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Russian Scientists Revive Plant From 30,000-Year-Old Seeds

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the to-make-a-new-type-of-vodka dept.

Biotech 162

An anonymous reader writes "It was an Ice Age squirrel's treasure chamber, a burrow containing fruit and seeds that had been stuck in the Siberian permafrost for over 30,000 years. From the fruit tissues, a team of Russian scientists managed to resurrect an entire plant in a pioneering experiment that paves the way for the revival of other species. The Silene stenophylla is the oldest plant ever to be regenerated, the researchers said, and it is fertile, producing white flowers and viable seeds. ... 'The squirrels dug the frozen ground to build their burrows, which are about the size of a soccer ball, putting in hay first and then animal fur for a perfect storage chamber,' said Stanislav Gubin, one of the authors of the study, who spent years rummaging through the area for squirrel burrows. 'It's a natural cryobank.'"

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That could be a market hit! (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105015)

You don't usually see something like this in your gardening store.

Re:That could be a market hit! (4, Insightful)

SpazmodeusG (1334705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105759)

That shouldn't be modded funny. I remember the Wollembi Pine retailing for $100 a sapling here in Australia a few years ago. Each sapling was numbered. There was a lot of novelty in having the Nth Wollembi Pine in the world.

There's a hell of a lot of money to be made here.

Re:That could be a market hit! (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106433)

This reminds me of a few years back, when they managed to grow a date palm from seeds found in some ancient egyptian tomb. at the time of the article, the tree was 3 feet tall and doing well.

Oh no (5, Funny)

j35ter (895427) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105023)

Another Ice Age sequel *facepalm*

Re:Oh no (2)

elashish14 (1302231) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105187)

I think you mean Jurassic Park.

The real-life kind of sequel

Re:Oh no (4, Funny)

j35ter (895427) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105249)

Jurassic park with prehistoric squirrels? Sounds like another George Lucas movie to me...

Re:Oh no (4, Funny)

djlowe (41723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105651)

Jurassic park with prehistoric squirrels? Sounds like another George Lucas movie to me...

I was thinking more of a sequel to Monty Python and the Holy Grail: "Far more terrifying than the Rabbit of Caerbannog, it stalks its prey as it has since the dawn of time..."

Re:Oh no (2)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106273)

Can't be worst than a George Lucas movie with a duck.

Re:Oh no (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106347)

Now that Marvel is doing their own movies, they should do a remake, complete with Dr. Bong.

Re:Oh no (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105357)

I think you mean Jurassic Park.

Sounds more like Zyryanka-Sartan Park to me. But that name would never fly on the US marker. :-)

I saw this movie (5, Insightful)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105027)

Well the question is, how can you know anything about an extinct ecosystem? And therefore, how could you ever assume that you can control it? I mean, you have plants in this building that are poisonous. You picked them because they look good. But these are aggressive living things that have no idea what century they're in, and they'll defend themselves, violently if necessary.

Re:I saw this movie (5, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105083)

But these are aggressive living things that have no idea what century they're in, and they'll defend themselves, violently if necessary.

Great, just great. And now we've brought them into an era when handguns are cheap and readily available.

Re:I saw this movie (4, Funny)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105645)

"How can you do this to us? We brought you back from the Ice Age, and now you've turned on us!"

"Well, what can I say? I guess I'm just a bad seed."

Re:I saw this movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39106015)

Yes according to TFS, these are seedy characters.

Re:I saw this movie (3, Interesting)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105115)

You know how marketing works, have this plant, direct from the previous ice age!.if those plants become somewhat popular and get out, i would be worried about our actual ecosystem, Anyway, isnt like something back in the age of dinosaurs or even before. Should not be so big incompatibilities with actual species, and could get back some healty food for us.

Re:I saw this movie (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105289)

Given that this is an ice age tree, from the permafrost, it would likely be cold-adapted. Having it somehow run wild in our post-ice-age onset global warming world is an unlikely scenario.

