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Computer Programmers Only the 5th Most Sleep Deprived Profession

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the it's-the-sun's-fault-for-coming-out-before-noon dept.

Programming 204

garthsundem writes "As described in the NY Times Economix blog, the mattress chain Sleepy's analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey to find the ten most sleep deprived professions. In order, they are: Home Health Aides, Lawyer, Police Officers, Doctors/Paramedics, Tie: (Economists, Social Workers, Computer Programmers), Financial Analysts, Plant Operators (undefined, but we assume 'factory' and not 'Audrey II'), and Secretaries."

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204 comments

Issue for me is pattern recognition. (4, Interesting)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#39221917)

Over the years, I seem to have trained my brain to seek out patterns in everything I encounter. This makes sleeping rough as any back ground noise resembling human speech causes me to become fully alert as my brain tries to make sense of what it heard. Only solution to this I've found is a good white noise generator that operates on the same frequency patterns as speech.

Course, I could just have the brain worms. Who knows.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 2 years ago | (#39221971)

ver the years, I seem to have trained my brain to seek out patterns in everything I encounter.

How has this benefited you in life?

(Not a troll- honestly curious)

I've trained myself to recognize patterns where it's applicable - but doing it everywhere/with everything seems like a waste of brain cycles.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222043)

Hard to say, its a difficult thing to quantify. I do a LOT of data analysis in my programming work, so its either a benefit or a side effect. However I could do without my mind shouting "WHAT'S THAT MEAN!" when someone three rooms away whispers...

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222511)

Hard to say, its a difficult thing to quantify. I do a LOT of data analysis in my programming work, so its either a benefit or a side effect. However I could do without my mind shouting "WHAT'S THAT MEAN!" when someone three rooms away whispers...

It's serotonin related anxiety. I had that for 30 years, and thought it was normal. If you want to get rid of it, an SSRI will work wonders. But then, of course, you have to weigh the side effects against the benefits. BTW, I thought I'd be less productive without that, but I find just the opposite.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222713)

As with all drugs that alter the brain chemistry, don't you run the risk of becoming dependent on them? Not addicted, but honestly chemically dependent. If someone takes SSRIs for 20 years, won't the brain re-wire itself to become dependent on those as a baseline for the "new normal"?

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222095)

. . . doing it everywhere/with everything seems like a waste . . .

. . . but it's a fun waste . . .

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222285)

Tell that to all the paranoid schizophrenics and psychotics who cannot turn their "pattern recognition" off.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (4, Interesting)

ilsaloving (1534307) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222123)

You mean I'm not the only one? Although in my case, I created a repeating track of ocean sounds.

The critical part of doing that, is that you have to make the track long enough that your brain doesn't detect the repeating pattern. My first attempt made it only 5 minutes long, and in surprisingly short order, I was going, "Okay here comes that particular crash of waves against the rocks..."

You also have to do something to deal with the start and end. I used audacity to add a 3 second fade in and out, at the start and end respectively. Then use an mp3 player that features a crossfade between tracks. and one-track repeat.

Oh, and then you take your speakers and put them on your window sill, pointing outside. The sound reflects back from the window and it sounds (somewhat) as if it's originating from outside.

Is there a hyphen in obsessive compulsive disorder? >.>

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (5, Funny)

dougisfunny (1200171) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222293)

Is there a hyphen in obsessive compulsive disorder? >.>

You should go check.... three times.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (2)

flargleblarg (685368) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222793)

No hyphen. It should be an en-dash in this case, not a hyphen.

This:

obsessive–compulsive disorder

Not this:

obsessive-compulsive disorder

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (2)

punman (412350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222373)

I can totally relate to this. I have to sleep with a fan or some other true white noise in the background. HAVE to. Absolutely have to.

My (ex-)wife bought or was given this noise generator thingy because we had problems sleeping with snoring and TV and such, and when I say "we" I mean that I had a problem sleeping, and she had a problem not turning off the TV when it was time to go to sleep. Anyway, it had a bunch of audio modes to pick from: birds, happy burbling river noise, jungle, crickets, a few others, and a white noise track. Well, the track for each was, as you said, just long enough that I could pick out the patterns, and as we listened to them to try to pick one, I was saying "no" to each one rather quickly, and she was getting more and more frustrated. Finally I said, "just try the white noise one, I don't care if it's boring, it's the only one that's going to work." Rather soon (almost immediately) I realized the track for the white noise was simply an 8 second loop and the "whiteness" JUST barely didn't match up from the end and the beginning so I could hear this tiny clip in the audio when it looped. "NOPE THIS ONE WON'T WORK EITHER" in fact, it was by far the MOST annoying one of the bunch. She never understood why, and it got returned or thrown out or donated or whatever.

