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Speech-Jamming Gun Silences From 30 Meters

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the shut-up-cannon dept.

Hardware 370

MrSeb writes "Japanese researchers have created a hand-held gun that can jam the words of speakers who are more than 30 meters (100ft) away. The gun has two purposes, according to the researchers: At its most basic, this gun could be used in libraries and other quiet spaces to stop people from speaking — but its second application is a lot more chilling. The researchers were looking for a way to stop 'louder, stronger' voices from saying more than their fair share in conversation. The paper reads: 'We have to establish and obey rules for proper turn-taking when speaking. However, some people tend to lengthen their turns or deliberately interrupt other people when it is their turn in order to establish their presence rather than achieve more fruitful discussions. Furthermore, some people tend to jeer at speakers to invalidate their speech.' In other words, this speech-jamming gun was built to enforce 'proper' conversations."

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Big Brother is speaking (4, Insightful)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209343)

Silence, peon. Your must wait your turn. And not yell. If you speak out of turn or too loudly, you will be muted.

Re:Big Brother is speaking (2)

prettything (965473) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209411)

or not, will these be available to all? i love this continuing boom in stuff designed to stop other peoples doin legal stuff, it complements the stuff they make to stop other peoples doing stuff that they have managed to make illegal. awesomes!

see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (5, Insightful)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209421)

If conversation fails, people escalate to violence.
If bigbro wields this against the masses, a riot's going to erupt. Might as well go straight for the teargas and flashbangs.

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209481)

Except this isn't about the conversation, this is about people trying to drowned out the conversation.

Screaming at someone while they are trying to talk is not a conversation.

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (5, Insightful)

iamgnat (1015755) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209743)

Except this isn't about the conversation, this is about people trying to drowned out the conversation.

Do you really think this technology won't be abused to silence disenting opinions in a conversation even if it is being delivered in a calm and well thought out manner? I don't buy into the "big brother" mass usage, but stuff like this is ALWAYS abused.

Hell, the RIAA will probably want to use it at concerts to prevent people from "violating their IP" by singing along...

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (5, Funny)

Yetihehe (971185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209885)

Silencing guns don't silence people. People silence people.</sarcasm>

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (2)

jittles (1613415) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210075)

Silencing guns don't silence people. People silence people.</sarcasm>

You're absolutely right. The gun has no reason to want to silence anyone or anything. Only people would have a motive to silence other people.

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (1, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209615)

That's exactly what they want. They want to drown out legitimate debate. When the people involved in that debate revolt, they get to bring down the hammer on them. And then they get to smear their political enemies as lawless.

This is exactly what we saw them do with OWS last fall. But this time the muting is literal, instead of using a media blitz to drown out the real message with confused ones.

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209727)

Not really.

If you've ever been in a discussion where, lets see, say, part of the group was motivated by political or personal interests and ... oh lets just make something up... maybe the rest of the team was ummmm technical in nature, and just wanted to solve the problem... and didn't care if Johhny's cousin sponsors a great product that we could hack into our system vs actually chosing the correct technology...

very often when logic and actual reason fail, people resort to loud repetition... see the concept of branding (a marketing concept) if you don't believe me, its a billion dollar industry based around brainwashing people by loud repetitive messages.... with no bearing on you know... reality.

This is a tool.

The same way a SWAT team is a tool.

both can silence voices.

both have appropriate uses.

its up to us to be responsible, and if we can't then we deserve to burn.

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210015)

Well, everyone let it happen with the Tea Party. They didn't really like the Tea Party message, so the left let it be drowned out by accusations of racism and violence.

Re:see, here's the fatal flaw with this idea... (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210051)

If bigbro wields this against the masses, a riot's going to erupt.

But it will be a silent riot. Now they only need to find a way to selectively block sight and, to all practical purposes, the riot will stop existing.

Re:Big Brother is speaking (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209721)

I can see this coming from Japan, there is a speaking etiquette that is being eroded due to modernization and the current generation losing older established traditions.

In other news had it come from the US I'd say it violates my freedom of speech. Insert rim shot.