In terms of "compatibility", barring any particular characteristics of a specific species (e.g. it being particularly poisonous or indigestible, the same way many (most) modern plants and some animals are for us), you could expect to eat a stegosaurus steak or a Jurassic plant pretty much as readily as a modern buffalo steak or root tuber.

Re:I saw this movie (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105519)

you could expect to eat a stegosaurus steak or a Jurassic plant pretty much as readily as a modern buffalo steak or root tuber.

I'm sure the farmer and meat processing plant would disagree.....

Re:I saw this movie (2, Insightful)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105117)

At least they'll help us fight the zombies.

Re:I saw this movie (3, Interesting)

Empiric (675968) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105161)

The only movie I can think of is "Little Shop of Horrors", but I don't think that was quite the violent-plant image you had in mind...

Re:I saw this movie (4, Informative)

gregg (42218) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105257)

The only movie I can think of is "Little Shop of Horrors", but I don't think that was quite the violent-plant image you had in mind...

It could be The Day of the Triffids [wikipedia.org] . Nothing is scarier than malevolent celery.

Re:I saw this movie (1)

Empiric (675968) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105483)

Re:I saw this movie (2)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105359)

There's Scary Movie 2 where one of the Wayans brothers gets rolled up and smoked by a giant pot plant....

Re:I saw this movie (5, Informative)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105171)

For the curious, pretty much all plants carry out some degree of chemical warfare between each other and other organisms—from the obvious, like plant seeds full of cyanides, to more subtle things, like conifers acidifying the soil around them with their needles and roots to prevent anything else from growing (and much more subtle things still.) I don't know quite enough about Siberia thirty thousand years ago to make a good statement, but I would guess that it was a little more temperate than it currently is; in that case, it's probable that the plants from that era were chemically more aggressive, as the the availability of resources and the richness of the soil would have been higher.

Then again, one need only take this particular species further south to find out that it might very well be about average for the present day. Unfortunately there isn't enough historical expression information about plants to make a guess at the inflation rate (or deflation rate) over the long-term for plant toxicity in different ecosystems... but it could make a neat thesis topic.

Re:I saw this movie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105291)

Well if we revived it from 30k years ago, maybe it'll be hearty and aggressive enough to suffocate kudzu!

Er, wait...

Re:I saw this movie (4, Funny)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105653)

kudzu is good, hides the redneck and hillbilly junk in the yards

Re:I saw this movie (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105315)

hi bonch

Re:I saw this movie (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105659)

Nope. Unless you mean this? [topatoco.com]

Re:I saw this movie (3, Funny)

wbr1 (2538558) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105431)

My question is, does Rick Moranis work at this lab? "Feed me Seymore!"

Re:I saw this movie (0)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105533)

Yes and no. I think the risk is somewhat mitigated by the fact that these are species that already lost evolutions little challenge. Its true that some of the stresses the wiped them out in the first place my be gone, or different. Some of the critters that once ate them may also be different in number for example.

Its more likely though that the environmental shifts these things failed to cope with in the past have continued and that they are even less 'fit' for today's world than when they left it. They might not be able to survive at all outside of cultivation.

Re:I saw this movie (4, Informative)

Fjandr (66656) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105921)

Actually, the particular species in question is still alive today. It didn't "fail" anything...

Re:I saw this movie (1)

ganjadude (952775) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105843)

you mean "the happening" was a warning and not a story of fiction???

global warming = naturally occuring cryobank w/d? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105051)

obviously less than ideal conditions, but isn't this an already well known cycle that occurs at the end of every ice age?
Species previously thought extinct (or endangered) reappeared with changes in climate conditions.
Interesting work none the less.

In Soviet Russia ... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105069)

.. plant revives you!

Re:In Soviet Russia ... (4, Informative)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105373)

.. revived plants kill you!

FTFY. From the second FA:

Tragedy has now struck the Russian team. Dr. Gilichinksy, its leader, was hospitalized with an asthma attack and unable to respond to questions, his daughter Yana said on Friday. On Saturday, Dr. Price reported that Dr. Gilichinsky had died of a heart attack.

