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TVShack Creator's US Extradition Approved

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the send-them-a-link-to-his-picture dept.

Piracy 253

chrb writes "British student Richard O'Dwyer, creator of the TVShack website, has had his extradition to the United States approved by Conservative Home Secretary Theresa May. Mr. O'Dwyer now has 14 days to appeal the decision. The extradition was requested by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which has accused O'Dwyer of aiding copyright infringement by publishing links to pirated content hosted on external sites."

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253 comments

Sigh... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343547)

I'm more afraid of the US government than I am of any terrorists.

WTF (4, Interesting)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343659)

The problem is the UK government.

Extradited for copyright infringement? Looks like both governments are "pwned". I know, lets make them bigger, that'll solve the problem.

Re:WTF (3, Insightful)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343727)

Both governments got pwned by industry and it is a sorry shame!

Re:WTF (3, Insightful)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344195)

The voters got pwned. Vote them out! Oh no, we can't, there's support/oppose religion, education, abortion, etc., so I can't throw my vote away on some guy who believes in what I believe because then the "other party" will get in, and they don't agree with some diversive issue!

Re:WTF (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344913)

>>>I can't throw my vote away on some guy who believes in what I believe because then the "other party" will get in, and they don't agree with some diversive issue!

I'm facing that now with the U.S. election. I've told people I refuse to vote for Romney, and getting a lot of flack for it "because we can't let the Democrat Obama back in". Really? But Romney is barely any different than Obama.

I'll vote for the best guy (Paul), and if he fails to get the R nomination, then I'll just stay home cause I honestly don't give a frak if either Obama or Romney wins. It's not really a change, is it?

Re:WTF (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39345163)

Same problem here in QLD for our coming state elections...

Labor: Incompetent, corrupt, and tired.
LNP (Liberals & Nationals): Insane and corrupt
Australia Party: Bigots
Greens: All of the above

I'm forced to vote greens on the basis that they're probably the most balanced (having qualities from all the other parties) and least offensive.
Not voting for anyone I want supporting any policies I want because every party has conflicting policies.

BTW, has anyone even seen the left wing of politics in australia recently? Is there still a left wing? it all feels pretty right with a varying amount of authoritarian and nannying.

Labor representative stopped me on my push bike to tell me a vote for him is a vote for 100 more carparks at my local train station, my response was to take off my helmet and say I'd vote for him if he could cut the travel time in half (1.2 hrs to go 60km) so I didn't have to get up at 5 am to go to work.

Re:WTF (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344273)

When you elect people who's only concern is for the "free market", why would you expect them to act against the wishes of their corporate masters? The problem here has nothing to do with "big government", indeed that stereotype plays right into the hands of the libertardians who brought us this ridiculous travesty.

Re:WTF (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344335)

The only possible interpretation of "big government" is "stuff I don't like".

Re:Sigh... (5, Insightful)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343711)

These days there appears to be very little difference between the US Government and The Terrorists. The US Government just puts everyone in fear of even the remotest possibility of copyright infringement. I remember when that wasn't criminal but a civil offense. America cannot really call itself "The Land of the Free" anymore.

Re:Sigh... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344049)

America cannot really call itself "The Land of the Free" anymore.

Damn right. "Land of the free" was released in 2012 and is copyrighted. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1988690/ [imdb.com]
  You will go to jail, pirate.

Re:Sigh... (5, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344393)

The more you outlaw, the less meaning your laws have. More laws never created more justice. Just more criminals.

And if there's no way to avoid being a criminal... well, why bother trying?

Re:Sigh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344383)

the difference is 'legality'

the government cloaks itself with the guise of legitimacy and legality

Re:Sigh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344813)

They're alot freer inside their borders than we are from them outside their borders.

Re:Sigh... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343977)

"Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which has accused O'Dwyer of aiding copyright infringement by publishing links to pirated content hosted on external sites."

Kind of like me pointing to a naked woman in the street and saying "look". She gets arrested for indecent exposure and I get arrested for pointing to it.