Re:Big Brother is speaking (2)

Ukab the Great (87152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209899)

I disagree. Yelling and interrupting others has no place in a democracy where decisions are made by rational, respectful debate and letting all voices be heard. Guests with dissenting opinions on the Bill O'Reilly show could sure use one of these devices.

Re:Big Brother is speaking (4, Interesting)

Tom Womack (8005) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209969)

This strikes me as an almost perfectly cliched Japanese technical solution to a social problem: you cannot accept the loss of face that would be involved in telling your minion Mr Akusake to shut up indicating that you do not have the degree of control over Mr Akusake that your relative positions would indicate, or the unspeakable loss of status that would be implied if you told your minion Mr Akusake to shut up and he didn't, but you can point the shutting-up machine at him and cause him to shut up.

Loud people dominating conversations is undeniably an actual social problem, and this is an actual technical solution to it.

Re:Big Brother is speaking (4, Funny)

Defenestrar (1773808) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209993)

"Silence, peon"?! Dude, think of the children! I mean seriously, think of the awesome power of this tool when used on children. Screaming in the back seat? Being asked a third time for candy before dinner? Grocery store tantrums that everyone notices? Not anymore!

This is probably the best parenting tool to come along since the willow reed or the TV!

On another note - this thing looks like it could be bypassed with the simple expedient of plugging your ears while speaking. If you wanted to get all technical with countermeasures, it'd be interesting to see what constructive interference does to mute the loud inconvenient person

introverted scientists.... (1)

schlachter (862210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210097)

"to stop 'loader, stronger' voices from saying more than there fair share in conversation" ....says the introverted scientist

First (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209345)

*jammed*

Re:First (1)

xeoron (639412) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210069)

Growing up, I always wanted a voice jammer for family parrots when they decided they wanted to screech. I, also, wanted one to use on my sister when she annoyed me. These days, I would love one to use against people being rude and too loud talking on their cells while in shops and while watching a film in a theatre.

Let me say this about it ... (5, Funny)

Barbara, not Barbie (721478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209347)

"This is totally ....."

Re:Let me say this about it ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209751)

Big Brother's cat got your tongue?

Oooppps! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209375)

And suddenly, an entire generation fell silent...

This is evil (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209381)

And those who invented it are evil as well. They should go kill themselves.

Obvious use (1)

wisty (1335733) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209385)

Schools will want them.

Even more obvious use (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209821)

Want to disrupt some boring political speech?

Dolores Umbridge (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209403)

That excerpt reads like a Dolores Umbridge quote.

Re:Dolores Umbridge (3, Funny)

lymond01 (314120) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209705)

If it's important enough to say, it's important enough to carve into the back of your hand.

Umm (3, Interesting)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209407)

So, here's the technical implementation:

The gun works by listening in with a directional microphone, and then, after a short delay of around 0.2 seconds, playing it back with a directional speaker. This triggers an effect that psychologists call Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF), which has long been known to interrupt your speech (you might’ve experienced the same effect if you’ve ever heard your own voice echoing through Skype or another voice comms program). According to the researchers, DAF doesn’t cause physical discomfort, but the fact that you’re unable to talk is obviously quite stressful.

What's to prevent someone from simply speaking louder to talk over the "jammer"? Why wouldn't this be the target's first reaction? Wouldn't a delay of 0.2 seconds sound just like an echo?

There's also the fact that this is highly targeted (no shutting up entire audiences) and doesn't actually create "silence", just cacophony.

Re:Umm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209499)

What's to prevent someone from simply speaking louder to talk over the "jammer"?

[fingers in ears] LA LA LA speech jammer what? LA LA LA [/fingers in ears]

This sounds to me more like a 'remote microphone/amplifier'. Figure out a way to ignore the DAF and isn't that all it really is?

Re:Umm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209515)

The targeted speakers can just use earplugs to not be distracted by their own echo.

It's not like they listen to anyone anyway.

Re:Umm (5, Interesting)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209581)

Having worked with different types of audio equipment my entire life I can assure you that this effect is real.

