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Marketing Agency Uses Homeless As Wi-Fi Hotspots

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the some-ideas-are-better-than-others dept.

Advertising 267

An anonymous reader writes "Marketing agency Bartle Bogle Hegarty (BBH) has launched a controversial charity scheme at this year's South by Southwest festival, in which homeless people are being used to provide Wi-Fi hotspots. The project, Homeless Hotspots, seeks to address people's need for a high-speed data connection at the festival in Austin, Texas, by issuing the homeless with T-shirts that say 'I am a 4G hotspot.' Passers-by may then pay what they wish either in cash or by PayPal to get online 4G networks via the Wi-Fi device that a homeless person is carrying and the proceeds go to the Front Steps Homeless shelter in Austin."

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267 comments

What!? (4, Insightful)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326177)

Why don't the proceeds go to the homeless person carrying around the equipment!?

Re:What!? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326189)

Because the do-gooders don't trust the homeless to spend the money the "right" way, most likely.

Re:What!? (5, Informative)

stating_the_obvious (1340413) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326221)

The homeless person doesn't keep the money for the same reason that the cashier at McDonald's doesn't get to keep the money... The profits will be donated to a homeless shelter in Austin.

Re:What!? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326243)

But just like the cashier at MCDonald's, won't the homeless person pocket the proceeds by scamming the cash register system?

Re:What!? (2)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326391)

and be caught by the DAILY audit.
besides why (other than Booze) would a homeless person risk a roof by trying to skim/scam the folks fronting this business??

Re:What!? (5, Insightful)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326433)

That's actually a very complex question with a variety of answers. Some people are homeless because they refuse to work within a system. Some are homeless because they're addicted to drugs and alcohol to such an extent that they have ruined their lives. Some because they have mental illness that prevents them from functioning clearly in the modern world. Some because they fell on hard times and had no safety net. For the last one, yeah, they'll be reasonable and try to work within the structure to maintain a roof over their head. The other three, not so much. And if you treat them like they just need a job and a home and 2.5 kids and a dog then you won't get the results you seek.

Mental Disability Stigma (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326965)

The assumption that someone who is unable to work due to being mentally ill would be unable to "spend money the right way" is disgusting. Most mentally ill are capable in many aspects of their lives, some just have certain limitations that keep them from working. (eg. PTSD, extreme phobias) Assuming that, just because they are mental ill in some fashion, they will not try and keep food on the table/roof over head is just.. wrong. Would you assume someone who had an arm or leg removed would fall in to the same category? What about a pregnant woman? The stigma associated with mental illness is terrible and, like most, largely inaccurate. Yes, you will have some people that are unable to "work within the structure," but don't assume that unable is the same as unwilling.

Re:What!? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326403)

The cashier at McDonald's is paid a wage. This is just slavery.

Slavery is involuntary, moran (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326537)

This is volunteering to earn their keep at a shelter.

Re:What!? (4, Insightful)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326565)

Since when is doing something voluntarily with no coercion or pressure "slavery"?

I mean, if any of these people find the shirts oppressive and unbearable I imagine they could, you know, refuse to wear them.

Re:What!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326717)

I mean, if any of these people find the shirts oppressive and unbearable I imagine they could, you know, refuse to wear them.

And of course the shelter will always be full when they want to stay there.

Re:What!? (-1, Flamebait)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326927)

Of course you are right. Just like your great grand-daddy was a kind hearted soul who provided food, shelter, and some scraps of clothes for some poor people with no-where else to go in exchange for doing a few chores.

Re:What!? (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326561)

Cashiers don't get paid? New one on me.

Re:What!? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326605)

what makes you think the homeless person doesn't get paid. Post says they don't get to keep the money. Cashiers get paid, but they don't keep all the money in the till.

Re:What!? (0)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326685)

Until I see something claiming otherwise, they don't get paid. Assuming they do get paid is a good way to come to a faulty conclusion. Sort of like assuming that slaves get paid for their services, which lessens the "holy shit that is evil what you are doing to that person right there" reaction.

Re:What!? (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326937)

By your comment I am not feeling very confident about your knowledge of what is and what is not slavery.

