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UK Government To Demand Data On Every Call, Email, and Tweet

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the save-it-all dept.

Government 199

judgecorp writes "The UK government is proposing a law that would require phone and Internet companies to store information on all communications, and hand it to the security services when required. The Communications Capabilities Development Programme (CCDP) abandoned by the last government is back on the table, proposed as a means to increase security, and likely to be pushed through before the Olympics in London, according to reports."

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Thank you (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099191)

Thank you Tory Government for proving you're just as big a bunch of cunts as the others.

Re:Thank you (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099275)

I wish all the old WWII guys would get in their wheel chairs, walkers, and slippers and hobble down to Parliament and scream:

Bloody hell! What the fuck! It looks like we wasted our time and our buddies' lives fighting the Germans!

And then flog all the PMs with their canes.

Re:Thank you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099541)

Implying they'd care to do that any more than others.

Re:Thank you (5, Insightful)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#39100591)

10-Step Plan to Cure Cancer in UK and US

1. Nationalize our communication systems. Telephony, cable TV, and data transmission need to become the people's. If we stopped sending a great deal of our money into the coffers of a few corporations that have so much cash that they continue to expand their control, we would have more money for other things like education. If France can offer the big three communication needs (phone, internet, and television) for a fee roughly 1/3 of what we are paying, we should follow their example.

2. Immediately institute regulations on the amount of interest that can be charged on credit accounts. Make it the prime rate plus 10-20% - enough to make them money but not so much as to continue to fleece the population.

3. Regulate severely or nationalize the use of debit cards and force businesses to discount for cash commensurate with the fees that they are paying for using these electronic transfers.

4. Separate the banks from speculation and traditional banking. By allowing our banks to become addicted to gambling they are no longer serving the public's interest but theirs.

5. Immediately institute a transaction tax of less than 1% on each transaction. The only effect that people would ever see is when they sell a stock and have to pay this fee out of their proceeds. What this would do is stop the manipulation that major players in the market can perform to bleed money out of the system.

6. Immediately cease the speculative trading of commodities. As I have often stated if you want to buy oil or grains then you must have the facilities to actually accept delivery of such commodities. If you cannot then you have no business in this market.

7. Immediately treat all income the same whether from salaries or capital gains: treat everyone the same as far as the taxes in our society are concern. Let them contribute to the social security and medicare systems as well pay their fair share of the burdens we all should share for living in a modern society.

8. Break up the media conglomerates. There is no reason that all of our news should be filtered through corporations like Disney or Rupert Murdoch's Media Empire.

9. Treat our trading partners in exactly the way we are treated. Japan can export as many automobiles as we can sell in Japan. China the same. As is stands now all this type of trade is doing is stealing bread off our tables.

10 Stop the damned revolving door that spins riches to those who worked in government service regulating the same industries that enrich them. Forbid anyone working in a senior position in government from working for a private firm in the same area for a period of time no less than five years and have this same restriction apply to family members.

http://sideshow.me.uk/sfeb12.htm#1202200100 [sideshow.me.uk]

Re:Thank you (0)

digitig (1056110) | about 2 years ago | (#39099627)

I wish all the old WWII guys would get in their wheel chairs, walkers, and slippers and hobble down to Parliament and scream:

Bloody hell! What the fuck! It looks like we wasted our time and our buddies' lives fighting the Germans!

And then flog all the PMs with their canes.

Yes, because the UK is famous for its death camps. Oh ... wait ... no it isn't.

Re:Thank you (5, Informative)

ocularsinister (774024) | about 2 years ago | (#39099715)

Actually, we invented them during the Boar war [boer.co.za]

Re:Thank you (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100135)

Perhaps they should change the name from CCDP to CCCP, seems more fitting.

Re:Thank you (2)

forkfail (228161) | about 2 years ago | (#39100385)

They'd all be wrong - there was no such war. We're at war with Eastasia, and we're friends with Eurasia. It's always been this way. You need to be reeducated.