Re:Sigh... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344677)

Well, more realistically it's like you telling somebody where to go to find a dealer to buy kilos of cocaine, and then going down with them all when they get busted, but still it's a little much for copyright infringement

Re:Sigh... (4, Insightful)

Robadob (1800074) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344739)

I better metaphor would probably be, holding a sign pointing to a shop that was left unlocked at night. Those who took notice of the sign and stole from the shop would be committing the offence, however you would probably be seen as inciting theft.

Re:Sigh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344997)

From what I understand, the links werent even posted by the man himself...

So it's like selling wood made for signage, and some people posting signs to the shop using your wood... and you get in trouble.

Re:Sigh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39345161)

A better metaphor would probably be, holding a sign pointing to a shop that was selling illegal copies of protected content. Those who took notice of the sign (say, RIAA and/or the government) ought, instead of punishing the linker (who did not actually commit any theft), to appreciate the fact that they make it easier to find/track those who are ACTUALLY committing the theft.

Re:Sigh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344047)

I'm more afraid of the US government than I am of any terrorists.

Yep. The only person I've heard of who has beaten an extradition case against the US is Sean Garland. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Sigh... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344551)

Nice. An actual terrorist (well, former terrorist, but these days...), and they accept the verdict of the Irish courts. But you watch their TV without permission, by God they'll tear down the rule of law and rip up their own constitution, and yours if that's what it takes, to bring you in.

Re:Sigh... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344433)

Makes sense.

Compare the amount of lives destroyed by terrorists in, say, the last two decades and compare it to the amount of lives destroyed by the US government and realize what's the bigger threat you're facing.

Re:Sigh... (1)

freman (843586) | more than 2 years ago | (#39345073)

There are infinitely worse things in the world than copying content... in fact, almost everything you can possibly do to another human being is worse than this... yet we don't see this sort of pursuit of people smugglers, priests, or pedophiles.

The Nazis are laughing ... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343571)

The UK is a more perfect fascist state than anything Germany could have created.

USA! USA! (4, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343577)

Way to go big boys! Extradite a harmless college kid who might be doing something moderately illegal but who's transgressions don't amount for a hill of beans, all things considered.

Leave those nice bankers and upstanding Wall Street financiers to ruin the economy with nothing more than an indignant letter and a small fine.

Yep, leaders of the free world we are.

Why should it be otherwise? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343673)

The rich rule. The rich have always ruled, and always will rule.

When some non-rich punk does something that pisses the rulers off, expect punishment.

"Justice" is just a fancy word the rich use to get the poor to buy in to their rulership. There is no reason to be surprised when any real sort of justice is sacrificed for the sake of enforcement of the Highest Law (the rich are entitled to wealth).

Something that is important to point out: competence and popular approval have *no bearing whatsoever* on actual power. All that matters is wealth.

Re:Why should it be otherwise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344671)

The rich rule. The rich have always ruled, and always will rule.

When some non-rich punk does something that pisses the rulers off, expect punishment.

"Justice" is just a fancy word the rich use to get the poor to buy in to their rulership. There is no reason to be surprised when any real sort of justice is sacrificed for the sake of enforcement of the Highest Law (the rich are entitled to wealth).

Something that is important to point out: competence and popular approval have *no bearing whatsoever* on actual power. All that matters is wealth.

No. You see, the United States' "Constitutional Republic" form of government was set up in such a way that prevented this from happening, at least as much as possible. The US really was designed to be a nation of laws, not of men.
 
However, this angered the richest elites of the globe so badly, that they have spent the last 200-odd years infiltrating our positions of power and weakening our Constitutional protections to the point where we have once again arrived at a place and time where the rich rule, everyone else is a serf, and there isn't a goddamned thing we're going to say about it because here in the new United States, we are all slaves.
 
And we do not wish to anger our slavemasters with any talk of our inalienable rights, Constitutions, or any basic freedoms, lest we be branded as dangerous extremists and thrown into a jail or worse, left unemployed with a stigma attached to us.
 
But, no. These kinds of abuses of power by the rich are exactly the kind of thing the United States government was designed to protect against. With liberty, and justice for ALL. It's our fault for letting them remove them from us so easily. It would take a little more than a scripted, spectacular, nationally televised, controlled demolition of two buildings that had failing foundations anyway which would cause them to be unusable in the near future anyway to get me to just hand over my rights to foreign interests.
 
