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195 comments

Crime solved when Police do their job, News at 11 (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39352907)

Wait, you mean investigating actual crimes leads to discovery of other, actual crimes?

SAY IT AIN'T SO

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (2, Funny)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353023)

Wait, you mean investigating actual crimes leads to discovery of other, actual crimes?

SAY IT AIN'T SO

I'm not sure theft of an ipad is really a "crime".. more like a "favor" in my opinion.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (3, Funny)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353097)

I'm not sure theft of an ipad is really a "crime".. more like a "favor" in my opinion.

No no, it is a crime. The damned Apple device sells like hot potatoes on eBay. Its theft represents big bucks lost !

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (3, Funny)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353991)

They sell hot potatoes on eBay? How do they stay hot until I get them? They must have some super high efficiency insulation to wrap them in!

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (4, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353225)

More to the point that Police should really put more effort into solving the small crimes. As it could lead them to going to the big ones.

Usually when someone is doing a big crime they will try very hard to cover up all their tracks. When they do a small one or probably more to the case someone else who is doing the small crime will make more mistakes. What probably happened was some dude who needed money for meth stole the iPad and then traded it for Meth to the dealer.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (1)

Brian Feldman (350) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353439)

Why would you assume that when you know the dealer* could have stolen it as well?

I think you probably meant broker or something.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (1)

peted56 (1842988) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353869)

The dealer had 35M of meth, would hardly be bothered with stealing something "worth" $50.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353659)

Or just trade up CIs.

Arrest someone for a petty crime.. give them a break for the name/evidence against a more serious criminal. Rinse and repeat. Druggie sells out his dealer, who sells out his supplier, who sells out someone else.. etc.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353667)

"Well, it IS white, overpriced, pushed heavily by dealers, and addictive to the point where criminal activity starts over it. But it weighs more than an iPad. Easy to get confused, boys. Let's head back to the station."

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353693)

They were investigating the missing iPad 3.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353043)

More shockingly, criminals (at least the ones who get caught) are not especially intelligent.

This kind of stuff seems quite popular here, as police need a metric tonne of evidence to investigate a possible grow op / drug operation .. you hear about police stumbling into grow ops while investigating other crimes more than you here about police directly investigating and finding them.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (5, Insightful)

Camaro (13996) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353185)

This is so true. I live near a major highway and hear all the time about major drug busts that occurred because less-than-intelligent traffickers got pulled over because of something stupid like speeding. They never seem to learn. If you're going to haul a metric shitload of dope across the country, make sure all your lights work and stay close to the speed limit!

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (0)

CubicleZombie (2590497) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353409)

And when they ask for permission to search, say "NO!"

My local newspaper lists arrests every week, and it always start out with a speeding stop, then drugs found during a consent search. Even if you're not guilty, who knows if the previous owner of your car didn't hide a joint somewhere and forget about it.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (1)

dave024 (1204956) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353581)

And hope the cop doesn't just lie on the report and say you consented to a search.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (3, Informative)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#39354071)

I'm sure that happens. But, I've refused to allow cops to search my vehicles, and so has my son. When I have refused, they threatened to bring a dog out to sniff my vehicle. The last time my son refused, they actually brought a dog out. The dog walked around the car three times, without alerting. The cop had the dog to "Sit" beside the driver's door, dog looked around for a few seconds, then slobbered on the door. "Ha, he's found something! That's what he does when he's alerting us!"

Bunch of losers found nothing of course - all they did was to waste their time, and the kid's time.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (2)

The Grassy Knoll (112931) | more than 2 years ago | (#39354019)

If you're going to haul a metric shitload of dope across the country, make sure all your lights work and stay close to the speed limit!

And make sure you don't get stuck in a tunnel [bbc.co.uk] !

.

Re:Crime solved when Police do their job, News at (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353351)

More shockingly, criminals (at least the ones who get caught) are not especially intelligent.

That's why they had the iPad in the first place

$35 Million Dollars (5, Funny)

Crasoose (1621969) | more than 2 years ago | (#39352909)

Even drug lords cannot afford the new insane iPad prices.