Re:What!? (2)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327029)

Well, perhaps you should ask your employer to to pay for your food and housing directly and not pay you a wage, and see how your relationship with them changes.

Re:What!? (1)

cwgmpls (853876) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326239)

Why shouldn't the organization that provides the start-up capital get a piece of the revenue?

Re:What!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326411)

You know this is slashdot, right? Any suggestion that those who risk capital should get any return will either be modded down or flooded in a lava explosion of communist/occupy something rants.

Re:What!? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326567)

Ooo "risking capital". Forming a limited liability company is about the least risky venture on the planet. For no other activity can one compartmentalise and get into a spiral of debt or misbehaviour while minimising personal consqeuences for debt or tort. Shareholders are even luckier, "owning" the company and creaming the profit while having no obligation to pay debtors in the company folds.

I started a business with a few thousand dollars about a decade ago. Went well. Sold it. Least risky thing I've ever done. Even if I'd invested ten times as much and e.g. mortgaged my house as security, I'd still have more protections than the average worker whose *house and everything else* are risk if he can't find a job. Even though I was working up to 18 hour days, the material rewards for succeeding as a business owner... woohoo... incomparable to every other poor sod who has to work two jobs same hours yet will enjoy a fixed pittance.

Succeeding in business is easy. Building a humane society is hard.

Re:What!? (3, Informative)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326973)

Anonymous Coward thinks it is "easy" to start a business, and that having an LLC somehow shields a company from losses to theft, rather than being a vehicle for minimizing losses to lawsuits.

Yes, surely he is right. No-one would dare to walk away with the property of an LLC, and even if they did, the LLC fairy would swing on down and make it all better with a wave of it's magic wand.

Re:What!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326581)

Well, the function of money is to provide liquidity. Without money we could only trade with those who had what we wanted if we had something that they wanted.
The thing where people with much money can increase this amount by trading without actually contributing more wealth to society as a whole is a bug that is abused.
If they actually took a risk that would be better, but they usually don't.

Re:What!? (0)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326569)

Yes, but this implies that they get ALL of it. No pay to the person doing the work and taking the physical risk of being on the street.

Re:What!? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326915)

No pay to the person doing the work and taking the physical risk of being on the street.

I think homeless implies that they are taking a risk of being on the street everyday...

Re:What!? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326247)

RTFA...

Whatever is paid goes to the homeless MiFi manager — either directly if you pay cash, or every two weeks if you use Paypal.

Re:What!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326365)

Why doesn't the homeless guy rip off the 4G device and sell it on eBay for more food?

It's the insanity of our tax and labor system (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326413)

It's not just taxes as Luckyo suggested, but also labor laws. Suddenly minimum wage comes into the picture as well. So you have minimum wage, FICA compliance (is the homeless man an employee or "self-employed") and similar nonsense. Pretty soon, a homeless guy who might have been content to just make a few bucks and pass a few bucks on to his homeless shelter is getting to experience the joys most of us go through every year with the IRS.

This is one of the reasons why minimum wage laws hurt the poor. As noble as creating a society that is intolerant of wage exploitation is, drafting laws that cover edge cases is at least as hard as doing software that does that. However, unlike software, failure to properly plan for edge cases like this means parties may be fined or jailed.

Re:It's the insanity of our tax and labor system (3, Insightful)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326647)

I'm not sure you are arguing that this is minimum wage laws hurting the poor. You're arguing that having to pay people at all is hurting them.

Minimum wage only means you have to pay the guy 10 bucks an hour, and not 2, for 3 days. (Or whatever the numbers are at this festival, minimum wage here is 10 bucks an hour). But if you could pay 2 bucks an hour they'd still have all of the other employment questions that have to be addressed (declaring it correctly to the revenue service).

To argue against the minimum wage you'd need to show how this business could run paying their people less than minimum wage, but can't manage at minimum wage, and then how those people would still be able to live at the price they can pay. When you're on a donation system though (even if the preferred price is 2 dollars for 15 minutes) you don't really know what the viable revenue stream is, and, in this case, because it's for a 3 day festival with the 'proceeds to charity' you can charge a ridiculously large amount of money, but you still have no idea how much take you'll have. It sounds like this is being run as a charity thing because well, it is. 3 days of work isn't going to be enough to meaningfully help someone out of a homeless shelter, no matter how much you pay them. But a few hundred or a few thousand bucks to the homeless shelter can help a lot of people for a lot more than 3 days.