However, depending on the delay it might not "shut you up" completely. It can make you slur or not be able to form words. You can get stuck on a single syllable because your brain says you haven't finished it.

So, no, it doesn't sound just like simple feedback or echo.

Re:Umm (1)

KhabaLox (1906148) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209723)

I would love to try this, just to experience it. I wonder if it is more effective than simply broadcasting a reverse wave-form of the person's speech (like noise cancellation head-phones)?

Re:Umm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39210005)

A reverse wave-form will cancel out the sound in a specific location/area, this causes the speaker to stop speaking or at least have great difficulty.

Re:Umm (4, Funny)

NormalVisual (565491) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209883)

I used to do this to co-workers at the music store I worked at many, many years ago. Make a bet that they can't say the alphabet, put a set of headphones on them, run it through a digital delay set to 150 ms or so, then sit back and listen to them sound like a speech-impaired two-year-old. :-)

Re:Umm (4, Interesting)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209649)

Interesting. I worked phone support for a company, and their systems would occasionally do this. The delay was anywhere from a fraction of a second to a couple seconds, randomly for each call it happened to. It is really, really annoying, but I always assumed it made me stop talking because I was trying to be polite to the customer and when I hear a voice from their end, I'd stop and listen.

It took me about a week to learn to just keep talking when I heard my own voice, and not someone else's.

Re:Umm (2)

rainmouse (1784278) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209759)

The effect can throw someone and confuse them. Most people are already nervous enough about public speaking, I can see how this would shut up disruptive people (or silence honest opinions) in a televised debate. It's not too dissimilar to tricks sound engineers can use to screw up live performances. either putting a delay on the feedback monitors or silencing them altogether is a way to really make even a very talented signer into a laughing stock. This is a cheap technique very readily used to humiliate over-confident people on televised talent shows to prop up ratings.

On a side note the linked article seems more like a tabloid driven, sensationalist, speculative rant than being in any way informative, accurate or scientific.

Re:Umm (1)

readin (838620) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209831)

That doesn't sound terribly effective. I remember trying a phone that similarly delays your speech at one of those hands-on children's museums. The first time you try it it does make you stop. But you quickly realize that if you ignore your own voice you can continue talking. You need to take an extra second before you speak (to plan out or memorize your sentence), but then you just say the whole thing instead of relying on audible feedback.

Re:Umm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209953)

What's to prevent someone from simply speaking louder to talk over the "jammer"? Why wouldn't this be the target's first reaction? Wouldn't a delay of 0.2 seconds sound just like an echo?

Better question:

What's to prevent the person being silenced from approaching the person with the gun, removing said gun from their hands, and ramming it through the jammer's teeth? Even at the full 100-ft range, the jammer taking off running to escape the incoming very-angry speaker would quickly lose the favor of any available audience, especially if two or three people have already been "silenced" in this manner.

Is this new? (5, Funny)

drooling-dog (189103) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209419)

Conventional firearms have been effective at silencing speakers for centuries. Do we really need this?

Re:Is this new? (3, Funny)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209777)

Yes. In places outside of Texas this is not yet accepted as a method of ending a casual conversation.

Re:Is this new? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209849)

Yeah like in say DC (highest in the nation btw).

Re:Is this new? (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209891)

Well, in all fairness, that thing is much to big to fit in my holster.

Guns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39210023)

Please tell us, what government are you speaking of that isn't 100% dependent on guns and the special right to use them as a business model?

Not really a speech jammer (4, Informative)

parlancex (1322105) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209425)

According TFA all the "jammer" does is play back a copy of your speech delayed by 0.2 seconds, akin to being annoyed by loud echo on a VoIP phone or Skype conversation. While echo can sometimes be annoying when it interrupts yourself, it is fairly easy to adjust if you've done it before and talk over yourself. Because the gun features both a directional microphone and directional speaker, if you can comfortably talk over yourself everyone else will hear you just fine, sans echo.