Re:$35 Million Dollars (2, Funny)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353187)

Buying overpriced, shiny toys posing as computers isn't normal...

. . . . . but on meth it is.

MAC: Not even once.

Re:$35 Million Dollars (1)

MarkvW (1037596) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353681)

That is one of the funniest posts I've read in a long time. Thanks!!

Re:$35 Million Dollars (3, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353255)

Someone else probably stole it and traded it for say $500 worth of drugs. Why take the hassle of waiting in the store when someone else will give it to you for cheap.

Re:$35 Million Dollars (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353595)

Actually, they probably traded it to the dealers for about 30 dollars worth of drugs. Usually when people buy or sell stolen goods in a straight up trade for drugs, they get 5-10% of the value.

Re:$35 Million Dollars (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353765)

Mod this up. This is no doubt exactly what happened. People transporting/stashing large amounts of drugs have very important reasons to keep a low profile and not engage in risky, petty crime. They also could afford to buy their own iPad.

They would have traded for much less than $500 worth though, most likely.

Re:$35 Million Dollars (1)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353973)

Yes, but people stashing 750 pounds of meth usually don't sell such small quantities. Especially not in exchange for stolen goods.

Re:$35 Million Dollars (3, Insightful)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353827)

Even drug lords cannot afford the new insane iPad prices.

The actual lesson is: Criminals are bloody stupid. If I had $35 million worth of drugs in a place, I would avoid doing anything that could get the police into my place. Like stealing an iPad. Or even picking one up that someone left on the train or bus.

But did they recover the iPad???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39352925)

?????

Re:But did they recover the iPad???? (2)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353071)

I'm no law technician, but sitcom knowledge tells me it'll probably now be evidence in an extremely lengthly legal case, and will be returned to the original owner later in the decade.

Find My Meth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39352933)

There's an app for that!

So the iPad (5, Funny)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 2 years ago | (#39352939)

Had found its way back to Apple HQ?

Re:So the iPad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353049)

Trolololo. Next tell us how Google is not evil and Microsoft and Apple are nothing but patent trolls selling products to hipsters. YOU SO FUNNAY!

Re:So the iPad (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353065)

More importantly, has the meth found its way back there?

Re:So the iPad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353215)

Coffee meets monitor. Well done.

Notable since most iPad users are on crack (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39352943)

Not even the A5+ is fast enough when you are tweaking,

Obligitory Apple-Troll Post (2)

PessimysticRaven (1864010) | more than 2 years ago | (#39352961)

Wait, so there's a drug that's MORE addictive and in-demand than something Apple produces? Who'dathunk?!

Re:Obligitory Apple-Troll Post (3, Insightful)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353079)

True, but the Apple addicts are more dangerous to confront.

Re:Obligitory Apple-Troll Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353639)

I guess they are. The police decided to bust the meth lab instead of recovering the iPad.

Depressing (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39352969)

Makes you wonder how much more of this stuff is out there. Meth is a bad, bad drug.

Re:Depressing (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353077)

Macroeconomics 101: Reducing the supply without reducing the demand does not change the quantity supplied, it only changes the price.

Re:Depressing (3, Informative)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353229)

Only if that demand is perfectly inelastic. In a more accurate model, the change in the price in turn changes demand: If meth costs more, fewer people will start using it.

Re:Depressing (3, Interesting)

bamwham (1211702) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353341)

Peolple who start using it is an increase to demand. The issue is what are the current users going to do if the price goes up. The addiction is strong enough that the "elastic demand-to-price" assumption is likely unreasonable. Addicts will find a way to pay the higher price, also note that this is a drug for which one can developa chemical dependency with one use. It breaks most of the economic models which were developed to study things like Sugar. It is much closer to the models that were developed to study Oil.

Re:Depressing (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353743)

It is much closer to the models that were developed to study Oil.

Except that you can't really produce oil in your basement following info found on the internet.

I suspect this will at most create a supply void that will quickly be filled by existing suppliers upping their production, and new suppliers entering a previously (one would assume) saturated market.