But yeah.

Patterns.

They suck sometimes.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (5, Funny)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222469)

Hmmmm... ... maybe you can't sleep because you stay up all night trying to perfect looping ocean sound tracks.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

kale77in (703316) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222693)

I once made a 13 minute loop of rain sounds for a friend who was in a mental hospital. It was 18 mins originally, but 13 after removing every time a car stopped, or plain flew by, or anything else that would have created a cognizable pattern. Very soothing stuff.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222725)

" track long enough that your brain doesn't detect the repeating pattern."
the brain will put a perceived pattern there, if there isn't a real one. Because if you don't have a pattern, you will go crazy.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

OrigamiMarie (1501451) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222125)

I've had that problem since I was a little kid. Presence of audible speech -> speech parsing daemon stays awake -> brain stays conscious. And if there is talking during that shallow part of sleep that comes every 90 minutes or so, I will wake up and stay awake. So now I sleep with earplugs (the best I've found so far for comfort and noise blocking are a brand that comes only in bright pink).

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222665)

You mention they only come in bright pink, but you won't help the rest of us out by giving more details, like a name, or Amazon link? I promise, I won't consider it slashvertising.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1)

Lord of the Fries (132154) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222263)

So do you have the inverse problem now that when you're in a meeting and the background noise of the ventilation system comes on, you nod off?

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222343)

8 hour rain videos on YouTube ftw.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (1, Interesting)

srussia (884021) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222945)

Over the years, I seem to have trained my brain to seek out patterns in everything I encounter. This makes sleeping rough as any back ground noise resembling human speech causes me to become fully alert as my brain tries to make sense of what it heard. Only solution to this I've found is a good white noise generator that operates on the same frequency patterns as speech.

The opposite keeps me up: pattern construction.

When listening to white noise, I have had the experience of faintly hearing a particular song, which I assumed was just coming from some neighbor's house. After a while I realized that the song kept on going and going far longer than it should be.

I figured out that the song never ended because I didn't know how its arrangement ended. In other words, my brain was attenuating frequencies that did not fit the song as I knew it. I was literally hearing a sound pattern by cherry-picking from the available acoustic stimulus.

That keeps me up at night.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (3, Informative)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222951)

Hope this doesn't bruise your ego, but everyone's brain is basically a giant pattern recognition device. Not everyone is tuned in to sound, though. I hear white noise (HVAC usually) as a rock band playing. Probably the distorted guitars and drums fit a similar spectrum. I have "transcribed" a few tunes, and they largely lack structure but don't match anything I or my friends recognize. Since I don't pay attention to lyrics in music, the vocals are usually nonsense syllables I can't make out.

An old episode of Radio Lab was investigating dreams, and one bit of info was that by having people play Tetris for a while before sleeping, they either thought about Tetris before sleeping, or reported dreaming about Tetris. The idea there was that it was part of the review/learning process.

I contest that and think that instead, since you were just doing Tetris pattern recognition, your brain is still in that mode while getting random input from your visual system. The first stage of sleep frequently being confused with being awake, it's hard to say for certain whether these people were actually dreaming, or awake and recognizing patterns, or really much of anything.

Mothers report being able to hear their child's cry in a crowded room - they are used to recognizing that pattern. Conclusion: stop listening to people, start listening to instrumental music, and you'll have a free radio in your head at all times.

Re:Issue for me is pattern recognition. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222967)

how have you trained your brain to recognize patterns?

secretaries??? wonder who they are up late with... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39221923)

secretaries??? wonder who they are up late with...

Re:secretaries??? wonder who they are up late with (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222019)

secretaries??? wonder who they are up late with...

The programmers, obviously.

17 minutes? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39221927)

Because we sleep 17 minutes less than Forestry workers? 17 lousy minutes? I sleep longer than that in crummy meetings.

