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10 Ways To Celebrate Pi Day

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the irrational-holiday dept.

It's funny.  Laugh. 196

alphadogg writes "There are holidays, and then there are holidays for nerds, and March 14 (3.14) is one of those. Based on the mathematical constant number that represents the ratio between the circumference and the diameter of a circle, Pi Day has grown to become somewhat of a day to celebrate for mathematicians and techies. Here are 10 things to do on the big day."

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196 comments

I got one! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355267)

I got something. Get a life and stop being dorks.

10? (4, Funny)

Joehonkie (665142) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355269)

Call me back when you have a list with 3.14 ways to do it.

Re:10? (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355567)

0. Don't observe it but say you did.
1. Observe Pi Day by calling in sick, then running the most Pi-utilising software you have all day long (games).
2. Troll your favourite fora with ludicrous suggestions of how to observe Pi Day.
3. Derive the constant via measuring the circumference of a peni--

There, happy now?

Re:10? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355753)

Observe Pi Day by calling in sick, then running the most Pi-utilising software you have all day long...

So the circumference of goatse divided by the diameter of goatse equals...

Oh you'll be calling in sick the next day too.

Re:10? (2)

sconeu (64226) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355593)

The editors should kill commenting on this story after 314 posts.

Re:10? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355703)

C'mon, you know you should simply celebrate it in one irrational way.

That should gave been "e Ways..." (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355301)

If would have the benefit of doubling as an "e-/i-(something)" pun in addition to its numerical quality. And no, don't say it. I'm aware that my suggestions tend to be irrational.

Re:That should gave been "e Ways..." (3, Funny)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355599)

If would have the benefit of doubling as an "e-/i-(something)" pun in addition to its numerical quality. And no, don't say it. I'm aware that my suggestions tend to be irrational.

It isn't the irrationality of your suggestion that is the problem, it's that it is too complex.

2 ways... (3, Informative)

i.r.id10t (595143) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355307)

Gonna go home tonight, and grill up a few steaks. And then hopefully the wife will give me a hummer... screw pie day, it is Steak & BJ Day!

Re:2 ways... (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355627)

Gonna go home tonight, and grill up a few steaks. And then hopefully the wife will give me a hummer... screw pie day, it is Steak & BJ Day!

Ah, you must celebrate the "American Pi" day.

You just missed it -- (4, Insightful)

Corf (145778) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355309)

I'm on the east coast of the USA. This story was posted two minutes before it should have been.

Posted by samzenpus on 01:57 PM March 14th, 2012

Re:You just missed it -- (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356327)

Missed? What do you think 3.14 / 2 equals?

This calls for... (4, Funny)

eexaa (1252378) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355315)

...walking in circles all day.

Re:This calls for... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355609)

no that would be Tao day, you can only walk in half circles on pi day

Re:This calls for... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355849)

"Tau".

"Tao" is a metaphysical term.

Lame (3, Insightful)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355319)

That was an incredibly dumb, ad-laden slideshow. How much does Network World pay to get adclicks for these stupid stories? Seriously did they spend anything more than 5 minutes chunking that turd out?

Re:Lame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355597)

There were ads?.....oh, right AdBlock strikes again.

Birthday (2)

mederbil (1756400) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355339)

It's my birthday. When all of your friends are nerds, they totally forget about it.

I think this is what having a birthday on Christmas like.

Re:Birthday (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355375)

Happy birthday to you Mederbil, 'tis mine too. It is also Einstein's birthday- and my cat's birthday (approx- exact day unknown- celebrated today)

Re:Birthday (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355675)

Happy birthday to you Mederbil, 'tis mine too. It is also Einstein's birthday- and my cat's birthday (approx- exact day unknown- celebrated today)

Happy birthday to you both, and to Schrödinger's cat as well.

Too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355351)

Should have celebrated ad 1:59 this morning.

Re:Too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355955)

Only if you use a retarded date time notation,
2012-03-14 16:00:00 is a better approximation.

