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"Irish SOPA" Signed Into Law Despite Resistance

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the good-luck-with-that dept.

Your Rights Online 129

First time accepted submitter cupantae writes "Despite the protests of over 80,000 Irish people, Junior Minister Seán Sherlock has confirmed that the controversial statutory instrument that reinforces online copyright laws in Ireland has been signed into law. The statutory instrument will make it possible for copyright holders to seek court injunctions against companies such as internet service providers or social networks whose systems are hosting copyright-infringing material. This comes in the wake of the music industry bullying the Irish government."

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London remake? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206181)

Time to see a rehash of the London riot, Irish style?

Re:London remake? (1, Interesting)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about 2 years ago | (#39206195)

London has nothing on Domhnach na Fola... Google it yourselves, I don't want to go off on one...

Re:London remake? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206357)

What the hell does bloody sunday have to do with SOPA?!? Or the recent London riots?!?

Re:London remake? (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#39206617)

Déjà vu

Re:London remake? (4, Funny)

robthebloke (1308483) | about 2 years ago | (#39206623)

The London rioters were U2 fans.

Re:London remake? (1)

MrKane (804219) | about 2 years ago | (#39206673)

hahah. If I had mod points! :)

Re:London remake? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206287)

The 2009 UK riots were about kids wanting to steal from stores so... no.

Re:London remake? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206369)

That was the 2011 riots, the 2009 riots weren't about stealing stuff.

The luck of the Irish. (1)

gislifb (1979154) | about 2 years ago | (#39206183)

They must have taken that decision after a few pints of Guinness...

Re:The luck of the Irish. (4, Insightful)

Fluffeh (1273756) | about 2 years ago | (#39206235)

They must have taken that decision after a few pints of Guinness...

No, just a junior minister who wants t become a senior minister. Having heavy pockets like those behind his campaigns will certainly help getting that little blister re-elected.

Bullying (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206989)

"Bullying the government". I almost fell off my chair. Come on now. Are we really expected to buy that the outcome was the result of "bullying" rather than accepting a bribe?

Let's call a spade a spade here. When government accepts a bribe, government is 100% responsible. There is no benefit of doubt. There is no "but". Government holds the keys to oppression, not the music industry. Government has the guns.

Re:The luck of the Irish. (3, Informative)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about 2 years ago | (#39207263)

No, just a junior minister who wants t become a senior minister. Having heavy pockets like those behind his campaigns will certainly help getting that little blister re-elected.

Irish politics and election campaigns do not work like that.

Generally, candidates who stand for election have their campaign paid for largely out of a general party political fund. You can get operatives like Bertie Ahern and a few independents who have their own separate funding structure, but in general people fight for party electoral nominations as they are the ticket into the Dail.

From here, the path from a back bencher to the top generally goes:
TD - > Junior Minister (a made up position with no constitutional weight) - > Minister -> Senior Minister (esp.Finance Minister) - > Taoiseach -> Scandal -> Retirement.

It is important to note that none of these steps requires a significant war chest beyond that provided by party political funds. It requires networking, skull-duggary, deals with rogues, backstabbing, ruthlessness and charm, but at no stage in the process after TD does someone need to schmooze the general public with a marketing campaign. At most they simply require a personal PR advisor (The last Taoiseach Brian Cowen, apparently didn't have one).

This isn't to say that money isn't involved, with certain Taoisigh being notorious for getting their palms greased before and after the office. But getting to the top in Ireland does not require massive personal funding, particularly corporate funding. Yet.

Re:The luck of the Irish. (1)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | about 2 years ago | (#39206731)

Or Sherlock was working to answer the question how could I best piss on freedom of speech and leave the information/tech industry at the mercy of the whims of an Irish judiciary that has already demonstrated willingness to impose draconian and ultimately ineffective measures?

He appears to have done a rather good job of solving this poser. What next, Sherlock? Oblige bus drivers to confiscate music players if their owners can't on demand present the CDs for the music contained on them? Too subtle? Okay, then why not get yourself a hot air balloon and a rifle, and hover over Dublin, taking potshots at the people below?

WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ?? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206193)

Ha !! You'll never know !!

Go DotCom !!
Go Assange(tm) !!
Go Manning !!
Go Slashdot !!

Re:WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ? (5, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#39206209)

The source, of course. In assembler. That's how the first compilers were made, and later rewritten once they were able to compile themselves.

Re:WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206257)

In compiler? The assembler is the tool. Assembly is the computer language assembled into machine code by the assembler.

Re:WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207051)

Thta's a lie perpetrated by the man to get in your pants - defacto juris delecti prudence. Too bad all my /. accounts have no points else I'd mod myself up, ad infinitum repetus. Ipso facto pluribus unum.

Re:WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ? (-1, Offtopic)

adawangping (2585815) | about 2 years ago | (#39206429)

Milan Fashion Week came to a close yesterday after leaving a cheap watches outlet [mysuperwatch.com] style statement with shimmering metallics, ornate gold detailing, longer hemlines, minimalist lines and feminine colours.