Re:In Soviet Russia ... (3, Insightful)

Flyerman (1728812) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105977)

Holy crap. That sounds like the beginning of a novel.

Enough Problems Already... (-1, Flamebait)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105073)

As if we didn't have enough issues with invasive and non-native plant species wreaking havoc on our ecosystems from the stupidity of yester-year? Now we want to revive 30,000 year-old plants and make it worse??? They died for a reason- get over it, move on, do something productive for TODAY.

Am I missing some major potential social or environmental benefit to doing this?

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105093)

Yeah -- reviving all the species we've killed with our careless exploitation of the planet.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (-1, Troll)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105139)

Human impact on the environment goes back before humans existed? That's impressive.

Also, note that the article makes no mention of any potential benefit to the world. They're just considering this a stepping stone to the ultimate goal of reviving the wolly mammoth. Not kidding. This is purely "because we can" and "so we can make money!" $cience. The potential fallout of this kind of reckless scientific exploitation is something we should have written off many, many years ago. The tone of the quotes in the article remind me of the race for an atomic bomb.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (2)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105181)

Did you fail at math? Homo Sapiens originated about 200,000 years ago. Last time I checked, 30,000 was less than 200,000.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105303)

Did you fail at math?

Obviously he went to high school in Texas. He probably did very well in math.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105985)

He failed at math but aced his bible classes.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39106387)

That would mean he aced his math classes since 6000 is less than 30,000.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105185)

Human impact on the environment goes back before humans existed? That's impressive.

(Different A/C here)

... you do realize humans are older than 30,000 years, right?

Anatomically, we're 200,000 years old. Behaviorally, we're 50,000 years old (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human).

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105349)

My mistake, I missed a zero. Funny how many different numbers I see flying around for how old humans are, yet everyone's up in arms about a simple oversight.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Funny)

ThePeices (635180) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105673)

My mistake, I missed a zero. Funny how many different numbers I see flying around for how old humans are, yet everyone's up in arms about a simple oversight.

Hi there, you must be new to Slashdot. Welcome to Slashdot.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Informative)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106577)

No you're way more than a zero off. Homo Erectus originated nearly 2 million years ago. So even if it had been 300,000 rather than 30,000 you're still nearly an order of magnitude off from being even remotely right.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (-1, Flamebait)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106645)

My mistake, I missed a zero.

Suuure you did, buddy.

Funny how many different numbers I see flying around for how old humans are, yet everyone's up in arms about a simple oversight.

And all of the numbers are a hell of a lot bigger than 30000. Face it, you're an ignorant Luddite whose opinions on this or any scientific matter are of less value than my dog's barking, and every post you make just underscores that fact. Now go play, kid, the grown-ups are talking.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105197)

You fool, humans have existed for at least 100,000 years

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105107)

Am I missing some major potential social or environmental benefit to doing this?

It proves that it's possible to grow plants from long-frozen seeds, so shows its worth preserving (freezing) seeds just in case something really bad happens to the living plants. (This has already happened, where species have been wiped out in the wild by mining and forestry, then reintroduced once the companies have left.)

The techniques might be useful for other, more recently extincted (?) species.

And it's challenging and interesting, that is reason enough.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Informative)

Jiro (131519) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105293)

If you read the article, which a lot of people on Slashdot don't do, a lot of scientists are skeptical, but even if the Russians did exactly what they said they did, they didn't grow the plants from seeds in the normal sense. They basically cloned the plants, growing them from cells in the seeds--if only a few cells are alive, they could be cloned but it probably wouldn't be enough for the seeds to sprout.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105381)

Thank you for posting the only sensible reply with actual substance. I appreciate your honest, meaningful response!

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

ankhank (756164) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105429)

Also gives some urgency to actually looking hard at the permafrost before it melts.
No telling what else is frozen in there that we might find handy or decorative to revive (besides mammoths, of course).

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105729)

How is a mammoth either handy or decorative?

It *might* be handy... but then you would be taking the Flintstones a little too seriously.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (2)

djlowe (41723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105887)

How is a mammoth either handy or decorative?