If you are American (0)

JohnWiney (656829) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355361)

The rest of the world tends to follow more sensible date conventions - by increasing significance (14-3-2012) or by decreasing significance (2012-3-14). The latter works best for sorting.

Re:If you are American (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355437)

No one cares, eurotard. Now go take your tri-yearly bath and brush your teeth for once. Your halitosis and.B.O. are off the charts.

Re:If you are American (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356135)

Well said, GRINGO!
By the way, how many inches do you fit in a mile again?

Re:If you are American (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356549)

12 x 5280. Wouldn't you be more interested in how many cm fit in a km? Both are trivial.

Re:If you are American (2, Insightful)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355443)

Sensible to you maybe. The American way reads the way the date is normally spoken. We usually say "March 14th 2012", not "the 14th of March 2012. Sometimes other people do things differently. We also drive on the wrong side of the road! Get over it.

Re:If you are American (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355557)

That's not the way it's normally spoken here.

Re:If you are American (3, Informative)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355575)

The American way reads the way the date is normally spoken

Only in America though- most people elsewhere say 14th of March. That said- just about all countries have thier idiosyncracies... ... admittedly America has more than most.

Re:If you are American (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356073)

Wrong. It works in Japan also. They use the logical yyyy/mm/dd format, so it's 2012/03/14. The European format is hardly world-wide, it's just 1 of 3 formats in
use.

Re:If you are American (1)

MisterMidi (1119653) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356451)

*The* European format? Which one? Just 1 of 3 globally? Try dozens. You've obviously never done any i18n.

Re:If you are American (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355625)

In English, you read it "March 14th 2012 in Spanish you read "14 de Marzo de 2012". I agree with you about doing things differently, but for some things it is better to have worldwide standards (like the metric system), to avoid expensive mistakes (like the Mars rover).

Re:If you are American (1)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355907)

Has it occurred to you that the date is spoken in that order in America because that's how it's always written here?

Re:If you are American (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356321)

Sensible to you maybe. The American way reads the way the date is normally spoken. We usually say "March 14th 2012"

But, for any data stored in a computer, it's generally a totally useless format, since you can't sort on it. unless you actually have it broken into fields.

When I write in my lab book, I write the way you said it. But when I need a computer to store data, yyyy-mm-dd makes the most sense.

We actually had this issue come up at a company I worked at. It's a multi-national, but the Americans insisted we switch all the computer program to use their date format. Eventually it took the CIO saying "too bad, this is corporate data standard" to resolve the issue. Mostly because it absolutely broke everything if you had to do data interchange (or share the system).

It may be closer to how we say dates, and match up with how many of us write dates, but once it's being stored in a computer, it's kind of a dumb format.

Re:If you are American (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355863)

Since all of last year's paperwork is in storage boxes at Iron Mountain, month/day sorts just fine.

Re:If you are American (1, Insightful)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356205)

The American convention puts them in order of importance to a listener, and is WAY more logical than the typical European standard.

Month > Day > Hour > Minute (With the year, only as needed)

When someone asks you when an event takes place, the logical response is to give them the general time frame, and then refine it. For example, "When is your party?" is met by "The seventeenth, at 9 PM". It's understood that it's this month and this year. Another example, "When are you starting classes?" is met by "August 26th". Again, it's understood that it's this year, so you start with the most general time (month) and refine from there.

The year is rarely needed in speech, and when it is needed (such as in discussing history), it is usually on it's own. "When did Constantinople fall?" "1453".

In the European method, you give the day first, without giving the month. This is akin to giving the hour before the day... "When is your party?" "9 PM. On the seventeenth. Of June." It's totally backwards -- no actual information is conveyed to the listener until you finish the statement. The proverbial German phenomenon of the "verb-at-the-end" grammar, about which droll tales of absentminded professors who would begin a sentence, ramble on for an entire language, and then finish up by rattling off a string of verbs by which the audience, for whom the stack had long since lost its coherence, would be baffled, are told, is a perfect analogue.