Re:WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206613)

Assembly is a type of language which can be convert (Very easily) into actual machine code, and an assembler is a type of program. The original assemblers had to be written in machine code (Technically on punch cards containing binary code).

Re:WHAT CAME FIRST ?? THE COMPILER OR ITS SOURCE ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207095)

Assemblers were originally written in machine language, which means the human was the original compiler, and the source was in his head.

tags? (-1, Offtopic)

psy0rz (666238) | about 2 years ago | (#39206201)

What happend to the slashdot tagging system

S...O...A...B.... (-1, Flamebait)

Deliveranc3 (629997) | about 2 years ago | (#39206207)

Go on, acknowledge the nazis.

Sucks to be Irish... (3, Funny)

Mister Transistor (259842) | about 2 years ago | (#39206231)

Just what they didn't need. "No Shit, Sherlock"...

Re:Sucks to be Irish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206269)

I hope they VPN the shit out of this law.

Re:Sucks to be Irish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206761)

This is a good test case of the actual effects of these implementations. Although somehow I suspect the local culture and constitution will have an effect on the consequences, one of which is the distinctive smell of opium and a gentle sound of a lonely violin around the Drumhallagh stone.

Re:Sucks to be Irish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39208525)

I wonder how this impacts all the large US companies which avoid some taxes using the Double Irish Arrangement [wikipedia.org]

Re:Sucks to be Irish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39208741)

I suspect the countries foolish enough to inflict SOPA-esque legislation are going to andure a few kicks to their economic groins before they realize what a friggin' mistake it was. Hopefully my country wises up from their examples...

Right.... (4, Insightful)

SraL (320007) | about 2 years ago | (#39206237)

Now check his bank account for a mahusive cash deposit.....

this isn't the half of it (2)

amalek (615708) | about 2 years ago | (#39206263)

Lads there will be a referendum coming in May or June where we'll have to decide if we take a bailout from the Rothschil- sorry, the IMF - and sign over our independence to the cabals that have already destroyed the US. Keep an eye on this one.

Re:this isn't the half of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206455)

You've also noticed that the financial elite has turned it's attention to Europe after enslaving the US? The best hope for the EU is for Germany and France to never fall into the eurobond trap. The Germans are (hopefully) too smart and the French are (hopefully) too proud. As for Ireland, I wish you luck.

Re:this isn't the half of it (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#39206629)

its only illegal if you get caught

Re:this isn't the half of it (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206503)

The referendum will pass. If citizens make the wrong decision, they'll be asked again and again until they return the correct choice. The Irish will do their duty. It's a nation that lives to be dominated. They get rid of the English, only to replace them with the Vatican. Only recently have the Irish begun to question their Catholic masters, and now they'll allow bankers to run the show. The same political parties that fucked the country remain. Sherlock did thus because he knows that most people won't give a fuck. This law is nothing but harmful for a country looking to encourage hi-tech industry. Sherlock blames the EU, when its not even clear that the EU requires this provision. And putting such legislation through without debate? Yeah, way to represent your citizens, ÂSherlock.Â

Everything will be fine. The boys can have a few jars, sing some rebel songs, and perhaps believe that they deserve the country that better men fought for.Â

Re:this isn't the half of it (1)

c0mpliant (1516433) | about 2 years ago | (#39206631)

I voted No twice on Lisbon and I'll be voting No again now on the Fiscal Compact Treaty. The lies of FG, FF and Labour will be see for what they are. Vote Yes for jobs? Lets see how well it works this time. I swear to god the media in this country would welcome the rise of the Nazi's in this country and simply say "think of the jobs that would be created by employing the skangers to legally rob people and the revenue that would be generated by the government taxing their procedes..." I just hope that the Irish people will see through the BS from FG/LAB/FF

Re:this isn't the half of it (2)

TheLink (130905) | about 2 years ago | (#39206669)

The corporations and friends will keep trying to push their laws in. There are zero/insignificant penalties when they fail.

There's no "I already said NO, if you ask me one more time you're grounded!" regulation.

Is this not a job... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206275)

for the new Internet-savvy IRA?

Re:Is this not a job... (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | about 2 years ago | (#39206313)

    I think it's more appropriately handled by the old school IRA.

Why? (3, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 2 years ago | (#39206359)

Last time I heard, Sony, Warner and the like weren't British. The IRA would do anything to placate the USA so long as the funds kept coming. They would have signed this bill into law like a shot - and then made money out of blackmailing the ISPs (nice little data centre you got here...wouldn't want it shut down by Sony, would you?).

Modern Sinn Fein, on the other hand, is quite a different matter, and is trying to build up an electoral presence in Ireland. Quite honestly, given the levels of corruption in both Fianna (epic) Fail and Fine Gael, they would most likely be a major improvement.

One recent Irish Taoiseach was so bent he had no bank account. He kept everything in cash in his house. He got his bribes by going to the racetrack, where he was always very lucky. The Rothschilds are not to blame for Irish corruption, nor is the IMF. If the Rothschilds really ran Ireland, it would be prosperous. You can't make money easily in a country full of poor people.