Makes perfect sense (1)

QuincyDurant (943157) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326971)

Using humans as high-tech signboards makes perfect sense to those who prize wealth above all else. But why stop there? Let's chain them to garbage cans and charge pedestrians a dime apiece to throw away their hamburger wrappers. Or, better still, have an auction for the rights to run and maintain the concrete under sidewalk.

Wifi should cost the same as a library card. But Verizon pay its CEO $37.5 million a year to make sure that it doesn't.
http://www.forbes.com/lists/2011/12/ceo-compensation-11_Ivan-G-Seidenberg_NBWH.html [forbes.com]

.

I saw my hotspot on the road cross today. (1)

dslmodem (733085) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326187)

OK, it is quite a dumb idea. Do they carry batteries?

Re:I saw my hotspot on the road cross today. (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326213)

Most likely, yes. Homeless are people used to fairly rugged environment, and lugging a few kilos of Li-ion on their backs isn't going to be much of a problem.

trade for a bottle? (1, Insightful)

neurocutie (677249) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326215)

And why wouldnt these homeless folk try to immediately cash in, sell or trade the hotspot device for money or a nice bottle? They are $100+ devices, nevermind 4g service for a day or so.

Re:trade for a bottle? (5, Insightful)

stating_the_obvious (1340413) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326251)

All homeless people are criminals? Part of this program is about raising awareness -- and clearly you could use some awareness raising....

Re:trade for a bottle? (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326585)

All GP seemed to imply is that there is a high chance at least some of those people would be willing to sell the equipment.

I dont think he said that all homeless people are criminals.

Oh please (3, Insightful)

unassimilatible (225662) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326599)

Raising awareness? Maybe we should all wear ribbons? Puh-leese. Last time I checked, homeless people are self-evident and don't need their awareness raised. If anything, I'm a little too aware of them when I enter my local grocery store. Yes, people are homeless often because they cannot follow rules, whether criminal or otherwise. A huge number of them are addicts, and most shelters have rules about sobriety. That's a major reason why many still live on the streets - they'd rather imbibe than have a roof over their heads.

So hell yes it's a legitimate question that they might keep the money or pawn the device. Anything else is political correctness, just as is the term "raising awareness."

Re:Oh please (2)

LordKaT (619540) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326681)

There are a lot more people who are homeless who aren't begging for spare change at your local grocery store than you seem to be aware of. Many of these people actually still have some dignity left to seek out help at a homeless shelter, and to bust their asses to find paying work instead of turning to bumming.

You just don't notice them because they use whatever spare money they can muster up to buy a gym membership and shower there.

Re:Oh please (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326983)

Dude, *I* was homeless for 6 months, so let's not go down that road.
Luckily I had people I could rely on to keep things sane, but most people don't that are in that position.

Re:trade for a bottle? (5, Insightful)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326259)

maybe because you're making the unfounded assumption that homeless == dishonest.

Re:trade for a bottle? (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326587)

You seem to be making the more invalid assumption that they are all honest, which is a good way to lose all of your start-up capital.

Re:trade for a bottle? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326687)

He could be making the (more accurate than not) assumption that human == dishonest, and recognizing that there are less power structures in place to encourage the homeless to behave honestly (or at least conceal their dishonesty), since they're pretty much screwed either way.

Re:trade for a bottle? (0)

philpalm (952191) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326315)

Some might trade, but the homeless person will find it hard to escape. Homeless folks are limited to where to escape. Police love to improve their arrest record.

Re:trade for a bottle? (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326457)

Some might trade, but the homeless person will find it hard to escape. Homeless folks are limited to where to escape. Police love to improve their arrest record.

In this case, police may be more likely to leave the homeless person alone. Ostensibly, the project has worked with the police and city government to explain the details and the roles of the individuals. Education of the police will prevent such activities. Unfortunately, the police do have a sordid history of "kicking" the homeless while they are down but this can be avoided if the project involved in the outreach educates all facets of society to make this a success.