7 hours is sleep deprived? (5, Insightful)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#39221947)

Looking at the most well rested and least, there's only a difference of like 4 minutes. Really, 4 minutes makes the difference between a good night's rest and being "sleep deprived?"

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (5, Interesting)

ironjaw33 (1645357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222035)

Looking at the most well rested and least, there's only a difference of like 4 minutes. Really, 4 minutes makes the difference between a good night's rest and being "sleep deprived?"

They don't show the standard deviation either, which could be huge.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (4, Insightful)

metlin (258108) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222339)

...and they've not included professions where most people I know get almost no sleep. I'm a management consultant, and between the travel, work, and client outings, we consider ourselves lucky if we get 5 hours of sleep on a week day. And compared to my i-banking friends, I'm practically a lazy ass. Ditto for a lot of people in consulting (management or IT), finance, and law (I did see lawyer and financial analyst there, but those numbers look like a joke).

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (3, Insightful)

metlin (258108) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222387)

And oh, I forgot: soldiers and people in the US military. Those folks have pretty brutal schedules, too.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (1)

jonadab (583620) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222501)

What about students? When I was in college, I routinely got excited about the prospect of three hours' sleep, and I was one of those students who actually tried to go to bed at night (as in, while it was still dark out), especially if I had a 7:30 class. Many others didn't.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (2)

garyebickford (222422) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222593)

Back when I travelled a lot doing sales support and also programming in the hotel rooms (sometimes all night), I got trained so that I would get on the airplane, sit down, buckle up and be asleep before we left the gate. Sometimes I woke up enough to tilt the seat back. I would wake up as we came in for a landing (each landing). I got at least 1/2 my total sleep that way, sometimes for six weeks at a time.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (2)

Mithent (2515236) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222399)

It probably is, which probably means that the results aren't statistically significantly different. This is such a common problem: in science, if you attempt to present data that doesn't have statistical significance (i.e. it's unlikely that any difference that you see is due to chance), no-one will believe you. But in the media, tiny differences in means observed from small sample sets are regularly presented as real differences, when in all likelihood it's all down to sampling error. (How accurately do people report the amount of sleep they get, anyway?)

We're never going to see error bars and p-values in reviews and newspaper articles, though, so you just have to take stories like this with a heavy dose of salt.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (1)

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222585)

Well, it's probably the last 4 minutes of sleep. Having to skip those always makes me feel sleep-deprived anyway....

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222687)

If the standard deviation within a group is large, than the small differences between the groups is even less relevant. A small difference between groups is most relevant if the standard deviation within a group is small.

But yes, undoubtedly the standard deviation is large, which really means that none of the listed professions get a statistically significantly different amount of sleep than the others.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (2)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222385)

The whole thing is completely pointless with variations between professions easily attributed to statistical background noise. On any given day the same survey would yield a completely different distribution.

Re:7 hours is sleep deprived? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222435)

This list doesn't make a lot of sense. The difference between the worst and the best is 15 minutes.
One things that is unknown is how many occupations are on the list. They interviewed 27,000 people. But if there are 10,000 occupations...

dumb... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39221959)

stupidest thing I've ever seen --- theres a 10 minute difference between the most well rested and the most deprived. WOW!!!

Re:dumb... (1)

kale77in (703316) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222739)

Spread across a whole profession that's somewhat more significant that it seems. it's equal to every sixth person getting an hour less sleep. Still not groundbreaking, but at least indicative.

7h3m vs. 6h57m (5, Informative)

Rene S. Hollan (1943) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222003)

I don't think that three minutes really makes that much of a difference between first and fifth place, when it represents less than one percent of the mean of those two points.

More surprising is that they think programmers get anywhere near 7 hours sleep a night: I average 5 Sunday to Friday, and 10 each on Friday and Saturday, for an average of 6h26m. In my youth, I got a LOT less (working 100 hour weeks was not unusual).

Re:7h3m vs. 6h57m (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222851)

That, and also the use of *only* the fifth even though there must be thousands of professions.

Lonley guys (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222013)

I note that the difference between the 5th most rested occupation and the 5th most sleep deprived is only ten minutes. Now - what would programmers be doing that keeps them awake for an extra ten minutes (and why are all of their socks stuck together)?

Less sleep needed (1)

chaim79 (898507) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222025)

Sound more like "less sleep needed" then "more sleep deprived", especially with only 23 minutes separating the most sleep from the least sleep.