Re:Why? (2)

amalek (615708) | about 2 years ago | (#39206395)

I disagree. It's standard tactic of that House to indebt governments because such loans are always backed by taxes on the people. If there Rothschilds really DIDN'T run the place, it would be prosperous. This is their MO.

Economics 101 fail (5, Interesting)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 2 years ago | (#39206943)

You don't get it, do you? If the people are poor, there isn't much tax revenue to raise. The idea is to get Governments into debt because they have a source of tax revenue and can continue to pay the interest. Therefore, the country as a whole needs to make plenty of money to pay the taxes. Since the rich avoid or evade taxes, that in reality means a prosperous middle class.

Rothschilds actually got going by realising this and placing the sons of the founder in the capitals of countries that were rapidly becoming rich. They had headquarters in places like Vienna, not Nebraska. They lent the British Government the money to buy the Suez Canal, which was a conduit for trade, thus (a) profiting from the loan and (b) profiting by lending to promote trade.

This is what is fundamentally wrong with Walmartonomics. Walmart pays as little as possible. But, to succeed, it must have plenty of people to spend money in its stores. In effect, it wants a shit economy so it can get a cheap workforce, but really it wants a high wage economy to maximise its income. This kind of works if for "Walmart" we substitute China, and for "High wage economy" we substitute "The West". But what happens when all countries have been dragged into the mire? No markets, that's what.

Ireland, Italy and Greece are in trouble because the Governments borrowed and the taxes weren't paid, either through evasion (Italy and Greece), through "avoidance" schemes (Ireland) or because also the Governments had lied about the actual GNP (Greece). This actually wasn't the fault of the bankers, but of greedy and corrupt politicians.

As I say, if Rothschilds really ran Ireland, they would do it on the principle that the best way to produce milk is to start off with well fed cows, not to start off with starving cows and demand more output for less grass. In national economics, the Old Testament is actually a much better guide than an MBA course.

Re:Economics 101 fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207111)

Ireland, Italy and Greece are in trouble because the Governments borrowed and the taxes weren't paid, either through evasion (Italy and Greece), through "avoidance" schemes (Ireland) or because also the Governments had lied about the actual GNP (Greece). This actually wasn't the fault of the bankers, but of greedy and corrupt politicians.

Ireland's issues lie not so much in tax avoidance, more in corruption, a bloated civil service, a lack of investment during the tiger years, and of course its ruinous lack of financial regulation and the subsequent decision to have the state absorb the gambling losses of bankers, developers and fucknuts who had no idea how over-leveraged they were becoming in the Boom That Shall Never End(TM).

A serious chunk of Ireland's national debt is attributable to these bail-outs. The debt will continue to mount so long as Ireland is happy to continue its tradition of ineptitude and corruption that runs all the way from top to bottom. Look at how much they pay their politicians! That alone should cause alarm bells to ring.

Re:Economics 101 fail (0)

Kjella (173770) | about 2 years ago | (#39207511)

This is what is fundamentally wrong with Walmartonomics. Walmart pays as little as possible. But, to succeed, it must have plenty of people to spend money in its stores. In effect, it wants a shit economy so it can get a cheap workforce, but really it wants a high wage economy to maximise its income. This kind of works if for "Walmart" we substitute China, and for "High wage economy" we substitute "The West". But what happens when all countries have been dragged into the mire? No markets, that's what.

Come on, if you take your small isolated community where everybody provides services to each other and everyone is roughly equally wealthy then obviously that is a well functioning market. If the world had grown organically as one "country" and one market, western workers never would have gotten so far ahead in wages as we have. There's been technology barriers, language barriers, transport barriers, trade barriers, culture barriers and so on meaning you "had to" get a western work that could command a higher and higher pay.

Those barriers have been coming down awfully quick and then obviously you get a lot of unbalanced flow of wealth, like you say one market is doing the production and one market is doing the consumption. Obviously in the long run that's not a sustainable situation, eventually the exchange of value must go both ways for there to be trade. Take my country Norway for example, why are we rich? Because we have oil to export (and gas and fish and hydro power for high energy products), we have something other countries need. Our politicians can spout all the bullshit they want about our workers and work life and regulations and education and whatnot but it's delusional. Our average worker is not that special.

Reality is, either you have to find a good reason as to why you should be able to charge so much more per hour, or it has to come down. And in that, your wealth obviously goes down, no longer can you buy ten hours of foreign labor for one hour of your own. You can of course be a brain surgeon instead of a McDonald's worker, but you can't simply expect your time to be more valuable by being western. And you can't close the door on cheap labor without closing the door on cheap products too.

Ireland, Italy and Greece are in trouble because the Governments borrowed and the taxes weren't paid, either through evasion (Italy and Greece), through "avoidance" schemes (Ireland) or because also the Governments had lied about the actual GNP (Greece). This actually wasn't the fault of the bankers, but of greedy and corrupt politicians.

