKaos (858439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39091133)

Australians cannot take up arms against tyranny. The Australian people have been disarmed by their government.

The last hope against tyranny in Australia is the conscience of the armed forces and police who may refuse orders to support a police state.

If that police state emerges, however, the people are powerless.

Hopefully they can elect some better politicians and avoid going down that road.

If they do, there will be nothing to bring them back. They're nothing like the Yanks, who, despite gun laws which might seem a bit strange in Europe, don't have to worry about a helpless descent into 1984. The problem the Americans have with guns is so many people who have been tossed aside, warehoused for profit, undereducated, and have nothing to lose. The guns aren't doing the shooting, it's the people who have fallen between the cracks.

I wish we could have American style gun laws here in the Netherlands. I know if we cloned their laws we would not clone their violence because Dutch citizens don't fall thought the cracks into hopelessness and criminality. There might be some violence, but it is a small price to pay to protect us against the rise of another Hitler.

I wouldn't underestimate the power of Australia's flawed democracy. The people here are just informed enough to keep governments fearful. The issue is how Australia's mega rich control the media and thus the population.

It's been my experience that all it takes is some well reasoned lobbying to sway politicians in this country. They may not agree with you but they *will* listen. If they agree with you they will tell you how and what they are doing. If you interests align with theirs they will consult you repeatedly until the objective is met.

Don't get me wrong, Aussies are still being manipulated, and there are many time where I've felt the manipulation has been prototyped in Australia first. It's just that we are no more or less manipulated into a "helpless descent into 1984" than anywhere else in the world.

Re:The Rule of Law is a 2-Way Street (1)

bug1 (96678) | more than 2 years ago | (#39088247)

'If the government begins to act outside the rule of law it becomes a tyranny ..."

Yes, if they too lazy to document their tactics things arent looking good.

Vote is the easiest way to get rid of a bad government, armed rebellions sounds like it would a lot of work.

Just curious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39086311)

How does New Zealand compare to Australia in its movement towards becoming a police state? Anybody who lives there care to comment? Tnx.

Re:Just curious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39091157)

Well, the government is constantly selling us out for big business, they're putting laws in place to stop us trading vegetables we grow with each other - even gifting them to family! I'm not sure what happened with it, but they were talking about allowing the police to install cameras and record up to 48 hours of video in an individual's home without a warrant. The police kept asking (begging) the previous "evil socialist" government to be allowed to stop and fingerprint anybody they felt like, in case they were wanted for a crime in the past (that government refused, I'm not sure that this hard core right-wing government would).

I recall reading somewhere that they've also recently installed scanners at international airports, rather like the millimetre wave scanners.

I've also been told that now the police can enter properties without a search warrant, but I'm rather skeptical about that. I haven't come across anything to suggest it's accurate.

Protest Like Canada Did (4, Interesting)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086507)

In Canada when the Canadian Securities Minister Vic Toews tried to get warrantless wire taping legislation passed this week Canadians decided to help out his information gathering process by:

Sending the minister responsible our web browsing histories every day.
CC the minister on all our email messages.
Email the minister what we up to are doing several times a day.
Updated the ministers Twitter account with what we are doing.

So much data ran into the Canadian Parliament's servers that they either fell over or were deliberately taken off line. The fate of Bill C-30 is now being reviewed.

Re:Protest Like Canada Did (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39089507)

Where is a similar campaign in Australia? Maybe nobody else cares? :-(

Cameras UP YOUR ASS!! THEY OWN YOU ALL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39086559)

One sick world, brought to you by the invisible serpents, controllers who dance behind the scenes and suck you into the occult and anti-Christian, anti-God beliefs.

It will only get worse.

Wake up and see:
http://pastebin.com/06yi5zCV [pastebin.com]

Pretty soon they'll have us paying for canned air, as prices rise the plebs just bump each other's fat assess in their houses to dancing with the stars and other trance enducing shows.

WHAT is PAULA ABDUL doing THIS WEEK?

Which celebrity died THIS MONTH?

You are LOST!

