×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Meteorite Crashes Through Cottage In Oslo

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the knock-knock dept.

Space 122

First time submitter Mastiff in Norway writes "Famous (in Norway) Norwegian astrophycisist Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard is ecstatic after a meteorite was found in an urban cottage in Oslo this weekend. This is the 14th meteorite that's been found in Norway, and only the second that crashed through a roof. It is not certain when the crash happened, since the cottage hasn't been used all winter, but on the 1st of March a big ball of fire was observed over the southern parts of Norway, and it is thought that this may be one of the pieces from that entry into the atmosphere. Maybe it's time to replace those tin foil hats with helmets?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

122 comments

He wouldn't be so ecstatic (5, Funny)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325787)

if it was his cottage that the meteorite had crashed through.

Also, names in l33t sp34k are sooo 90s...

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (5, Informative)

dinfinity (2300094) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325791)

Well, the damage wasn't too bad actually. Pics: http://www.vg.no/bildespesial/spesial.php?id=8728 [www.vg.no]

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325855)

It's not bad at all.
I was expecting the smoldering remains of a once beautiful cottage. I didn't think a roof from what appears to be a mostly wooden house would stop a piece of rock hurled at it at enormous speeds.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (5, Funny)

trongey (21550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325929)

... I didn't think a roof from what appears to be a mostly wooden house would stop a piece of rock hurled at it at enormous speeds.

It's good Norwegian wood. I think some guy made a few dollars singing about it.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326197)

It's good Norwegian wood. I think some guy made a few dollars singing about it.

The book was better.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326723)

It's good Norwegian wood. I think some guy made a few dollars singing about it.

Jeez, all these years I thought that guy was singing about an encounter with a Norwegian transvestite...

I once had a girl
Or should I say she once had me
She showed me her room
Isn't it good Norwegian wood?
She asked me to stay
And she told me to sit anywhere
So I looked around
And I noticed there wasn't a chair

ONLY the second? (3, Informative)

beh (4759) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327083)

"This is the 14th meteorite that's been found in Norway, and only the second that crashed through a roof. "

Who wrote this?

Have you got any idea how "densely" populated Norway is?

Sure, people won't be monitoring all of the countryside for meteorite impacts; but even then, I'm sure they get to see easily more than 7* the roof space area in non-roofed area during their day-to-day activities.

So, among 14 meteorites, 1/7th has hit a house...?

How many meteorites does the country get???

Owning a summer place is a hassle (3, Funny)

Latent Heat (558884) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327317)

I always thought that owning a second place that you kept closed up for winter was a pain -- squatters, nosy neighbors, raccoon and squirrel damage, local meth addicts looking to take your stuff, trees falling down, water pipes freezing and bursting. And now this, meteorites! There is no end to the trouble!

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

Goaway (82658) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326571)

Once a fragment that small reaches the ground, it's no longer travelling at enormous speeds. The fireball is caused when the meteorite sheds most of its velocity and the energy is turned into heat. Any surviving parts will be falling at terminal velocity, which is uncomfortably high for a piece of rock, but not enormous.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325973)

That's awesomely bizarre. Maybe they'll just repair the damage themselves, but I'd love to hear the call to the insurance company for that one. "You're asking about your coverage for WHAT?"

The broken surface of the meteorite nicely shows the fusion crust and what looks like an interesting brecciated interior.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326651)

Farmers' insurance company in the US has an ad campaign running currently where they specifically brag that they cover damage due to random objects falling from space. Probably more common that you'd think, due to the rarity of these events ever actually occurring.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

retroworks (652802) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327911)

I would have thought it terribly uncommon. But if Insurance companies have ad campaigns about it, I'm positive it's even less common than I thought. Isn't the whole point of insurance to sell you flood damage in the desert, fire damage in the swamp?

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2)

heypete (60671) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326961)

My renters insurance from when I lived in the US (provided by USAA) coverd damage to insured property due to falling aircraft, spacecraft, satellites, and/or objects falling from space on the condition that the object pass through the ceiling, wall, or window prior to it striking and damaging the insured property (i.e. I can't file a claim for a meteor damaging my computer if there's not a hole in the ceiling from the meteor passing through it.).