Well, it's an awful lot of meat... I'd imagine that there'd be a LOT of people willing to pay a premium for a nice mammoth steak, perhaps served with a nice reduction of merlot and portabello mushrooms.. not to mention the fact that you could use the other parts too: Ice Age Oysters, anyone?

You could make a rug out of it's pelt. Then there's the tusks... and you could powder the bones and sell it as an aphrodisiac.

Why, the possibilities are endless!

Regards,

dj

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Interesting)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105999)

I absolutely agree with you that threatened plants should be preserved. There is a problem, though, and that is some plants are very adapted to a tiny environmental niche. By way of example, there are prairie flowers here in Minnesota that grow only on the south side of sandy glacial moraines in a few mile radius from Glendalough State Park. According to park rangers, efforts to plant them in cultivation elsewhere have failed, as have efforts to transplant them elsewhere in the state. It's something about the soil, the drainage, the natural fertilizers, the rain, the light, the humidity, the temperatures, the snowfall, the bugs, the freezing, all coming together so intricately that nobody knows which environmental cues are required to grow them.

Overall, this plant does not have great survival traits. And as such, I'd guess that such a plant isn't adding much to the ecosystem. But as often happens with wildflowers, there may be a certain pollinator that is finely adapted to it, meaning that if the plant dies, that specialized moth/fly/insect may die with it. So while the plant may not be directly critical to humans, it's still having some impact on its environment.

In terms of "what is the most important plant to save", this wouldn't be at the top of the list. And in terms of "if we have storage space to save only 100,000 different seeds, so let's save the ones we know we can grow back", it also won't make the cut. But in terms of "what plants are so threatened that we should preserve their seeds while a few still exist?" it might make that list.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (3, Interesting)

El_Oscuro (1022477) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106595)

Kind of like the Venus Flytrap. Contrary to popular belief, it is native to the coastal plains of North/South Carolina, not some exotic tropical jungle. Efforts to introduce them elsewhere have mostly failed, even though apparently someone has done so in New Jersey. I have a nice small colony [thinkgeek.com] which I grow outside year round in Maryland, but it requires upkeep. These plants would never survive here without my help. I mean, what could possibly go wrong? H'mm, those plants look a little big to be eating just insects. Are they supposed to be moving like that? Wait a #y!(132~a... NO_CARRIER

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105129)

The plant might contain the cure for cancer, aids, altzheimers, etc. Then again, it might just taste good mixed in a tossed salad.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105425)

Then again, it might just taste good mixed in a tossed salad.

I've heard that it improves the taste of beef synthesized from stem cells.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105703)

yeah, that stuff just doesn't have the quite the zing of something that died properly in agony spouting blood. I think they should rectify that by putting brains, nerves, ciculatory and endocrine systems from stem cells into that meat.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Insightful)

yodleboy (982200) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105143)

do we have to know the benefit up front? So maybe we recover some extinct species that got wiped out by your invasive ones. Or maybe we find a bunch of seeds, grow the plant and find out it's the perfect plant for producing biofuels. Or maybe we restore some lost Amazonian species that just happens to lead to a cure for cancer. Who knows, isn't it worth trying?

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105145)

The plans contain the cure for cancer or maybe HIV or maybe the common cold? Don't dismIss it until after it Is studied

Re:Enough Problems Already... (3, Funny)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105165)

Isn't there like a Flat Earth Society website that you anti-science douchebags can hang out?

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105369)

Apparently your place is a good start! I stated an observation and solicited feedback. Isn't that how the scientific community works? You don't seem to like that approach though.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (3, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105573)

I stated an observation and solicited feedback.

No you didn't, you stated:

They died for a reason- get over it, move on, do something productive for TODAY.

So rather than being curious as to what the purpose of this was (since your question was rhetorical, as you obviously don't care about the responses) you insisted that they stop doing this and do something else. What that might be I can't fathom.

Your post indicates little to no actual curiosity and rather indignation that they are doing something you perceive to not be valuable. So yeah, you're gonna get flamed.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105329)

Am I missing some major potential social or environmental benefit to doing this?