More like that the bearer of bad news doesn't get reelected. So if your trade isn't balanced, if you're in reality burning away your savings will you be the one to impose cutbacks? No. So to sustain it they took up more and more debt, they entered a spiral like credit card victims do, using one credit card to pay the other credit card's bills until all they can afford is the interest payments. Then you take it one step too far and the house of card collapses. Even with the knife at their throats the cuts don't go over lightly, now it's all emergency brakes on and even that may not be enough.

Re:Economics 101 fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39208151)

One who controls the neck controls the head.

Re:Economics 101 fail (2)

DwoaC (885991) | about 2 years ago | (#39210291)

You don't know what you are talking about regarding Ireland. While I am sure "avoidance" happens in Ireland as in any country the reason the tax take collapsed (for the most part, many books will be written about Ireland in the coming years) was the collapse of the construction industry which shrank in size by over 50%. Considering it was the largest part of the tax income this had a major impact on the country's budget. Join that with the 100 billion plus that was given in bailouts to the bank and you see why the Irish economy collapsed. Nothing to do with "avoidance". Using Ireland for "avoidance" costs other countries tax but actually adds to Ireland take.

Re:Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206489)

If the Rothschilds really ran Ireland, it would be prosperous. You can't make money easily in a country full of poor people

Those statements are absolutely hilarious. Do you really think that any foreign elite would give a rat's ass about the prosperity of their "subjects"? Hell, most native elites don't either! Remember the saying, "The Almighty, indeed, sent the potato blight, but the English created the Famine."
As long as you control the laws and have police power, you can make tons of money in a country full of poor people. Just keep them frightened of some external bogeyman and dependent on your largess.

What a shame (5, Insightful)

NewtonsLaw (409638) | about 2 years ago | (#39206311)

What a shame it is that 90% of the public are so complacent and unwilling to take action to protect their rights from the goose-stepping content cartels.

Imagine if, even if just for a month, *nobody* bought any music from members of the RIAA, nobody went to any theatres to watch movies from the MPAA, or bought their DVDs or even hired their DVDs.

Can you just see the look of absolute fear that would envelope them?

Even if we could find enough people to reduce their sales and rentals by 50%, that would send a very strong message that perhaps, when it comes to copyright "it's better the devil you know [filesharing] than the devil you don't [boycotts]"

Unfortunately, any move to organize a campaign of abstinence or a boycott would be doomed to failure -- because most people just don't give a damn anyway.

We get the government (and the storm-trooper tactics) we deserve they say. Maybe they're right :-(

Re:What a shame (5, Insightful)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 2 years ago | (#39206379)

Considering this is happening in Eire one might find it kind of sad given this very famous quote:

"It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance; which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime and the punishment of his guilt." -- John Philpot Curran: Speech upon the Right of Election for Lord Mayor of Dublin, 1790. (Speeches. Dublin, 1808.) as quoted in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations

Re:What a shame (4, Insightful)

KozmoStevnNaut (630146) | about 2 years ago | (#39206425)

I don't know how much of a difference it'll make, but I won't be buying any music, movies or books in March. Not a single CD, DVD or paperback, nothing. Not even a download of any kind.

Probably won't make a big difference, but it'll sure make me feel better.

Re:What a shame (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206565)

I'll be torrenting for everything I need. The music and movie industries are busy taking away my rights. I see no reason to respect theirs. Screw protesting, free stuff is better.

Re:What a shame (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206739)

That sends the wrong message too. There is plenty of DRM-free stuff available for purchase from hard working artists, independent film and record labels etc. .. that's the stuff we should all be buying.

Re:What a shame (1)

KozmoStevnNaut (630146) | about 2 years ago | (#39209855)

Don't crank up the torrents.

Buy from independents instead, if you must buy. But is it really that hard going a single month without buying anything?

Rediscover the old movies, music and games you already own. If you're anything like me, you probably have a couple of titles that you never got around to. Give them a go :-)

Re:What a shame (2)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#39206641)

there's always plenty of free porn

Re:What a shame (1, Interesting)

goose-incarnated (1145029) | about 2 years ago | (#39207103)

I call bullshit on your post. Why not simply buy the stuff people like me produce? Almost all of my entertainment these days is from independents (good thing I don't need movies for entertainment :-). Simply go to amazon and purchasing a kindle book by someone like myself (c'mon - it's 0.99 USD - not that much for 30 mins of entertainment!). I've been reading stuff by the independents. Very little of it is bad. I tried watching a major hollywood release with big names in the credits just last week and never even made it to the half-way mark before leaving the theatre, so it's not like I've lowered my standards for entertainment, but yet still, I get more than enough from indies (books, mostly)

I'm betting that you won't get anything for the month of March, and then purchase two months worth of content in April. Yeah, that's really sticking it to the man!!! *rolls eyes.

btw, Google: "amazon zombies! lelanthran" for my book. If you don't like it, email me and I'll wire you your 0.99 USD back. But at least taking a chance on a non-DRM, non-RIAA, non-MPAA, non-affiliated publisher you get to say "Hey, I actually talk the talk and walk the walk". Now, you're just talking the talk.