Fortunately, I never had to use it. /it always seemed odd that anything involving radiation (e.g. ranging from radioactive contamination all the way up to a full-out nuclear explosion) was completely exempted from the policy. I presume that a nuclear explosion would be catastrophic to insurers (not to mention residents) covering that region which is why the exclude it (same thing with floods), but still...

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325793)

It's not l33tspeak. Norwegian has a letter that looks like an o with a slash through it.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

Fishead (658061) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325815)

I'm jealous. That'd be so much easier and cooler than finishing my renovations and selling my house. My insurance policy says I'm covered for "acts of God". As long as nobody's hurt of course.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (4, Funny)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325867)

My insurance policy says I'm covered for "acts of God".

Not to completely hijack the thread, but I've always wondered how that kind of clause works out with atheists or more generally speaking people of non-evangelical christian religions.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (5, Informative)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325963)

The same. In law, at least, it's not a religious concept; in some jurisdictions it is called "force majeure [wikipedia.org] ."

IANAL, but these terms basically all seem to mean the same thing, events beyond your control. A war or even a strike can also qualify.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326407)

My housing insurance did not cover war-like acts. It also said that, "A nuclear detonation of any kind will be considered a war-like act, even if conducted during peace time."

Very nice.

Although it doesn't really matter -- I would have bigger things to worry about than housing insurance in that case.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (3, Funny)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326547)

Well at least your refrigerator would survive, so there is that.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326809)

Although it doesn't really matter -- I would have bigger things to worry about than housing insurance in that case.

Strong disagree... I live 1000s of miles downwind of LA. No direct biological effect on me or mine if "they" pop the port of LA with something inside a shipping container, but its basically a dirty bomb attack on me for resale value, or maybe govt certified verified licensed decon, etc.

There's a uniquely American fixation that any nuclear attack means the fireball must be directly over their head because the world revolves around them. More likely it'll happen 2000 miles away.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326829)

My housing insurance ... said that, "A nuclear detonation of any kind will be considered a war-like act, even if conducted during peace time."

Oddly, the US Government has pretty much the same opinion, at least if it is on US territory.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2)

Namlak (850746) | more than 2 years ago | (#39328131)

The same. In law, at least, it's not a religious concept; in some jurisdictions it is called "force majeure [wikipedia.org] ."

IANAL, but these terms basically all seem to mean the same thing, events beyond your control.

So this "act of God" concept actually works to the benefit of the atheists. The religious can have their claim denied because they failed to pray that they would be spared the incident or failed to achieve a sufficient degree of piety to influence their deity. The atheists would have no such control, and thus, liability.

Tricky, those insurance lawyers!

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (4, Funny)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326009)

Not to completely hijack the thread, but I've always wondered how that kind of clause works out with atheists or more generally speaking people of non-evangelical christian religions.

Athiest: "My house got blown away by a tornado, but I'm not collecting the insurance money because there are no gods!" Um, I doubt that will happen.

My question is, what of people who worship money? Would being swindled be an act of god?

Force majeure (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325997)

Force majeure is a term not often heard, but it is present in many contracts. Basically if something gets to big and unforeseen, most insurance companies does not give coverage. This instance in the article would be too small. But, if a larger thing were to happen, then this clause would come into effect. You should re-read your contract and look for this phrase. I strongly suspect you'll find it in most insurance-contracts. Of course the salesmen will say otherwise in oral terms, but that is only because they lack proper legal education.

Also, when thinking that this term is redundant, please keep in mind that the year is now 2012.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325863)

Nothing about this here:

http://astronomi.no/

Which is the Norwegian site for astronomy news. I guess they move at the same pace as the rest of the universe.

captcha: enemas

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325879)

if it was his cottage that the meteorite had crashed through.

Given what some falls sell for, he might be anyway, as he might make a tidy profit.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326707)

i would imagine a real piece of meteorite would sell well on ebay.

Norwegian meteorite 100,000,000 years old. No returns, please read full listing for actual meteor composite. Serious about keeping good seller satus. Starting bid - 100,000.00

Off subject...
Not sure why, but thinking of that scene in Joe Dirt with the missile.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326827)

Would they require to destroy it (probably by dissolving in some acid) and send them photographic proof of destruction if you claim it's fake?