But hey, Real Americans (tm). Suit yourselves.

Re:Why should it be otherwise? (1)

gottspeed (2060872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39345087)

As long as people register their biological property with the state upon birth they have no rights, just privileges afforded to them by the state. You get what you settle for.

Re:USA! USA! (3, Funny)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343733)

Way to go big boys! Extradite a harmless college kid who might be doing something moderately illegal but who's transgressions don't amount for a hill of beans, all things considered.

Leave those nice bankers and upstanding Wall Street financiers to ruin the economy with nothing more than an indignant letter and a small fine.

Yep, leaders of the free world we are.

You dirty, diseased hippie! Do you not understand the ineffable majesty of the free market? Behold! Mammon hath spoken and lo, the government has acceded to its demand. In my father's house there are many rooms but you have to pay your way if you want to stay. The bankstas have bought their way into heaven, as hath been shewn to be just in the Gospel of Wealth.

Blessed are the rich: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are those who own: for to those who hath much, more shall be given.
Fuck the meek: for they shall inherit shit.
Fuck those who hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be mulch in the flowerbeds of the wealthy.
Blessed are the powerful: for they shall gain more power.
Blessed are the pure of avarice: for they shall take more than they are owed.
Blessed are the warmakers: for they shall make bank on both sides of the conflict.
Blessed are those who persecute: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Re:USA! USA! (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344035)

>>>Do you not understand the ineffable majesty of the free market?

Funny. But not true. Private profits and socialized losses (taxpayer bailouts of failing companies) is NOT in any way a free market. In fact it's a centralized economy with the private cartel known as the Federal Reserve Banks pulling the strings for the corporations it serves (not the american people). And Presidents Bush/Obama/Romney and the Secretary of Treasury were/are/will be happily cooperating with the transfer of wealth from our wallets to the Fed's gang of corporates.

NOT a free market. Not even close
.

Re:USA! USA! (2)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344213)

Abolition of the reserve would make the problem worse, not better.

Re:USA! USA! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344423)

Pray tell do elaborate...

Re:USA! USA! (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39345009)

Prior to the Fed there were 50 State banks. The spreading of the power made it very difficult for corporations to bribe and control. More importantly: These banks did not have the power to print money (and thereby destroy our savings). There's a reason why the dollar lost 97% of its value since the Fed's creation, but lost none prior to its existence. We were better-off before the Fed existed with its loose and irresponsible fiscal policies.

Re:USA! USA! (2)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344421)

That is a pretty good description of the policies the religious right have hitched their wagons to for some reason.

Re:USA! USA! (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343899)

Yep, leaders of the free world we are.

Yes, well... we're free in the same way china is a democracy: It's in the name, it's not what we do. In the "land of the free", everything needs to have an owner and a price. There is no public and there is no free; Even your rights can be sold. Just sign here on the dotted line and we'll give you 15% off on your car insurance.

Re:USA! USA! (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343981)

Leave those nice bankers and upstanding Wall Street financiers to ruin the economy with nothing more than an indignant letter and a small fine.

Time to get your optics checked? Most heavily regulated industries in the world and they're the cause of all that's wrong. Oookay then.

Re:USA! USA! (5, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344443)

And all was sorta OK until the regulations were relaxed. NOT a coincidence.

Uh huh.. right. (4, Insightful)

Sri Ramkrishna (1856) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343585)

What's wrong with the U.K laws on copyright infringement that a U.K. citizen needs to be shipped to a foreign country to face this kind of stuff? I don't remember any U.S. citizens getting shipped to some other country for this?

Re:Uh huh.. right. (5, Interesting)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343737)

It does seem odd I agree.

The UK a year or so back signed a bizarre extradition treaty with the US a year or two back that allowed exactly this kind of thing.

US really does want to police the world... and tax the world too- and the two things (tax, extradition) and probably linked. US expects citizens to pay taxes to the US government... even if they don't live there. If you live in Denmark, for example, but are a US citizen- the US expects you to pay income taxes to them as well as Denmark. (they have treaties with many countries which mean lower-paid paid people don't get double-taxed- it's mainly the rich they're trying to get).