Re:What a shame (1)

KozmoStevnNaut (630146) | about 2 years ago | (#39209795)

I am in fact walking the walk. Most of my reading material comes from the public domain (thank you, Project Gutenberg!) and I hardly watch any movies or TV shows. Yes, I am that guy who doesn't even own a TV.

I have cut most of the major publishers out of my life already, cutting out all of them for a month will not be a challenge.

BTW, nice move starting a sales spiel by calling bullshit on my statements. That's one sale you won't be getting, generous return policy or not.

Re:What a shame (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207415)

I don't know how much of a difference it'll make, but I won't be buying any music, movies or books in March. Not a single CD, DVD or paperback, nothing. Not even a download of any kind.

Probably won't make a big difference, but it'll sure make me feel better.

Well, since you (and others) will not be buying anything, it will reduce revenues for the MAFIAA companies. This drop will be shown as evidence that piracy is happening and that even more draconian laws are needed.

Re:What a shame (1)

KozmoStevnNaut (630146) | about 2 years ago | (#39209825)

Well, then I guess I'll just have to pirate even more stuff to live up to their expectations! ;-)

Re:What a shame (1)

GmExtremacy (2579091) | about 2 years ago | (#39206889)

Imagine if, even if just for a month

Preferably even longer than that. And I'd extend that to companies like Sony that use DRM and remove features from their products out of paranoia.

Re:What a shame (2)

CyberB0B39 (1563627) | about 2 years ago | (#39206917)

Everytime I head a story like this it just energizes me to try to screw these companies out of as much money as possible. I joined Swapadvd, Swapacd and Paperbackswap and have decided to never buy a new DVD, CD or book ever again. http://www.swapadvd.com/ [swapadvd.com] http://www.paperbackswap.com/ [paperbackswap.com] http://www.swapacd.com/ [swapacd.com]

Re:What a shame (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206983)

What a shame it is that 90% of the public are so complacent and unwilling to take action to protect their rights from the goose-stepping content cartels.

Not really surprising, since it doesn't affect 90% of the public.

You may be surprised to know that most people go about their lives without spending a second thought on movies or music. If it's there for them when they return home, they might watch it.

Otherwise there are more important things in life than listening to some freeloaders moaning about copyright.

Re:What a shame (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#39210351)

Not really surprising, since it doesn't affect 90% of the public.

You may be surprised to know that most people go about their lives without spending a second thought on movies or music. If it's there for them when they return home, they might watch it.

Or more likely, they don't know they do it. Casual copying is fairly large and most people don't consider it a crime (encouraged back in the day with dual-deck cassette decks that could do high-speed dubbing).

They probably visit some web site and click "download song" without a second thought, unaware of the legal implications. Just like people used to dub tapes or give away mixtapes and such - it's such an ingrained behavior that most people don't realize it's actually illegal.

Heck, I'm fairly certain a good chunk of people copy movies and games they borrow from friends very innocently (the tools to do so are basically "insert, copy, done")

I'm sure the 90% would be affected by things like this, it's just they don't know it yet nor realize it. Heck, in many places it's actually illegal to placeshift/timeshift, yet you'll find DVD recorders, VCRs/DVRs, and all the other tools to do stuff like that on the shelves of stores.

80,000 is not enough (4, Interesting)

metrix007 (200091) | about 2 years ago | (#39206337)

Ireland has a population of about 5 million.

If only 80,000 protested then that means the majority is either OK are at least apathetic towards the legislation.

In that case, there is nothing wrong with it going ahead. The problem lies with the rest of the population who didn't do their part to protest, not the government passing a law.

Yet another strike against democracy.

Re:80,000 is not enough (4, Insightful)

Phrogman (80473) | about 2 years ago | (#39206377)

Sadly democracy relies on the bulk of the citizens actually keeping appraised of various issues, having the education and intelligence to really make an intelligent decision and then actually acting upon it by at least electing representatives that represent their opinions - and keeping a leash on them to ensure they don't waver from the path.

Most people don't care at all until a government does something they don't like - and by then its way too late.
They won't notice until someone abuses this legislation to take down some website they care about with no recourse, no warrant and no time in court.

Sad to see Ireland sell itself to the big Media corporations like this. So much for all the years of struggle for an independent Ireland.

Re:80,000 is not enough (5, Insightful)

NewtonsLaw (409638) | about 2 years ago | (#39206449)

Don't forget that the public generally only knows about the things the media tells them about and -- in the list of SOPA sponsors there are a huge number of big media players -- all eager to use it to protect their content.

Hence, we've seen very little (if any) objective mainstream media coverage of SOPA and what it will mean to the average joe citizen.

Unfortunately, the real power to shape the minds and opinions of the masses lies in the hands of the likes of Rupert Murdoch and the other media barons.

