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25 Alleged Anonymous Hackers Arrested By Interpol

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the ddosing-a-jail-cell dept.

Crime 256

PatPending sends this quote from an AFP report: "Interpol has arrested 25 suspected members of the Anonymous hackers group in a swoop covering more than a dozen cities in Europe and Latin America, the global police body said Tuesday. Operation Unmask was launched in mid-February following a series of coordinated cyber-attacks originating from Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Spain,' Interpol said. The statement cited attacks on the websites of the Colombian Ministry of Defense and the presidency, as well as on Chile's Endesa electricity company and its National Library, among others. The operation was carried out by police from Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Spain, the statement said, with 250 items of computer equipment and cell phones seized in raids on 40 premises in 15 cities. Police also seized credit cards and cash from the suspects, aged 17 to 40."

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Interpol (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195319)

I thought we established in the previous Slashdot post about the 'won't pray to Mohammed' guy that Interpol itself couldn't arrest anyone.

Re:Interpol (5, Informative)

zippo01 (688802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195337)

"The operation was carried out by police from Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Spain, the statement said, with 250 items of computer equipment and cell phones seized in raids on 40 premises in 15 cities. Police also seized credit cards and cash from the suspects, aged 17 to 40." The way I read it is Interpol Interpol coordinated everything, and physical arrest was made by locals.

What asshole modded this down? (1, Informative)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195423)

Looks like he answered the question well to me.

Re:Interpol (3, Insightful)

Tar-Alcarin (1325441) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195887)

Except, of course, the headline states: "Interpol Arrests 25 Suspected Anonymous Hackers"

I know that headlines need to be short, to the point etc, but they could have rephrased it with "Interpol has 25 Suspected Anonymous Hackers Arrested", and it would be accurate.

Re:Interpol (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195949)

"Interpol differs from most law-enforcement agencies -- agents do not make arrests themselves, and there is no single Interpol jail where criminals are taken. The agency functions as an administrative liaison between the law-enforcement agencies of the member countries, providing communications and database assistance."

Re:Interpol (1)

Tar-Alcarin (1325441) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196003)

Yes, I too have RTFA, and I know they explain things in there.

The problem is that it's the headlines that get republished and read everywhere, thus reiterating the fallacy that Interpol makes arrests.
This /. story is just one example of how people rewrite the heading and get the wrong idea.

Re:Interpol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195989)

But then that's passive voice and possibly too long.

Re:Interpol (4, Insightful)

flyneye (84093) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196069)

Let us further put this in perspective.
Interpol finds 25 drones,who, while a microscopic part of a greater good, were too dumb to cover their tracks. Interpol pats itself on the back for generating headlines cheaply through ineffective, but showy action.

We should also consider that Anonymous exists for the purpose of Meta-vigilance in a world of unwatched watchmen and corrupt governments. Participants who stray to unofficial actions like " C.C.Fraud" have no business claiming the Anonymous banner as theirs.(obviously not too anonymous if they got caught, duh)
Let's call a spade, a spade and a club, a club.

Re:Interpol (5, Insightful)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196159)

Hardly. Interpol helps arrest 25 drones who participate in semi-organized cyber-guerrilla warfare against political targets. The idea that Anonymous is serving the "greater good" is not implied by their targets or by their results. Anonymous is not _coherent_ enough to have a well defined purpose. They consistently mistake what is effectively electronic graffiti for meaningful protest, and fail to convey or enunciate what they actually want. Anonymous may well have a few technically competent core hackers, but they rely heavily on their much larger community of script kiddies and poorly skilled hangers on to form the necessary crowds.

Like the fools at political rallies who throw bottles at police and overturn cars, they actively _discredit_ the political causes they occasionally espouse. They encourage police and voters to think of the genuine political movements as similar vandals. And they're not _competent_ enough to be genuine threats to those they claim to battle: they've demonstrated that again and again. If they were competent enough to actually raid corporate email or financial records and get them to Wikileaks, then I'd take them far more seriously.

Re:Interpol (1)

webheaded (997188) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196375)

Wow I have been on the internet too much lately. I read that last part as "arrested by lolcats."

Re:Interpol (1)

ddtracy (2565031) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196023)

Muslims don't pray to Muhammed so it was probably not that statement that made them want to arrest him. It was probably something in line with "won't accept Muhammed as a prophet" or "I'm atheist now" or "agnostics rule!".