You mean besides knowing yet another way we can undo some of the damage we've caused to this planet?

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105337)

No one said they was releasing it in the wild. I'd imagine it's being kept in a lab. This is good in several ways. The technique proved successful in reviving something old, and you now have a plant to provide genetic comparison from 30,000 years ago compared to now. Having such info can only be good in genetic research especially in regards to evolution. Who knows, this plant may be a cancer curer though probably not. It's research, you just can't measure it's importance until we are long dead usually since something small can lead to something big.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105389)

... get over it, move on, do something productive for TODAY.

Like... stop posting on /.?

Re:Enough Problems Already... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105569)

They died for a reason- get over it, move on, do something productive for TODAY.

Why? So you can bitch about that too?
You've already posted before about how if it doesn't benefit you personally, it shouldn't matter to anyone.

You are just a short sighted selfish anti-science anti-progress miserable excuse for a human being.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

tomhath (637240) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105901)

FTA:

The burrows were located 125 feet (38 meters) below the present surface in layers containing bones of large mammals, such as mammoth, wooly rhinoceros, bison, horse and deer...

Gubin said the study has demonstrated that tissue can survive ice conservation for tens of thousands of years, opening the way to the possible resurrection of Ice Age mammals.

Ice Age mammals might be useful today. If nothing else it would be pretty cool to see a mammoth or a wooly rhino..

Re:Enough Problems Already... (4, Informative)

Fjandr (66656) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105931)

Something a lot of people seem to be missing: this is not an extinct species. These are seeds from a plant that is still alive and growing wild in Siberia to this very day.

Re:Enough Problems Already... (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106155)

Why have most people decided that the current ecosystems on Earth are as they should be forever? It seems like there is this desire to correct anything that results in population balance changes. Do we really think that we can stop all environmental and evolutionary change on Earth forever?

Things have been changing for a long time with and without our direct intervention.

Invasive species suck sometimes. They can cause a loss in species diversity. They can also be a tremendous driving force for adaptation by the struggling native species. Every species could have been considered invasive at some point in history or they would have never become established. I'm not condoning wanton spreading of species around the world, but I don't think it's going to cause some sort of complete ecological collapse if some weed starts growing in peoples backyards.

So...what happened to the squirrel? (1)

gimmebeer (1648629) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105101)

Scientists just come along and steal the food you've had stashed for 30,000 years... being a squirrel is rough.

Re:So...what happened to the squirrel? (0)

djlowe (41723) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105813)

So...what happened to the squirrel?

The scientists found it frozen nearby, and after taking samples, dismembered it and made stew. One scientist, on sabbatical from an unnamed US university, was heard to exclaim: "That's good eatin'!"

Others weren't as enthusiastic, however, stating that they found it tough and overly gamy, and criticized the accompanying wine as being of a particularly poor vintage, one not nearly suited to the momentous occasion.

Irreverently yours,

dj

little shop of horrors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105109)

Apparently they haven't seen this movie in Russia yet

just what I need (5, Funny)

bandy (99800) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105175)

Just what I need - another plant to be allergic to.

Re:just what I need (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105401)

Just what I need - another plant to be allergic to.

TFA the 2nd:

Tragedy has now struck the Russian team. Dr. Gilichinksy, its leader, was hospitalized with an asthma attack and unable to respond to questions

Here, doctor! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105199)

Take my HELIX FOSSIL. I'll be right back.

Scrat? (0)

Vrallis (33290) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105285)

Was Scrat's acorn in there too? Did the poor little guy ever get his treasure?

After the plant matures... (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105299)

It will spray it's euro toxin at the researchers and take over their bodies with it's spores. commanding it's new plant zombie army to take over the world!

and it will have fabulous parties.

Re:After the plant matures... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105463)

It will spray it's euro toxin at the researchers and take over their bodies with it's spores. commanding it's new plant zombie army to take over the world!

and it will have fabulous parties.

>euro toxin

Is that the one that causes them to manage their finances like a European country? If so, they'll soon be out of grant money and we won't have to worry about them or their prehistoric plants any longer.