Re:Thank you (2)

justforgetme (1814588) | about 2 years ago | (#39099557)

The solution is only one:
Flood them! Create that much data that they simply won't be able to keep it all.
Only thing that is needed is some background service that logs on to fake
facebook, email and twitter accounts and corresponds with other (also fake)
accounts while your laptop is idle.

Have fun sorting through the yottabytes UK gov...

Re:Thank you (3, Funny)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | about 2 years ago | (#39099637)

reaction from UK government: We need a very advanced AI to sort through all that data. Let's call it Skynet.

Re:Thank you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099699)

They've already had one called Skynet since 2003 -- see: SKYNET [eads.net]

Re:Thank you (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | about 2 years ago | (#39100313)

We need a very advanced AI to sort through all that data. Let's call it Skynet.

Replace 'Skynet' with 'G.C.H.Q.' and replace 'advanced AI' with 'tonnes of data entry work', and you're not too far off.....

Re:Thank you (1)

DrBoumBoum (926687) | about 2 years ago | (#39100647)

Simpler reaction: make this illegal. If you do this you're with the terrorists/child molesters. Case closed.

Re:Thank you (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099711)

How will you know that you've succeeded in overwhelming them?

How will you stop the bastards from stealing an ever-increasing portion of your income in order to upgrade their surveillance infrastructure to cope with the traffic?

How will this deter unscrupulous, complicit telecomms vendors from creating increasingly efficient and intrusive forms of spy gear to meet the demand?

Technological workarounds -- Tor, PGP, and all the rest -- are important, but they're only stopgaps. This needs to be stopped at its source.

Not to distract you from implementing and deploying your clever flooding plan or anything, but please at least sign the petition too.

Re:Thank you (2)

asdf7890 (1518587) | about 2 years ago | (#39100151)

At that point they find something in your fake data that could be construed as incriminating in some small way, start an investigation that does nothing more than point out all the fake data you have created, then they can charge your with falsifying evidence, wasting police time, and possibly a few other odds and ends.

Re:Thank you (1)

gknoy (899301) | about 2 years ago | (#39100501)

How is it falsifying evidence? You're not generating false data ... about the data you generate. You're just generating useless data that no one in their right mind would care about. "Your honor, I am part of BardTweets, a non profit organization of Shalespeare Fans. We tweet all Shakespeare, all the time."

Re:Thank you (2)

forkfail (228161) | about 2 years ago | (#39100401)

Coming next: The National Bandwidth Preservation Act, making it a terrorist crime to use more than X gigs per month, and for intentionally adding noise to the national security logs.

Re:Thank you (1)

Errol backfiring (1280012) | about 2 years ago | (#39100511)

So all those people who annoy me with their senseless conversations in the train are actually doing a good thing?

Re:Thank you (2)

Blue Stone (582566) | about 2 years ago | (#39100449)

George Orwell - Animal Farm. Tells you a great deal about human nature and its response to power. All power corrupts, and unless you have functional reins and limits on those who are given power, it becomes, over time, ever more of a tyranny. Alas.

That'll be the scheme opposed by the CURRENT lot? (5, Insightful)

Rogerborg (306625) | about 2 years ago | (#39099211)

When they were in opposition?

I guess whether it looks like a good idea or not largely depends on whether you're the one choosing the "preferred bidders". And thinking about your post-political career.

Re:That'll be the scheme opposed by the CURRENT lo (5, Insightful)

Grumbleduke (789126) | about 2 years ago | (#39099383)

That's a side effect of two-party/adversarial politics. The party in power only opposes stuff because they see it as their job to. If the current government proposed a law outlawing the mistreatment of kittens Labour would probably find an angle to argue against it. It's because party politics isn't about serving the people any more (if it ever was), it's about beating the other party at the next election, and that means scoring points wherever possible.

The only thing more depressing than a situation where one side opposes the exact same thing they supported when on the other side of the chamber, is when both sides agree on something, and it gets rushed through without any of the issues being examined.