Stratfor Wikileaks Hack Paybaaack (3, Interesting)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196085)

Payback for recent Anonymous [slashdot.org] hack of Stratfor [slashdot.org] . Corrupt global economic hitmen [wlcentral.org] protecting themselves by going after the whistleblowers, yet again [salon.com] ?

Fail (5, Interesting)

xenobyte (446878) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195341)

What does credit cards and cash have to do with DoS and Anonymous?!

Do they really think that Anonymous pays people for performing attacks or what? - They seriously need to look up what Anonymous is.

Re:Fail (5, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195461)

It's standard procedure in policing to sieze anything and everything for which even the slightest excuse exists. There are three reasons:
- Because it's easier to take the lot at arrest and work out later what is actually relivant rather than get that done beforehand.
- Intimidation value. The most miserable the suspect, and the more their life is ruined, the more other potential offenders will fear the police.
- Profit! Much of the equipment is never returned even if the suspect is later found innocent, or even released without charge, and eventually gets sold at police auction.

Re:Fail (5, Interesting)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195573)

It's standard procedure in policing to sieze anything and everything for which even the slightest excuse exists. There are three reasons:
- Because it's easier to take the lot at arrest and work out later what is actually relivant rather than get that done beforehand.
- Intimidation value. The most miserable the suspect, and the more their life is ruined, the more other potential offenders will fear the police.
- Profit! Much of the equipment is never returned even if the suspect is later found innocent, or even released without charge, and eventually gets sold at police auction.

this is especially true in countries not so well off. like all the countries mentioned.

also the intimidation value is for the suspect in the case.. so that he'll fess up and confess. because the chances are the cops questioning the suspects have no fucking idea what they're trying to get the guy to confess to!

Re:Fail (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195587)

Also the fact that the people doing the confiscating often aren't techies and therefore take everything because they don't know what not to take. Always during footage of such raids you'll see them trying to cart off big old 21" CRT monitors, joysticks and so on.

Re:Fail (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195861)

And often because their instructions are something like, "Take all the computers and anything that looks like you can connect it to a computer."

Re:Fail (1)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196015)

How hard would it be to hide a USB storage device in a joystick, in the hope that the police will think "This is just a joystick, we don't need to take it"?

Re:Fail (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196083)

The police will seize it, but they probably won't actually analyse it. You can get USB flash drives which look like a USB cable. OTOH, micro-SD cards are so small that they're highly unlikely to be found if hidden.

Re:Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196225)

Considering the joystick very well could get sold at an auction (I sell secondhand joysticks all day) you might want to include some rom in the joystick and lojacks it for you when the user starts playing with it. You could find out where they live, break in when they're away and steal back your flash drive joystick.

Re:Fail (3, Interesting)

gmack (197796) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195593)

Anon/lolsec made it much easier for the police to do this by bragging that they engaged in credit card fraud(used stolen card numbers for charitable donations).

Re:Fail (2)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195903)

LulzSec is to Anon as Westboro' Baptist is to Christianity; Similar ideas, taken too far.

Yeah , ain't life tough if you're a crim (-1, Troll)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195795)

So they might not get back their equipment. Well boo hoo, cry me a river. They'll probably be too busy making sure Bubba isn't standing behind them in the showers for the next few years to worry about whats happened to their "l337" kit anyway.

Re:Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195913)

250 items of computer equipment and cell phones seized

seized credit cards and cash

And here I thought the major cost of reading 4chan was eye bleach.

Re:Fail (1)

Pax681 (1002592) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196041)

What does credit cards and cash have to do with DoS and Anonymous?!

Do they really think that Anonymous pays people for performing attacks or what? - They seriously need to look up what Anonymous is.

i know what you mean but it happens here in Scotland and, i suppose, in England,Wales and Northern Ireland and in the US too!
the credit card, bank details and,in Scotland, items of value bought within the last twelve years. If it is proven that you are guilty then the resultant items can be sold as "proceeds of crime".
i would however contest that there were no "proceeds of crime" in these cases as it wasn't some tax evasion, drug dealing, gun running or other profitable criminal activity
it may however be just part of standard procedure or just an extra "fuck you" as a warning shot to other Anons.
In Scotland the items ARE RETURNED is a verdict of NIT GUILTY is arrived at or if there is no case to answer or no charges brought
i know this as a buddy of mine had this happen to him recently. the charges were dropped and his lawyer made damned sure he got his stuff back
The credit card may well have been used to pay for domain names/hosting or some-such. and thus easily linking the people to the actions they are accused of.