And... get this... if you renounce your citizenship- you can still be extradited for tax evasion because they can change you with renouncing your citizenship to avoid paying taxes.

The next step of course is the US will start granting citizenship to random rich foreigners (who didn't ask for it) to get income tax from them.

Re:Uh huh.. right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344349)

The US doesn't really expect its shitizens to pay tax, at least not if they are really wealthy and live in California.

One wonders and hopes, really hopes, that the US will fragment into lots of little countries and give the thesis embodied in "Ectopia Emerging" a chance. Plus the lower states could be handed to Mexico and Florida handed to Cuba (so that Castro gets his criminals back).

Re:Uh huh.. right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344793)

shitizens

Oh, has "sheeple" finally been replaced as the universal signal for "I am a retarded teenager?"

Re:Uh huh.. right. (1)

DickBreath (207180) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344327)

My understanding is that what he did was legal in his own country. It was only illegal in the US. Therefore, he gets extradited to a foreign country.

I wonder. Would the UK extradite someone to Iran for some horrible crime, say, like looking at a non-nude picture of two shirtless guys kissing? (Or girls, if you are into that sort of thing.)

Re:Uh huh.. right. (1)

MisterSquid (231834) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344807)

My understanding is that what he did was legal in his own country. It was only illegal in the US. Therefore, he gets extradited to a foreign country.

That's just it. My understanding is that it is NOT illegal in the US to link to copyright-infringing websites. Can someone who RTFA'd provide some clarity?

Re:Uh huh.. right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39345001)

If Brits can be extradited to USA for copyright infringement at home, surely Americans can be extradited to Saudi Arabia for drinking beer at home? After all, it's all just the rule of law, right?

Welcome to media nazi america! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343587)

There's really not much more to say.

Other than to wonder why the fuck all these other countries are bending over like our bitch. At the rate we're going you won't be getting much out of america in exchange for your citizens rights.

Re:Welcome to media nazi america! (1)

j35ter (895427) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344469)

Because you guys are bullies and your "diplomatic missions" all over the world engage in "lobbying" for the interests of the US ... not choosing their methods. And that is exactly why you have "terrorists" going after US interests. Sorry to say that but the "terrorists" are the freedom fighters and the USofA is the evil empire :)

Is the US finally going too far? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343589)

Going after sites that are not even registered in the US? Going after kids that aren't US citizens? Sure there are laws. That doesn't mean those laws are correct or right.

well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343609)

Well what do you expect, only days before the great Dave is going "Round the World" for a close lick of the Presidential orifice, who knows what he wants from the USA, I guess the UK will be paying for it for years.

Re:well (2)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343939)

Tony did so much, particularly in his willingness to have UK citizens and guests handed over to the US with evidence that wouldn't even allow a UK prosecution. Dave, here are some options:

1) Fuck the need to even have a court decide - just send the U.S. a weekly list of everyone in the UK. The U.S. can tick the names they'd like, and the UK will helpfully ship them over with a minimum of fuss.

2) More military blank cheques! It's a been a while since Tony went all Lord of The Rings when he promised to follow George to "whatever end" - let's do this again. Just place the entire British armed forces under Obama's control.

Dave, you may feel tempted to ask for something in return - DON'T! It'd be terribly rude to expect something in return, and what would the Americans think of us?

And again I ask: (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343631)

Why isn't the U.S. on the Enemies of the Internet 'under surveillance' list? Russia and Australia and the UK are there, but the U.S. isn't? It makes no logical sense.

Re:And again I ask: (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343765)

Thanks to the wonders of outsourcing they don't torture people directly anymore and the guards in Gitmo need something to do anyway.

One more terrorist down (2)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343677)

This will teach you to launch a suicide attack on our entertainment industry, you monster!

Extradition? (4, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343689)

For posting a bunch of links, he is being extradited? Well, I guess that is what happens when politicians accept bribes from the copyright lobby...