Re:trade for a bottle? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326787)

Police love to improve their arrest record.

Yeah but homeless people are smelly and need new clothes. It's much easier to arrest a young clean cut suburban dude for posession or some other minor crime than a homeless person. Yuck!

Re:trade for a bottle? (2)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326429)

And why wouldnt these homeless folk try to immediately cash in, sell or trade the hotspot device for money or a nice bottle? They are $100+ devices, nevermind 4g service for a day or so.

There may be a few that engage in this kind of behavior but I'll wager that most will be honest because they are given a ray of hope in a hopeless situation. Rather than just recieving money, they are given a personal stake in their own rise out of poverty and homelessness. When an individual is given the opportunity to not only rise out of the misery of homelessness but have a stake in their own success, said individual is likely to exhibit quite a bit of integrity.

Not a bad idea (4, Insightful)

cwgmpls (853876) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326219)

It's basically an updated version of the street newspapers that homeless people have been selling for decades. Micro-business like this can be the first step and getting out of poverty.

Re:Not a bad idea (2)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326323)

Exactly .. that was the first thought that I had. It seems that various people in the process of submitting this story don't have a clue of how successful such schemes can be.

Re:Not a bad idea (4, Interesting)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326397)

It's basically an updated version of the street newspapers that homeless people have been selling for decades. Micro-business like this can be the first step and getting out of poverty.

This is actually an excellent idea! It could be even better if it were implemented in such a way that the homeless person could eventually become their own independent business owner. It is news like this that we need to hear more often and it is very uplifting to read on a Monday morning. What if the homeless person could eventually raise enough money to buy the device and a kind of franchise right to do business as x? I disagree with using the term charity here. Charity is simply a free gift without any commitment in return. Ideas like these encourage commitment and integrity which the homless person needs to exhibit! The next step is to let them earn the money to purchase the device and become an independent business owner. This can also spur other forms of creativity on the part of the people vending the service like ways to power the devices and maybe design a rolling portable table where people can sit down for a bit. The possibilities are many

Ah yes, (-1, Troll)

MitchDev (2526834) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326231)

"So Mr. Smelly homeless person offering 4G, do you take Via, Master Card, or American Express? It's not like I carry cash around you folk."

Re:Ah yes, (2, Informative)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326285)

Most likely they take the money through a browser at the time of login.

At least that's the way I would do it.

(and IF this is sarcasm then you're right on that the first thing the right-winger would say is "smelly," and if you ARE a right-winger then you sure showed your true colors)

Re:Ah yes, (3, Interesting)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326621)

You get modded informative for an incorrect, stereotypical, insulting generalization of "right-wingers"?

I suppose I should be kicked out of the party for actually caring about homeless people. I imagine all those other evangelical charities, missions, etc should as well, since clearly they all view homeless people as rubbish.

Re:Ah yes, (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327049)

Churches and political affiliation has no (true) connection. Actually, in some cases churches do actions that are oddly "left-wing" or as some "right-wing" call it, socialist commie bullshit.

Re:Ah yes, (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326311)

It's the CC company that takes the hit, albeit there's a minor hastle with canceling your credit card and getting a new one.

You *do* have a throw-away CC, don't you. One you use for internet and other dodgy enterprises, not the one that is only used at reputable establishments. You can ask the CC company to put just about any name on a 2nd card.

Re:Ah yes, (1)

philpalm (952191) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326371)

Smelly? They screen out the ones smelly. Are all homeless smelly? A lot of them use public bathrooms. Also you can stay downwind of them.

Give a man a a fish (4, Funny)

srussia (884021) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326473)

"So Mr. Smelly homeless person offering 4G, do you take Via, Master Card, or American Express? It's not like I carry cash around you folk."

As the saying goes:"Give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. Teach a man to phish, and he'll clean out your bank account. "

I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (4, Insightful)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326253)

Giving jobs to those people in need instead of just some spare change is exactly the thing that can help them.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

StoutFiles (2471680) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326331)

Because when you talk to them about the 4G hotspot they will no doubt ask you for spare change, especially if you can afford a 4G device.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (2)

characterZer0 (138196) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326513)

So what? If you have some spare change, give it to him. If you do not, tell him you do not.