Re:That'll be the scheme opposed by the CURRENT lo (1)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about 2 years ago | (#39099453)

Sad thing is you can argue against pretty much any good idea by saying there's not enough money to fund enforcement of it.

At least you can use the same argument against bad ideas fairly effectively too. But this is the main reason even good ideas rarely make it into law.

Re:That'll be the scheme opposed by the CURRENT lo (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099899)

That's a side effect of two-party/adversarial politics. The party in power only opposes stuff because they see it as their job to. If the current government proposed a law outlawing the mistreatment of kittens Labour would probably find an angle to argue against it. It's because party politics isn't about serving the people any more (if it ever was), it's about beating the other party at the next election, and that means scoring points wherever possible.

The only thing more depressing than a situation where one side opposes the exact same thing they supported when on the other side of the chamber, is when both sides agree on something, and it gets rushed through without any of the issues being examined.

Close, but not quite. It's an effect of both parties really being the same party behind the scenes. They only pretend to be fighting each other to give the silly voters the illusion that voting for the other set of scum might change something.

Things will only change when the citizens march on the legislative bodies and kill the legislators. Which means it will never happen, because we've all lost the killer's edge that our ancestors had. Oh well, it was such a nice civilization while it lasted.

Re:That'll be the scheme opposed by the CURRENT lo (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099485)

Yep, same as the Canadian ruckus. The Conservative government is pushing C-30 -- which is largely the same as bill C-74 tabled by the Liberals, back in 2005. It seems by the time a political party is large enough to play a meaningful role in parliament, it's already large enough for widespread corruption to be a statistical certainty.

Dupe! (0)

Mister Transistor (259842) | about 2 years ago | (#39099221)

This is even on the same front page! Well, I guess we haven't had a dupe story in a little while - they used to be thick like files around here!

Not a dupe! (5, Informative)

dkleinsc (563838) | about 2 years ago | (#39099331)

If you're referring to this [slashdot.org] , it's not in fact a dupe, because the other story is about the Canadians trying to do exactly the same thing as the UK is doing here,

Re:Not a dupe! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099417)

No he's referring to this [slashdot.org] .

Re:Not a dupe! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100573)

All those stories (and the past ones regarding US doing the same in the past) should be unified to "english speaking countries ban privacy worldwide" and no more dupes.

Oh noes! (1, Insightful)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | about 2 years ago | (#39099241)

Doubleplusungood!!!!!!

like your goverment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099263)

i wonder what could go wrong if this where voluntary opt-in for every citizen?

The UK is dead. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099287)

What remains is a pathetic pretender which occupies the same position on the globe,
but which deserves no respect from its citizens or anyone else in the world.

This IS where the USA is heading, in case anyone was wondering. And before
you jump to conclusions with some xenophobic diatribe, allow me to
mention that I am American.

1984 (1)

ericestate (2578511) | about 2 years ago | (#39099313)

I always thought Big Brother would start in the US.

Re:1984 (5, Funny)

CimmerianX (2478270) | about 2 years ago | (#39099389)

Nope... it starts in England. Didn't you see 'V'?

Re:1984 (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#39099433)

Didn't Nineteen Eighty-Four also take place in England? Right in London as I recall.

Re:1984 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099583)

Exactly... only then it was called Airstrip One.

Re:1984 (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 years ago | (#39099463)

Was 1984 itself being in England not enough of a clue?

Re:1984 (2)

DaMattster (977781) | about 2 years ago | (#39099405)

I always thought Big Brother would start in the US.

The funny thing is so did I. But, come to think of it the D.C. Comics guys also thought it would start in the U.K. with their V for Vendetta movie. And, in actuality, the whole surveillance camera moves began in London.