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (5, Funny)

jones_supa (887896) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325951)

Also, names in l33t sp34k are sooo 90s...

In this case there is a reason for it. You see, if your profession is astronomy in Norway, it is customary to replace all the O's in your name with Ø so they look like planets with orbits.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326041)

He's a real fun guy. He is very enthisiastic about astronomy, and do a lot of public happenings when there are major astronomical events. Also ver supportive about anything that promotes astronomy and science.

Trust me, my name also contains Ø. It's pronounced uh like in duh.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39327447)

He's a real fun guy. He is very enthisiastic about astronomy, and do a lot of public happenings when there are major astronomical events.

He is also very enthusiastic about minor astronomical events.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39327871)

He's a real fun guy. He is very enthisiastic about astronomy, and do a lot of public happenings when there are major astronomical events. Also ver supportive about anything that promotes astronomy and science.

Trust me, my name also contains Ø. It's pronounced uh like in duh.

So your real name is AnØnymØus CØward?

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (2)

Dan East (318230) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326061)

In this case there is a reason for it. You see, if your profession is astronomy in Norway, it is customary to replace all the O's in your name with Ø so they look like planets with orbits.

Norwegian Nuclear Physicists do the same thing, although the astronomers claim they came up with the idea first. Considering that astronomy is the older profession of the two, they may indeed have prior art.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (4, Funny)

dotancohen (1015143) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326117)

In this case there is a reason for it. You see, if your profession is astronomy in Norway, it is customary to replace all the O's in your name with Ø so they look like planets with orbits.

I think that this guy bit my sister once.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

fifedrum (611338) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327631)

thank you. I came to this thread expecting a moose bit my sister joke and it wasn't until your post, almost 1/2 way down the page, until it struck.

good jorb.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325991)

Moronic troll.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

niftydude (1745144) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326011)

Also, names in l33t sp34k are sooo 90s...

Knut time-travelled here from the 90s you insensitive clod!

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

rgbatduke (1231380) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326475)

Actually, meteorites are worth a rather lot of money. Meteorites with "provenance" -- ones that did things like crash through the roof of a cottage at a known place and time -- are often the most valuable. Insurance will likely fix the cottage, and the owner might make anywhere from $1 to $1000 per gram from the meteorite itself, sold at auction -- the higher end if it is an attractive or rare type. A rare/beautiful meteorite with unusual provenance and no weathering is more valuable than gold. Even an ugly, common meteorite with provenance like "hitting a house" is probably $50-100/gram -- or more. Who knows what a collector will pay at auction?

rgb

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

FranktehReaver (2441748) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326493)

I do like how it only went through the overhang on the house and not into the house. But in customary fashion I shall ignore that I read the article and make outlandish comments based on nothing.

....I heard it took out the entire kitchen and after it made its impact a new life form emerged and burrowed into their mattresses.

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326539)

if it was his cottage that the meteorite had crashed through.

Also, names in l33t sp34k are sooo 90s...

His thrill factor would be off the charts if it had. I'd welcome one to crash through my roof! What's with you? Afraid of a little meteor shower now and then?

Re:He wouldn't be so ecstatic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326613)

An acquaintance once removed of mine is a biologist. A few years ago he got bitten by a snake and almost died, but still he was fucking extatic afterwards, because it apparently was some rare species and they still managed to catch and keep it.

I think it's safe to extrapolate to other scientists, so if the meteorite crashed through that astronomer's roof he might still balance out on happy in Dwarf Fortress fashion, because on one hand his wife's head was smashed in, but on the other hand he now owns a meteorite.

I saw TFA (1, Funny)

eternaldoctorwho (2563923) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325825)

Pics or it didn't happen.

Re:I saw TFA (1)

crunchygranola (1954152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327247)

Conversely anything that appears in a picture is real?

I've got some amazing things to show you! (Any photoshopping done was just to enhance clarity, honest.)