We're stuffed mate!

Re:80,000 is not enough (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | about 2 years ago | (#39207285)

"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." - Thomas Jefferson

Jefferson knew that for democracy to work we had to have an informed electorate. Unfortunately now people are to caught up in TMZ or Survivor or whatever the flavor of the month is. The bulk of the population is wholly absorbed in bread and circuses. Consider this, those distractions are produced by the companies that are pushing these style of laws. Any politician worth his salt knows that the movie/TV/music industries are not only good sources of funds, but also allow him to have more power as their product distracts the populace. Conversely the big media companies have a multi-fold interest in the situation. They of course want the revenue, that is their primary reason of existence, it is what a company does in a capitalist society. In addition, they have a vested interested in maintaining their hold on entertainment as it is their 'bread-and-circuses' that allow the feedback loop to the politicians to work.

Re:80,000 is not enough (4, Insightful)

Hentes (2461350) | about 2 years ago | (#39206421)

Only a small fraction of the population is politically active enough to protest against something. Show me one protest that consisted of more than 50% of the population. That doesn't mean that the remaining 6120000 people would vote for the law in case of a referendum.

Re:80,000 is not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206453)

Show me one protest that consisted of more than 50% of the population.

The American Civil War (1861–1865)

Re:80,000 is not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206835)

Yes. 50% of the population fought in the American Civil War, I have no doubt.

Re:80,000 is not enough (1)

nukenerd (172703) | about 2 years ago | (#39207647)

Did you mean 100% (50% on each side)? In a sense they did, in that many historians reckon the ACW was the first "total war". When I read the GP I was thinking myself for an example when I read the parent and realised the ACW is a good one.

You cannot expect the elderly, women (in those days anyway) and children to fight on the battlefield, but, particularly in the South, they did things on the home front like making observation balloons out of their silk dresses, a bit like in Britain in WW2. Then there was Sherman's terrible "Ride" though the south when they were beaten.

Because the Union won, it wrote the history books; so we don't hear so much about the awful things it did to the civil population of the South.

Re:80,000 is not enough (1)

Lennie (16154) | about 2 years ago | (#39207129)

I'm not from the US, but how much choice did people have ? Usually with any war, there isn't much choice.

No one really wants war, most of the time war is a last resort.

So only 200,000 people in the USA at that time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39208823)

And since 70% of the population would be ineligible by cause of being too old, young or female, that would actually be impossible.

In actual fact, less than 5% of the people in the USA were involved in the civil war. Toward the end, attrition reduced both the numbers of people and the willingness to let those too young or too old (but not too female) get away from being conscripted.

Re:80,000 is not enough (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206475)

Ireland has a population of about 5 million.

If only 80,000 protested then that means the majority is either OK are at least apathetic towards the legislation.

In that case, there is nothing wrong with it going ahead. The problem lies with the rest of the population who didn't do their part to protest, not the government passing a law.

Yet another strike against democracy.

Ireland is the kind of place where the government puts a treaty in front of us to vote for or against. If we vote against, then a few months later the exact same treaty is in front of us to vote for or against, as many times as needed until we get the right answer.

For it to be a strike against democracy there would need to be democracy in Ireland.

Re:80,000 is not enough (3, Interesting)

Mitreya (579078) | about 2 years ago | (#39206737)

The problem lies with the rest of the population who didn't do their part to protest, not the government passing a law.

No, no. The problem lies with politicians operating on an assumption that any legislation is ok as long as 50% of people aren't protesting on the street. Elected politicians are supposed to represent the population. It's their job.
What is sorely needed is an easy mechanism to initiate a vote of no confidence (and if 51% vote to recall, politician immediately gets removed from post and banned from running for 2 years). If a legislation that pissed off a lot of people had such potential consequence (and SOPA appears to qualify), politicians would be so much more careful in what they vote for. As it stands, by the time they are running for re-election 2+ years may have passed...

Re:80,000 is not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206763)

New laws should be opt in instead of opt out, unless x% of the population come out to support it it automatically fails

ten to one ratio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206837)

For every complaint that actually gets maid to a business or whatever, there's generally ten people who would complain but didn't for a variety of reasons (ranging from "just walked away, never to return" to "I'd prefer just to whine to my mates about it for sympathy").

Re:80,000 is not enough (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 2 years ago | (#39206881)

"Voting by not voting is voting?"

No, sir. I do not see you reasoning. What I see are 80,000 concerned people against an action proposed by a group of people who are FAR less than that number. If you wanted to count active votes for and against the proposition, the 80,000 is the obvious winner. Not voting isn't a vote of approval.

Peaceful declaration of independence (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206353)

This post marks my intent to declare independence. At the time 30 days from now, all properties held by me shall belong to the new country Freefromcorporategreedistan and will fall under the governance of myself. No law shall be passed in Freefromcorporategreedistan which allows invasion of privacy, or restriction of human rights without judicial oversight. The right of the corporation to profit shall be protected except where fundamental human rights (privacy, judicial oversioght, etc) supercede.