Or do we have a class system wherein people of your type should not have to encounter, acknoweldge the existence of, interact with, or - heaven forbid - directly help out of your ubundance people of lower classes? God made them poor, they should know their place.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

slater.jay (1839748) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326659)

Religious practice by itself is associated with $1,388 more given per year than we would expect to see from a secular person (with the same political views, income, education, age, race, and other characteristics), as well as with 6.5 more occasions of volunteering.

And the source [hoover.org].

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

slater.jay (1839748) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326721)

And let's head off the criticism that's no doubt coming:

Religious people are more generous than secular people with nonreligious causes as well as with religious ones. While 68 percent of the total population gives (and 51 percent volunteers) to nonreligious causes each year, religious people are 10 points more likely to give to these causes than secularists (71 percent to 61 percent) and 21 points more likely to volunteer (60 percent to 39 percent). For example, religious people are 7 points more likely than secularists to volunteer for neighborhood and civic groups, 20 points more likely to volunteer to help the poor or elderly, and 26 points more likely to volunteer for school or youth programs. It seems fair to say that religion engenders charity in general — including nonreligious charity.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326891)

And how many more times likely is a religious person to murder multiple people than an atheist?

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (4, Insightful)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326691)

Giving change I think is the WRONG sort of help. There are homeless people Im sure who would use the money well, but it seems like a self defeating proposition, not to mention dangerous:

* the more successful panhandling is, the more dishonest panhandlers there will be
* it cannot be ignored that there are many homeless people who are homeless because of drugs; in that case you would only be worsening the problem
* it could well be an attempt to get you to pull out your wallet for a quick mugging (they might not even be homeless)

If you want to help someone in a real, immediate way, and you are in a city, theres a good chance there is a diner or fast food place nearby. Invite them to lunch, get some coffee, whatever. This will address a real need, and it will be a heck of a lot safer (as youre in a highly visible place). If you have the time, sit and chat with them, as it may have been some time since someone actually talked with them.

Throwing money at them seems like a lazy, counterproductive way to address the issue.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

StoutFiles (2471680) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326993)

This has nothing to do with class structure or religion, I would just prefer not to be asked for money. I also have never read any stories where the homeless have risen out of poverty due to spare change. That money is mostly used for drugs/alcohol.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326349)

Tapping an untapped work force

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326357)

Because people would have to confront homelessness instead of focusing on the important issues like who's going to win Survivor or American Idol.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

philpalm (952191) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326387)

Passing out fliers and corner advertising, loophole to hire less than minimum wage? Repub(s) claim trickle down economics. Are they putting their money where their mouth is?

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326811)

Are you? You seem to sling names around and bash others. Before you do that, do you buy from dudes on the corner selling a paper? How about would you use this system they are talking about?

As a 'repub' I would say someone is breaking the law if they are not paying their people correctly. This is like having an 'intern' then working them 80 hours and say 'thanks for your time'. It is not right. Never was. To blame 'repubs' for this is disingenuous. Try calling them out for what they are cheapskates who do not pay their people.

Re:I fail to see why this would be a bad thing (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326645)

But this isn't a job, as all the money appears to be "donated" to the homeless shelter.

Now that might seem like an ok deal for the "worker"/slave, as they help to ensure that there will be a place to sleep with warm food, until you consider that they can be kicked out at any time with nothing to show for their effort.

Basically, this is micro-Communism. Fuck that, pay them a wage, or let them keep a portion of the money earned for their labors.

More info.. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326321)

Suggest you guys check out the actual blog post, answers a lot of the questions asked.

http://bbh-labs.com/homeless-hotspots-a-charitable-experiment-at-sxswi

Exploitation (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326353)

This is the most exploitative, ignorant, inhuman scheme I've ever heard of.

He is not a wifi hotspot. He is not a thing. He's not something for you to graffiti-tag to market your shitty pay-per-use wifi. He is a human being, and entitled to dignity.