Re:Cameras UP YOUR ASS!! THEY OWN YOU ALL! (2)

Whiteox (919863) | more than 2 years ago | (#39090293)

I love your paranoia. Unfortunately no organization has the forethought, skills and determination to carry this through for longer than a few years. I think the East German Stasi needs special mention as they kept millions of jars containing smells of their population.
What is actually happening is a direct result of the 'War against terror'. It is the governments of the world spying on their populace to root out terrorists. From there every government is becoming more and more paranoid and is casting their nets in private lives.

The dumbed down TV/Celeb/Politico shit is just that. All it takes is a news organisation to focus on some subjective grub of matter and it floods the consciousness of the public.
How can this happen???
Simple - the secret is that humans are highly susceptible to suggestion. That's why so powerful ideologies like religion, nazism, communism, dictatorships, advertising and (add your own) take root so easily, cause wars, degeneration of thought and rationality.
We're all convinced too easily; we fall into one camp or the other, whichever has the greatest pull on our sensibilities. It is a disaster.
For the general public, it is hard to cure them of this suggestible susceptibility. For the individual, it is much easier.
What I would like to see is an advertising campaign and maybe school curricula that teaches freedom of thinking and suggestibility.

I do this one-on-one with my kids. I point this stuff out to them in ads, TV shows etc.
For example: There is a laugh track on 'That 70's Show'. If you ignore the laugh track, then the show stops being funny. Ads are the same. Instead of an ad stating the product/price/availability, it is mostly always linked to sex and security.
Educate your kids/friends etc and that will wake them up and maybe give them freedom of thought and critical thinking will arise in them.

The problem in Australian politics is that they can't see the wood for the trees and pretty much no-one in Australia gives a shit - typically an Australian characteristic.

Re:Cameras UP YOUR ASS!! THEY OWN YOU ALL! (1)

freman (843586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39095535)

10 "We're not catching any terrorists"
20 "They must be out there, cast the nets wider"
30 "We're still not catching any terrorists"
40 "We know they exist somewhere, clearly we're not looking hard enough, cast the nets wider!"
50 goto 10

spying on the spied spies (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 2 years ago | (#39086693)

Quis custodiet ipsos custodet.
Who watches the watching watchers?

Re:spying on the spied spies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39089901)

The ICAC

I knew this would happen!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39088041)

As soon as they passed this law back here a few years back it greatly disturbed me for the possible abuse of such things. We are truly an American test tray!

"Reading our email"? I don't think so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39088853)

For all those people saying that "the government is acting outside the law" - try reading the law first. Any intercept of telecommunications requires a warrant. Period. The Police can legally access certain information from telcos without a warrant, however, including the subscribers name and address, or a list of phone calls made/received. This does not include, however, the contents of those communications, or "tracking your every move".

The article title suggests Police are tracking cellphone locations and accessing email contents regularly without warrants, but later admits that only data that can be accessed without a warrant only includes "phone and internet account information, outward and inward call details, phone and internet access location data, and details of IP addresses visited, though not the content of communications."

  1. 1. "phone and internet access location data" does not mean "tracking your every location", it just means finding asking "where was this phone call made from?"
  2. 2. "phone and internet account information" does not mean "reading your email", it means "who owns this phone number or email address?"

Re:"Reading our email"? I don't think so... (1)

Sparx139 (1460489) | more than 2 years ago | (#39089327)

You know, if you're going to tell people to read the law the least you can do is actually link to the thing.

Curious : What if an Officer falls in love ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39088971)

Imagine a lonely ASIO officer assigned to investigate a pretty woman connected to a drug lord. The lonely ASIO officer falls in love with her prettiness and begins to have a co-dependent spying one way relationship with her. Every time she meets a nice man, he uses his unregulated abilities to screw up her relationships. He knows where she is at all times. He knows who she is dating and fucking. He can fuck her life up in all sorts of ways, and find ways to get into her life, and attempt to be her Prince Charming.

When you give people unregulated power to spy, you're assuming these people are infallible Gods. But they're humans, like everyone else, and giving them that much spying power can unleash their human nature and all that comes with it.

Big deal... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39094961)

In the last two years, some states have shown an increase of more than 50 per cent in these surveillance authorizations, which can be granted by senior police officers and officials instead of a magistrate or judge.

Sooooo, the police are doing something that they are legally allowed to do to catch people that are doing things that are illegal.

Earth shattering...

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