Re:Fail (1)

Pax681 (1002592) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196047)

argh.. damn my craptastic typage! a verdict of "NOT" guilty.....
NIT GUILTY.. the fleas did it sir!" :P

Re:Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196199)

Just because they return your stuff after a verdict of not guilty verdict is reached doesn't mean that they haven't complely fucked your stuff up through the process of investigation. Nor does it mean that you will be guaranteed to be reimbursed for damages they did to your home or vehicle while searching or performing forensics.

Wrong wording. (1, Informative)

bejiitas_wrath (825021) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195345)

sed s/hackers/crackers/gi;

A hacker is a person that is modifying something to change it, like hacking on source code to improve it.

A cracker is a person who is trying to break into computer systems.

Re:Wrong wording. (5, Insightful)

rikkards (98006) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195459)

Wording is what society makes it. Sorry hacking is now associated as much with the latter definition as the former and posting that is not going to change anything.

Re:Wrong wording. (4, Insightful)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195475)

And that's why we can still say "nigger".

Re:Wrong wording. (0)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195539)

Agreed, this battle is already lost.

Re:Wrong wording. (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195597)

Damn Angelina Jolie for showing her tits and making that lame movie memorable!

Re:Wrong wording. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195697)

I don't remember that bit. I think I'm going to have to watch that movie again...

Posted AC for obvious reasons.

Re:Wrong wording. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195729)

"Damn Angelina Jolie for not showing me her memorable tits!"
FTFY

Re:Wrong wording. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196027)

Elephant banana. Legs adjective fluorescent touch. Twat.

Re:Wrong wording. (4, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195469)

Words change. What was originally a misuse of the word 'hacker' has since become dominant over the earlier meaning.

Re:Wrong wording. (0, Flamebait)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195589)

yep, I'm tired of this always coming up and people bothering to mod it. especially when the guy has a popular myth quote as sig. I wonder if he goes to gay parades because they're just cheerful.

Re:Wrong wording. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195645)

I routinely use "gay" in that sense and have gone to gay parades because they're just cheerful. They're not about buttfucking other men, but about celebrating who you are as long as you're not harming anyone else.

Re:Wrong wording. (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195647)

Even his correction is wrong, as 'cracker' is also commonly a term for someone who specialises in breaking software copy-prevention measures.

Re:Wrong wording. (5, Funny)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195905)

I was called a cracker once, on the subway in New York. I don't think the intended meaning was the same.

Re:Wrong wording. (2)

tao (10867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195555)

A cracker is a person who's modifying software to remove the copy protections, adding missing functionality (for games this would be cheat modes), shortening things, etc., to improve it.

Re:Wrong wording. (2)

f3rret (1776822) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195571)

Words do this thing where they change meaning through regular use.

It's interesting, if you're a language nerd, you're obviously not one.

Re:Wrong wording. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195607)

Educated people tend to place importance upon using words correctly so that complex communication remains possible. They will often note that the common use of a word has shifted, yet still promote its intended use.

Giving control of your language to people who can't (or simply won't) communicate correctly is a bad idea.

Re:Wrong wording. (4, Insightful)

Ravon Rodriguez (1074038) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195875)

The thing is, it's not your language, my language, or any other one person's language. English is constantly evolving, and insisting on using outdated definitions of words limits your potential audience. In order to efficiently convey ideas, it's important to use words that everyone understands; this is the information age, and scientific, political, and social debate isn't limited to the elite anymore.

Re:Wrong wording. (4, Interesting)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196029)

The thing is, it's not your language, my language, or any other one person's language. English is constantly evolving, and insisting on using outdated definitions of words limits your potential audience. In order to efficiently convey ideas, it's important to use words that everyone understands; this is the information age, and scientific, political, and social debate isn't limited to the elite anymore.

u nggaz shd bettr be rdy4 txt msg spk in ur books

Re:Wrong wording. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195581)

Your definition hasn't been in use 10 years ago and yet you still think you can change it? Stop living in the past...

Re:Wrong wording. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195627)

To: Parent.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7E-aoXLZGY

If you don't want language to evolve, speak Latin.

Re:Wrong wording. (1, Troll)

MORB (793798) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195783)

And a sperg (an offensive diminutive for "aspergers") is someone who cares way too much about minutiae that nobody else cares about. Hackers are people breaking into computer systems. It's what everyone calls them, it's how everyone understands the word.