I guess it depends too on how much current suppliers keep in stock. That is, does the shortage hit right away, or is there a fairly long grace period for production to pick up. If the later, there might not be any change at all.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353343)

Demand for physically addictive drugs is pretty damn inelastic. Since we're being pedantic, in an even more accurate model, the change in price changes the supply as more firms enter the market and then the price goes back down. If meth costs more, more firms will start supplying it.

Re:Depressing (1)

CubicleZombie (2590497) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353519)

Drugs are the best example of inelastic demand.

I don't know about meth, but I do know that the price of cigarettes has no effect on how much I want one or how many I would consume. Anyone who's taken macroeconomics knows that cigarette taxes are entirely about revenue, not prevention. Addiction's a bitch.

Re:Depressing (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353517)

So? Crystal meth is an express elevator to hell. Humanity would have been better served if it never existed. I'm expressing my depression that it even exists.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353083)

It's great for law enforcement, keeps 'em busy.

Re:Depressing (2, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353095)

Meth is a bad, bad drug.

...which we prescribe to children...

http://www.rxlist.com/desoxyn-drug.htm [rxlist.com]

Re:Depressing (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353483)

Nope, RTFA, this is crystal meth.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353621)

Impurities aside, "crystal meth" is methamphetamine is desoxyn.

Re:Depressing (3, Informative)

SMoynihan (1647997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353715)

Crystal meth is Methamphetamine (pure, in a crystalline form).

Desoxyn is also Methamphetamine ((S)-N,-dimethylbenzeneethanamine hydrochloride).

No essential difference (apart from dose).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methamphetamine [wikipedia.org]

Re:Depressing (4, Informative)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353499)

I've been diagnosed with ADHD for the past 12 years or so. For the last 6, I've gone untreated. As an illustration of how screwed-up my body chemistry is, consider that I drink 4 cups of caffeinated coffee daily at work, primarily to reduce the jumpy focus. A short while (30-60 minutes) after my first cup, focusing on a single idea becomes much easier. I'll drink more to maintain that focus through the day. In the late afternoon, I'll sometimes switch to caffeinated soft drinks, mostly for taste. In the evenings, I'll have another caffeinated soft drink, to relax me for sleep. I'll often be happily unconscious by 11.

ADHD is weird. Stimulants (like caffeine and more potent drugs like methamphetamine) even out the brain chemistry, making people like me closer to normal. For myself, I spent much of my time in college training myself to focus, so the slight assistance of caffeine is all I usually need, but I'm a pretty mild case now. It doesn't surprise me at all that some people are prescribed methamphetamines to slow down.

Re:Depressing (4, Informative)

phoenix_rizzen (256998) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353941)

My sister has ADHD. When she was younger (under 12) we used to have to give her hot chocolate or even mochas before bed in order for her to fall asleep. You get some weird looks from people when you say that ("You give her caffeine so she can sleep?"). But it works.

It's strange how you have to give someone stimulants in order for the body to catch up to the brain, thus evening things out and allowing them to concentrate and "be normal".

She's now on Dexedrin and , both amphetamines, both stimulants, both used to relax/calm her down enough to get on with her day.

Yeah, ADHD is a weird chemical imbalance.

Re:Depressing (0)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353757)

Meth is nowhere as bad as alcohol. Alcohol is a real killer, wrecker of lives and families. Even tobacco is more addictive and more destructive than meth.

Re:Depressing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353999)

You see plenty of alcoholics who live to a ripe old age. Meth kills fast and makes you look like crap compared to alcohol. I'd take a beer belly vs. tooth loss and the hollow look of a meth face any day.

Illegal meth production also creates much worse environmental problems than illegal alcohol production. I'd much rather buy a house where moonshine was made than one where meth was manufactured.

Re:Depressing (4, Insightful)

phoenix_rizzen (256998) | more than 2 years ago | (#39354015)

Except that it takes years of heavy drinking to start turning your insides into mush (mainly liver/kidneys, which are easily repairable), and only a few months of heavy meth use to turn your brain into mush (which is extremely hard to repair).