Re:Not really a speech jammer (4, Informative)

snowgirl (978879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209841)

According TFA all the "jammer" does is play back a copy of your speech delayed by 0.2 seconds, akin to being annoyed by loud echo on a VoIP phone or Skype conversation. While echo can sometimes be annoying when it interrupts yourself, it is fairly easy to adjust if you've done it before and talk over yourself. Because the gun features both a directional microphone and directional speaker, if you can comfortably talk over yourself everyone else will hear you just fine, sans echo.

Looking up Delayed Auditory Feedback, it's been long used to help stutterers to produce fluent speech. It causes them to speak slower, but they also speak more fluently.

I'm with you, this does not actually stop speaking, it just makes it annoying and stressful to speak, but a lot of people won't suffer any impairment in dominating a conversation even with this device.

Re:Not really a speech jammer (0)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209887)

Aw, and here I was expecting someone to have combined ultrasound "laser sound" tech with the inverse-signal noise-cancellation stuff Bose advertises the shit out of.

Hmm... that's actually a pretty cool idea. Someone should try it.

Re:Not really a speech jammer (2)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209929)

You are correct. Because this gun doesn't use destructive interference or anything else that would *mute* sound, it can easily be subverted by plugging your ears. I do it all the time with BF3's crappy voice chat function.

As long as you block out the echo (mentally or physically), you can easily talk.

Re:Not really a speech jammer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209995)

The occupy movement already does this anyways. They call it a microphone check, essentially they say "microphone check" which is a queue to the audience around them to repeat "microphone check" all at once. Then, the person speaking states his case and they all repeat his every word, thereby echoing what he is saying, delayed by a few seconds. Essentially, they're already in tuned with hearing themselves twice, so this won't affect them probably.

Re:Not really a speech jammer (1)

schlachter (862210) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210063)

Wear ear plugs and you will defeat this tech.

Three hurras for the STFUgun! (5, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209439)

Hip! hip! H....

Wow... (1)

Shoten (260439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209445)

Damn, somehow my ex-wife has become a Japanese researcher?

Keep it on all the time (1)

CSHARP123 (904951) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209449)

Keep it on all the time in all places. That way you don't have to fear free speech. On the paper Big brother can easily say, we have best free speech law in the world, but in reality we use this neat little gadget that make sure that no one else other big brother is speaking. How innovative?

Not as cool as hyped... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209453)

I was disappointed to see that it doesn't create some kind of actual interference, but rather just gives them a local echo of themselves and creates a psychological effect. This can easily be overcome with practice. If you've ever announced in a gym or a stadium, you get the same effect and get used to it quickly.

The Oscars will be the first customer (2)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209459)

No more get-the-hint loud music, desperate host or shepherds crook. Instead the blubbering ham - sorry , I mean award winning thespian - suddenly goes silent and just looks like a fish gasping for air. In fact , the ceremony could probably be improved vastly if it was switched on 99% of the time.

Possible Marketing Strategy (1)

justdiver (2478536) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209463)

Instead of calling it the speech-jamming gun, call it a "Mother-In-Law Silencer" or something like that. I know I'd buy one.

Re:Possible Marketing Strategy (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209747)

THIS IS GENIUS. Although I actually happen to enjoy chatting it up with my mother in law oddly enough...

First Rule (1)

Sarius64 (880298) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209471)

The first rule of Speech-Jamming Guns is no one talks about Speech-Jamming Guns! Sheesh.

Chicago Way (1)

A10Mechanic (1056868) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209475)

They pull a gun, I pull a bigger, more boxy looking gun, with two lasers, and surround sound.

ASL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209483)

Makes me glad I learned sign language.

Re:ASL (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209575)

That's why we have a right to arms people... so we can still speak ASL when our voices are muted by Japanese Speech stopping guns. The founding father's thought of everything.

Easy work-around (1)

Barbara, not Barbie (721478) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209491)

The gun works by listening in with a directional microphone, and then, after a short delay of around 0.2 seconds, playing it back with a directional speaker. This triggers an effect that psychologists call Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF), which has long been known to interrupt your speech (you mightâ(TM)ve experienced the same effect if youâ(TM)ve ever heard your own voice echoing through Skype or another voice comms program). According to the researchers, DAF doesnâ(TM)t cause physical discomfort, but the fact that youâ(TM)re unable to talk is obviously quite stressful.