Re:Less sleep needed (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222795)

please quote correctly:
Demetrius: "Villain, what hast thou done?"
Aaron: "That which thou canst not undo."
Chiron: "Thou hast undone our mother."
Aaron: "Villain, I have done thy mother."
TA -IV-II

Also:
Painter: "Y'are a dog."
Apemantus: "Thy mother's of my generation. What's she, if I be a dog?"
ToA 1-1

If the taught period slang, and pointed out You're mama joke when try to teach Shakespeare in high school they would get a lot more interest,..cause it's Naughty.

Really now? (2)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222041)

I question these results when neither Pilot nor Air Traffic Controller are on this list.

Re:Really now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222447)

I question these results when neither Pilot nor Air Traffic Controller are on this list.

Those are two occupations where getting enough sleep is strongly encouraged by management. If a doctor wants to swap a shift with another doctor, there's generally nothing to stop them from doing it, even if the acquired shift comes immediately after a previous shift. However, if a pilot wants to swap a flight with another pilot, the airline will first ensure that the pilot has had enough sleep, enough hours since their previous flight, and enough hours since their last drink of alcohol.

Re:Really now? (1)

Garth Smith (1720052) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222483)

As someone who's worked in Alaska... where's the fishing positions? All the crabbers?

Of course it might be hard to get sleeping stats for people who spend months out at sea. As Mike Rowe was once told by a crabber regarding safety, "OSHA??? No, Ocean!"

I'm sure we can assume they missed a lot of other occupations so I'd take this list with a grain of salt.

Re:Really now? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222819)

In the military I would routinely go 72-104 hours with no sleep.
I don't think any other profession can top the military for sleep deprivation.

Nor parents. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222723)

Parents of young children are obviously more sleep deprived than any of the above.

Re:Really now? (1)

WeatherServo9 (1393327) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222953)

Actually, they shouldn't be on the list. They both have limits to the number of hours they can work to prevent fatigue on the job. Here's [businessweek.com] an article that mentions some of the requirements.

thinking about stuff (2)

hey (83763) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222069)

I'm a programmer and I can't sleep because I'm thinking about stuff (bugs, better algos, etc).
Maybe this is a problem for authors or artists too.

Re:thinking about dicks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222157)

I bet the problem is that your up late thinking about dicks and other faget stuff. Its well known fact that programmers are faget.

Re:thinking about dicks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222765)

Somebody who assumes somebody else is thinking about dicks and "other faget stuff" probably is himself.

Faget alert! Faget alert! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222643)

Most likely you're thinking about how much of your boss's dick you can deepthroat the next day, faget.

Re:thinking about stuff (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222757)

What I hate... I when I'm fixing all these bugs- typing furiously... I'm on a roll- finding solutions to all the corporate problems... and then I realise I'm really in that bizarre between wake-and-sleep stage and I'm not really fixing any bugs- or typing... I'm laying in my bed.

Re:thinking about stuff (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222853)

Get up, write down a list of everything that's on you mind with solutions descriptions. Not code, just ideas.

Do it routinely. That will stop a large percentage of insomnia.

The real story.... (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222081)

So the difference between least and most is less than 30 minutes? The real story here is occupation makes very little difference in your sleeping habits.

Only ten minutes behind, 5th is still pretty bad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222097)

The reason why programmers don't get enough sleep is probably because there fagets. Their staying up late every night having faget ass sex orgys at there clubs. Everyone knows thats what fagets are all about. Ive met alot of programmers and I think all of them were fagets. As far as I can tell its a faget profession.

As an ex programmer and ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222129)

As an ex-programmer, I was sleep deprived because I just couldn't get my work done in the time allotted to me. Was the schedule unrealistic? Maybe. Am I not smart enough to work in the profession? Maybe. Although, my shit worked as spec'ed, it was well documented, and when folks took over my stuff, it was easy to follow and understand - it was easy to maintain. Maybe us stupid people do have a place in IT because we write easy to understand stuff.

I once had a brother in law who was a cop. Cops and their unions LOVE to point out how little cops get paid. What they don't tell you is that is their base pay. I swear to god, they get a differential for everything. I used to joke to my ex in-law, "What? Do you get extra pay for just showing up to work?"