Language evolves. Get over it.

Re:Wrong wording. (1)

ddtracy (2565031) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196063)

Let's simply use the common definition and stop this cracker/hacker thing. "Hackers" are simply people who find solutions to problems so that they can do whatever they are trying to do. Nowadays people use black/grey/white/blue/red -hat words for that stuff you are talking about.

INTERPOL ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195359)

It still runs Windows 95/98 on its desks, you know !! Truly amazing work, boys !! Truly amazing !!

It won't help. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195369)

Legio mihi nomen est, quia multi sumus.

Re:It won't help. (5, Funny)

robably (1044462) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195439)

"Lego is available to all men, and what a multitude of things you can do with it."

Those Latins, they knew a thing or two.

Re:It won't help. (1)

jonamous++ (1687704) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196009)

Could not stop laughing - awesome. :)

They're defeated now! (5, Funny)

GmExtremacy (2579091) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195373)

Surely they've been completely defeated. What a good use of time and resources.

Anonymous is a national security threat.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

Corbets (169101) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195405)

Surely they've been completely defeated. What a good use of time and resources.

Anonymous is a national security threat.

Well, that really depends. Most of Anonyomous, according to your various news sources, consists of script kiddies willing to "bot" their PC out to a couple folks with actual hacking expertise. Despite the "we're all equal, there are no leaders here" mantra, it appears that these efforts are coordinated from a reasonable discrete number of sources.

If they've got those sources, then the capabilities of Anonymous will indeed go down.

As for them being a national security threat, no more so than your average vandal or thief - but we toss them in jail, too.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195493)

Obviously the coordinators need some IT security (breaching) experience. There is likely quite a few more than 25 of those however.

Re:They're defeated now! (2)

GmExtremacy (2579091) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195559)

As for them being a national security threat, no more so than your average vandal or thief - but we toss them in jail, too.

It all depends on how much effort and resources we're putting into it. Spending billions of taxpayer dollars to catch jaywalkers would be a complete waste of time.

Of course, I don't think this situation is as bad as it is with piracy (so much time, effort, and draconian laws over people copying data).

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196037)

Those ad-hoc leaders are transient though, so they'll have to lock up every skilled hacker in existence to take down Anonymous.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195435)

When the risk of participating becomes too high, most members will abandon Anonymous.

Re:They're defeated now! (3, Insightful)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195517)

Anonymous is more like a publishing and public rage outlet. There's hardly a member card required for it either, if I went to some random secret document repository, tossed everything in a photocopyer, escaped and then published it as "Anonymous", all on my own, it's quite unlikely that someone would pop up to claim "Oh he's not Anonymous, we are!".

The standard meaning of the word still applies even though there's a lot of internet and 4chan memes associated to it also nowdays.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

GmExtremacy (2579091) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195533)

I don't think that'll ever happen. There are simply too many of them, and I simply don't think they're worth the time and effort it would take to pay too much attention to them to try to send a message.

It'll get even worse if they learn what anonymity actually is.

Re:They're defeated now! (4, Insightful)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195547)

Anonymous is a national security threat.

They are, but not in the way you or I would think.

Are they a threat in the sense of "getting control of nuclear missiles by whistling over Skype?" Absolutely not.

Are they a threat in the sense of making our government look as corrupt and incompetent as it really is? Absolutely, and that's why Interpol and the like are so hardcore about stopping them.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195585)

Are they a threat in the sense of "getting control of nuclear missiles by whistling over Skype?" Absolutely not.

I did that last night. But encoding the coordinates in the waveform is a bitch so I ended up nuking sealand.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

sociocapitalist (2471722) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196121)

Also, it's easier to capture a bunch of script kiddie front line 'cyber-solders' (I doubt they caught anyone of significance but maybe, who knows) than to stop the real threats like those coming from certain other countries that have organized crime funded teams or who have no boundary between commercial and government applications and thus use military tech to industrially invade the rest of the world.

The real problem, of course, being that the western agencies are neither competent enough to go after the real threats nor would our lame ass governments do anything about it if they did actually track anything significant back to said countries.

Re:They're defeated now! (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196125)

Yea just like the fight against killers and druggies, they're all defeated now!

Darn (1)

Trunksword (2585203) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195381)

Sad to hear, I'm not a big fan of the ideal of hacking but I did appreciate their personal sacrifice to get back at people for violating peoples rights.

NOT GUILTY (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195387)

Arrested people are not anonymous.