Just stuff your fingers in your ears and go "You still suck and I'll say whatever I want when I want it and you can't stop me NYAH NYAH NYAH NYAH NYAH!"

Also, the effect isn't that pronounced - I got used to it when one of my daughters kept using her iPhone on speaker and I'd be able to hear everything I said repeated back. It probably only workes on old farts who never had kids and keep going "turn off that damn speakerphone!" It certainly won't work on the current generation for more than a few seconds.

Finally a device for Husbands of the world (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209501)

Finally a device for Husbands of the world.

The non-talkative will inherit the world. Blabbermouths of the living room when Liverpool FC be gone.

Re:Finally a device for Husbands of the world (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209525)

Should say when "Liverpool FC are playing" be gone.

Harper is gonna love these (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209517)

I betcha Harper is going to order a dozen of these for the Canadian Parliament next week!

Watch for a "bulk order" from the US Congress and Senate by month end, too.

So it's basically a mute button for people? (4, Funny)

Millennium (2451) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209519)

There's a Nobel prize waiting for the person who invents a way to use this over the Internet. Possibly the Nobel Peace Prize itself.

Re:So it's basically a mute button for people? (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209541)

Mute button to stop speech on the interent?

That's called the FBI.

This couild be a HUGE seller for parents! (2)

King_TJ (85913) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210031)

"Are we there yet?" "Are we ......

(That's better!)

Beneficial Uses (1)

Translation Error (1176675) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209529)

But this invention can be used for good! Just imagine the benefits of having one on hand at political debates and the Academy Awards!

Delayed Auditory Feedback (1)

alexo (9335) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209531)

Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF), is a device that enables a user of the device to speak into a microphone and then hear his or her voice in headphones a fraction of a second later. [...]
DAF usage (with a 175 millisecond delay) has been proven to induce mental stress.

-- Wikipedia [wikipedia.org]

Don't speech Jam me Bro... (1)

CSHARP123 (904951) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209545)

Does anybody know how to scream in sign language?

Re:Don't speech Jam me Bro... (2)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209643)

Yes.

You stand firmly with back straight, legs shoulder width apart. Breath in deep, fill your lungs- then exhale whilst really loudly yelling:

"IN SIGN LANGUAGE"

That's how you scream "in sign language".

Japanese sense of humour? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209555)

I'm not Japanese culture expert, but can these usage suggestions be humour on the part of the researchers?
Not detecting humour on an everyday basis is more worrisome than crackpot ideas.

Academy Awards (1)

Ogive17 (691899) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209567)

Give each winner 30 seconds then turn on this device and go to commerical. Maybe they'll finally get through the show in under 4 hours.

More Importantly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209573)

Will it shut my wife up?

Re:More Importantly (0)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209675)

Buy her some treakle toffee... you'll have peace whilst she tries to chew through it.

yea but (1)

milkmage (795746) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209577)

FTA: "At a political rally, an audience member could completely lock down Santorum, Romney, Paul, or Obama from speaking. "

well, I'm sure the secret service would notice if you were pointing toaster at POTUS (look at the pic, handheld, yes? inconspicuous? no)

wonder if you could defeat it with a piece of glass like a bigger teleprompter screen (it doesn't use noise cancelling technology) - no mention of how it works in an amplified environment where sound comes real time from multiple directions/sources.

"The gun works by listening in with a directional microphone, and then, after a short delay of around 0.2 seconds, playing it back with a directional speaker. This triggers an effect that psychologists call Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF), which has long been known to interrupt your speech (you might’ve experienced the same effect if you’ve ever heard your own voice echoing through Skype or another voice comms program). "

Likelihood this will be used legitimately (2)

ilsaloving (1534307) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209579)

This would be a fantastic tool to help enforce respectful dialog during discussions/debates.

However, the likelihood that this will be limited to just that, is so low as to require an entirely new not-yet-invented field of mathematics just to calculate the odds.

easy workaround? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209639)

Wait, so what happens if the target plugs his or her ears? Wouldn't they then get no auditory feedback, allowing them to speak? Seems a bit easy to beat..