Re:1984 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099549)

V for Vendetta was written by Alan Moore during the 1980s. As a lefty anarchist wizard type the Thatcher government scared the shit out of him & thats why it was set here. Also November 5th has been a part of our culture for centuries so the Guy Fawkes imagery wouldn't exactly work so well in the US. As for the security cameras we have the last Tory government to thank for that. In the 90s they dished out grants for CCTV systems to councils as it was seen as cheaper than hiring more police. TV programmes showing various CCTV criminal happenings (like Police! Camera! Action!) convinced people this was somehow a good way to cut crime & the Blair government kept up the nonsense. Now we have the Tories back in they'll be like they were in the 80s - all for privacy IF you're rich. Otherwise fuck you, the government will try to watch your every move and control everything you do.

Re:1984 (1)

Mashiki (184564) | about 2 years ago | (#39099607)

You know it kinda makes me wonder how much more the average Brit will take before they simply riot the hell out of the place. Then again, there might not be that many actual brits left, in the last 3 years I've had 104 families move into my neighborhood that came from there to Canadaland.

Re:1984 (3, Funny)

Idimmu Xul (204345) | about 2 years ago | (#39100203)

We tried that last year.. everyone just nicked sportswear from Soccer World :(

Re:1984 (1)

sakdoctor (1087155) | about 2 years ago | (#39099667)

The world in 1984 is a global symmetric system.

You have some of the prerequisites for that system in place:
Perpetual war on X
A vast military-industrial complex to destroy the excess of human production.
Choice between two indistinguishable political ideals.

However the 1984 world is also in equilibrium. Once big brother exists, he will always have existed.
You're discounting the possibility of being conquered from without.

Re:1984 (1)

forkfail (228161) | about 2 years ago | (#39100443)

No, it starts where the power is concentrated. And the greatest power in the world right now is corporate; which is still somewhat decentrailzied, but does spread all over the Western hemisphere.

For the sake of the Olympics... (4, Insightful)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | about 2 years ago | (#39099333)

But I'm afraid they won't remove that law after the Olympics.

Re:For the sake of the Olympics... (5, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | about 2 years ago | (#39099687)

The threat of terrorism is a lame excuse for mass surveillance.
Copyright protection is a lame excuse for mass surveillance.
Child porn is a lame excuse for mass surveillance.

The Olympics!? They're not even trying any more.

Re:For the sake of the Olympics... (1)

forkfail (228161) | about 2 years ago | (#39100453)

If you don't support this surveillance, you stand with the terrorists and child pornographers who want to keep the children from watching the Olympics!

https (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099335)

Somebody out there probably never heard of Twitter switching to https [techcrunch.com] .

Re:https (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100079)

These are MPs you're talking about. Most of them have never heard of Twitter.

welcome to the NWO (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099359)

Welcome to totalitarianism, ladies and gentlemen. I know I'm probably going to get flamed for this, but you left-wing socialist idiots are finally getting what the hell you've been asking for at the expense of everyone else who knows how to fend for themselves vs. living off the government nanny state like a parasite.

Re:welcome to the NWO (1)

dave420 (699308) | about 2 years ago | (#39099479)

You're more likely to get "flamed" because you don't know what "totalitarianism" means, yet seem to think beyond all doubt that you do. The rest of your abject nonsense is just laughable.

Re:welcome to the NWO (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099491)

Dude I think the right-wing with their obsession with big-business, concentrating wealth in the hands of a few and assuming people are worthless unless they have money has kind of helped. As for this libertarian bollocks about people fending for themselves, well I wonder how many of you lot work for the government in some manner or other (military, security, university researchers, politics, military contractors - jeez even computer companies probably sell half of their shit to the public sector). Remember throughout the entire of human history since the discovery of agriculture there existed a parasitic ruling class that sucked up the surplus production from the masses in order to build its castles/temples & live a life of luxury. This goes on for thousands of years in different forms - nobility, emperors, bankers.... and when someone suggests a century or so ago 'Hey, lets take some of this wealth and give it back to the people' the supposed freedom-loving right-wing scream "SOCIALISM!!!"