Honestly, thats about the only way to avoid pollies with heavy pockets encroaching on our freedom under the payroll of greedy outmoded, obsolete corporations.

Re:Peaceful declaration of independence (2)

crutchy (1949900) | about 2 years ago | (#39206657)

fuck off!!!!!

we're the People's Front of Judea, and if you wanna join the PFJ you'd ave to really 'ate the corporations

Re:Peaceful declaration of independence (1)

JockTroll (996521) | about 2 years ago | (#39206879)

If you want to succeed without being arrested and thrown in jail and then locked up in the funny farm, you better have the ability to do a colony drop on anyone who might disagree with you.

Sieg Zeon!

Mont Blanc Pen (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206355)

To avoid producing knockoffs, Mont Blanc Pen Sale [montblanc-pen.org] runs a series of boutiques in lots of nations. While there's a high probability of having an authentic item on ebay, professionals state that sale are filled with counterfeit pens. Today the title Mont Blanc pen [montblanc-pen.org] is synonymous for luxury products including obviously, exquisite hands crafted pens however it has not been this way. The thing is, within their very early years they maintained as Simplo Larger Mont Blanc Pen Outlet [montblanc-pen.org] Company. Small businesses resides in Hamburg Germany that made rather simply crafted fountain pens, by present day standards. Their Early Years to start with up Enterprise The organization in those days in early 1900s was possessed by three pen mont blanc [pen-mont-blanc.com] males, August Eberstein, Claus -Johannes Voss and Alfred Nehemias. In those days, being that they are a comparatively new start up enterprise, the organization made and offered just one pen model which was their Rouge Et Noir which was released in 1909. Their Name Switch to Mont Blanc Pen Online [montblanc-pen.org] Right after in 1910, new was created and released which pen transported the title Mont Blanc Pen Store [montblanc-pen.org] . We're not really sure why although not lengthy after that the males who went the organization made the decision to evolve that title for their company and therefore, the organization started to become referred to as Mont Blanc pens.

"Irish SOPA" Signed Into Law... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206417)

This is begging for an "Irish SOPA -> Protests -> "Irish Spring" joke.

Re:"Irish SOPA" Signed Into Law... (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | about 2 years ago | (#39206787)

What? Do they even have spring in Ireland? I thought it was all volcanic rock and ice and lutefisk all year round :)

Re:"Irish SOPA" Signed Into Law... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207173)

That's not Ireland. That's Greenland!

Re:"Irish SOPA" Signed Into Law... (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about 2 years ago | (#39207551)

"Irish Spring" joke.

Ok then. It's called Autumn.

Re:"Irish SOPA" Signed Into Law... (1)

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) | about 2 years ago | (#39207975)

I'm surprised nobody has made the "Irish Spring SOPA" joke yet. Time to clean house!

Black March (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206485)

It's called Black March. I think a better awareness campaign would have made it more popular but essentially, it's about not buying or downloading any media content for the month of March in order to make a dent in the entertainment industries profits. Check it out!

Re:Black March (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206913)

I wish /. would take a more active role in promoting these kinds of activities.

Re:Black March (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207021)

It's called Black March.

Not the best choice of name, since in corporate accounting black ink is traditionally the colour of positive revenue...

Re:Black March (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207235)

I forgot about it. I am re-committed. Dont buy legit, dont steal, and make as much noise as you can for 30 days. Monks lit themselves on fire for their beliefs. I think its slightly easier to consume no media for 30 days :)

Sad Day (3, Insightful)

zg3409 (1956556) | about 2 years ago | (#39206535)

It's a sad day for the internet in Ireland. Yes there are ways around censorship, but the more governments try to control the internet the more they damage the whole point of it. Remember censorship is considered a fault by the internet and it automatically attempts to re-route the traffic. It will also affect jobs as no-one will want to set up a site based here, nor on Amazon's european cloud, which is based here, for fear they could be taken offline by some wide ranging vague complaint by rights holders, which we have already seen overstep their ability to actually remove actual content. Of course rather than remove content based in Ireland they will also attempt to block foreign content. Not ideal if you want to do business worldwide

Re:Sad Day (2)

JockTroll (996521) | about 2 years ago | (#39206859)

Remember censorship is considered a fault by the internet and it automatically attempts to re-route the traffic.

No. This childish notion with no basis in reality needs to be shot down because it makes delusional people think the internet is some living, sentient entity that can automagically repair and heal itself. This is not reality. The internet is a communications network with strong decentralization features, but it lacks any cognitive abilities and is not a person or even an animal. It's a network of machines. If steps are not taken in meatspace to defend it, it will be subverted and bent to the will of the 1%, or whatever you want to call the Ruling Elite.

irish resistance? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39206541)

We all know that a huge chunk of the irish population lived with machine gun fire and regular bombings for breakfast right? bring back the IRA, but not as a religious segregation movement. as a populous uprising. without the violence. just make very bad copies of the belongings of those who want rich americans rights more than populous opinion. make copies of cars, and houses. but the copies be so poorly executed that they are on fire. and delete originals :)

I thought the Irish were keen on the tech industry (2)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 2 years ago | (#39206741)

The last time I visited, they were digging a trench across the entire country to put optical fibre in ; we drove alongside it for quite a stretch.