Anyone who uses this technology... (1)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209689)

...isn't worthy of respect or being listened to in the first place.

If I'm ever at a political rally where one of these is used that candidate will never get my vote.

Speech jamming can't stop me! (1)

zildgulf (1116981) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209711)

I know American Sign Language and if this technology becomes widespread many others will learn it too!

Imagine learning ASL will become a exercise in free speech and resistance. Who would ever thought that?

Re:Speech jamming can't stop me! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209957)

A/S/L ?

Re:Speech jamming can't stop me! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209971)

I know American Sign Language too, it consists of only one hand sign.

Won't work with politicians (4, Funny)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209719)

They like to hear themselves talk too much.

Easily Rendered Ineffective (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209731)

You can simply be used to hearing yourself echoing, and some people actually can speak MORE clearly when they feel they're being interrupted (this gun's method was used as a treatment for those who have debilitating problems with stuttering to make the patient think they're being interrupted). Either way, you can easily train yourself to be immune to this gun.

Failing that, just plug a mic into ordinary sound-canceling headphones to create a headset that cancels sound matching your voice so you can hear everything else, and as a fun side effect you'll instinctively speak even louder since you can't hear yourself.

Speech jamming vs POV gun (1)

gzipped_tar (1151931) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209741)

Whenever I heard of Japanese speech-jamming machines I go grab my point-of-view gun.

They obviously haven't been in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209745)

... Glasgow trainstation where there are echos from the announcements at all sorts of times delays.

Scotland isn't afraid of silly little echos! We'll toss'em like cabers! MEN.

In Soviet Japan ... (0)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209779)

... gun silences you!

You get the same effect... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209811)

...by playing 'Indian Love Call' by Slim Whitman

Jam my speech? (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209817)

Someone in Japan has guns. They'll use that to speak instead.

Typical Japanese.

Military Uses Anyone? (1)

AJH16 (940784) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209843)

I'm just imagining this thing in a special ops context. How useful would it be to be able to remotely confused the ability of a group of guards to speak to each other without losing focus on the battle at hand?

Easy to beat (2)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209851)

"The gun works by listening in with a directional microphone, and then, after a short delay of around 0.2 seconds, playing it back with a directional speaker."

Basically, this messes with your brain, causing you to stop talking. Two very simple techiques for stopping this
1. Put a finger in each ear or cover them with your hands
2. Train yourself to block out the echo. I understand those in the radio industry already do this.

Interesting little research, but not practical.

Washington DC (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209857)

Can this be scaled up to encompass all of DC? We can install "voting" buttons in everyone's residence and call it the "I'm sick of your bullshit" button. When the majority of the country presses it, DC is silenced for a day.

It probably wouldn't accomplish much, but that's not much different than things are going right now. At least we could stop the flow of noise pollution emanating from DC for a couple for days per year.

Wear ear senmuffs (1)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209921)

It works by confusing the speaker with his own words delayed - so if you can't hear your own words because you are wearing ear muffs you won't become confused.

anti-jamming device (1)

KDN (3283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39209939)

The device works by replaying your voice with a slight delay. I envision a counter device that will play white noise, or maybe eventually even record your own voice and cancel out the remote delayed voice so that you never hear it.

Covert ops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39209989)

Imagine a person giving a motivating speech to hundreds or thousands - then all of a sudden blurp bloa bah blah - the crowd looks confused, some erupt in laughter. Instant credibility loss. Who would suspect an attack from an actual weapon?

So it's a heckler gun. (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210001)

Hecklers will find it useful.

Get back to me... (1)

NikeHerc (694644) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210029)

Get back to me when it works on management, irrespective of the range.

Puffft (1)

WillRobinson (159226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39210055)

We have had these in Texas for years, we call them Glock's

We need these in free speach zones (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39210089)

We need these in free speach zones to drown out the words of those protesting nutjobs.

This would be a great addition... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39210095)

...to any Republican primary debate. Just zap 'em when they go over time and won't shut the f#ck up.

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