As for this law, well thats being pushed by a Tory government. The last Labour government were also quite right-wing & like most of your US politicians in the pockets of big business. So if you're remotely bothered about this then perhaps you'll start fighting against the global corps who control your life instead of sounding like an Alex Jones wannabe. You lot are going to keep screaming about socialism until every last fucking right you have has been taken by the rich at which point it'll be too late to do anything at all...

Re:welcome to the NWO (1)

lorenlal (164133) | about 2 years ago | (#39099953)

Anon parent and grandparent - Although I'm sure you both feel like your side is less to blame than the other, I think that the anger shouldn't be against the ideas of the opposing side. I believe it should focus on the execution by the corrupt few who chose to implement the policies. Honestly, conservatism, libertarianism, liberalism, and even socialism all have advantages and could probably work if it weren't for asshats. That's the rub, there's always going to be some asshats. Anymore, I think policy should be directed to controlling the damage by asshats.

Re:welcome to the NWO (3, Insightful)

Shark (78448) | about 2 years ago | (#39099543)

Name-calling aside, I think Parent has a point. I'm pretty sure it's the responsibility of the people to keep government power limited and we definitely have been slacking off lately in favour of all the wonderful handouts. We ask that it runs everything then we complain that it does so for its own sake rather than ours. We kid ourselves if we think government any less selfish than those evil corporations. We're too lazy to vote with our dollar against the latter and too lazy to change the former and keep it in check. Bottom line is that we get what we deserve.

I see this as a natural reaction: The Internet has caused a little surge of activism lately and we can very well see how that has the government running scared.

If you don't support this... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099395)

... then you are a pedo terrorist who hurts animals, or something like that.

I, for one, welcome our new CCDP overlords, in my back end... and front-end... and side-end.

WHEN WILL IT EVER END?!

to THE KLOUD, Alice! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | about 2 years ago | (#39099547)

Nahh, they need to bill this as the "data preservation act", free backups for everybody. They can spin it as a job-creator in the hard drive industry!

Inevitable (0, Troll)

concealment (2447304) | about 2 years ago | (#39099419)

We can talk about how this might be 1984 or not, but the inevitable path of technology is such that soon all information will be easily available and stored whenever possible.

The reason for this is simple. If your child is kidnapped by an insane pedophile, you want the Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs) to use everything they can to find that guy. If a record of tweets, blogs, phone calls and IMs helps them do that, it could save your child.

I'm not enough of a hypocrite to say that I'm going to stand around talking about privacy issues if my kid has been stolen away by someone who is probably busy raping that kid in a panel van. I think my opinion at the time will be "Do whatever you want and get the kid back."

This is the eternal tension in law. Privacy is a great idea, but there are a lot of bad guys out there and we want to keep tabs on them. I think a better solution is to find a government we can trust.

Re:Inevitable (5, Insightful)

_8553454222834292266 (2576047) | about 2 years ago | (#39099477)

Are you serious or just trolling?

The reason for this is simple. If your child is kidnapped by an insane pedophile, you want the Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs) to use everything they can to find that guy.

Sure, within the limits of the law and, in the US at least, the Constitution.

If a record of tweets, blogs, phone calls and IMs helps them do that, it could save your child.

So could putting cameras in all our houses. Where do we draw the line? I'd rather not live in a police state for the few times it may be convenient.

Privacy is a great idea, but there are a lot of bad guys out there and we want to keep tabs on them. I think a better solution is to find a government we can trust.

Good luck with that.

Re:Inevitable (2)

Znork (31774) | about 2 years ago | (#39099577)

So, what's your plan in the much more likely event that the LEO sticks your child in the same cell as that psycho because they consider him a terrorist after reading his tweets, blogs and IM's?

See, if it's just the insane guy you have a chance. If it's the government, you're going to join the suspect list for complaining. Heck, we've already heard here that you're of the opinion that doing whatever it takes to get him back is ok, so maybe you're planning violence.

Re:Inevitable (1)

dogganos (901230) | about 2 years ago | (#39099587)

Of course he is trolling, consciously or unconsciously.