To be continued, I guess.

Sad for the naive (4, Interesting)

igb (28052) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195399)

There is something slightly sad about kids being convinced that their elite skills mean they are undetectable finding that actually national agencies are not totally ineffective. It's a sort of hacker Dunning-Kreuger effect: people who might be able to convincingly shield their identity on-line aren't confident about it and therefore take additional precautions, while those who are confident may find their confidence is misplaced.

Re:Sad for the naive (1)

cheaphomemadeacid (881971) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195575)

yeah well, using tor and all works fine but it kinda defeats the purpose if you log in to your facebook account ;P

Re:Sad for the naive (3)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195671)

No, it's not "slightly sad". It's seriously disgusting that anyone claiming to be technically literate at all about the internet doesn't understand how easy it is to be traced by three-letter agencies who have the connections and resources.

The people who got caught were egotistical fools, not "elite hackers."

Hell, they aren't even "hackers" or "crackers" -- the vast majority of them are uneducated script kiddies and fools turning their machines over as bots to be run by someone else.

Re:Sad for the naive (1)

igb (28052) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195737)

I presume I needed <irony> tags around "elite".

Re:Sad for the naive (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195847)

Actually, no. They were probably back hacked by security personnel working in the private sector who then provided the information to law enforcement (interpol) to verify and arrest (through local agencies.)

Re:Sad for the naive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195911)

Some people are just not psychologically normal. There are billions of people on the internet ergo the tiniest minority can be numerous. A young guy in my country was arrested for massive internet crime perpetration. Was he scared or surprised? No, he was actually thrilled; to him it was immense fun, excitement and recognition of his greatness.

Re:Sad for the naive (1)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196281)

There was a biology professor on the radio the other day, saying that in 15-20 years time it will be possible to buy and assemble all the equimpent and knowledge necessary to build a 100% fatal, 100% transmissible pathogen. Mail-order genetic engineering is already available, all we need are the recipes, and then any whacko can end the human race. So, enjoy it while it lasts, we're in the end-game now. Maybe. Or, maybe that guy on the radio was just being a little bit melodramatic.

may god b with anon (0)

echonyne (2545100) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195401)

fku u interpol and other law inforcements..seriously FUK U! Anon did a great job. I just hope all of them return safely to their family. After all that they have done for us, support and all that stuff. :| .. niner

Missed the point (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195407)

Once identified them, they weren't Anonymous anymore. They arrested just hackers.

Re:Missed the point (1)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196289)

They weren't anonymous any more, but they were still Anonymous. You capitalise it, it becomes a proper noun.

Anonymous (1)

Grindalf (1089511) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195427)

So it's a case of "Remember remember the 5th of November, Gunpowder, Treason and Plot" as we say in the UK on "Guy Fawkes Day."

Re:Anonymous (1)

f3rret (1776822) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195595)

It happened somewhere around the 29th of Febuary though, which isn't quite as catchy.

Re:Anonymous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195947)

February 29 is handy though, half of Anonymous are lard-asses who couldn't be bothered to get up out of their basements more than once every four years.

That explains (2)

Gonoff (88518) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195457)

I have seen stuff recently asking people to let Anonymous use their computers for a DDOS on Interpol. In the past I have seen similar notices to DDOS other targets and have commented that it was a really stupid idea. This time, I never got round to saying how bad an idea it was.

hah (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195471)

The thing is that Anonymous is really just an idea. and as we all know, you can't just arrest an idea and throw it in jail.

Yeah. Next, let's arrest a revolution, or a book and other stuff like that. Congrats for wasting taxpayers money!

All crimes are ideas too (2, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195749)

Or perhaps you thought kidnap, extortion etc were instinctive? Perhaps in your utopia we shouldn't arrest any criminals because you can't destroy their ideas?

Grow up.

Re:hah (-1, Flamebait)

nhat11 (1608159) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196175)

Congrats being an asswipe for supporting people crashing systems and stealing information and money.

Re:hah (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196191)

Ideas can be killed too, but not in the common sense. Eliminate the important people that are promoting the idea and the idea will slowly disappear, or at least loose it's importance. Another option is to change the meaning of an idea, just like it happened with "anarchy" which now is mostly understood as a synonym for chaos, complete disorder, violence, molotov cocktails, people breaking things etc. Anarchy means much more then that.