It has started (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325841)

at last something 2012ish more serious than continents suddently moving thousand of kilometers because earth core getting microwaved

Re:It has started (-1, Offtopic)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325861)

It's a shame a 4-digit UID is wasted on a post this idiotic and nonsensical.

Re:It has started (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39325887)

It's a shame you can't humor.

How you never saw that post was tongue-in-cheek I will never know.

Re:It has started (1)

mcgrew (92797) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326671)

I'm pretty sure he was going for "funny" and probably has enough karma to not worry about downmods or need an upmod.

Re:It has started (1)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327861)

Yeah, actually I was tired and thought he was trying to make a bunch of 2012 mayan conspiracy end of the world crap that we've been seeing a lot here. Im using the DST card on this one.

Norwegians, look to your yards ! (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325875)

Seriously, anyone here who lives in Norway (especially Oslo) should look for meteorites in their yards, on their roofs, etc. It is very common for meteors to break up as they reenter, and so it is very common, having found one large meteorite in an area, to find others nearby.

Re:Norwegians, look to your yards ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326013)

How would you be able to tell the meteorite from other rocks? Assuming they didnt leave an impact crater.

Re:Norwegians, look to your yards ! (2)

mbone (558574) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326797)

How would you be able to tell the meteorite from other rocks? Assuming they didnt leave an impact crater.

Look for something that seems out of place.

If you see a rock on your lawn or in your flower bed, hopefully you would know if it was there last week, or not. Likewise, rocks don't tend to get on roofs by other means.

Also, this fall did have a nice fusion crust and most (but not all) meteorites are magnetic.

Looking in your yard for a meteorite would normally be a waste of time, except that it is a good assumption that there are other pieces of this out there that no one has recognized.

Re:Norwegians, look to your yards ! (1)

crunchygranola (1954152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327275)

How would you be able to tell the meteorite from other rocks? Assuming they didnt leave an impact crater.

...

If you see a rock on your lawn or in your flower bed, hopefully you would know if it was there last week, or not. Likewise, rocks don't tend to get on roofs by other means.

...

Your neighborhood must have much better behaved kids than mine.

I'm a heathen vik (1)

Grindalf (1089511) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325885)

I'm a heathen vik, have they been breaking the Rune Law? Maybe the gods are angry, but like astrophysicists! :0)

God Hates Norwegian Cottages (4, Funny)

rossjudson (97786) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325923)

It's the only rational explanation.

Re:God Hates Norwegian Cottages (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326121)

Oh I don't know, Norway now has a little piece of heaven on earth. 14 pieces apparently.

Re:God Hates Norwegian Cottages (1)

Rakshasa-sensei (533725) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326141)

Norwegians hate God back.

(Highest number of atheist and non-religious in Europe, plus we burn churches for sport)

Re:God Hates Norwegian Cottages (2)

rossjudson (97786) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326265)

It gets even funnier if you misread "It is not certain why the crash happened, since the cottage hasn't been used all winter".

Re:God Hates Norwegian Cottages (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326991)

Internet atheists would do well to remember that we also have a STATE CHURCH and not only is there no separation of religion and government, offices in the STATE CHURCH are (in theory) appointed by the king.

We just don't go ape over religious issues like some other countries I know.

Uptick in meteorites? (1)

Prosthetic_Lips (971097) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325953)

Maybe we are seeing more meteorites due to the thinning of the ozone layer, or thinning of the whole atmosphere! Forget the tinfoil hats and helmets, get your space suits on!

Re:Uptick in meteorites? (1)

canajin56 (660655) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326385)

Since the "thinning" of the ozone layer is caused by ozone being reacted away, not by the stratosphere being annihilated, it would have 0 effect on the actual thickness of the actual atmosphere. Probably the uptick isn't in meteorite impacts, but meteorite impacts that get reported in the international news.

Cottages (1)

fwarren (579763) | more than 2 years ago | (#39325959)

"Look, good against cottages is one thing. Good against the living with a tin foil hat? That's something else."

fascinating (1)

k6mfw (1182893) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326045)

That is so cool, I glanced at the pics, wondering did the rock bury itself deep in the cottage? Or maybe its speed reduced to a rate equivalent as if tossed from a high rise?

OK, so when will someone post a Bruce Willis reference or a car analogy?