Alcoholism tends to grow slowly over time. Meth addiction tends to go from nothing to "holy shit, the bat people are everywhere man, you gotta protect me" in no time flat. Especially if you start smoking it.

And if you quit drinking, your body can recupurate and recover from most of the damage. If you quit meth after years of hardcore use, your body is still messed up.

Alcohol is bad. But meth is 1000s of times worse.

iPad was tracked to a Pollos Hermanos warehouse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39352975)

Or was it under a commercial laundry?

But did they recover the iPod? (0, Redundant)

UnifiedTechs (100743) | more than 2 years ago | (#39352983)

Article doesn't say.

Re:But did they recover the iPod? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353121)

They did. It does:

After tracking down the iPad to an apartment complex in San Jose, the Palo Alto Police entered the apartment and were stunned to find, in addition to the iPad, one of the largest methamphetamine stashes ever seized in the US.

Yes, but... (2, Insightful)

Sez Zero (586611) | more than 2 years ago | (#39352999)

BUT WHAT ABOUT THE iPAD!?!

Re:Yes, but... (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353085)

It was involved in a drug bust, it's entirely possible it will vanish into police bureaucracy and be claimed by someone who has no business having it and any attempts to claim it by the actual owner will be met with lots of indirect and passive resistance. AKA redtape.

Re:Yes, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353139)

Conspiracy Troll; crawl back into your conspiracy hole.

Re:Yes, but... (1)

bipbop (1144919) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353761)

Police seize and keep stuff all the time, even without charging anyone. Consider Tenaha, Texas [wikipedia.org] . Or Detroit [detroitnews.com] . But the problem is pervasive.

It's thanks to civil asset forfeiture law [wikipedia.org] that police can keep your stuff, even if they don't charge you with any crime. This isn't news, and it isn't a "conspiracy", as you put it, just (increasingly) common practice among law enforcement.

Meanwhile, in Apple HQ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353487)

Minion: Sir, there's a story that the police found 750 pounds of meth while they were searching for the iPad
Tim Cook: But what about the iPad?

Minion: Errr... story doesn't say

Ghost of Steve Jobs: This is unacceptable Tim. People must be focused on the iPad

TC: Sorry my lord, but how will we draw their attention away from the meth?

GoSJ: Simple. Make the iPad even more addicting than 750 pounds of Meth!

Minion: Oh, how about we use it as our new marketing campaign? "For the LOW LOW price of 599, you can be just as addicted as paying 35 million dollars for meth!"

GoSJ: Good thinking minion. Tim, see to it that he gets promoted

Minion: Really? Dose that mean I get to...?

TC: Yes, minion. You're going to the Genius Bar.

heisenbergh (1)

omar_armas (633987) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353005)

Heisenbergh would be very upset!

Re:heisenbergh (1)

tusam (1851540) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353171)

He would be, for such bad spelling.

Goes to show one thing; if you want to be remembered, forget about nobel prices and learn Auto-Tune.

Re:heisenbergh (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353431)

I'm pretty sure this is a reference to the TV show "Breaking Bad." The main character is a chemist who makes meth under the street name of Heisenberg.

To my knowledge, the show doesn't use auto-tune in any way, but I think the post still illustrates your point.

Re:heisenbergh (1)

tusam (1851540) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353721)

Yeah, he took it in reference to the physicist.
What I meant by auto-tune was that general public don't care about physicists (which might be one reason why names get misspelled), so better make bad music if you care about fame.

Re:heisenbergh (1)

fuzznutz (789413) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353451)

I believe that's Nobel prizes Mr. Spelling Nazi.

Re:heisenbergh (1)

tusam (1851540) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353625)

I rarely point out typos but when I do I make one too.

iPad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353017)

But did they find the iPad?

Morons (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353091)

FTA:
>The officers didn't have a search warrant, so they knocked on the door of the apartment and asked the occupants for permission to come in. They consented, Tomkins said.

My. God. Hey, I'm glad that those drugs are off the market now, but are people with $35M in drugs that stupid? Even if they made the cops get a search warrant, the drugs are unrelated to the iPad, so they would not have gotten in trouble if they'd simply said no (right? I always thought illegal items unrelated to a search warrant cannot be confiscated).