Extrajudicial law (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343725)

So, what this guy did is not a crime in the UK, but because it is in the US he is being sent to stand trial there. Basically, UK citizens are subject to US law (albeit it can only be selectively applied).

Something to worry about for everyone in a country that has an extradition treaty with US.

Re:Extrajudicial law (4, Funny)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343943)

So basically it's like the 1760s (Americans were taxed and arrested by laws of a UK parliament they never elected), except now it's operating in reverse.

Re:Extrajudicial law (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344233)

So, what this guy did is not a crime in the UK, but because it is in the US he is being sent to stand trial there. Basically, UK citizens are subject to US law (albeit it can only be selectively applied).

As far as I am aware, it may well have been a crime in the UK. Copyright infringement is a crime in the UK and encouraging the commission of a crime is also a crime. It is hard to see what the supposed purpose of TVShack was if it wasn't to encourage its users to download copyright TV shows from the external links without the appropriate license.

There is also the fact that the majority of copyright owners whose rights were being ignored were US corporations, and were obviously so, would seem to give some degree of connection to the US sufficient to justify a US trial.

Do I like current copyright laws? No. But I am not going to pretend they don't exist...

Re:Extrajudicial law (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344801)

It is hard to see what the supposed purpose of TVShack was if it wasn't to encourage its users to download copyright TV shows from the external links without the appropriate license.

The same could be said about all hyperlinks, save the TV part. Never have I obtained a license to provide or follow a link, despite the majority of all links being to copyrighted material.

BULLSHIT! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343735)

ACTA has not been ratified by the US Congress so it's not legal here, and as far as I know it is not yt legal there, so why are the dumbass cops and judges going along with it?

Additionally, providing links to stuff, is not excuse for prosicuting them.

Everybody remember this. DEMAND A TRIAL BY JURY. that in itself can be a denial of service attack, but don't mention that part.

Wow, what a crock (4, Interesting)

dirk (87083) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343743)

His extradition is definitely a crock. If what he did is not a crime under UK law, then it shouldn't matter if it is under US law. I'm sure many things I do are crimes in other countries, but if they asked the US to extradite me they would be laughed at. The internet is an international entity (will more specifically, it is non-national). If someone does something on the internet that is legal in their country, then that is all that matters. If someone from your country accesses it and they shouldn't, deal with the people who fall under your laws.

As for what he actually did, I am torn on it. He obviously did not actively violate copyright since he just linked. But I think he definitely wasn't in the right either, as he was actively making money off of piracy. To take a real world example, if I set up a business that tracked drug dealers and you could pay me 5 dollars to tell you exactly where the drug dealer was that had what you were looking for, I would definitely be prosecuted for aiding and abetting or conspiracy or something. I am not doing anything illegal, as I am not selling drugs, but I am certainly helping the people who are doing something illegal.

Re:Wow, what a crock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344113)

then it shouldn't matter if it is under US law. I'm sure many things I do are crimes in other countries,

Size matters!

Re:Wow, what a crock (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344735)

Regardless of UK legality, under no circumstances should a citizen of a sovereign nation be extradited and forced to stand-trial in a country in which the act did not take place. More simply, one should subject only to the laws of his land.

But not to worry: the population will not be made aware but instead be lulled into a stupor by X Factor and programmes of the like.

Re:Wow, what a crock (1)

gottspeed (2060872) | more than 2 years ago | (#39345157)

The reason this shit happens is that people themselves are sovereign at birth and they give it all up to the state to handle through citizenship. Investigate subrogation of rights.

So totally broken ... (4, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343757)

Speaking to BBC Newsbeat, Mr O'Dwyer said: "I've done nothing wrong under UK law, and, it's pretty ridiculous isn't it?

He didn't break any UK laws. But he can get extradited. That makes no sense. Never mind the fact that he never actually provided any copyrighted information, just links to it.

This is so horribly flawed, it isn't funny. Welcome to a world in which extraterritorial laws can be applied whenever someone wishes -- or, more accurately, when the government in question can exert enough pressure on your own. Which basically is the US.

Can't wait for Americans to be extradited to Iran or somewhere else for violating their laws ... because it would be hypocritical to deny the request now.