Re:fascinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326301)

Ok, car anology:
It's like the semi that lost braking going down a mountain, spins through the sand and gravel in the emergency ramp, and has just enough momentum left to bump into a sapling. The tree will be fine, the sand got thrown around a little, but the only participant with a real problem is the semi that needs some repairs before it's road-capable again. The analogy fails that there are no 'meteorite repair shops' around, unles you want to find some potter and have a big layer of ceramics put around the thing and then 'free' it back into space with a very expensive rocket launch.

Re:fascinating (3, Informative)

BattleApple (956701) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326711)

The average velocity of meteoroids entering our atmosphere is 10-70 km/second. The smaller ones that survive the trip to the Earth's surface are quickly slowed by atmospheric friction to speeds of a few hundred kilometers per hour, and so hit the Earth with no more speed than if they had been dropped from a tall building. For meteorites larger than a few hundred tons (which fortunately are quite rare), atmospheric friction has little effect on the velocity and they hit the Earth with the enormous speeds characteristic of their entry into our atmosphere.

source: http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/meteors/impacts.html [utk.edu]

Get With The Times (1)

NicknameAvailable (2581237) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326071)

It's all about MuMetal hats these days.

Re:Get With The Times (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326339)

MuMetal is quite fragile -- it loses its magnetic shielding properties if you as much as bend it. It might be somewhat impractical to wear it -- it'd need to be bonded to a stiff substrate to protect it from being deformed too much.

Re:Get With The Times (1)

crunchygranola (1954152) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327311)

MuMetal is quite fragile -- it loses its magnetic shielding properties if you as much as bend it. It might be somewhat impractical to wear it -- it'd need to be bonded to a stiff substrate to protect it from being deformed too much.

Well, duh! If it is to protect you from mind control AND meteorites of course it will be bonded to a nice sturdy Kevlar helmet!

Hodges Meteorite (4, Informative)

Jonathunder (105885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326099)

The 1954 Hodges Meteorite, which crashed into a house in Alabama, is the only one in recorded history to have actually hit a person. She survived, suffering only a bad bruising.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylacauga_(meteorite) [wikipedia.org]

So, what you're saying is... (2)

englishknnigits (1568303) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326363)

we need a government agency to protect us from these dangerous meteorites! I'll write my congresswoman right away!

Re:Hodges Meteorite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326421)

The wikipedia article you cited refers to a _SECOND_ incident of a meteorite hitting someone in Uganda in 1992, adding to the urgency of englishknnigits plea to his congresswoman!

Meteorite? (1)

Mike (1172) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326107)

So it landed, bounced, and then crashed through the cottage?

Or was it just a meteor like most? :-P :-P :-P :-P

Re:Meteorite? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326377)

It became a meteorite the instant it touched the cottage roof.
Then it crashed through.

Re:Meteorite? (4, Insightful)

canajin56 (660655) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326625)

It is a meteorite now, and anything it did in the past is something it did, regardless of its technical state at the time. It's allowable to use something's/someone's current state/title/etc when referring to it's past. So when talking about a serving Senator's past actions in the private sector, it's not inaccurate to say "Ten years ago, the Senator blah blah blah" even though you are describing something that happened when they were NOT a Senator yet. And, a police officer giving testimony in court can say "Witnesses report that the deceased was seen driving away from his home at 7:35PM" without implying that a corpse was driving!

Maybe its time to leave Norway? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326985)

This message sponsored by the makers of Foil Hats. They know what you're thinking and they know where you live.

How does one know? (1)

kbg (241421) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327181)

I have always wondered how you can know if a certain rock is from outer space? I mean how can you be certain that this specific rock was a meteorite. I understand that meteorites are composed of different material from the rocks in the area, but how do you know it is from outer space and not from a volcano on earth for example?

Dodge the Meteorites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39327205)

That's why I sleep in a tent in the garden. No chance of being hit when those darn meteorites are aiming for houses.

At least that's what news stories tell me ...

You Know Your Planet Is Overpopulated When ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39327731)

it has become a not uncommon occurence to have meteorites crashing through roofs on their way to the planet's surface.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...