Re:Morons (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353261)

There must be some very interesting psychology happening there, because you hear about this all the time. Granted not when $35M of drugs are involved, but you do hear about people consenting to completely voluntary searches, even when the police clearly explain they don’t have to consent and it is voluntary .. only to have drugs / weapons / stolen property found.

Then again, stupid criminals get caught more often ... so maybe there is some selection bias happening.

Re:Morons (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353835)

1) Often its the cops word against the perps word as to permission being granted.

2) You're also assuming the cops are successful more than 1 in 100 times.
Permitting to search means they glance at things for a minute and leave you alone, mostly. I have been searched at a speeding traffic stop late at night. They don't waste hours of their time unless they've had an anonymous tip or you smell like a cheech and chong movie. The cop searching my car was pretty much looking for open containers. (no I was not drunk, I pretty much don't even drink, don't like it)
If you don't give them permission, they get excited and you sit there for hours until they get a judge to sign a warrant, or they bring out a police dog trained to "signal" on command, then surprisingly it signals (after they command it) and they use that as justification to tear the car apart.

Re:Morons (1)

DrgnDancer (137700) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353427)

It's illegal to search for things outside of the terms of search warrant. If you walk in and discover palates of drugs on the living room floor you can still use that as evidence. Once you're inside anything in obvious view or come across in what was clearly intended as a search for the original item is OK. If your warrant is for something large and you check under the seat cushions, what you find is probably not admissible. If you're looking for an iPad and you check under the seat cushions, but find a diamond ring it's probably admissible (it's reasonable to think someone might have hidden an iPad under seat cushions).

Basically the cops can't search for anything not in the warrant, but if they find something not on the warrant without looking for it, they're probably OK. There's gray areas here, obviously. Very small items might be hidden almost anywhere so it's hard to argue that almost anything found wasn't in the scope of the search, but that's mostly how it works.

Re:Morons (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353937)

It's not really $35M in meth. When these drug busts happen, to make them seem more sensational the recorded "street value" of the drug is the going price sold in its smallest quantity, completely ignoring that someone moving a large quantity probably isn't breaking it up and selling it on the street themselves. That would be like saying the $10 carton of candy bars you can get at Sams/Costco is worth $50 because there are 50 bars in the carton and you can sell them in a vending machine for $1 each. In reality, it's a $10 box of candy with the potential to be resold for up to $50.

Why is this on Slashdot? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353099)

So, why are stories like this on Slashdot in the first place? Just because an iPad was mentioned? Come on, editors.

Re:Why is this on Slashdot? (1)

PessimysticRaven (1864010) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353161)

I don't know about you, AC, but my schadenfreude is at an all-time high when I read stories such as this one. Reminds me of the deadly waves of stupid that come wafting off some people. Particularly some criminals.

In other words, Slashdot is performing a vital social service.

Not even once... (1)

Theophany (2519296) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353133)

New iPad theft awareness campaign?

Hard to swallow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353137)

I have trouble believing the police were looking for an iPad during their warrantless search.

Re:Hard to swallow (0)

Anrego (830717) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353319)

Luckily there is a whole process between arrest and prison with lawyers and gavels and stuff to sort that out. The system does kinda work sometimes.

As a side effect, that ipad is probably going to be evidence and the origional owner will probably not see it again till some time later on in the decade. That's one Apple product off the street.. and that's how these things are done.. one battle at a time!

Stolen iPad? Sure (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353181)

There was no iPad, It was just a story so the cops had an excuse to search.

An Apple is a terrible thing to waste (2)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353223)

Sure they call em Apples but it is really a Gateway drug,

Another win .... (5, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353227)

... in the war to stamp out addictive substances that are destroying our youth!

And they found some meth as well.

This would be funny if it was lost in the owners.. (4, Funny)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353241)

This would be funny if it was lost in the owners own apartment.

Why such a huge ammount? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353273)

Why was there so much in one place? Apparently they stumbled upon a regional or perhaps even national distribution node. I can't believe tweekers are coming up with $35 million to support their habits in San Jose on a regular basis.