We never learn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105307)

Have we learned NOTHING from Jurassic Park?

Re:We never learn (1)

powerspike (729889) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105419)

Have we learned NOTHING from Jurassic Park?

You don't need to run fast, just faster then the next person...

Re:We never learn (2)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106023)

Have we learned NOTHING from Jurassic Park?

You don't need to run fast, just faster then the next person...

In this case, you just have to outrun the plant.

Bad news good news (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105341)

Bad news, the plant turns out to be carnivorous. The good news, at least we know why the Mammoths died out.

Oblig. Dr. Ian Malcolm (0)

Loopy (41728) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105405)

Oh, yeah. Oooh, ahhh, that's how it always starts. Then later there's running and screaming.

I'm not supersticious, but... (4, Insightful)

MoldySpore (1280634) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105511)

...I really have to question the idea of bringing back life that ceased to exist thousands, and eventually possibly millions, of years ago. Jurassic Park jokes aside, I hope they will take adequate precautions to not bring back something that could wind up being disastrous on the CURRENT iteration of Earth. I'm all for stuff like this, I just hope they err on the side of caution before bringing back random plants and introducing them into a modern ecosystem that has evolved well beyond when some of those plants will have existed.

Re:I'm not supersticious, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105695)

That's what they said to Yaweh, but did he listen? No...

Re:I'm not supersticious, but... (2)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 2 years ago | (#39105741)

There's only one way to find out!

Realistically though, 30,000 years ago the earth wasn't much different than today.

Re:I'm not supersticious, but... (2)

Algae_94 (2017070) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106229)

Some of the oldest living plants today are over 4000 years old [wikipedia.org] . Theoretically then, 30,000 years could be covered by 8 generations of one of these extremely long-living plants.

Re:I'm not supersticious, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39106227)

Oh yes... Cause with millions of years behind us we certainly been regressing in the evolution fight-to-death. I'd be more worried about the plant we revive.

Russia rocks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105655)

Say what you will about Russia, but it is the next China.

They could accelerate it by taking up Mises economics and reducing the influence of the mob.

If it was legal for a US citizen I would help them spike their economy.

JJ

32,000 years, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39105911)

...IT'S OVER 9000!!!

Obligatory tag (1)

RareButSeriousSideEf (968810) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106117)

#whatcouldpossiblygowrong

Good thing the seeds didn't come from Monsanto (0)

Valacosa (863657) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106361)

Terminator genes would have made this sort of thing impossible.

That's nothing! (1)

Niobe (941496) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106397)

A bloke round here found a tree MILLIONS of years old and it was still ALIVE. http://www.wollemipine.com/aboutwp.php [wollemipine.com]

SWM seeks Slashdot from 6 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39106415)

I miss you Slashdot--the old Slashdot that is. Your comments used to be insightful and thought provoking. Now I just click on the comments to see if I've rightly guessed the particular flavor of insipid drivel you're producing these days. I know you're still out there somewhere, but like me, I think you lurk because any intelligent and informative comment will just be lost on people whose goal in life is to see "(Score:5, Funny)" after their post title. Where have the scientists, dreamers, geeks and ethical hackers gone? Where did all the CSI watching, fear-mongering, smart ass posers come from? Please let me know if we can meet somewhere, preferably in private, and recapture the glory. You know how to reach me.

What happened? (1)

Niobe (941496) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106445)

The world got stupider my friend, hadn't you noticed?

Re:What happened? (1)

Niobe (941496) | more than 2 years ago | (#39106451)

..but it's always been at least 90% stupid

Amber? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39106613)

Perhaps they have the DNA of a species of creature (from the creatures blood) in the body of a mosquito which accidentally fell into some amber. They can extract the DNA of the creature from the blood held in the mosquito and resequence the DNA, adding bits of DNA from ...say a frog or amphibian. But then the animal...creature gets loose on the island, and the people need to get off the island via helicopter because "Danger, objects in mirror are closer than they appear", and I've seen the movie. Still, its impressive what they did. Not like the movie mind you, but still impressive.

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