Re:If you are American (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356469)

Um the American convention is Month/Day/Year. So "in order of significance to the listener, leaving out the parts that are implied/unimportant" doesn't work. If the year is important then it's in the wrong place. Assuming that if the year matters nothing else does is not a safe assumption. "When you were born?" First you should tell me roughly how old you are, then when I should send you the birthday card. "When was V-J Day?" again the year is most important, but the month and date are as well.

The best convention is Year/Month/Day. It matches the idea of ordering them in terms of importance (decreasing significance) and is the best for sorting.

Re:If you are American (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356301)

I was having a really hard time understanding why it's pi day, thanks for this details.
I find the US date format extremely confusing, being that ISO date format is used day to day, and, ocassionally, the DD/MM/YY format. Standards are not really something the US seems to like.

Pi? (2)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355367)

Nah, I'd rather have cake. But I will have 3.14 slices of it.

Explanation (3, Funny)

batquux (323697) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355393)

"Based on the mathematical constant number that represents the ratio between the circumference and the diameter of a circle"

In case you're reading slashdot and don't know what pi is.

Re:Explanation (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356013)

"Based on the mathematical constant number that represents the ratio between the circumference and the diameter of a circle"

In case you're reading slashdot and don't know what pi is.

Of course. Being of sound mind, we Slashdotters use tau [youtube.com] .

Pi is wrong (0)

robably (1044462) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355449)

In case you haven't seen it yet, the Tau manifesto [tauday.com] proposes we should use Tau (2xPi) instead.

Re:Pi is wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355485)

So they should stick to their own day, the 28th of June.

Re:Pi is wrong (1)

AshtangiMan (684031) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355515)

So celebrate on June 28th and leave the rest of us alone . . . but I'm taking a copy of the Tau Manifesto to the Pi party tonight. Mostly so that people will be prepared for the Tau party.

Apple Pie (1)

A10Mechanic (1056868) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355459)

Celebrate with 3.14 slices of apple pie. I refuse to slice it any thinner, as it tends to crumble.

Re:Apple Pie (1)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356399)

Celebrate with 3.14 slices of apple pie. I refuse to slice it any thinner, as it tends to crumble.

Seems like a rational amount.

It's also 14.3 day in Europe (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355467)

Which means? Hmm....metric Pi?
Gimme my Pi in Yards any day!

E day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355611)

Too bad leap years only add a single day to February, otherwise we might be able to have "E Day" on 2.71

Our Pi Day (5, Insightful)

netsavior (627338) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355623)

First I taught my kids (age 5 and 6) about Pi with a circle drawing and a ruler and some string.
Then I taught them about the greek alphabet so they would understand what the "Pi" symbol came from
Then I taught them about homophones
Then I taught them about puns based on homophones
Then we made a pie, they learned about measuring and cooking.

Then we ate pie while they snickered about the fact that they don't have to do school work during spring break.

Real top ten list (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355695)

Here's the real top ten list. (to get the real networkworld.com just click reload ten times while reading this)

1) Sing "Shes my Cherry Pie" by ... Winger I think, as loud as possible in your cube at work. Bonus points for interpretive dance and/or dressing up like the girl on the promotional poster. Extra bonus points for posting the video of your performance to youtube. Extra Extra bonus points for getting the video pulled for (c) violation.
2) Buy a raspberry pi linux board. Ha ha, you can't. Maybe by tau day?
3) Wasn't there some dumb movie a decade ago with some line about warm apple pie is like sex or something? Well you figure it out, then watch the dumb movie, and/or bake a warm apple pie, then...
4) This isn't a hallmark holiday, this is a /. holiday. To celebrate, if your significant other is female, buy her a new PC video card, install it for her in your PC, and use it for her to play skyrim all night. Thanks Honey!
5) File a bug because I only provided 4 ways to celebrate and promised 10. Idiocracy quote: Carls Jr, F you, I'm eating (lunch in my case)

See you on Tau day when I present another fun filled click fest of meaningless things to do about nonsense (although that sounds like a modern political platform).