I think they said on the news that unrefined meth was moved up from Mexico and that they were doing the final step in the process to make it marketable. Why would the cartels risk so much on one distribution point though?

Re:Why such a huge ammount? (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353557)

Well, one possibility is that the police are paying way over the odds for their meth. Does anybody here know -- er, admit to knowing -- the actual street price of meth?

Re:Why such a huge ammount? (1)

ThinkWeak (958195) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353787)

It looks like it would come out to be about $104 and change per gram. I don't buy/use meth, but I think that's in the ballpark.

Re:Why such a huge ammount? (1)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353979)

Do keep in mind that police estimates of the value of the drugs are often street-level prices. Someone who's sitting on meth worth $35 million on the street isn't out selling it in those quantities. They buy or manufacture a large batch at price much lower than the street price, then they sell it in smaller batches at a price which is higher than the one they paid but still a lot less than the street price, the next guy in the chain is probably the guy who sells smaller batches to individual dealers (who in turn sell it to users).

Dumbass Drug Dealer: Has $35 million of meth, (1)

illumynite (239768) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353321)

Can't break-down and buy an iPad at Best Buy up the street.

Re:Dumbass Drug Dealer: Has $35 million of meth, (1)

ThinkWeak (958195) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353809)

Just a guess, but I'm thinking maybe someone traded "their iPad" for meth. That's just a guess though.

And we're supposed to care because...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353371)

... because there was an iPad supposedly involved? Is that why ./ needs to hear about this?

Heisenberg ?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353397)

Does this mean the next series is cancelled ?!

Apple = Gatway Drug (1)

qwertphobia (825473) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353411)

Unfortunately for Apple, this is yet more proof that their products are a gateway drug.

First you get a free iTunes card, so you need some free software from Apple.

Then you realize that iTunes doesn't support yout Zune, so you get an iPod Nano next time around.

Before you realize it, you're knee deep in stolen iPads and $25M in high-grade meth.

*sniff* Hand me a tissue... (1)

lazlo (15906) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353435)

The real tragedy here is to think of how many cold symptoms could have been avoided if that meth had been allowed to remain unadulterated in its beautiful unsullied pseudophedrine form.

Meth must really be a hell of a drug. People are willingly converting PSE into meth, which logically leads to the conclusion that meth is even better than NyQuil. I didn't think such a thing was possible.

Re:*sniff* Hand me a tissue... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353661)

Just try to snort NyQuill and see what happens. I dare you.

Re:*sniff* Hand me a tissue... (1)

lazlo (15906) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353873)

{snnnooorrrttt} "Hey, this stuff smells like-" BOOM! you're in a coma.

(Dennis Leary FTW)

Find My MethPad (NT) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39353507)

Find My MethPad (NT)

780 (1)

Crasoose (1621969) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353571)

One small correction, the amount of meth found was 780 pounds not 750 pounds as listed in the summary.

Re:780 (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353807)

Are you SURE you saw 780 pounds? You know, mistakes are made. Here, take this envelope and think carefully about just how much meth was found.

Proper drug busts only by accident then? (1)

fleeped (1945926) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353791)

Says a lot about the police corruption.. (obviously not referring to TFA's guys)

Just another reason to go after small crimes (4, Insightful)

Rich0 (548339) | more than 2 years ago | (#39353803)

Often local police don't pursue small crimes like theft. They don't fingerprint cars that have stolen radios, or follow-up when you report your cell phone stolen (despite the fact that it probably broadcasts a GUID and is GPS trackable with a warrant).

However, going after small crimes can be a way to go after big crimes. Somebody who has stolen an iPad could very well be into some other crime, and when you walk into their house anything in plain sight is fair game. Plus there is the whole bit about nipping problems in the bud - the teenager stealing radios today could be trading in guns in a few years.

Sure, fingerprinting the car with a stolen radio costs more than replacing the radio, but the goal isn't to replace the radio - it is to deter real crime, and send the message that stealing is going to get you in trouble.

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