Christmas once fell on a Sunday night and as a senior guy he jumped at it. Why? Because he got: weekend pay, National Holiday pay, night shift pay, and overtime all on top of that.

He basically made almost a month's pay in one night.

And being Christmas night, he rode around and occasionally called in a plate of someone (most likely someone like my wife - a nurse) who had to work too - and didn't get all of those perks because they happen to have a great union. Yes, he had a brand new Mercedes- He got sick of his Porsche.

tl;dr - Cops are sleep deprived because they just love all that extra pay.

Re:As an ex programmer and ... (1)

garyebickford (222422) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222649)

Some of the top paid gov employees in Massachusetts are cops - IIRC a few made more than the governor. A lot of this was overtime they picked up for sitting in a cop car with the lights on at construction zones (yes, in Massachusetts until recently ALL construction zones had to have a cop with the lights flashing, and all flaggers were cops). A year or two ago they managed to get a law passed allowing non-police to do some flagging.

PhD student (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222221)

I doubt that any of those works as hard as a PhD student.

line on economists (1)

ThorGod (456163) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222273)

Personally, I would love to know why economists are on this list. Economists in academia, at least, seem to have flexible schedules that should let them get lots of sleep. Maybe a lot of them are grad students scrambling to publish, publish, publish. Or maybe there are a lot of folks like Larry Summers who prefer allocating more hours for work

I'm not going to lecture you on what an economist is and does (I could, I am one). But, I'd prefer if you just kept your prejudiced notions to yourself.

Re:line on economists (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222553)

You just sit around drinking coffee at starbucks discussing the Keynes with other economists don't you?

No wonder you can't sleep- too much caffeine. ;)

Re:line on economists (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222921)

I'm actually curious a to why that profession is on the list. Not trolling, just wondering. I had suspected you had an office job, read/write papers and do anylisys for whatever organization hired you. But I am surprised that it's so time consuming you can get 8 hours.

I know,l this whole post sounds like a troll, but I can't think of any other way to put it.
I get Cops, Dr.s factory workers. Office workers?

I woudl pout new parent towards the top of the list!

Any article that cites CPs is good for /.? (1)

PHCOSci (1771552) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222277)

This study is a joke. The highlight of the article shouldn't be that the word "Computer Programmer" was used. Anyone with half a mind for statistics can see that this hand-waving study is some horribly contrived sociology survey. There is, for any reasonable metric of error, a significant difference between these survey-based data points. New article title: "New York Times will publish any study of any quality if it applies to a broad base of people that might open the link". Bad science in the news is a disease.

But is occupation the reason? (1)

RazorRaiser (895600) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222283)

It seems to me like LAN parties and latenight TV would be a much greater sleep distraction than work.

Volume versus quality... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222289)

I work as an LEO in the UK and one of the things I've noticed is that although the sleep volume matters, so does *when* you get to sleep. After an eight day week of disrupted sleep one good night's sleep can leave you feeling fully rested. A weekend of night shifts and a full 10 hours sleep during the day *still* leaves you feeling tired.

Did they really survey *all* professions? (1)

Colonel Fahlt (1267662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222337)

I'm surprised that some military trades don't make the top five list, just lumping them together as one. (Though I suppose rest periods might average it out.)

Programmer who doesn't sleep (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222405)

I'm a programmer and I probably get 8 hours sleep... over a three-day period.

Got nothing to do with my job. When I get off work- my work stays at work... I'm just a natural insomniac and would not be sleeping no matter what my job.

IT vs Programmers (1)

geoffrobinson (109879) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222415)

I would like to see programmers broken out by IT support, DBAs, etc and normal developers. The first group has to do stuff in the middle of night or respond to emergencies. And I wonder if they are lumped in.

This has to be a joke. (1, Troll)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222425)

If you're trying to tell me Doctors and Lawyers are more sleep-deprived than I am, you don't know shit.

Let's start with the fact that, as a computer programmer, I make a fraction of what they do - money is a frequent concern and often keeps me up figuring out finances or worrying. It must be tough to budget groceries, gas, and electric bills when you make $300k-$700k per year, right? Shit.

How about housing? I live in a tiny apartment downtown on my salary, while repaying loans, working a job at ~$30,000 a year. I can't afford a mansion in the 'burbs with a huge yard and golf cart paths like they can. I can't even afford a nice luxurious bed to sleep on at night. Clearly, they have it so hard.