The Joy of Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355759)

Weird "article" if a slideshow can be called that. I was surprised that they omitted David Blatner's book, "The Joy of Pi" (ISBN: 978-0802775627). David's been hustling pi for years!

www.JetCityOrange.com/pi/

Good day, lame list - instead, consider Tau. (3, Informative)

Starker_Kull (896770) | more than 2 years ago | (#39355773)

I am a little happy that Pi day is noticed, and perhaps gives an excuse to think deeply about something rather than just bake pies - but it's a pretty lame list. I propose my own:

1) Read about Tau vs. Pi. [tauday.com] The arguments for what we can choose in mathematics vs. what is given, require one to think quite a bit about what is useful in math vs. what is convention and makes one, frankly, appreciate pi far more than any of the activities in the article.

2) Actually try to measure pi. Note I didn't say, 'calculate'. It is revealing how hard it is to actually measure things in the real world beyond three or four significant figures, and it makes one appreciate the beauty of abstract calculations.

3) Read about e. e is actually much cooler in many ways, but because there is no ridiculuously simple, visualizable definition of it, it doesn't get the limelight (such as it is.) A great historical book on e: "e": The Story of a Number [amazon.com]

But if you insist on knowing what the slideshow list of ten things is:

1) Make a pi-themed pie
2) Rock a Pi Day T-shirt
3) Write Pi-kus or Pi-ems
4) Go on a pi scavenger hunt (this, at least, has some vague mathematical attraction, although you could accomplish the same with a random sequence)
5) See how many digits of pi you can recite
6) Watch "Pi" the movie (gibberish math, but a cool movie that gets a little bit of the obsessional nature that can capture those who dive into abstract mathematics)
7) Listen to Pi music
8) Tell Pi Day jokes
9) Celebrate Albert Einstein's birthday (same day)
10) Read a book about pi (they don't even suggest the classic historical work on pi, by Beckman: A History of Pi [amazon.com]

Like I said - mostly silly, not very mathematical. I would prefer pi day be a day of observance rather than a secular holiday :-)

Heretics! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39355911)

The real pi day is pi approximation day is 22/7. Death to the unbelievers!

TAU RULES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356197)

PI Drools.

Two's Day (1)

seven of five (578993) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356291)

How about celebrating Two's Day... two being the ratio of a circle's diameter to its radius. Make it the second working day of every week...

nothing to celebrate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356397)

After seen the tragic in Switzerland I don't think there's much to celebrate...

Pie of course (3, Insightful)

shreak (248275) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356473)

When I got home yesterday my daughter asked me "Will you help me make pumpkin pie if I go get the stuff for it?" I said "sure" because opportunities to hang out with my daughter are rare to be sure. So we're making pumpkin pie, well she is, I'm just there for moral support I guess.

I ask "So what is the pie for?"
She says "Tomorrow is pi day so I'm bringing pie to school"
I say "Oh, cool"

Inside I'm thinking "How the fuck did I get shit this right?"

signed,
stumbling into success

Steak and Blowjob? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356483)

??

You gotta geek out on Pi Day (1)

EuNao (1653733) | more than 2 years ago | (#39356523)

This post missed some of the the most important things to do on Pi Day in my opinion. You should learn something about math on Pi Day, like something about Euler's Identity [memvance.com] . You should teach your kids the wonder of math, there are simple things like teaching them about the area of a circle or you could show them Donald Duck in Mathmagic Land. You should not just bake a Pie but decorate it or some sugar cookies with circles, ellipses and cylinders. Make the day into an event. Celebrate being different, we are Geeks after all. Lastly of course you can't forget the Mathematical Pi [youtube.com] song. Play it LOUD!!

Eleven (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#39356565)

Where I live it's 14-3.

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