You can't bring as an argument in favor of the proposed law the opinion of someone who's kid has been abducted! He's too biased to think rational, and you can't build a law on top of such a bias.

And needless to say, as has been proven multiple times, child abuse has been an ideal means to build consensus on limiting free speech which threatens Their Democracy.

Re:Inevitable (1)

peppepz (1311345) | about 2 years ago | (#39099605)

I don't think that any kidnapper would give hints of his whereabouts on Twitter.

This is not about increasing police presence, hardening penalties for criminals, adding more cameras in public places - this is about tracking every single life on the internet at the highest possible level of detail, and without a warrant from any judicial authority. As someone else said, "Stalin's dream".

Re:Inevitable (1)

GLMDesigns (2044134) | about 2 years ago | (#39099623)

I think it is close to inevitable that government agencies will collect all data. What counts is the restrictions we place upon its use. There is an important distinction between storage and usage. I'm NOT saying that I'm in favor of this - only that I see that storage of all data will be the logical compromise with law enforcement requiri a court order to use said data. But, I fear, the data will be collected and stored unitl "needed."

We all see the horror that this can bring, the misuse, etc...

Pretty soon, in the US, the 4th A will become as much of a rallying cry as the 1st and 2nd Amendments are currently.

  • The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause ...

I don't think we can prevent the data from being stored. We may be able to make so that private companies cannot keep this data - that the data must be collected and stored by the government - but I don't see how that is a significant improvement. I think we must focus our attention on limiting the power of government in general. We must not let ourselves become terrified of our governments and our politicians.

Re:Inevitable (5, Insightful)

Shark (78448) | about 2 years ago | (#39099671)

I think a better solution is to find a government we can trust.

The only answer to that is: A government that doesn't have such powers. Sorry but you can't have your cake and eat it... You either accept that your rights are in someone else's hands to be abused, or yours to defend. The middle ground situation you're looking for is never stable enough to last more than a generation, if that.

Re:Inevitable (1)

GLMDesigns (2044134) | about 2 years ago | (#39099773)

Amen to that.

Re:Inevitable (0)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 2 years ago | (#39099985)

Sure, because that stuff is not ever used to cause harm, only to prevent it.

I'm going to stand around talking about privacy issues if my kid has been stolen away by someone who is probably busy raping that kid in a panel van

No, you're standing around talking about it while none of that has even happened. Why don't you just lube it up and present it as a gift to your local Gauleiter? That would be way more tasteful than parading the potential rape of a child around like this.

Re:Inevitable (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100521)

There is not "a lot of bad guys" out there. Most of them are in your imagination.

Second, even if there were, there are other solutions to the problem than spying on everyone. Like making sure people don't become bad guys in the first place.

UK is no different than the rest of the world (5, Insightful)

ACK!! (10229) | about 2 years ago | (#39099435)

I remember a conversation between my wife a naturalized US citizen and her kin from the UK about security and who cares how much they know as long as you have nothing to hide. It is amazing and sad but a vision into our future. There is a whole series of reports and exposes in the British press a few months ago about how the presence of all the cameras and surveillance tactics have done nothing to make the country any safer. It is basically a giant scam to sell products to the UK government but .... now it is entrenched. Oh well this is how freedom ends right ? With thunderous applause?

Re:UK is no different than the rest of the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099661)

It is neither amazing nor sad that the typical citizen is less paranoid than the typical Slashdotter. Perhaps the opposite is true, in fact. Cameras are a huge civil liberties issue? Not yet. We'll see. The conceit that this is somehow a uniquely British problem is hilarious, too. Go look in a Sears and tell me how many CCTV cameras you see. Multiply with the number of similarly-sized stores in the US. You're probably already pretty close to the total number of CCTV cameras in the UK.

Re:UK is no different than the rest of the world (2)

Johann Lau (1040920) | about 2 years ago | (#39100017)

did you just compare CCTV inside of stores to CCTV in public spaces... seriously?