After all, if you can ask for the extradition of someone who didn't break any laws in their country, you can't deny to extradite your own people who broke the laws of another country. But, we won't see that.

Someone jumped the shark here, not sure if it was the UK or the US to be honest. I think both have set a horrible precedent.

Re:So totally broken ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344545)

Can't wait for Americans to be extradited to Iran or somewhere else for violating their laws ... because it would be hypocritical to deny the request now.

No it wouldn't, because the US doesn't have an extradition treaty with Iran.

This situation is bad enough as it is. Don't make it worse by crippling the sensible side with bullshit arguments like that.

Ugh (2, Interesting)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343773)

This really is shameful to say the least. When I heard about this kid months ago I thought, no way, the extradition won't happen. His life has already been turned upsidedown but surely common sense will prevail - but when? I was very wrong obviously. If the intention is to make an example of this guy, exactly what message does it really send? To me, all this really says is that those misguided persons whose job is to enforce copyright have lost all sense of proportion and basic human decency. Bastards.

Useful for Government Purposes (3)

KermodeBear (738243) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343787)

I don't understand why ANY government would want to take down these sites - even if they are in the pocket of Big Media.

Websites which simply link to content point you to the people providing the content, making it much easier to find the people committing the actual crime.

Why not let these sites stay up, let people run them, and just mine them for data?

Once all the providers of infringing content have been sued / arrested / whatever, the linking sites have nothing to link to, and they die out too.

Is my reasoning incorrect, or is it just too high a level of thinking for the government to handle?

Re:Useful for Government Purposes (1)

Killall -9 Bash (622952) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344177)

Why? Because police the world over are fucking lazy.

The site may be a library of copyright infringers, but try finding the person(s) responsible for the infringement.

Someone somewhere did a whois lookup for http://randomletters.cc/ [randomletters.cc] thought about it for a few seconds, then said "Fuck this, I have a quota to make, and I'm not going to make it chasing imaginary people with names I can't pronounce through countries with no extradition treaty."

Re:Useful for Government Purposes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344339)

I imagine the links were probably hosted in countries where the government actually cares about the concept of "sovereignty" over their own people, like Russia. You don't get extradited from Russia for assassinating someone with polonium, let alone posting information on the internet.

Hang the tourist in Gitmo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343841)

This man is obviously a tourist and he hates our freedoms! He will eat our children in their sleep lest we deport him to the freedom-loving peoples of North America where justice will be served! This tourist must suffer for his evil crimes against humanity! He is obviously an Al Yipee-kieeeeda tourist and should be hung by the neck until he is made dead! God bless North America and all who sail in her for taking this tourist off our hands and KILL HIM BY FIRE! He is the worst kind of tourist: a pedo tourist! Thank you Coalition Government for averting 9/12! You have my vote at the next general election!

Re:Hang the tourist in Gitmo! (2)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39343895)

This man is obviously a tourist and he hates our freedoms!

Do you mean Tourist or Terrorist? One is a destructive force that causes mass hysteria and panic.

The other doesn't carry a camera.

Re:Hang the tourist in Gitmo! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344597)

Dude, if you ever witnessed drunk Germans during their holidays, you know that these words can be used pretty much synonymously.

Re:Hang the tourist in Gitmo! (2)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344655)

Don't be too hard on him, the DHS can't seem to tell the difference anymore either.

Great for portraits too! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343919)

Posting anonymously so as not to karma whore off someone else's post, but since most people will never RTFA:

I can't wait for the yearbook photographer to come on campus to take some candid shots on campus...

Thats a poodle thing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39343953)

Only poodle countries send a native citizen overseas to be charged of something that only harmed a few pockets in other country. This treaty is the most stupid and anti-sovereign act Ive ever seen. Yes, thats why we call the UK the USs poodle...

If someone needs to be punished, it must be punished by its own people, not other country that thinks its the Roman Empire...

This is really astonishing..

Re:Thats a poodle thing... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344617)

Now, now, you give the Brits far too much credit. I couldn't think of any case where a Barbarian tribe handed over one of theirs to the Romans for trial.