You can kill a revolution by arresting the entire leadership too. Depending on how important the idea behind the revolution is and how broad the support is, new leaders may emerge or not. Sometimes the population is so displeased that leadership is not even necessary and the masses will simply rise. This is the worst kind of revolution as far as the people in power are concerned because it's the hardest to kill. That's why they work so hard to make us think we are pleased and to break us apart. It's a matter of keeping control over us.

Interpol never arrests anybody (4, Informative)

Sqr(twg) (2126054) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195491)

While it would be cool if they were an international police force arresting cybercriminals, Interpol is really just an organisation for information exchange between national police forces. The arrests were made by the ordinary police in the respective countries and according to local laws.

Re:Interpol never arrests anybody (2)

GreatBunzinni (642500) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195525)

I just logged on to say exactly that. Claiming that Interpol arrested anyone is like claiming that the local police administrative clerk who happened to send/receive cooperation requests from/to any other police force is the one responsible for doing any of the arrests.

So, the question which must be asked is who exactly is behind these arrest warrants? And why did anyone tried to pass the idea that there is an international police body with global jurisdiction that is dedicated to attacking this elusive anonymous group?

Re:Interpol never arrests anybody (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195943)

And why did anyone tried to pass the idea that there is an international police body with global jurisdiction that is dedicated to attacking this elusive anonymous group?

Promoting the idea - or in this case fear - that there is an international anti-crime bogeyman who can come get you across borders? I guess it's the same as many other "for the good of the people" campaigns: If we help just one kid say "No" to Anonymous then it was worth it.

Fear of getting caught, and/or being punished, is a major deterrent to committing most types of crime. The more Anonymous related arrests the authorities claim to make the greater the deterrent to those who haven't decided to participate, or who are on the fence. Headlines are powerful (except, of course, most headlines on /.).

They should have waited ..... (5, Funny)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195507)

until they gave out information on the Mexican drug lords.

Anonymous threatens to take action in new video (1)

arquebusierx (1775964) | more than 2 years ago | (#39195629)

Be afraid, people. [youtube.com] On a side note, I spent a good chunk of my late teenage years on the various 'chans, it's weird seeing them get so much mainstream attention. People from my high school that barely knew how to use Youtube are now all gun-ho about memes, 4chan, etc on Facebook. 4Chan recently came up on a local radio station when a woman was talking about teenagers and hardcore pornography. Then you have the example above, where popular TV show (in Canada at least) skewers the whole movement. I dunno, maybe down the road it'll be remembered as the first internet counter-culture; something wicked cool that a bunch of kids born in the 1990s were a part of.

We Are Anonymous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195635)

We are Anonymous.
We are Legion.
We are all going to a pound-me-in-the-ass prison.

Oooops.

On a more serious note, everyone gets caught eventually. Everyone. You can't keep doing this kind of stuff and expect to be completely untouchable. You will be found out. Sure, it may take a while, but if you're stealing corporate data / defacing sites / whatever long enough then it's only a matter of time.

I expect one of those "we are everyone / we are noone / blah blah blah / aren't we cool" kiddie press releases from the organization anyway though.

Re:We Are Anonymous (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196143)

Maybe they should do what the smart criminals are doing? Remember, "we hang the petty thieves, and appoint the murderers to high office" -- that's not just still true, that's even more true than ever before. So just become too big to fail or something, and instead of going to jail you'll get the big moneys.

At any rate, you simply gotta plunder from the poor and helpless and you'll be fine. And when you get "found out", you just grin and play for time.

Re:We Are Anonymous (1, Funny)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196337)

We are all going to a pound-me-in-the-ass prison.

Why are USians so obsessed with gay rape? I never hear that kind of thing in British discourse.

Time to change ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195679)

my FTP Login id !

good riddance (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195803)

filthy nosepicking miscreants

Arrests... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39195845)

Interesting, how many bankers have been arrested for the GFC? I wonder what the damage done by bankers is versus anonymous.... hmmm.

Amazing how efficient they are ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196153)

when it comes to this sort of thing, yet financial terrorists are allowed to roam and loot without the slightest problem.

If they were smart... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39196255)

They would've collected a bunch of really important information and then set up a deadman's drop offsite.

"You don't want to let me go? I hope your country's citizens don't mind reading about THIS." or "Oh, that information/software/hardware that doesn't have a patent yet? About that..."

probably just random people running HOIC (1)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | more than 2 years ago | (#39196369)

or compromised PCs running HOIC. I would be surprised if the bagged anyone of importance but they sure make it sound good.

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