If you're interested in helping, do so. Don't come up with some bullshit scheme to allow you to profit at the same time as you pretend to be helping.

Hey I plan too! Let's use battered women as sparring partners! We'll partner with Golds Gym, give them a t-shirt that says "I'm used to it!". We'll make a fortune off of all the misogynist muscleheads who hang out there. Then give the proceeds to, oh I dont know. We'll make up some "dont beat women" charity or something, make ourselves directors.

Re:Exploitation (2)

bickerdyke (670000) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326563)

Just to play devil's advocate:

A "hotspot" is not a thing. It's a description for service provided (usually by an access point/ router combo). Or rather the place where you can get that service. It's similar to "I am Jon and I'll be your waiter for tonight."

Re:Exploitation (5, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326851)

This is the most exploitative, ignorant, inhuman scheme I've ever heard of.

Clearly you haven't travelled much or read any history.

Re:Exploitation (1)

PGGreens (1699764) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327021)

If you notice in the video, his shirt says, "I'm Clarence, a 4G hotspot." So, if it makes it any better, he is at least 4G hotspot with a name.

I AM A 4G HOTSPOT (5, Funny)

eltonito (910528) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326355)

For some strange reason, I really want one of those T-shirts.

Re:I AM A 4G HOTSPOT (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326461)

Can I touch your 4G hot spot?

Re:I AM A 4G HOTSPOT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326557)

Is 4G actually the real honest name of a piece of technology, or is it a silly attempt at marketing thru bigger numbers? Kinda like how some music players call themselves MP7 (or 8, or 9) players.

Yeah, or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326375)

Alternatively, punch them in the face and steal their device.

I have a feeling.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326383)

There will be a sharp increase in the mugging of homeless people

This will eliminate homelessness. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326395)

Once all the homeless people are put in jail for the torrents that were shared on their hotspots, they won't be homeless anymore!

Just put the hotspot at the corner liquor store (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326405)

Becuase that is right where the homeless guy is headed once you hand him some cash.

oh hey they are homeless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326417)

and when people start mugging the homeless, what then?

What we really need (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326425)

Is to give those jobs to people who aren't homeless but merely out of work. Unemployment is crazy these days and I'm sure lots of not-bums wouldn't mind doing this for a little extra cash.

Actually, what we should probably do is bring back indentured servitude for homeless or unemployed people, and introduce slavery for people who are in prison for serious crimes. "Got a life sentence for raping and killing 19 little girls? Enjoy working in the plantation/factory/sewers forever, buddy." It would certainly solve the issue of people outsourcing jobs to other countries because the labor is cheaper...

Hidden agenda (4, Funny)

dmesg0 (1342071) | more than 2 years ago | (#39326445)

The wireless antennas will be placed near the reproductive organs and work at full power on as many channels as possible. All that in order to decrease the future homeless population.

Re:Hidden agenda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326511)

We need to do that with all people.

Re:Hidden agenda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326607)

The wireless antennas will be placed near the reproductive organs and work at full power on as many channels as possible. All that in order to decrease the future homeless population.

Actually, I CAN imagine overpaid, privileged CEOs and airheaded marketing teams thinking "homelessness" is a genetic infection...

"I am not a wifi hotspot" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326533)

"I am a wifi hotspot" probably qualifies as a demotion from "human being." I suppose it's not as bad as paying the homeless to fight, but it's hardly a charitable sentiment.

shits should say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326785)

I a'm homeless have cash and telecom equipment on me.

I a'm unarmed as well.

if I fight back they will fire me.

I'm all in (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39326893)

Exploiting the homeless sounds good to me! We Evil Capitalists are all about exploiting the poor. In fact we would prefer that everyone be poor. It's much easier to get rich off poor people. And how you might wonder do we get so stinking rich off people who have no money? The answer is simple my friend. VOLUME!

This message sponsored by First CityWide Change Bank. All we do is make change.

I don't see a problem with this. (5, Funny)

tehlinux (896034) | more than 2 years ago | (#39327041)

I know when I'm on the lookout for wifi, the first place I want to bring my laptop is in an alley full of homeless people!
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