Consider transportation for a second. I drive a beat-up, heavily-used 2001 Mitsubishi I paid ~$4500 for, which admittedly just sits there. I hardly drive, if at all. I have gone months without having to drive due to being near lots of shops and working near my home. I still cannot afford a brand-new Mercedes or BMW, let alone two or three of them. I can't afford a plane, despite the fact that I love to fly them. Woe is the doctors and lawyers.

Consider a social life: Doctors? Women are all over them. Being a doctor is chick-bait, though I still don't understand why. Being a Computer Programmer? Yeah, no girl is going to say "Being a computer programmer is SO sexy! Let's go out!". That doesn't happen to us. Jeez, it must suck not having to try, right doc?

Either this is a colossal sign of bad statistical analysis, or doctors and lawyers are all whiny emo bitches who think the grass is always greener.

Fuck this article. It's a joke.

Re:This has to be a joke. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222529)

Fuck this article. It's a joke.

Really? Because from the tone of it, it sounded more like your post was a joke.

Re:This has to be a joke. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222835)

Go talk to somebody in Residency for five minutes, and see if you still seriously think they're not sleep deprieved. Go talk to the Lawyers at a major lawfirm, ask them how many BILLABLE hours (Not all hours they work are billable) they're EXPECTED to pull each week...

Re:This has to be a joke. (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222897)

Sounds like to me you're in the wrong line of programming. Some coders make 100k a year. But if you're only making 30k, there are several reasons why. First, your work could be easy to outsource for. Second, your employer values your locality. Or third, you're a sucker for accepting this payment. Again, programming isn't the problem here. But perhaps the type of programming you're doing is not very marketable in the workforce.

Re:This has to be a joke. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222991)

Yet your post has nothing to do with sleep.

Apropos... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222513)

I just stayed up until 3:30am coding some hard core shit. It didn't help that I was doing a Swordfish/Hugh Jackman dance around the computer all night, probably kept me up longer than otherwise.

Unfortunately I can't hack out phat code without dancing around the keyboard.

Pilots most rested? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222521)

Obviously this study is not based on reality since they've listed as airline pilots as one of the most rested professions. In reality we battle fatigue and sleep deprivation on a regular basis. I was honestly expecting us to be at the top of the list...

Difficulty parsing (1)

michaelmalak (91262) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222597)

I stumbled a few times on "mattress chain Sleepy's" before I realized it wasn't about someone chained to their cubicle with a mattress in it.

Only? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222599)

"Only" the fifth most sleep deprived? I found it astounding that programmers are on the top 10 at all. It's not as if you have to do the coding at awkward hours. For the vast majority, programming is a 9-to-5 job.

Averages mean NOTHING - only my experience matters (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222617)

I don't match any of these averages, so the study is not just flawed and useless but completely misleading! I was up all night just thinking about what I was going to complain about on slashdot today and got less than 2 hours of sleep. These "researchers," if you can even call them that, have absolutely no f*ing idea how taxing it can be to be an internet gadfly.

Misleading / bad study (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39222629)

This sounds like a horrible study to me, or at least misleading based on the article. I'm a programmer and know a teacher and I know exactly why she sleeps more than me. It's not because my job prevents me from sleeping, it's because her job wears her out and by time she finishes for the day (no, not when school gets out, when she actually finishes work) she's exhausted. As a programmer I can get 6 hours of sleep and still work fine. I don't see anything in this study that proves sleep deprivation over getting less sleep by choice/lack of exertion.

How much do game developers skew the data? (1)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222673)

i wonder if they counted game developers like EA, MS and a host of others? we all know this sub sector of the programming world is not for people that need 8 - 10 hours of sleep even though for people to be productive the next day that is exactly what they need.

Military? (1)

DocZayus (1046358) | more than 2 years ago | (#39222675)

I don't understand how the military aren't in that list. It is not unusual for a military member to go 24 hours without sleep when on a mission.

Physical Fatigue of Position Not Considered? (1)

csshelton (949006) | more than 2 years ago | (#39223023)

Wouldn't you imagine that highly physical jobs like Forest / Logging Workers, Athletes, Construction Workers, ... require a significant amount of additional sleep to compensate for physical strain (more than 15 minutes)?
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