Re:UK is no different than the rest of the world (1)

peppepz (1311345) | about 2 years ago | (#39099665)

and who cares how much they know as long as you have nothing to hide

(as if there weren't plenty of things that people don't want everyone else to see, even though there's nothing wrong with them)

Unprecedented level of security (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 years ago | (#39099455)

"The project appears to have been resurrected over fears of a terrorist attack at this summer’s Olympic Games in London and security services’ inability to track terrorist’s communication over the internet. The government has already pledged ‘unprecedented levels’ of cyber security for the event."

And they're right! Once the Anonymous take down their systems, they will be completely secure. A malfunctioning web site has never exploited anyone's browser.

Re:Unprecedented level of security (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099689)

Because if a system has potential flaw it is worthless? You can also blind a CCTV camera with a towel or a brick, doesn't mean it is will be unable to do its work in other cases.

increase security (1)

dogganos (901230) | about 2 years ago | (#39099505)

for whom?

CCDP? (1)

newcastlejon (1483695) | about 2 years ago | (#39099525)

Hmm, only one letter away from CCCP...

Re:CCDP? (1)

cmdr_klarg (629569) | about 2 years ago | (#39099643)

AKA the Soyuz Sovetskikh Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik AKA the Soviet Union.

(CCCP is the acronym for the Cyrillic spelling. My attempt to copy/paste that failed)

Re:CCDP? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#39100607)

Overexplained the joke.

My steampunk styled nixie die uses chips of a design so old, the datasheet has the CCCP symbol on. I like to brag that it is made with genuine Soviet engineering. This is half-true: The chips are actually manufactured more recently, but the mask was designed by Soviet engineers.

Why not just get the NSA to send them a copy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099603)

Would be more efficient than duplicating efforts.

decentralized communication needed (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099675)

Governments will never stop seeking more and more power over individuals. Corporations will always serve the will of their plutocrat masters.

Anonymity is the ONLY effective defense against power, that is why powerful interests do everything they can to eliminate it.

"The People" who aren't in either of those camps need a means of anonymous, distributed, communication that is outside of anyone's control.

Imagine a box anyone with a little electrical knowledge can wire into a hot outlet. Or a solar powered "wifi grenade" that can be thrown on a roof to make a node in the mesh and last until someone finds it. Set these up to connect to existing hotspots to piggyback on the "plutocrat" internet. Configure them to be low noise enough that they are difficult to distinguish from regular traffic. Add a little onboard storage and files can be "cloud stored" and impossible to remove.

We are coming to a crossroads. The future will be either the one of the boot stomping on the face like 1984, or one where the evil men who seek power are constantly frustrated by freedom loving individuals who have a greater understanding of technology.

time to start encrypting everything (4, Insightful)

Khashishi (775369) | about 2 years ago | (#39099717)

encrypt your phone calls, email, everything

Re:time to start encrypting everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099787)

That will soon become illegal too and we will get you anyway, pedo.

Re:time to start encrypting everything (1)

Tuan121 (1715852) | about 2 years ago | (#39099905)

jfij2oijf93j(*J#*(@(#*&$@#*(&JIEWJFiofjeoiwjifojio

Re:time to start encrypting everything (3, Informative)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about 2 years ago | (#39100069)

jfij2oijf93j(*J#*(@(#*&$@#*(&JIEWJFiofjeoiwjifojio

The prevalence of *, (, o, i, and j indicate that you are right handed. The proximity of £, @, and #' indicate and American keyboard setup.

Either way, this isn't encrypted text, and can be rejected as worthy of analysis.

Re:time to start encrypting everything (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about 2 years ago | (#39099991)

The thing about encryption is that you have to convince the other party that it's a good idea too.

Some people (your friends, family) may decide it's easier to just not talk to you any more.

Re:time to start encrypting everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100567)

encrypt your phone calls, email, everything

No. Everyone must spam; 60k emails/day * 63M people = way too much data to process.