Now watch the sudden departure of internet companies from Ireland....

Oh well (2)

firefrei (2569069) | about 2 years ago | (#39206915)

Democracy doesn't work. But it's the best out of a shit selection of (tried) options for ruling a country. Sometimes I'm not saddened if normal folks aren't aware of such laws - why would they care? At this stage they'd only seem like trivialities compared to the actual problems most people have in their lives.

Amazon's eu-west-1 region is in Ireland.... (1)

slashpot (11017) | about 2 years ago | (#39206979)

Now I have to find a new datacenter to store all of my backups in.

This might be a good thing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207093)

(Yes I'm an optomist)
It's prompting a review of copyright law in Ireland and, at least initially, it looks like all parties are welcome at the table. So rights holders, tech and internet companies and shockingly even the public!

http://www.siliconrepublic.com/new-media/item/26025-irish-govt-to-review/

(Yes the IRMA will probably just buy, bully and bribe their way to even more bat shit insane legal rights. It's Ireland, we've got SOPA like rules, blasphemy is a crime and we're not even slightly surprised by the stupid corruption of our politicians and civil servants anymore)

Re:This might be a good thing. (2)

WhyNotAskMe (2571885) | about 2 years ago | (#39207439)

I'd view this with a healthy dose of suspicion. I'm in Canada. We are a small country population-wise, and subjected to bullying in trade negotiations by our neighbour, the USA. We are eternally pressured to enact stronger copyright laws for example.

One fine day, our government decided we needed to update our copyright laws. They sought broad public input. Now we are at the point of passing these new laws. Wouldn't you know it, though they consulted broadly, in the end they simply ignored any input that did not correspond with their hidden agenda. It was all a sham. Their hidden agenda was dictated by the US based corporate lobby. Even worse, after going through that process, at last minute they now want to sneak in new provisions that weren't even discussed, like DMCA laws. Worse yet, we don't have the fair use laws here that make the DMCA laws palatable in the US.

The bottom line is, this is probably what you can expect in Ireland, and is what has already happened in countries like Australia and New Zealand. We just cannot defend ourselves from Yankee Imperialism.

The problem begins in the USA, and it must be solved there. We must give our American friends who are fighting against this our full support.

WhyNotAskMe.org [whynotaskme.org]

Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#39207379)

Maybe now they won't walk around smelling like potato peels and Guiness, CHA ZING

drama queens (1)

superwiz (655733) | about 2 years ago | (#39207569)

The Irish just had to turn a farce into a tragedy.

And... (2)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about 2 years ago | (#39208009)

It will be good for the rest of the world, as I'm sure if there were any Irish based Social Networks or Hosts of any kind they're feverishly working to move out of Ireland. Pity that ISP's will probably be screwed since they can't realistically leave and still service Irish customers.

Welcome to the Irish internet circa 1995.

Re:And... (1)

DwoaC (885991) | about 2 years ago | (#39210407)

You mean like Facebook? I don't think they will be too concerned about this. Maybe Google then? Nope staying put. I hate this bill but don't for a second think this will change anything other than harm small individuals.

For the artists (2)

10101001 10101001 (732688) | about 2 years ago | (#39208593)

For those who support the idea of copyright, SOPA is on its face wrongheaded. Again and again, legislation is enacted or pushed to be enacted "for the artists". It makes me think of all the times similar wordings "for the workers" invariable is designed to benefit companies. I thought it was well understood that trickle-down economics doesn't work. It's not enough to find ways to give companies, IP based or not, more money through tax breaks or longer/stronger copyright terms in the hopes they'll decide to pass some of those benefits down to the actual people behind the work. Unions as they are obviously aren't enough if the government is so concerned that it keeps pushing for more, global copyright treaties and laws.

If there really is an actual interest in the worker, why aren't laws written that actually benefit the worker? Eliminate de facto work-for-hire. Set a minimum wage and benefits for artists. Create a government initialized organized, yet artist paid and run, legal pool for dealing with things like contracts with companies for their work, pursuing piracy by both companies and end users, etc. I'm certain there are other ideas which would promote the arts and sciences by encouraging artists to produce, so investigate that and enact further laws to that end. In essence, where's all the talk about actually improving productivity and benefits? Why is the question of piracy framed in whether Disney's profits go up or down by 0.1% instead of whether there's enough animators producing good work and whether their pay is going up or down and whether it's deserved? Acting upon monolithic companies is clearly doing no good, but is it any wonder when democracies and business don't tend to like a government that deeply meddles with the inner-workings of an economy? At the same time, how can using a broad stroke and a giant club really have a directed effect?

Maybe that's just macroeconomics? :/ I don't really know enough to say.

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