His mother put it well. (4, Insightful)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344029)

On Tuesday his mother said: "Today, yet another British citizen is being sold down the river by the British Government.

Dear British government: Please grow a pair and tell the US to fuck off.

Easy Things are Good to Do? (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344057)

It's good the FBI, and Scotland Yard can do this. I hear the Taliban are bad bunch of dudes to go up against?

I predict he will be extradited (5, Insightful)

FeatherBoa (469218) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344105)

He will be charged with everything they can think of. Made up stuff, real stuff from jaywalking to treason.

He will be facing 300 years possible sentence if convicted of even half of it.

He will be facing a 5 years incarceration just waiting for a trial.

They will offer a plea deal: plead to being a bad boy and you can go home tomorrow, wear a radio on your ankle for a year and that's it.

He will do the deal.

The US will get a conviction, which they will trumpet from the rooftops. They will have a precedent that they covet, and anyone running any similar operation will pretty well have to stop it, lest they meet with a much worse fate.

The American's, no doubt, believe they are doing this fella a favour, since their first instinct was to scoop him up into a black helicopter, or even just nuke him remotely while he rides his bike to school.

Take it on the bright side (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344167)

If you're a God-loving, honest, and straight down to earth, hard-working, non-gay and non-commie/non-socialist man (a real man, not one of those metrosexual pervs) who likes to buy products very much, then you probably have nothing to fear. I guess.

How is this different? (3, Insightful)

Teppy (105859) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344191)

Fuck Allah! Can I now be extradited to Saudi Arabia for violating Sharia Law?

Re:How is this different? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344753)

There's no nice way to say this, but I''d suggest that you pack your tooth brush and some lubricant.

Where the bigots lead the sheep will follow.

Missing the big picture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344337)

I think people reall miss the big picture when it comes to copyright, in particular. People bemoan the RIAA/MPAA/etc. and th government trampling individual rights, the extension of copyright terms, legal protection for DRM, etc. (I share these concerns). Bit I think the big picture looks like this:

-Early in its history, America's economy was based in resource extraction.
-Later, it became a manufacturing powerhouse. But it was eclipsed.
-While that has brought some pain, the US economy thrived by being the leader in innovation. However, the US is in th process of being eclipsed here, as well.
-Where is the US still the indisputed leader? In the creation/export of CULTURE (e.g., entertainment). And regardless of individual freedoms, I believe the US will do everything possible to protect that 'industry'. Including many of the things that peopl around here believe to be so obscene.

I predict he will plead guilty. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344399)

He will serve considerable time in a US jail.

We will forget about him.

He will appear on morning TV in the UK a few days after his release.

Nobody will care because by the time he's free such extraditions will be a common occurance throughout the democratic developed world.

We made our bed, no point pissing and moaning now because nothing is going to unmake it without spilling blood. And we're far too preoccupied with our pathetic little lives to do anything other than bitch.

What bothers me most.. (1)

jwijnands (2313022) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344479)

Is that the chances of a fair trial after extradition are slim to none. Add to that the fact that conditions in a lot of American jails would qualify as cruel and unusual punishment in any West-European country... Distasteful affair again!

Where's the media? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344645)

Seriously, where're the tabloids that are usually latching on "scandalous" stories before they even hit the ground? Where's Sun's outcry about the scandalous hijacking of one of their finest young by a terror regime abroad?

Re:Where's the media? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344957)

All of the big media companies are in favor of these ridiculous copyright laws. You won't find many of them defending this kid.

Totally corrupt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39344657)

Both the US regime, and their UK puppet administration are now owned by corporate interests.
Clearly they have now overstepped the mark, and are not democratic governments. I hope the population will rise up, and overthrow these fascists.

Pinochet didn't get extradited (3, Insightful)

pinguwin (807635) | more than 2 years ago | (#39344989)

Some years back, the home secretary decided that pinochet wouldn't be extradited because he was...too sick, yeah, too sick. So someone who makes a few links gets extradited for something that isn't a crime in the UK and a mass murderer doesn't even though he murdered thousands. I'm ashamed of the U.S. If I were a UK citizen, I'd be ashamed too.
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