Is UK taking hints from India now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099801)

This sounds very close to Indias IT act 2011, and proposed changes in 2012 (for which 22 companies have been taken to court)

If they snoop the Queen, is it treason? (2)

davecb (6526) | about 2 years ago | (#39099823)

... or perhaps just mutiny?

So the conent of every phone call, email and tweet (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about 2 years ago | (#39099871)

should be "Dump your Member of Parliament."

Don't just complain about it. Run for Parliament and throw the corrupt government out. Shut down the program.

Unfortunately you won't be able to penalize companies for cooperating with the law. But you may be able to prove corruption of your current MPs and lock them the hell up for taking or soliciting bribes.

They hate us for our freedoms... (1)

advocate_one (662832) | about 2 years ago | (#39099887)

oh wait... tw@ts...

Re:They hate us for our freedoms... (1)

forkfail (228161) | about 2 years ago | (#39100503)

Like most such spin, it makes much more sense if you turn it around. In this case, a neocon saying, "We hate our own people for their freedoms" makes a heck of a lot more sense.

We do things better than China and Iran (1)

dataxtream (1292440) | about 2 years ago | (#39099911)

Do China and Iran have this much control?

Wow, just one digit off (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | about 2 years ago | (#39099921)

CCDP vs CCCP. So close. (CCCP was better known in the west as the USSR, you can see it on aircraft and cosmonauts)

Context (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099975)

The biggest fear for me is how they can take things out of context.....and even then at their own discretion. Like that bloke off on his holidays who said he was gonna "destroy America" only to be greeted with a rubber glove at LAX.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2012/01/2-british-tourists-deported-at-lax-over-twitter-jokes/1

1984 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39099989)

do i need to continue

Right to be forgotten (1)

LtGordon (1421725) | about 2 years ago | (#39100023)

When the topic was related to Facebook's storage of user information, there was all this talk about the EU's "right to be forgotten" and how Facebook was violating this "right". Apparently this protection doesn't extend to the government.

The Internet, RIP (1)

JockTroll (996521) | about 2 years ago | (#39100113)

Made in the USA, 1969 Killed in the UK, 2012

Thanks a bunch, limeys. Thanks for colonialism, hooliganism, and this. May your fucking island disappear under the Atlantic forever so that we can all piss into the waves that drank it.

Governments working in unison (1)

m_number4 (902127) | about 2 years ago | (#39100123)

I've noticed that various western governents (australia, UK, Canada,) seem to working almost in unison with these orwellian type laws. There have been 3 or 4 major laws or decisions raised by each countries government in succession over the last year or two, I'd read about it in the Canadian papers then not a week later find out both Australia and the UK are trying to pull the same nonsense.

Re:Governments working in unison (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100433)

I'd guess the use of social networking in the Arab Springs has got them shit scared.

Odd they wouldn't think that they could keep people happy by better serving them than coming up with this draconian shit.

Re:Governments working in unison (1)

forkfail (228161) | about 2 years ago | (#39100549)

Look to where the real power is; that is, who pays off the politicians in those governments. Look to where the politician's loyalties lie (hint: for the majority, it's not to the people who elect them.)

What a relief (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100163)

the Olympics are coming to Britain. They will do just as much for the economy as they did in Greece.

just use OTR and Tor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100297)

Off-the-Record (OTR) gives you "perfect forward security", which means even if they know both your and your friends secret keys, they can't decipher the conversation they've captured. Keys are used to authenticate each other together with random values. The authentication generates a one-time key for that connection. When session is closed, key is forgotten and only way to decipher the captured data is to bruteforce AES.

The onion router (Tor) gives you anonymity so that even if government knows every single connection your network connection makes, they can't be sure it was you and who you connected to.

Unfortunately, it's only feasible for chatting. For voice communications it has too poor quality (latency, jitter).

How are you preparing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39100311)

With the psychotic behavior of many Western governments growing more pronounced, what are you doing to prepare for the upcoming revolutions?

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